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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
September 19, 2010

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,319 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

************************************************************************

IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1.  The Long Gun Registry - the new Census questionnaire battlefield?
2. The Census long form questionnaire : moved to the back burner, for now...
3. Pathways colleges : corporatizing our universities? (Nick Falvo in Academic Matters) - September 18
4. Alberta: All-party committee pushes for minimum wage increase, provincial antipoverty strategy - September 14
5. EI Financing: Reset Required (Caledon Institute of Social Policy) - September 14
6. Household Food Insecurity in Canada updated (Health Canada) - September 14
7. How Much New Social Housing is British Columbia Building? (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - September 13
8. The Economic Case for Universal Pharmacare (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - September 13
9. Canadians precariously close to financial instability, study finds (Canadian Payroll Association) - September 13
10. Economic Survey of Canada (Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) - September 13
11. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Child and spousal support, 2009/2010 - September 17
--- University tuition fees, 2010/2011 - September 16
--- Family income and individuals income, related variables: Sub-provincial data, 2008 - September 16
--- Canadian Economic Observer September 2010 - September 16
--- Canadian Economic Accounts Quarterly Review, Second quarter 2010 - September 14
--- Study: Freshwater supply and demand in Canada, 1971 to 2005 - September 13
11. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - September 19

International content

12. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
13. Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2009 (U.S. Census Bureau) - September 16
14. Australian Policy Online - selected recent content
15. CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!
Gilles

[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

1. The Long Gun Registry - the new Census form battlefield?

Canada's Long Gun Registry :
A valuable tool for law enforcement and public safety
or another expensive form of government intrusion into people's private lives?

-----------------------------------------

First,
some context:

Canadian Firearms Registry
Read this Wikipedia article for a comprehensive
and current overview of the whole issue.

---

LEGISLATIVE SUMMARY
Bill S-5: The Long-Gun Registry Repeal Act

22 April 2009
HTML version - table of contents + complete report on one (long) page
PDF (143K, 20 pages)
By Robin MacKay
An excellent, objective presentation of the whole ball of wax, including the August 30 posting of the RCMP evaluation.
Source:
Parliamentary Information and Research Service

-----------------------------------------

The Bill:

On September 22, Canadian parliamentarians will vote on a private member's Bill to eliminate the long gun registry under the Firearms Act.

BILL C-391
An Act to amend the Criminal Code and the Firearms Act (repeal of long-gun registry)

NOTE: Bill C-391 includes a series
of proposed amendments to The Firearms Act, 1995.
[You'll need this to make sense of the private member's Bill.]

-----------------------------------------

The RCMP evaluation of the registry:

On August 31 (2010), an evaluation dated February 2010 of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police's Canadian Firearms Program was posted to the RCMP website.
Here's a link to the evaluation and an informal table of contents:

RCMP Canadian Firearms Program Program Evaluation
Final Approved Report
(PDF - 3.1MB, 148 pages)
February 2010
History of Firearms Control - Current Legislation - Canadian Firearms Program (Overview) - Roles and Responsibilities - Logic Model - Findings and Recommendations - The Firearms Funding Program (for Opt-in Provinces) - Examples of Registry successes - Domestic Violence and access to firearms - Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police op-ed in the Globe (Appendix E : "Safety at Risk if Gun Control Dismantled : Gun control saves lives.") - Provincial and Territorial Interviews of Key Firearm Stakeholders (Appendix F : questionnaire) - The Canadian Firearms Registry On-Line (Appendix G) - Rationale behind Firearm Licence Renewal Process (Appendix H) - Effects of Elimination of long gun registration (Appendix I)

"In providing a searchable database of guns owners and the firearms that are registered in their possession, the registry serves two main public safety functions: first, to promote officer safety by making information available to police officers regarding potential personal safety risks – such as the presence of firearms in a dwelling – when responding to a call for service; and, second, to support police enforcement and investigation activities, such as recovering confiscating firearms from an individual who has been charged with a violence-related offense. In both areas, the contribution that the registry makes to promoting public safety is dependent on the quality and accuracy of the information contained therein."
(Excerpt from the final report, page 45)

My personal favourite among the 33 recommendations is #13:
"That the existing full registry be maintained as part of the Canadian Firearms Program in order to increase the non-restricted firearms compliance rates in accordance with current legislation."

On the same page as the link to this evaluation on the RCMP website, there's a link to the following:

Program Management Action Plan
Undated except for the convenient datestamp at the bottom of the page ("Date Modified: YYYY-MM-DD") --- [&$*#@] --- the action plan appears to be a response to the February evaluation report. I say "appears", because the action plan has no introduction or link to contextual information whatsoever --- it simply repeats and responds to each recommendation, without further commentary. The action plan response also contains other information, but it's pretty minimal, if you ask me...

The good news for folks who support recommendation #13:
*
Management supports the recommendation.
*
Responsible: Canadian Firearms Program
* Planned Action :
Subject to the will of Parliament, the RCMP will continue to manage the program in accordance with current legislation and applicable Acts.

Source:
Canadian Firearms Program (CFP)
CFP provides direct operational and technical firearms-related support to law enforcement across Canada. It also oversees the administration of the Firearms Act and its related Regulations.
[ Registration of Firearms (individuals) ]
[ Frequently-Asked Questions About Registration ]

Source:
Royal Canadian Mounted Police

-----------------------------------------

Selected media analysis:

In the words of Liberal MP John McCallum :
“Stephen Harper doesn’t like to let facts or truth get in the way of his ideological agenda.”
[ Tories hiding facts on census, gun registry, Liberals charge - August 26, 2010 ]
Hear, hear.

---

A gun-toting gun registry skeptic recants
September 1, 2010
By Thomas Walkom
(...) I own rifles and admit that, until now, I hadn't been entirely convinced the registry was useful. (...) The RCMP report explains why I was wrong. First, it points out that the vast majority of firearm-related deaths in Canada are the result of rifles and shotguns — not handguns. (...) Second, the gun reforms have worked. In 1996, before these reforms were instituted, 63 people were murdered with long guns in rural areas. By 2005, the number had dropped to 50. In 1996, 23 people across Canada killed their spouses (mainly women) with long guns. By 2007, that number was only eight. This was not simply the result of Canada becoming a nicer place. Between 1995 and 2006, the overall homicide rate stayed constant...
Source:
The Gun Registry : A Toronto Star Special*
* includes links to dozens of related articles and online resources - recommended!!

-------------------------------------------

* Treasury Board report, 2008-09
("Strategic Outcome - Canadian Firearms Centre")

* Commissioner of Firearms - 2008 annual report
(...) This linking of firearm to owner [firearms registration] contributes to public safety in three ways:
1. It holds firearm owners accountable for their firearms;
2. It assists in investigations involving firearms as it facilitates the tracing of a firearm to its last lawful owner; and
3. It provides police officers with up-to-date firearms information and warns them when firearms may be present at a location so they can better protect themselves and their communities.

-------------------------------------------

The duel over gun control pits law-and-order Tories against the police
August 27, 2010
(...) But the unprecedented consensus among police chiefs, labour organizations, physicians, coroners, law associations, women’s groups and victims’ representatives is that the long gun registry is a valuable tool for law enforcement and public safety. Lined up against them: lobbyists, hunters, three out of Canada’s 430 police chiefs, a few retired police officers as well as some cops still on active duty, and the Canadian Shooting Sports Association, headed by Tony Bernardo, who has ties to the powerful US National Rifle Association (NRA). (...) So, not unlike the battle over the mandatory long-form census, once again it’s hard-core expertise and evidence against ideology.
Source:
Toronto Star

-----------------------------------------

The NRA connection is
not shocking, nor is it recent:

Is Canada's gun lobby an offshoot of the NRA?
Oct 30, 2006
(...) [T]he Harper government's proposed dismantling of the gun registry will make us less safe, not safer. That's the position of groups like the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, the Canadian Professional Police Association and the Canadian Public Health Association.
Source:
Toronto Star

-----------------------------------------

And we're apparently not sure
how Stephen Harper will vote on the bill:

Young Harper supported long-gun registry:
PM flopped vote on Bill C-68
September 14, 2010
Prime Minister Stephen Harper originally voted in favour of the long-gun registry as a member of the Reform Party, switching sides in a final vote. Sitting in opposition as a Calgary MP, Harper twice voted for Bill C-68 -- an expansive package on gun control. But in a third and final vote in June 1995, he voted with his party by opposing the bill, attributing his change of heart to the will of his constituents.
Source:
Ottawa Citizen

------------

COMMENT:
In the end, the exhortations of the Canadian Association of Police Chiefs and the Canadian Medical Association may have as much influence on the Prime Minister's decision regarding the long-gun registry as Munir Sheik did in the Census decision. Sheik was the StatCan boss who resigned over the Census long-form questionnaire flap.

As noted above, "...not unlike the battle over the mandatory long-form census, once again it’s hard-core expertise and evidence against ideology."

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

2. The Census long form questionnaire - moved to the back burner, for now...

THE CENSUS LONG FORM QUESTIONNAIRE - moved to the back burner, for now...

September 18, 2010
In the past week, it seems that the media's attention has been diverted from Prime Minister Harper's single-minded determination regarding scrapping the 2011 Census long form questionnaire to Prime Minister Harper's single-minded determination regarding scrapping the long gun registry under the federal Firearms Act. Even Tracey Lauriault of datalibre.ca (the most comprehensive resource on the Census issue, in my view) hasn't posted any updates on the long form controversy since September 11 because there's not much to report...

Here are the only two pertinent recent articles that I found on Sept. 18:

Morale at StatsCan cautious, Fellegi pushes for Statistics Act amendments
Methodological decisions should be based on science alone, not politics: Fellegi.
By Jessica Bruno
September 13, 2010
The mood at Statistics Canada is cautious, seven weeks after its chief statistician Munir Sheikh quit because he didn't agree with the government's move to scrap the mandatory long-form census, say sources inside and close to Statistics Canada. "I think everybody's holding their breath to see what going to happen next," said Armine Yalnizyan, a senior economist with the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives who has been a vocal national opponent of the government's move to end the mandatory long-form census, referring to employees at Statistics Canada.
Source:
The Hill Times

--------------------------

Government study reveals significant errors in voluntary census
Simulation done before Ottawa scrapped long-form census found data was skewed
By Steven Chase
September 9, 2010
A study conducted by Statistics Canada weeks before Ottawa revealed its plan to scrap the mandatory long-form census found that significant errors can creep into survey results gathered on a voluntary basis.
Source:
Globe and Mail

---------------------------

Check the Google.ca News Search Results Page to see if there's anything recent for "Canada census 2011, long form questionnaire."
Here's the most recent media roundup (dated September 11) from datalibre.ca (34 links)
* Go to datalibre.ca for earlier postings

Related link:

Statistics Canada's Census of Canada Home Page

- Go to the Census 2011 questionnaire links links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/2011_census_questionnaire.htm

3. Pathways colleges : corporatizing our universities? - September 18
(Nick Falvo in Academic Matters)

The Pathway College Concept:
One more step towards corporatizing our universities

By Nick Falvo
September 18, 2010
Those who spend a good deal of their lives on university campuses have been hearing a lot lately about companies such as Navitas and Study Group International, companies that promote the “pathway college concept.” The jury is still out on what they will mean for post-secondary education in Canada. At best, a healthy level of concern is in order. At worst, they represent the next step in the ongoing “corporatization” of Canadian campuses. (...) For faculty associations representing professors, pathways colleges threaten to erode the quality of teaching at Canadian universities. Indeed, some detractors of the pathways concept believe the profit motive will inevitably result in international students being misled into believing their chances of gaining entry into the university are greater than they really are.
Source:
Academic Matters

- Go to the Education Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/education.htm

4. Alberta: All-party committee pushes for minimum wage increase, provincial antipoverty strategy - September 14
(Caledon Institute of Social Policy)

Alberta

Alberta Employment Minister Lukaszuk
urged to up basic wage by two bits

By Karen Kleiss
September 16, 2010
Albertans earning minimum wage will get a 25-cent-an-hour raise and the province will implement a poverty reduction strategy if the government accepts new recommendations from an all-party committee. The standing committee on the economy voted Wednesday to recommend Employment Minister Thomas Lukaszuk quickly raise the minimum wage to $9.05 and that he take steps to implement a provincewide poverty reduction strategy similar to the 10-year plan to end homelessness. The current minimum wage of $8.80 an hour and has not changed since April 1, 2009. Alberta is one of three provinces that does not have a poverty reduction strategy.
Source:
Edmonton Journal

On the same topic, from
the Calgary Herald:

Alberta MLAs reopen minimum wage debate; is $8.80 too much to pay?
Alberta dropping to second-lowest rate in Canada
By Renata D'Aliesio
September 15, 2010
Alberta's minimum wage -- frozen earlier this year -- is set to sink to the second lowest in Canada as a group of provincial politicians weigh possible changes that would affect how much low-paid workers make. An all-party MLA committee meets today to hash over about a half-dozen draft recommendations on the future of the province's base pay after Employment Minister Thomas Lukaszuk requested a review in February
Source:
Calgary Herald

Related links:

Success! WOW!
September 15, 2010
Yesterday was a great day for the entire Vibrant Communities Calgary family. We would like to thank all of the volunteers and community partners that make it possible for us to do the important work of addressing the root causes of poverty in our community. With the help of Dave Taylor, Independent MLA for Calgary Currie we were able to help motivate the Standing Committee on the Economy to unanimously recommend a Poverty Reduction Strategy for Alberta.
Source:
Vibrant Communities Calgary

* Standing Committee on the Economy (Alberta Legislative Assembly)
* Calgary-Currie MLA Dave Taylor - home page

Memorandum : Alberta Minimum Wage Review (PDF - 633K, 2 pages)
February 25, 2010
Memo consisting of a request from the Minister of Employment and Immigration the Standing Committee on the Economy to conduct a review of Alberta´s minimum wage policy to ensure that it meets the current and future needs of workers and employers and remains relevant throughout changes to the economic climate.

Women Together Ending Poverty:
Submission to the Minimum Wage Policy Review
(PDF - 86K, 7 pages)
June 23, 2010
(...) WTEP believes that the minimum wage should be a living wage thereby providing someone who works full time access to a standard of living that is at least over the low income cut off line. We believe that such a policy is good for women, and good for the economy.
Source:
Women Together Ending Poverty
WTEP is a diverse, grassroots women’s group that was formed in Calgary in February 2008, to educate and empower ourselves and other women to take action on the root causes of poverty.

-----------------------------------------

Official minimum
wage levels by province:

Current And Forthcoming Minimum Hourly Wage Rates For Adult Workers in Canada
This is the BEST resource for info on current and upcoming minimum wage levels by province/territory.

Minimum Hourly Wages for Canadian Adult Workers since 1965
NOTE: this information is broken up into five files - one for each decade.
The link takes you to the latest decade; click the date links at the top of the page to open pages for earlier periods.


Source:
Minimum Wage Database
[ Employment Standards Legislation in Canada ]
[ Labour Program, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada ]

-----------------------------------------

- Go to the Alberta Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/abkmrk.htm
- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

5. EI Financing: Reset Required - September 14
(Caledon Institute of Social Policy)

EI Financing: Reset Required (PDF - 39K, 4 pages)
September 2010
By Michael Mendelson, Ken Battle and Sherri Torjman
In mid-November 2010, the Canada Employment Insurance Financing Board will likely recommend a 15-cent increase in Employment Insurance employee premiums from $1.73 to $1.88 per $100 of insurable earnings for 2011. The contribution for employers is 1.4 times the employee premium so the cost for employers will rise as well. The Cabinet has until November 30 to act on the Board?s recommendation. The Cabinet could decide to reject the proposal and continue the current EI premium freeze for another year. Either way, it faces a tough dilemma.
Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
Established in 1992, the Caledon Institute of Social Policy is a private, nonprofit organization with charitable status. It is supported primarily by the Maytree Foundation, located in Toronto. Caledon is an independent and critical voice that does not depend on government funding and is not affiliated with any political party.

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm

6. Household Food Insecurity in Canada (updated) - September 14
(Health Canada)

September 14
New from Health Canada:

Household Food Insecurity in Canada
The Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion (ONPP), Health Canada, is pleased to announce the posting of new surveillance information on household food insecurity in Canada.
On this web page, you'll find links to:
* statistics on household food insecurity in Canada, including new information based on data collected in 2005 and 2007-2008;
(e.g., Household Food Insecurity In Canada in 2007-2008: Key Statistics and Graphics)
* methodological considerations for measuring and monitoring household food insecurity in Canada;
* key resources related to household food insecurity measurement; and
* information on how to obtain detailed summary data tables on household food insecurity in Canada, including by province and territory.

Source:
Health Canada

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Health Links (Canada/International) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/health.htm

7. How Much New Social Housing is British Columbia Building? - September 13
(Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

British Columbia

Social housing reality check:
Ministry’s own service plans show few net new units since 2006
News Release
September 13, 2010
(Vancouver) A new report shows that despite some positive recent developments on rental assistance and homelessness, BC’s progress in building new social housing units has been minimal. Unpacking the Housing Numbers: How Much New Social Housing is BC Building? is being released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives and Social Planning and Research Council of BC. The authors conducted a detailed examination of BC Housing’s service plans for 2006 to 2011. (...) In fact, the government’s own data indicate an overall net increase of only 280 new housing units over the past five years, a sobering and concerning finding.

Complete report:

Unpacking the Housing Numbers:
How Much New Social Housing is BC Building?
(PDF File, 559K, 12 pages)

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social, economic and environmental justice. Founded in 1980, the CCPA is one of Canada’s leading progressive voices in public policy debates.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (A-C) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk2.htm
- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

8. The Economic Case for Universal Pharmacare - September 13
(Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

New from the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives:

The economic case
for universal pharmacare

September 13, 2010
The main argument that is typically made against the establishment of universal Pharmacare is economic in nature. However, a new CCPA report shows that the economic argument in favour of such a program is loud and clear, regardless of which industrial policy is subsequently considered. Canadians could save between 10% and 42%—up to $10.7 billion—of total drug expenditures.

Complete report:

The Economic Case for Universal Pharmacare
Costs and benefits of publicly funded drug coverage for all Canadians
(PDF - 2.3MB, 86 pages)
by Marc-André Gagnon, Guillaume Hébert

National pharmacare plan could save up to $10.7 billion a year: study
News Release
September 13, 2010

Fact Sheet: The economic case for Pharmacare (PDF - 143K, 1 page)

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social, economic and environmental justice. Founded in 1980, the CCPA is one of Canada’s leading progressive voices in public policy debates.

- Go to the Health Links (Canada/International) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/health.htm

9. Canadians precariously close to financial instability, study finds - September 13
(Canadian Payroll Association)

Canadians precariously close to financial instability, study finds
September 13, 2010
Six out of 10 Canadians are living paycheque to paycheque and most are one pay slip away from financial instability, according to a new study. On Monday, the Canadian Payroll Association reported that of 2,700 Canadians surveyed 59 per cent are stretching their pay to the limit and expect they would be in financial difficulty if their pay was cut or delayed by one week. That figure is unchanged from last year. Dealing with debt is also top of mind, the study showed. (...) In May the Certified General Accountants Association of Canada reported that the amount of household debt across the country reached a new high of $1.41 trillion in December 2009. About six out of 10 Canadians said even though their debt load had increased they felt they could manage it or take on more.
Source:
Toronto Star

Related links:

Canadian Workers living from paycheque to paycheque
Employees worried about the economy, debt and retirement
(PDF - 1.3MB, 35 pages)
August 2010
TORONTO (September 13, 2010) – A major national survey of working Canadians, released today, shows that employees continue to live paycheque to paycheque. They are concerned about how interest rates and the economy will affect their personal finances and retirement.
Source:
Canadian Payroll Association
The Canadian Payroll Association (CPA) has been representing employers’ payroll interests since 1978, through its mission of Payroll Leadership through Advocacy and Education and its values of Community, Professionalism and Authoritative Knowledge.

<>COMMENT:

Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose.*
[*Translation: http://preview.tinyurl.com/2fenacz]
In 1995, the federal government announced that the Canada Assistance Plan (federal cost-sharing of approved welfare costs) would be terminated in April 1996 in favour of the Canada Health and Social Transfer, a block fund that would see less federal cash flowing to the lower order of government for welfare. In return, there would be no conditions for the cash from Ottawa except for a ban on a residency requirement for welfare eligibility purposes.
---
For links to more detailed information about the transition from CAP to CHST, go to the
Canada Assistance Plan / Canada Health and Social Transfer / Canada Social Transfer Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/cap.htm
---
I was employed as a researcher in the federal government at the time, and I was invited in the summer of 1995 to attend a roundtable with some academics, some NGO people and some labour movement reps in the boardroom of the National Council of Welfare here in Ottawa. Over the course of a day-long session, the group discussed what national standards Ottawa might/should impose on the provinces and territories to qualify for federal contributions to provincial/territorial welfare costs. I can't recall  any great resolutions being crafted or a plan being hatched --- but I do remember a senior person from a national union stating bluntly that the majority of her union's rank and file were one or two paycheques away from financial crisis. And yet, she said, her union members were consistently and viscerally critical of people on welfare and how generous they perceived the welfare system to be. That's what we're fighting in our own union, she said - the power of the right-tilting media that can influence many rank-and-filer union members to trash the very system that would be there to help them if they were destitute.
I don't think things have changed much.

Pity.

Gilles

- Go to the Non-Governmental Organizations Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ngobkmrk.htm

10. OECD Economic Survey of Canada - September 13
(Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development)

Canada : Structural reforms key to boosting long-term growth
13-Sep-2010
Canada’s economic recovery is set to slow over the short term. Boosting jobs and competition and containing healthcare costs would help strengthen future growth, according to the OECD Economic Survey of Canada.

Overview of
OECD Economic Surveys: Canada, September 2010
(PDF - 3.3MB, 16 pages)
- incl. summary, assessment and recommendations, chapter summaries, highlights, links to additional information, and more...
Source:
OECD Economics Department
[ Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development - OECD ]

Looking for more Canadian content on the OECD website?
www.oecd.org/canada

... is a one-stop-shop for OECD reports and statistics on Canada. Browse the documents in chronological order or by topic (e.g. economy, trade, development, environment, energy, social issues).

---

Related link from
Finance Canada:

September 13, 2010
OECD Lauds Canada's Good Economic and Fiscal Performance
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, today issued the following statement on the release of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s (OECD) Economic Survey of Canada, which is published every two years:“I am pleased that the survey recognizes Canada’s inherent domestic strengths and policy actions that ensured that as a country we were in far better shape than any other major industrialized country. The survey lauds Canada’s economic and fiscal performance and policy initiatives..."
Source:
Department of Finance Canada

---

Media:

Canada rode recession well but should cut health costs: OECD
September 12, 2010
MONTREAL — Canada's economic policies and conservative banking culture helped the country weather the global financial crisis, but the government should lower health care spending to stave off debt, a report said Monday.
Source:
AFP - International news

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

11. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Child and spousal support, 2009/2010 - September 17
--- University tuition fees, 2010/2011 - September 16
--- Family income and individuals income, related variables: Sub-provincial data, 2008 - September 16
--- Canadian Economic Observer September 2010 - September 16
--- Canadian Economic Accounts Quarterly Review, Second quarter 2010 - September 14
--- Study: Freshwater supply and demand in Canada, 1971 to 2005 - September 13

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

September 17, 2010
Child and spousal support, 2009/2010
Data on child and spousal support payments collected from maintenance enforcement programs across Canada are now available for 2009/2010.

Related report:

Child and Spousal Support:
Maintenance Enforcement Survey Statistics 2009/2010

September 2010
[Only two links from the report are highlighted below - to access the rest, click the link above.]

1. Highlights
• As at March 31, 2010, nearly 408,000 cases, most involving children, were registered in Maintenance Enforcement Programs in the 11 jurisdictions reporting data (Manitoba and Nunavut are not included). In most jurisdictions, this number has been gradually declining over the last several years.
• On March 31, 2010, 64% of cases had arrears (money owing from earlier missed payments). Total arrears owing was $2.7 billion for the 11 reporting jurisdictions

2. Introduction
3. A description of maintenance enforcement services
4. Tables
5. Data quality, concepts and methodology
6. Appendices
7. User information
8. Related products
9. PDF version (396K, 58 pages)

[ Earlier editions of this report - back to 1999/2000 ]
[ Product main page ]

Related subjects:

* Children and youth
* Crime and justice
* Civil courts and family law

---

September 16, 2010
University tuition fees, 2010/2011
Canadian full-time students in undergraduate programs this fall paid 4.0% more on average in tuition fees for the 2010/2011 academic year than they a year earlier. This increase is slightly higher than the one for 2009/2010, when tuition fees rose 3.6%.
- incl. four tables:
* Average undergraduate tuition fees for Canadian full-time students, by province
* Average graduate tuition fees for Canadian full-time students, by province
* Average undergraduate tuition fees for Canadian full-time students, by discipline
* Average graduate tuition fees for Canadian full-time students, by discipline

Related subjects:

* Education, training and learning
* Education finance

---

September 16, 2010
Family income and individuals income, related variables: Sub-provincial data, 2008
According to family income data derived from 2008 personal income tax returns, Calgary was the census metropolitan area with the highest median total family income ($91,570), followed by Edmonton ($88,190), Ottawa–Gatineau ($87,160) and Oshawa ($83,220).
- includes two tables:
* Median total income of census families and persons not in census families, by census metropolitan area Census families
* Median total income of census families, by family type and census metropolitan area

Related subjects:

* Income, pensions, spending and wealth
* Household assets, debts and wealth
* Household, family and personal income

---

September 16, 2010
Canadian Economic Observer September 2010
1. Sections:

* Current economic conditions * Economic events * Feature article * Recent feature articles * National accounts * Labour markets * Prices * International trade * Goods-producing industries (manufacturing, construction and resources) * Services (trade, transportation, travel and communications) * Financial markets * Provincial (unemployment rates and Consumer Price Index)
2. Tables
3. Charts
4. Appendices
5. User information
6. Related products

Canadian Economic Observer main product page
Click View for the latest issue of this periodical; click Chronological index for earlier editions.

---

September 14, 2010
Canadian Economic Accounts Quarterly Review, Second quarter 2010
* GDP by income and by expenditure
* GDP by industry
* Balance of international payments
* Financial flows
* Labour productivity
* International investment position
* National balance sheet accounts

Canadian Economic Accounts Quarterly Review main product page
Click View for the latest issue of this periodical; click Chronological index for earlier editions.

---

September 13, 2010
Study: Freshwater supply and demand in Canada, 1971 to 2005
Renewable water resources have declined in Southern Canada over the past three decades. From 1971 to 2004, water yield in Southern Canada, the area in which 98% of the population lives, fell by an average of 3.5 cubic kilometres a year.

The study:

Human Activity and the Environment Freshwater supply and demand in Canada 2010
HTML version
PDF version
(3MB, 61 pages)

--------------

The Daily Archives
- select a month and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

---------------------------------

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm

- Go to the Education Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/education.htm

- Go to the Government Social Research Links in Other Countries page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internat.htm

12. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - September 19

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
:

September 19, 2010

What's new online:
[This section archives documents that
have been featured on the CRRU homepage..]

World conference on early childhood care and education, Moscow, Russia 27-29 September 2010
15 Sep 10 - Upcoming UNESCO conference aims to "reaffirm ECCE as a right of all children and as the basis for development". Resources already online include a concept paper and four regional reports, including one for North America.

Progress for children: Achieving the MDGs with equity & Narrowing the gaps to meet the goals
15 Sep 10
- Two new reports from UNICEF find equity is the key to progress for children, and to meeting the Millennium Development Goals.

Educational indicators in Canada: An international perspective
15 Sep 10
- Report from the Council of Ministers of Education Canada expands on the data collected for OECD's "Education at a Glance" report; facilitates the comparison of education in Canada with other OECD countries.

Our emerging plan for an integrated system of early care and learning in BC
15 Sep 10 - Briefing Note from the Coalition of Child Care Advocates BC & Early Childhood Educators of BC calls for all community and school-based ELCC programs to be moved under the Ministry of Education.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news
[This section features interesting and noteworthy
news about ECEC and related issues in Canada and internationally.]

· Top-up fees pervade free childcare
[UK] 14 Sep 10

· U.S. education guru praises Ontario's schools
[CA-ON] 13 Sep 10

· School's in for Edmonton little tykes
[CA-AB] 9 Sep 10

· Canada lags on pay equity
[CA] 8 Sep 10

· Women at work: still behind on the bottom line
[CA] 8 Sep 10

· Leaders, experts to discuss early childhood care in Moscow
8 Sep 10

· All-day kindergarten a 'no brainer' to put kids on the path to success
[CA] 7 Sep 10

more CC IN THE NEWS »

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

13. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

September 17:
Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2009
Race and School Suspensions
Effects of Mothers’ Health and Education on Children

September 16:
Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2009

September 15:
Millennium Development Goals
Farmers Markets and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
School Breakfast Program
Children’s Health Insurance Coverage - Florida

September 14:
Social Security Disability Program and the Jobless
Poverty and Crime
Homeless Families in Shelters
Debit Card Tax Refunds

September 13:
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Enrollment - Montana
Public Housing and Drug Testing - Flint, MI
US Poverty Rate

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

14. Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2009 - September 16
(U.S. Census Bureau)

On September 16, the U.S. Census Bureau released its annual report entitled
Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2009.

------------

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2009
News Release
and
Summary of Key Findings
September 16, 2010
The U.S. Census Bureau announced today that real median household income in the United States in 2009 was $49,777, not statistically different from the 2008 median. The nation's official poverty rate in 2009 was 14.3 percent, up from 13.2 percent in 2008 — the second statistically significant annual increase in the poverty rate since 2004. There were 43.6 million people in poverty in 2009, up from 39.8 million in 2008 — the third consecutive annual increase. Meanwhile, the number of people without health insurance coverage rose from 46.3 million in 2008 to 50.7 million in 2009, while the percentage increased from 15.4 percent to 16.7 percent over the same period.

These findings are contained in the report Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2009. The results for the nation were compiled from information collected in the 2010 Current Population Survey (CPS) Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC).

-----------------------------------------
Complete report and related
Census Bureaus resources
-----------------------------------------

Income, Poverty, and
Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2009
(PDF - 1.1MB, 88 pages)
Issued September 2010

* Highlights
* Tables & Graphs
* Detailed Tables
* Historical Tables

------------

Fact Sheets
* Income and Poverty Fact Sheet
(PDF - 25K, 3 pages)
* Health Insurance Fact Sheet (PDF - 29K, 3 pages)

------------

Census Blog Entry
Income, Poverty and Health Insurance
September 16, 2010
The number of people in poverty in 2009 – 43.6 million – is the largest number ever recorded in this 51-year period. Partly this is because our population is much larger. The poverty rate in 2009 was the highest since 1994, but is 8 percentage points lower than it was in 1959.
Source:
Random Samplings:
the official Census Bureau blog

------------

Earlier editions of
Income, Poverty and Health Insurance in the United States
- back to 1985

-------------

Related Census Bureau links:

Income
- incl. links to : * Income Statistics * Guidance about Sources * Income Inequality * State Median Income * Local Area Data * Historical Data

Poverty
- incl. links to : * Overview / Highlights * Definitions * Poverty Data Sources * Microdata Access * Poverty Thresholds

Health Insurance
- incl. links to : * Help for CPS Users * Revised CPS ASEC Health Insurance Data - * Help for ACS Users - * Help for SIPP Users
----
* CPS ASEC =Annual Social and Economic Supplement [ part of the Current Population Survey ]
* ACS = American Community Survey
* SIPP = Survey of Income and Program Participation

Source:
Census Bureau

------------------------------------
Media and NGO Analysis
------------------------------------

From the
Washington Post:

Poverty rate at highest level in half-century, data show
By Carol Morello
September 16, 2010; 1:14 PM
One in seven Americans is living in poverty, the highest number in the half-century that the government has kept such statistics, the Census Bureau announced Thursday. Last year was the third consecutive year that the poverty rate climbed, in part because of the recession, rising from 13.2 percent in 2008 to 14.3 percent, or 43.6 million people, last year.

------------

From the
New York Times:

Recession Raises Poverty Rate to a 15-Year High
By ERIK ECKHOLM
September 16, 2010
The percentage of Americans struggling below the poverty line in 2009 was the highest it has been in 15 years, the Census Bureau reported Thursday, and interviews with poverty experts and aid groups said the increase appeared to be continuing this year. With the country in its worst economic crisis since the Great Depression, four million additional Americans found themselves in poverty in 2009, with the total reaching 44 million, or one in seven residents. Millions more were surviving only because of expanded unemployment insurance and other assistance.

------------

From
Poverty Dispatch
:

Fifteen related articles from various media sources - September 17
- Click the link above to access all of the articles below:
* Poverty rise stirs debate over aid programs, By Corey Dade, September 16, 2010, National Public Radio
* Poverty rate hits 15-year high, U.S. figures show, By Alfred Lubrano, September 17, 2010, Philadelphia Inquirer:
* ‘The new poor’: Poverty reaches historic levels, By Tony Pugh, September 16, 2010, Miami Herald
* 1 in 7 in U.S. lives below poverty line, By Don Lee and Alana Semuels, September 17, 2010, Los Angeles Times
* The new poor and the almost-poor: Will poverty rate climb more?, By Patrik Jonsson, September 16, 2010, Christian Science Monitor
* US adds 3.8 million more to ranks of the poor as poverty rate jumps, By Ron Scherer, September 16, 2010, Christian Science Monitor
* Despite recession, seniors see income gains, By Dennis Cauchon and Richard Wolf, September 17, 2010, USA Today
* Not quite poor, but struggling: Do seniors need their own poverty index?, By Matt O’Brien, September 16, 2010, Contra Costa Times
* Poverty rise reflects toll of recession, By Bill Bush and Rita Price, September 17, 2010, Columbus Dispatch
* A descent into poverty for millions, By Warren Wolfe and Jeremy Olson, Minneapolis-St. Paul Star Tribune
* Poverty in Hawaii highest since ‘97, By Mary Vorsino, September 17, 2010, Honolulu Star-Advertiser
* Michigan’s poverty rate hits 14%, highest level in 16 years, By Mike Wilkinson and Catherine Jun, September 17, 2010, Detroit News
* Poverty at a 51-year high in the U.S., By Renée C. Lee, September 17, 2010, Houston Chronicle
* Texas seeks answers to rising poverty rate, By Robert T. Garrett and Kim Horner, September 17, 2010, Dallas Morning News
* One-time working men now the ‘fresh face of poverty’, By Rick Montgomery, September 16, 2010, Kansas City Star

------------

From the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:

Statement: Robert Greenstein, Executive Director,
on Census’ 2009 Poverty and Health Insurance Data

By Robert Greenstein
September 14, 2010
The Census Bureau data for 2009 reflect the severity of the recent recession, as poverty rose sharply and the number of uninsured spiked. The new figures somewhat overstate the rise in poverty, however, because they do not count the bulk of direct assistance that the 2009 Recovery Act provided to households, which kept millions of Americans from falling into — or deeper into — poverty (as a broader measure of poverty that Census will release later this year is sure to show).

View the full statement:
HTML version
PDF version
(2 pages)

------------

From the
Economic Policy Institute:

Economic Policy Institute experts
respond to new data on income, poverty and health insurance

September 16, 2010
This morning’s release by the U.S. Census Bureau of the 2009 income and poverty numbers is yet another reminder of the severity of the Great Recession that began in December 2007.

------------

From the
Center for Law and Social Policy :

September 16, 2010
*
Statement Regarding Census Poverty Numbers by Alan W. Houseman : 'We Should Collectively Be Appalled'
* Will We Let a Generation Grow Up Poor? by Danielle Ewen and Hannah Matthews
* Make Kids' Brains "Too Big to Fail" by Jodie Levin-Epstein
* Record Number in Poverty Hits African Americans Hardest by Rhonda Tsoi-A-Fatt

-------------------------------------
Related links (preceding
the release of the report)
-------------------------------------

Record gains for US poverty with elections looming
By HOPE YEN and LIZ SIDOTI
The Associated Press
September 12, 2010
WASHINGTON -- The number of people in the U.S. who are in poverty is on track for a record increase on President Barack Obama's watch, with the ranks of working-age poor approaching 1960s levels that led to the national war on poverty. Census figures for 2009 - the recession-ravaged first year of the Democrat's presidency - are to be released in the coming week, and demographers expect grim findings.(...) Beginning next year, the government plans to publish new, supplemental poverty figures that are expected to show even higher numbers of people in poverty than previously known. The figures will take into account rising costs of medical care, transportation and child care, a change analysts believe will add to the ranks of both seniors and working-age people in poverty.
[ includes non-government, unofficial speculation about what the poverty numbers are likely to look like.]
Source:
Washington Post

-------------------

Understanding the Census Bureau’s Upcoming Report on Poverty
Official Figures Will Miss Majority of Recovery Act's Assistance to Households
By Arloc Sherman
September 14, 2010
On September 16, the Census Bureau will release official figures on poverty in 2009.
Below are three facts to keep in mind when reviewing the new data:
1. The Official Poverty Measure May Increase by a Record Amount in 2009
2. Official Figures Omit the Impact of Large Parts of the Recovery Act
3. Poverty is Likely to Rise Even Higher Next Year if Key Recovery Provisions Are Allowed to Expire
Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

----------------------------------

Link to 2008 report and analysis and
analysis by selected non-governmental organizations:

Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2008
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm#income_poverty_uninsured

----------------------------------

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

15. Australian Policy Online - selected recent content

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia.
[ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week (see below)
appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page.

Week ending September 19, 2010
Most viewed this week on APO:

1. Climate Change Bill 2010
2. Leaving Care and Homelessness: A CHP Sector Forum
3. Measures of Australia's progress, 2010
4. Closing the gap in education?
5. Structural change in the Australian economy

[You'll find these links on the APO home page.]

-------------------------------------------------------

New Research : Social Policy
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social Inclusion * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

Week ending September 19, 2010
Most viewed this week in the Social Policy area:

1. Leaving Care and Homelessness: A CHP Sector Forum
2. Measures of Australia's progress, 2010
3. Closing the gap in education?
4. The rise of religious schools
5. Strengthening culture, strengthening identity

[You'll find these links on the APO Social Policy page.]

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

16. CRINMAIL
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
:

Latest issues of CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter):

15 September 2010, CRINMAIL issue 1192
In this issue:
- Feature : Convention on the Rights of the Child Elections 2010: The candidates – who's who (part 1)
- Latest news and reports
*** Repressing minority groups (Chile, France)
*** Where's the justice? (Kenya, United Kingdom, Sudan)
*** Children's views on drug and alcohol issues
*** Europe in turmoil (Roma rights, EU child rights strategy)
- Employment : UNICEF

8 September 2010, CRINMAIL issue 1191
In this issue:
- Top story : Children's rights under Brazilian law
- Latest news and reports:
*** Breaking new ground (Bangladesh, South Korea, Americas)
*** Discrimination against Roma people (France, Italy, Sweden)
*** Calling time on abuse (India, Senegal)
*** Haiti: Report on inter-country adoptions
*** Employment
- Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Laws * Issues
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

------------------------------------------

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL
- links to hundreds of weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.
NOTE: see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm for the table of contents for, and links to, several months' worth of issues of CRINMAIL.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

 

Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com



*****************************

Some questions,
some observations...

*****************************


I went to a bookstore and asked the saleswoman where the Self Help section was, she said if she told me it would defeat the purpose.

Whose cruel idea was it to put an "S" in the word "Lisp"?

If a man stands in the middle of the forest speaking and there is no woman around to hear him....
Is he still wrong?

If someone with multiple personalities threatens suicide....
Is it considered a hostage situation?

Is there another word for synonym?

Isn't it scary that doctors call what they do "practice"?

Where do forest rangers and French Foreign Legionnaires go to get away from it all?

If a parsley farmer is sued do they garnish his wages?

Is it true that cannibals won't eat clowns because they taste funny?

Do they use sterilized needles for lethal injections?

What was the best thing BEFORE sliced bread?

Did you hear about the guy who lost his left arm and leg in a car crash?
He's all right now.

Did you hear about the man who was tap dancing?
He broke his ankle when he fell into the sink.

How do you get holy water?
Boil the hell out of it.

How does a spoiled rich girl change a lightbulb?
She says, "Daddy, I want a new apartment."

What did the fish say when he hit a concrete wall?
"Dam".

What do Eskimos get from sitting on the ice too long?
Polaroids.

What do prisoners use to call each other?
Cell phones.

What do you call a boomerang that doesn't work?
A stick.

What do you call cheese that isn't yours?
Nacho Cheese.

What do you call Santa's helpers?
Subordinate Clauses.

What do you get from a pampered cow?
Spoiled milk.

What do you get when you cross a snowman with a vampire?
Frostbite.

What do you get when you cross an elephant and a skin doctor?
A pachydermatologist

What's a zebra?
26 sizes larger than an "A" bra.

What kind of
lettuce was served on the Titanic?
Iceberg.


Source:
The internets


-----------------------

And, in closing...

-----------------------


Do you (or someone you know) have diabetes, multiple sclerosis or asthma?
If so, those compact fluorescent lightbulbs may be aggravating the medical condition.

"(...) Compact Fluorescent Lightbulbs (CFL bulbs) create what is called 'dirty electricity',  -0 in short, gnetic field (EMF) radiation that worsens symptoms of persons with diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and asthma. The more CFLs in a house, the worse."
Source:
Energy-efficient light bulbs are poisoning us (YouTube video)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6K_xFVvsNDo


------------------------

Photo Tampering  Throughout History
http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/farid/research/digitaltampering/


------------------------------


LyricsTube:
Lyrics and music videos on YouTube
http://www.lyricstube.net/


------------------------------

Kayaking  with the Orcas (video)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GIrsrRnerHY&feature=related


------------------------------

www.jimmyr.com/
Total time-waster!
Don't go there!
OK, go, but don't blame me if you get hooked too.