Canadian Social Research Newsletter
October 19, 2014

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

This week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,730 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. 17 October : International Day for the Eradication of Poverty (United Nations)
2. Poverty Costs Saskatchewan : A New Approach to Prosperity for All
(Saskatoon Poverty Reduction Partnership et al) - October 2014
3. The Burden of Poverty: A snapshot of poverty across Canada
(Citizens for Public Justice)
- October 2014
4. Canada and BC Invest in Homeless Prevention (BC Housing) - October 17
5. [First Nations Child Welfare Funding] Closing arguments in government discrimination case begin Monday (APTN National News) - October 17
6. [Payday lenders] Recent events in Alberta around social policy and research (By Joe Ceci, Momentum) - October 16
7. SPARmonitor - Monitoring Toronto's Social Change - October 15 (2014) issue
[SPAR = Social Policy Analysis & Research, City of Toronto]

8. [Federal] New Democratic Party pledges national $15-a-day child care - October 2014
9. In the long view, inequality seems unimportant (William Watson in the Ottawa Citizen) - October 11
10. Job Numbers Surprise (Angella MacEwen, Progressive Economics Forum) - October 10
11. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Consumer Price Index, September 2014
- October 17
--- Study: Aboriginal languages and selected vitality indicators, 2011 - October 16
--- Heeding the users’ voice (New StatCan website coming this Fall) - October 15
--- Health Reports - October 15
12. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

13. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
14. Speech : Perspectives on Inequality and Opportunity from the Survey of Consumer Finances (By Janet Yellen, Chair of US Federal Reserve) - October 17
15. Human Development Reports - found in The Scout Report (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
16. Child Rights Information Network - CRIN

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/personal.htm ]
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------------------------------------------------

Go to the home page of the
Canadian Social Research Links website:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/index.htm


1. 17 October : International Day for the Eradication of Poverty
(United Nations)

17 October : International Day for the Eradication of Poverty
http://www.un.org/en/events/povertyday/
2014 Theme:
Leave no one behind: think, decide and act together against extreme poverty
The International Day for the Eradication of Poverty has been observed every year since 1993, when the United Nations General Assembly, by Resolution 47/196 [ http://goo.gl/mCCMEC ], designated this day to promote awareness of the need to eradicate poverty and destitution in all countries. Fighting poverty remains at the core of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) [ http://goo.gl/pPAqZU ] and the development of the post-2015 development agenda [ http://goo.gl/RdkUU9 ].

Source:
United Nations

http://www.un.org/

---

Statement from [Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada]
Minister Paradis: International Day for the Eradication of Poverty

http://news.gc.ca/web/article-en.do?nid=894959
October 17, 2014 - Our great nation of Canada is built upon generations of families who, through war and peace, struggled to preserve a free and open society–a society that provided an opportunity for all to advance, regardless of race, religion or economic status. As Nobel Prize-winning economists have concisely summarized, development is freedom. By increasing personal freedoms we remove barriers to innovation and ingenuity and lay the foundation for healthy communities, accountable governments, and respect for the rule of law. Only with these conditions in place will we achieve sustainable economic growth and permanently reduce poverty.

Source:
Government of Canada News

http://news.gc.ca/web/index-en.do

---

ChewOnThis!, Canadians Agree, We Need a Plan to Eliminate Poverty
Press Release
October 17, 2014— Today, marks the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. People passionate about ending poverty will use the lunchtime on that day to draw attention to the 833,000 Canadians who have to rely on food banks each month to put food on their tables. As part of Dignity for All: The Campaign for a Poverty Free Canada, volunteers at “ChewOnThis!” events are asking people across Canada to join the strong call for a federal plan to address poverty by simply going online to:
http://www.dignityforall.ca/en/press-release-chewonthis-canadians-agree-we-need-plan-eliminate-poverty

Related links:

Dignity for All: the campaign for a poverty-free Canada
http://www.dignityforall.ca/

---

Chew on This
http://www.chewonthis.ca/
Join Dignity for All in this campaign as we call on the federal government to step up and take action to address poverty and food insecurity in Canada.

---

From Statistics Canada:
[ http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

Income in Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=75-202-X&lang=eng

2. Poverty Costs Saskatchewan : A New Approach to Prosperity for All - October 2014
(Saskatoon Poverty Reduction Partnership et al)

NOTE : Saskatchewan is one of two Canadian provinces without an official poverty reduction plan.
BC is the other one : see http://bcpovertyreduction.ca/ ]

---

Sask. campaign releases poverty report:
Calls for province to work on comprehensive plan
http://ckom.com/story/sask-campaign-releases-poverty-report/427764
By Bryn Levy
October 17, 2014
Saskatchewan's poor are getting poorer, according to a newly released report by a group calling on the provincial government for a comprehensive poverty-reduction strategy. (...)
The campaign is centred around the claim that Saskatchewan loses $3.8 billion a year in potential revenue and unecessary spending on things like emergency room visits and justice system costs due to poverty.

---

Poverty Costs Saskatchewan:
A New Approach to Prosperity for All
(PDF - 6.8MB, 54 pages)
http://goo.gl/gbEUMv
October 2014
By Charles Plante and Keisha Sharp

Excerpt from the Executive Summary:

Here are seven simple facts about poverty in our community, and how reducing it helps us all.
1) Poverty costs us all.
2) In spite of a growing economy, poverty has not gone away.
3) Poverty affects us unequally.
4) Poverty is hard on people’s health.
5) Poverty is getting harder and harder to escape.
6) The public supports action on poverty.
7) We can reduce poverty in Saskatchewan.

This report was produced as part of the Poverty Costs campaign, an initiative involving the following organizations:

* Saskatoon Food Bank & Learning Centre
http://www.saskatoonfoodbank.org

* Saskatoon Anti-Poverty Coalition, Upstream
http://www.thinkupstream.net)

* Unite Digital Marketing Co-op
http://www.unitecoop.com

* Saskatoon Health Region
https://www.saskatoonhealthregion.ca

* Saskatoon Poverty Reduction Partnership
http://www.saskatoonpoverty2possibility.ca

Related links:

Poverty Free Saskatchewan
http://www.povertyfreesask.ca/

Poverty Costs
http://www.povertycosts.ca/

---

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

- Go to the Saskatchewan Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/skbkmrk.htm

3. The Burden of Poverty: A snapshot of poverty across Canada - October 2014
(Citizens for Public Justice)

From
Citizens for Public Justice:

The Burden of Poverty: A snapshot of poverty across Canada
http://cpj.ca/burden-of-poverty
October 2014
“The Burden of Poverty: A snapshot of poverty across Canada” uses the most recent data from Statistics Canada to demonstrate the reality of poverty across the country. This report provides an accessible set of materials to support national and community-level anti-poverty work across the country, including CPJ’s own outreach and engagement activities, and Dignity for All: the campaign for a poverty-free Canada.

Download the complete report:

The Burden of Poverty: A snapshot of poverty across Canada (PDF - 1MB, 7 pages)
http://cpj.ca/sites/default/files/docs/files/The%20Burden%20of%20Poverty%20Report.pdf
October 2014
There is no reason why poverty should exist in a country as wealthy as Canada. Approximately 4.8 million people in Canada live in poverty according to the Low Income Measure. That’s roughly 1 in 7.

Highlights of the “Burden of Poverty” report:
*
Measuring the unequal impact of poverty on some groups, like new immigrants, families led by single mothers, un-attached adults, youth and Aboriginal people.
* Presenting poverty rates for each province and territory as well as 32 communities across Canada.
* Calling for a federal plan to deal with the causes of poverty.

Source:
Citizens for Public Justice
(CPJ)
http://cpj.ca/
Citizens for Public Justice promotes public justice in Canada by shaping key public policy debates through research and analysis, publishing, and public dialogue. CPJ encourages citizens, leaders in society, and governments to support policies and practices which reflect God’s call for love, justice, and stewardship.

---

- Go to the Social Statistics Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm

- Go to the Non-Governmental Organizations Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ngobkmrk.htm

4. Canada and BC Invest in Homeless Prevention - October 17
(
BC Housing)

From BC Housing:

Canada and BC Invest in Homeless Prevention
http://www.bchousing.org/Media/NR/2014/10/16/5590_1410161033-822?WT.mc_id=NR+-+HPP
October 17, 2014
British Columbians at risk of becoming homeless have more support to find homes in the private market. The new Homeless Prevention Program will make rent supplements and support services available to four at-risk groups.

The Homeless Prevention Program (HPP) [ http://www.bchousing.org/Initiatives/Access/HPP ] assists youth transitioning out of foster care, women who have experienced violence or are at risk of violence, individuals leaving the hospital and correctional systems, and Aboriginal people. Monthly supplements provided to participants to put towards housing costs are funded through the Canada-B.C. Investment in Affordable Housing. The Province will also contribute additional funding to support services that connect clients to community supports, helping them to maintain successful tenancies. This will help prevent vulnerable British Columbians from becoming homeless.

The governments of Canada and B.C. will provide an estimated investment of $62.5 million over five years [2014-2019] to the Homeless Prevention Program for rent supplements under the Canada-B.C. Agreement for Investment in Affordable Housing [ http://goo.gl/2Pc65f ]

The HPP is available in six communities around British Columbia and will grow to over 30 communities around the province.
Over the next five years, it is estimated that the program will provide housing and support for up to 4,000 people.

Source:
BC Housing

http://www.bchousing.org/

Related link:

B.C. government’s provincial housing strategy
http://www.housingmattersbc.ca/

Federal partner:
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

http://www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/

---

- Go to the BC Government Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk.htm

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

5. [First Nations Child Welfare Funding] Closing arguments in government discrimination case begin Monday - October 17
(APTN National News)

First Nations Child Welfare Funding:

Closing arguments in government discrimination case begin Monday
http://aptn.ca/news/2014/10/17/closing-arguments-government-discrimination-case-begin-monday/
October 17, 2014
By Mark Blackburn
Closing arguments in the discrimination case against Canada begin Monday at the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal.

For the past year and a half, the Assembly of First Nations and the First Nation Child and Family Caring Society have been arguing before a panel of 3 commissioners that Canada spends less on First Nations child welfare than provinces do off reserve.

Cindy Blackstock, executive director of the FNCFCS joined Nation to Nation host Nigel Newlove to discuss the week ahead.
(Video, duration 5:25 --- click the link above)

Source:
APTN National News

http://aptn.ca/news/
[ delivers the news of the day and provides a more in-depth look at the issues facing Aboriginal communities in Canada and around the world

Aboriginal Peoples Television Network
http://aptn.ca/

---

- Go to the First Nations Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/1stbkmrk.htm

6. [Payday lenders] Recent events in Alberta around social policy and research - October 16
(By Joe Ceci, Momentum)

Topic : Payday lenders

Recent events in Alberta
around social policy and research:
By Joe Ceci

On October 6, Calgary City Council introduced a Notice of Motion on Payday Lending:
http://www.actiontoendpovertyinalberta.org/calgary_city_council_introduces_notice_of_motion_on_payday_lending

The motion passed by 11-2 votes, so now city administration must report back by March with potential amendments to land use and business licensing bylaws that could help limit the prevalence of payday lenders. (Please note – the Notice of Motion linked here is not the final version that council debated. I have included the revised version of the NOM in the attachment for you).

Shortly after the motion passed, the Calgary Herald ran an editorial expressing their views on the City’s decision:
http://goo.gl/lBQ2xE

This letter to the editor [ http://goo.gl/E0jbFs ] also ran shortly after the motion passed, featuring a local Calgary man’s personal experiences with payday lenders.

I (Joe) responded to the Herald’s editorial in this letter to the editor [ http://goo.gl/4p7acw ] that ran on Tuesday, Oct. 14th

Joe Ceci, MSW RSW, is Manager of Public Policy for Momentum and
Coordinator of Action to End Poverty in Alberta

Related links:

Momentum
http://www.momentum.org/
Momentum is a Community Economic Development organization. Our mission is to partner with people living on low incomes in order to increase prosperity, and inspire the development of local economies with opportunities for all. Our vision is that every person in Calgary can have a sustainable livelihood and contribute to their community.

Action to End Poverty in Alberta
http://www.actiontoendpovertyinalberta.org/
The Inter-City Forum on Social Policy (ICFSP) has been researching the impacts of poverty in Alberta for several years. In 2010, member municipalities of ICFSP agreed to play a leadership role in engaging interested stakeholders to promote the need for a comprehensive poverty-reduction plan for Alberta. (...)
The goal of the ICFSP is to create and help implement a comprehensive plan to prevent, reduce and ultimately eliminate poverty in Alberta.

---

Earlier report
from Momentum.org:

The Real Cost of Payday Lending (PDF - 256K, 10 pages)
http://momentum.org/files/Publications/Real-Cost-Payday-Lending.pdf
June 2014
Since the early 1990s payday lending businesses have become increasingly prolific in most parts of Canada, including Calgary. The payday loan
industry claims that they provide a needed service at a reasonable cost and do not target those living on low incomes or push customers for repeat business. Social agencies and advocates working to reduce poverty view payday lenders and other fringe financial businesses as problematic for those looking to exit the cycle of poverty. Payday lenders charge interest rates that, when annualized, top 400% .

Source:
Momentum.org

http://momentum.org/

---

Canadian Payday Loan Association
http://www.cpla-acps.ca/english/home.php

---

- Go to the Alberta Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/abkmrk.htm

7. SPARmonitor - Monitoring Toronto's Social Change - October 15 (2014) issue
[SPAR = Social Policy Analysis & Research, City of Toronto]

From the
City of Toronto:

SPARmonitor - Monitoring Toronto's Social Change
[SPAR = Social Policy Analysis & Research, City of Toronto]

This Bulletin is a quick inventory of current social research information.
Its purpose is to promptly disseminate to interested staff recently produced
research materials and initiatives relevant to social policy.

---

Latest issue of the
SPARmonitor
:

SPARmonitor : October 15 (2014) - issue 140 (PDF - 172K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_140.pdf
October 15, 2014

This issue covers the following:

Ø Building Toronto, Creating Community
Ø Toronto's Vital Signs Report 2014
Ø Global Age Watch Index 2014 Insight Report
Ø Tier for Two: Managing the Optics of Provincial Tuition Fee Policies
Ø Police and Crime Rates in Canada
Ø Hear Our Voices - Technical Report, Do Adolescent Girls’ Issues Really Matter?
Ø The Trauma and Homelessness Initiative

Source:
SPARmonitor
- Monitoring Toronto's Social Change
http://www.toronto.ca/sdfa/spar-archives.htm
- includes links to bulletins from January to March 2011 and to all 33 issues of SPARmonitor for 2010.
But curiously, nothing since then...

---

Selected earlier issues of the SPARmonitor
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm#spar
(This link will take you partway down the Ontario NGO Links page, where you'll find links to over three dozen earlier issues of the SPARmonitor going back to June 2011.)

[ Social Development, Finance & Administration
http://www.toronto.ca/sdfa/index.htm ]
[ City of Toronto
http://www.toronto.ca/ ]

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm

8. [Federal] New Democratic Party pledges national $15-a-day child care - October 2014

New Democratic Party
Mulcair's plan : Affordable childcare

http://www.ndp.ca/childcare
You’ve waited too long for affordable childcare. New Democrats are ready to make it happen.
Tom Mulcair has a plan to ensure there’s a space for every child – and parents won’t pay more than $15 a day.

Source:
New Democratic Party of Canada
http://www.ndp.ca/

---

Six lessons Canada can learn from other countries when it comes to child care (video, duration 1:36)
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/video/globe-now/video-six-lessons-canada-can-learn-from-other-countries-when-it-comes-to-child-care/article21143437/?click=sf_globefb#dashboard/follows/
Globe and Mail feature writer Erin Anderssen shows us how Canada compares to other countries when it comes to child care, and offers six examples of things we can learn from those countries to improve our own system.

---

PRO:

October 14, 2014
Seven perfectly sensible reasons why child care is good for the economy
http://www.pressprogress.ca/en/post/7-perfectly-sensible-reasons-why-child-care-good-economy
Child care is back in the news with two competition visions: give parents a monthly cheque of $100 to help cover monthly child care bills [ [ http://goo.gl/dThmKK ] that can top $1,000 [ http://goo.gl/z1L8Ww ] or build a real national $15-a-day child care program [ http://goo.gl/btjfUm ].
So for those of you who need a good, hard dollars and cents explanation about why a real child care program is worthwhile, here are seven perfectly sensible reasons why the investment is good for the economy.

1. Child care pays for itself
2. Child care creates jobs
3. Lack of child care increases costs for businesses, lowers productivity
4. Child care makes living more affordable for parents
5. Child care leads to better outcomes for children
6. Child care encourages greater participation of women in the workforce
7. Child care can help close the gender gap

Source:
PressProgress

http://www.pressprogress.ca/

---

CON:

NDP’s plan to save Quebec daycare is as palatable as a campaign to kill the Canadian beaver
http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2014/10/14/john-ivison-ndps-plan-to-save-quebec-daycare-is-as-palatable-as-a-campaign-to-kill-the-canadian-beaver/
By John Ivison | October 14, 2014
(...)
Tom Mulcair said Tuesday, Canada “can’t afford not to” spend $5-billion a year on a new plan to create or maintain one million childcare spaces. The goal, said the NDP leader, is to make sure that parents don’t pay more than $15 a day for a childcare space. It’s an investment that pays for itself, he said, citing economists who claim that such programs contribute $1.75 for every dollar invested. “It’s as good for the economy as it is for the family,” he said.

Source:
National Post
http://www.nationalpost.com/

---

- Go to the 2015 Federal Election and General Political Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_2015_fed_election.htm

9. In the long view, inequality seems unimportant - October 11
(William Watson in the Ottawa Citizen)

In the long view, inequality seems unimportant
http://ottawacitizen.com/news/world/watson-in-the-long-view-inequality-seems-unimportant
By William Watson
October 11, 2014
The OECD recently published a 274-page study called “How Was Life? Global Well-Being since 1820.” [ It’s not entirely clear why an organization of 34 rich countries is analyzing economic history]. But both the study and its interactive website are fascinating.
It’s good to be reminded from time to time — it would be better if we were reminded roughly hourly — just how much life for the great mass of people has improved in the last 200 years.
(...)
Seen in the historical perspective the OECD’s work provides, inequality means that a few people now have astronomically more than past generations while most of the rest of us have only humongously more. Yet some observers are now so obsessed with inequality they would overturn the social system that has generated such unprecedented well-being. History will weep if we let them.

Source:
Ottawa Citizen

http://ottawacitizen.com/

---

From the
Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD):

How Was Life? Global Well-Being since 1820
http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/economics/how-was-life_9789264214262-en
October 2, 214
How was life in 1820, and how has it improved since then? What are the long-term trends in global well-being? Views on social progress since the Industrial Revolution are largely based on historical national accounting in the tradition of Kuznets and Maddison. But trends in real GDP per capita may not fully re­flect changes in other dimensions of well-being such as life expectancy, education, personal security or gender inequality. Looking at these indicators usually reveals a more equal world than the picture given by incomes alone, but has this always been the case? The new report How Was Life? aims to fill this gap.

Table of Contents:
* Foreword
* Preface
* Readers' Guide
* Executive summary
* Global well-being since 1820
* Demographic trends since 1820
* GDP per capita since 1820
* Real wages since 1820
* Education since 1820
* Life expectancy since 1820
* Human height since 1820
* Personal security since 1820
* Political institutions since 1820
* Environmental quality since 1820
* Income inequality since 1820
* Gender inequality since 1820
* A composite view of well-being since 1820

Related OECD links:

How's Life 2013 : Measuring Well-Being
http://www.oecd.org/statistics/howslife.htm
November 2013
Every person aspires to a good life. But what does “a good or a better life” mean? The second edition of How’s Life? paints a comprehensive picture of well-being in OECD countries and other major economies, by looking at people’s material living conditions and quality of life across the population. In addition, the report contains in-depth studies of four key cross-cutting issues in well-being that are particularly relevant: how has well-being evolved during the global economic and financial crisis?; how big are gender differences in well-being?; how can we assess well-being in the workplace?; and how to define and measure the sustainability of well-being over time.

http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/economics/how-s-life-2013_9789264201392-en
- includes links to all chapters, country snapshots (including Canada), tables, charts and more

More OECD reports about Canada
http://www.oecd.org/canada

Source:
Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development

http://www.oecd.org/
The mission of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is to promote policies that will improve the economic and social well-being of people around the world. The OECD provides a forum in which governments can work together to share experiences and seek solutions to common problems. We work with governments to understand what drives economic, social and environmental change.

---

But wait --- The OECD Disparaged??

The OECD has become a major world policy nag
http://business.financialpost.com/2014/10/08/william-watson-the-oecd-has-become-a-major-world-policy-nag/
By William Watson
(...)
... a foundational principle of economics is that there can be too much of a good thing. The OECD costs two-thirds of a billion Euros a year. Canada’s contribution to the base budget is almost 4%. The OECD has become a major world policy nag.

COMMENT (by Gilles)

...and by "nag", Watson means independent monitor and watchdog.
Wassup with this evidence-based public policy-making thing, anyway?

Well, the OECD library is teeming with reports showing that Canada could and should be doing better with respect to reducing the income and wealth gap between Canada's richest and poorest citizens. However, The Harper Government™ has chosen to ignore those reports and those of United Nations Rapporteurs on a number of issues, including indigenous peoples and housing. Given the ruling party's aversion to groups that critique its policies at every turn, it's surprising that Watson isn't calling for the OECD to be degraded and defeated...!

[Factoid : Mr. Watson has a long-standing relationship with Montreal's Institute for Research on Public Policy and the C.D. Howe Institute where he and his socially- and fiscally-conservative buddies keep churning out tomes of libertarian pontifications for the masses.]

---

- Go to the Income and Wealth Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

- Go to the Government Social Research Links in Other Countries page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internat.htm

10. Job Numbers Surprise - October 10
(Progressive Economics Forum)

Job Numbers Surprise
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/2014/10/10/job-numbers-surprise/
By Angella MacEwen
October 10, 2014
For the first time in a while, Statistics Canada gives us some good news on the job front. 74,000 net new jobs added in September, certainly nothing to sneeze at. Still, we would need to keep this pace up every month for the next year to close the employment gap left by the last recession.

Source:
Progressive Economics Forum
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/

Related link:

October 10, 2014
Labour Force Survey, September 2014
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/141010/dq141010a-eng.htm
Employment increased by 74,000 in September, nearly all in full-time work. This pushed the unemployment rate down 0.2 percentage points to 6.8%, the lowest since December 2008.

Source:
Statistics Canada

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html

---

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm

11. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Consumer Price Index, September 2014
- October 17
--- Study: Aboriginal languages and selected vitality indicators, 2011 - October 16
--- Heeding the users’ voice (New StatCan website coming this Fall) - October 15
--- Health Reports
- October 15

What's new from The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/a-daily-quotidien-eng.htm

Past issues of The Daily
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/DAILY/daily.cgi?s=last

[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

October 17, 2014
Consumer Price Index, September 2014
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/141017/dq141017a-eng.htm
Consumer prices rose 2.0% in the 12 months to September, following a 2.1% increase in August. On a seasonally adjusted monthly basis, the Consumer Price Index increased 0.2% in September, after rising 0.1% in August.

October 16, 2014
Study: Aboriginal languages and selected vitality indicators, 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/141016/dq141016c-eng.htm

October 15, 2014
Heeding the users’ voice
New StatCan website coming
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/eng/blog-blogue/cs-sc/htuv
At Statistics Canada, usability testing of our website is an ongoing endeavour. It is an important one because StatCan has a daunting amount of material—the largest information trove among all government departments and agencies.

The October 2014 edition of the StatCan Blog looks at measures the agency undertakes as it develops its new website, slated to launch in beta form next month. One of the main tenets of building a better website is to take into account the needs of users.

By Gilles:
The folks at StatCan have been in the website stats business for many years, so they know pretty much what they need to do technically to keep up with security and accessibility issues. My only suggestion --- more a plea, actually --- is to archive the existing collection of StatCan material. Otherwise, anyone who has amassed a large collection of links over time, like the Canadian Social Research Links Guy, could suddenly see hundreds or even thousands of their links suddenly "go 404."
PLEASE keep the current StatCan links live (permanent redirect links, perhaps?)...
Merci.

Source:
StatCan Blog
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/eng/blog-blogue

October 15, 2014
Health Reports, October 2014
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/141015/dq141015b-eng.htm
The October 2014 online issue of Health Reports, released today, contains two articles.

The first article, Two approaches to linking census and hospital data,compares registry and non-registry approaches to linking 2006 Census data with hospital data from the Discharge Abstract Database for Manitoba and Ontario, two provinces for which health insurance registry data are available to Statistics Canada.

The second article, Use of acute care hospital services by immigrant seniors in Ontario: A linkage study,compares the hospitalization rates and length of stay in hospital of immigrant and Canadian-born seniors in Ontario using linked 2006 Census–Discharge Abstract Database information.

Check past issues of The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/DAILY/daily.cgi?s=last
Select day / month / year to access issues of The Daily going back to 1995.

StatCan Blog
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/blog-blogue/eng
The goal of the StatCan Blog is to pull back the curtain to explain some of the agency’s inner workings, and to show the links between quality statistics and the lives of Canadians.
Source:
The Daily

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

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- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

12. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
http://www.childcarecanada.org

October 19, 2014
What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

Update on ChildCare 2020: Canada’s fourth national child care policy conference
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/14/09/update-childcare-2020-canada%E2%80%99s-fourth-national-child-care-p
17 Sep 2014 | Canada

Getting less bang for the child care buck – all $6.8 billion of them
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/14/10/getting-less-bang-child-care-buck-%E2%80%93-all-68-billion-them
15 Oct 2014 | Canada
BRIEFing NOTE by Martha Friendly contrasts Canada's substantial spending on the Child Care Expense Deduction, Universal Child Care Benefit,and potential spending on income splitting with the limited public spending on early childhood education and child care. Friendly critiques demand-side funding methods, saying "Canada is living proof of the failure of these approaches."

NDP childcare plan
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/14/10/ndp-childcare-plan
15 Oct 2014 | Canada
Thomas Mulcair and the NDP have nailed down the first plank of their 2015 election platform by committing to a national childcare program.

Community reaction to NDP's childcare plan
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/14/10/community-reaction-ndps-childcare-plan
15 Oct 2014 | Canada
Various community organizations across Canada have responded to the NDP's childcare platform. The CRRU has collected a number of these available responses.

Selected submissions to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance pre-budget consultations 2014
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/14/10/selected-submissions-house-commons-standing-committee-finan
15 Oct 2014 | Canada
The House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance received submissions from 421 Canadian groups and individuals as part of their pre-budget consultations. We've selected some key submissions addressing early childhood education and care.

MORE research, policy & practice
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice

2. Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad

NDP proposes $15-a-day national child-care program
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/14/10/ndp-proposes-15-day-national-child-care-program
15 Oct 2014 | Canada

Why Canada needs a new approach to child care
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/14/10/why-canada-needs-new-approach-child-care
15 Oct 2014 | Canada

Will child care ever decisively captivate voters?
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/14/10/will-child-care-ever-decisively-captivate-voters
15 Oct 2014 | Canada

National child care good for the economy says NDP. Conservatives break out election spin.
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/14/10/national-child-care-good-economy-says-ndp-conservatives-break-out-el
15 Oct 2014 | Canada

$15 child care: Canada's hottest new political pledge?
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/14/10/15-child-care-canadas-hottest-new-political-pledge
15 Oct 2014 | Canada

MORE child care in the news
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

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CRRU Archive

All newer content from January 2013 to date is archived in a special section of the Early Childhood Development Links page of this site.
Click the link immediately below to go there:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm#crru

For links to weekly issues of this weekly alert from June 2009 to December 2012*,
check out the CRRU Links Archive on this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/crru_links_archive.htm

* NOTE (by Gilles):
In December 2012, my HTML editing software was crashing whenever I would open the above archive page to add or edit something.
After several hours of tinkering in a vain attempt to make everything work, I finally decided to go with Plan B : you can still click the link above to access the CRRU archive (including contents of each issue from June 2009 to December 2012), but all new content since then is archived on the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page : http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm.

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Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
http://www.childcarecanada.org/res/enews/index.html
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere
http://www.childcarecanada.org/links/index.html

CRRU Publications
http://www.childcarecanada.org/pubs/
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

ISSUE files
http://www.childcarecanada.org/resources/issue-files
- theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

http://www.childcarecanada.org
CRRU is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

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- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

13. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.. The Dispatch is distributed by the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. News articles from online newspapers are posted here in a number of general categories, and are tagged with more specific keywords relevant to each article.

Tags
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/tags/

Clicking on a word or expression in the list of tags will call up all relevant news items from past Dispatches under that tag.
Tags include:
* Academic achievement * Affordable Care Act (ACA) * Applicants * Budget cuts * California * Cash assistance * Census * Child poverty * Child welfare * Child well-being * Cities * Economic stimulus * Eligibility * Enrollment * Florida * Food insecurity * Foster care * Health care costs * Health insurance coverage * Homeless families * Income * Indiana * Jobless benefits * Job losses * Jobs * Kids Count * Low-wage work * Medicaid * Michigan * Minnesota * Neighborhoods * Ohio * Poverty measurement * Poverty rate * Privatization * Recession * Safety net * Schools * Shelters * SNAP/Food Stamps * States * Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) * Texas * Unemployment rate * Wisconsin

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

October 17, 2014
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2014/10/17/
Section 8 Housing – Oregon
SNAP and EBT Cards
Foster Care System – Oklahoma
General Assistance and Immigrants – Maine (2 articles)

October 16, 2014
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2014/10/16/
Supplemental Poverty Measure (4 articles)
Housing Policy and Poor Children

October 15, 2014
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2014/10/15/
Medicaid Expansion – Mississippi
Consumer Debt Loads
Homelessness and Housing First – Utah (2 articles)
Access to Health Care – Wisconsin

October 14, 2014
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2014/10/06/
Students and Internet Access
Food Deserts – Denver, CO

October 13, 2014
No Poverty Dispatch today.

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Earlier Poverty Dispatches (back to July 2006):
1. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page: [ http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/ and click on a date in the calendar in the top right-hand corner of the page.
2. Change the month by clicking the link at the bottom of the calendar.
OR
3. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page and click on a category or a tag in the right-hand margin.
4. See http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/povdispatch_archive.htm (more complete listing, but only goes back to December 2011)

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NOTE : You can subscribe to this email list or RSS feed
by clicking "Subscribe" in the right-hand margin on any page of the Poverty Dispatch website

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)

http://www.irp.wisc.edu

University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://www.wisc.edu/

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

14. Speech : Perspectives on Inequality and Opportunity from the Survey of Consumer Finances - October 17
(By Janet Yellen, Chair of US Federal Reserve)

Perspectives on Inequality and Opportunity from the Survey of Consumer Finances:
Speech by Janet Yellen, Chair of US Federal Reserve At the Conference on Economic
Opportunity and Inequality, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, Boston, Massachusetts
HTML version :
http://federalreserve.gov/newsevents/speech/yellen20141017a.htm
PDF version (454K, 33 pages) : http://federalreserve.gov/newsevents/speech/yellen20141017a.pdf

October 17, 2014
The distribution of income and wealth in the United States has been widening more or less steadily for several decades, to a greater extent than in most advanced countries. This trend paused during the Great Recession because of larger wealth losses for those at the top of the distribution and because increased safety-net spending helped offset some income losses for those below the top. But widening inequality resumed in the recovery, as the stock market rebounded, wage growth and the healing of the labor market have been slow, and the increase in home prices has not fully restored the housing wealth lost by the large majority of households for which it is their primary asset.
(...)
In my remarks, I will review trends in income and wealth inequality over the past several decades, then identify and discuss four sources of economic opportunity in America--think of them as "building blocks" for the gains in income and wealth that most Americans hope are within reach of those who strive for them.

Four Building Blocks of Opportunity:
1. Resources available to children in their most formative years;
2. Higher education that students and their families can afford;
3. Ownership of a private business;
4. Inheritances.

RESEARCH TIP:
The transcript of this speech contains 43 endnotes, many of which offer links to more detailed studies.

Source:
U.S. Federal Reserve System

http://federalreserve.gov/

---

- Go to the Income and Wealth Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

15. Human Development Reports - found in The Scout Report
(University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Human Development Reports
http://hdr.undp.org/en/countries

This fascinating interactive map from the United Nations Development Program [ http://www.undp.org/ ] provides Human Development Reports on over 200 countries around the world. Fancy a factoid? While the United States scores number five in its ability to promote human development, with a mean income of $50,000 a year and a murder rate of less than 5 out of every 100,000 people, the prison population stands at a whopping 716 per 100,000. Compare that to Canada’s homicide rate of 1.54 and incarceration rate of 118. Other interesting tidbits gleaned from this site reveal the mean years of schooling in Kazakhstan (10.37 years) and the life expectancy in Madagascar (64 years-old). There is a lot of great educational material here, including the HDialogue section that features timely articles on issues related to human development, such as “Trans-border Vulnerabilities” and “The case for investing in early childhood.”

Source:
The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout 1994-2014.

https://www.scout.wisc.edu

Related links:

2014 Human Development Index and its components
http://hdr.undp.org/en/content/table-1-human-development-index-and-its-components
Spoiler : Canada is #8, U.S. is #5.

Human Development Reports
http://hdr.undp.org/en

Human Development Statistical Tables
http://hdr.undp.org/en/data

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- Go to the United Nations Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/un.htm

16. Child Rights Information Network - CRIN

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
http://crin.org/

CRIN is a global children’s rights advocacy network. Established in 1995, we press for rights - not charity - and campaign for a genuine shift in how governments and societies view and treat children. We link to nearly 3,000 organisations that between them work on children’s rights in every country in the world and rely on our publications, research and information sharing.

Our Vision
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all their human rights guaranteed by the United Nations, regional organisations and national governments.

Link to the latest issue of CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter):

15 October 2014 - CRINmail issue 1399
https://www.crin.org/en/home/what-we-do/crinmail/crinmail-1399
In this issue:
Latest news and reports
- French court confirms child’s life sentence
- Activists urge mandatory sex education
- Girls sold as concubines, recruits ‘martyred’
- Abuse of migrant & indigenous children
- ‘Ecocide’ and children’s rights
- Nobel committee prizes child rights work
Access to justice for children in Hungary
Upcoming events
Employment
Also in this issue:
World news
Publications
Events
Issues
Law
Advocacy
Challenging breaches
Take action
Campaigns
Guides

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CRINMAIL Archive (earlier issues)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/CRINMAIL_archive.htm
- includes a table of contents for each issue, as in the above, back to 2009-2010

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Subscribe to CRINMAIL English
http://www.crin.org/en/node/293
NOTE : In addition to CRINmail English, you can subscribe to the following newsletters:
* Armed Conflict CRINmail
* Child Rights at the United Nations
* Children in Court CRINmail
* CRINmail EN ESPAÑOL
* CRINmail Francais
* CRINmail in Arabic
* CRINmail in Russian
* Violence CRINmail

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CRIN News Archive
http://crin.org/en/library/news-archive

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CRIN Country Pages : CANADA
http://crin.org/en/library/countries/canada

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Children's rights Wiki - from CRIN
http://wiki.crin.org/mediawiki/index.php
The Children's Rights Wiki assembles all information about children's rights in every country in one place. The purpose of the project is to make the huge volume of information that exists on children's rights more accessible, assist children's rights advocates in identifying persistent violations, and inspire collective action. This is a web-based, multi-lingual and interactive project.

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Canada and Children's Rights
http://wiki.crin.org/mediawiki/index.php?title=Canada
- from the Children's Rights Wiki

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- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong to me, Gilles Séguin.
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/personal.htm

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
http://www.cupe.ca/
Thanks, CUPE!

------------------------

If you don't already receive this weekly newsletter by email but would like to, you can sign up for the Canadian Social Research Newsletter on the online subscription page : http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly newsletter.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com