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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
December 19, 2010

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,366 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...



IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. Welfare Incomes 2009 (National Council of Welfare) - December 13
2. Release of the Fiscal Monitor for October 2010 (Finance Canada)
- December 17
3. Homeless in the Homeland : A Growing Problem For Indigenous People in Canada's North (Parity Magazine - Australia) - November 2010
4. Income inequality bad for everyone: Richard Wilkinson discusses The Spirit Level (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)
- December 17
5. A holiday gift from the CCPA: Enhanced publications access (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - December 17
6. SOUNDBITES e-Bulletin (Social Planning Toronto)
- December 16
7. New reports from the Centre d'étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion in Québec:
--- Equivalence scales: an Empirical Validation - September 2010
--- From after-tax income to market basket measure (MBM) disposable income - September 2010
--- Les déterminants macroéconomiques de la pauvreté : Une étude de l’incidence de la pauvreté au sein des familles québécoises sur la période 1976-2006 - August 2009
8. Canada Without Poverty Fall 2010 Newsletter - November 17

9. Demand Ontario welfare reforms you would want as a recipient (Social Assistance Review - Income Security Advocacy Centre) - December 8
10. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]

--- Survey of Household Spending, 2009 - December 17
--- Employment Insurance, October 2010 - December 16
--- Women in Canada : Economic well-being, 2008 - December 16
--- Leading indicators, November 2010 - December 14
--- Canadian Economic Accounts Quarterly Review, Second quarter 2010 - December 14

--- Education Matters: Insights on Education, Learning and Training in Canada - December 2010 - December 13
11. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - December 19

International content

12. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
13. [U.S.] The Other Welfare : The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program for children (Series in the Boston Globe)
14.
Australian Policy Online - selected content:
--- Poverty versus inequality (July 2009)
--- Welfare quarantining: reversing the burden of truth (February 2010)
15. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)


Have a great week!
     Gilles
..

[ gilseg@rogers.com ]



1.Welfare Incomes 2009 - December 13
(National Council of Welfare)

Welfare design outdated, counterproductive
More effective solutions exist says new National Council of Welfare report
News Release
December 13, 2010
[ PDF version ]
OTTAWA, ONTARIO– A new report from the National Council of Welfare (NCW) shows that welfare can be harder to get today than 20 years ago. This means more people were forced into destitution to qualify for welfare in 2009, when the recession’s casualties were mounting. Canadians cannot receive welfare if their liquid assets, such as cash, money in bank accounts or even retirement savings, are over the limit set for their particular circumstances. The NCW report, Welfare Incomes 2009, illustrates many cases where these asset limits have eroded, whether by inflation or design. The limit can be as low as $50.

The report:

Welfare Incomes 2009 (PDF - 6.2MB, 117 pages)
As the National Council of Welfare has done since 1986, in Welfare Incomes 2009 we look at the situation of four family types: a lone parent with a 2-year-old child, a couple with two children aged 10 and 15, a single person considered employable and a single person with a disability.

Chapter 1 lists the main elements of the complicated process of qualifying for welfare in Canada.
Chapters 2 to 5 focus on each family type, comparing their welfare incomes over time and gauging their adequacy using two low-income measures—Low income cut-offs and the Market Basket Measure—as well as average and median incomes.
Chapter 6 looks at liquid asset provisions as of January 1, 2009 and for the first time compares 1989 levels in constant dollars of 2009 to those of 2009.
Earnings exemption provisions are the subject of Chapter 7, where we also look at the potential impact of the federal Working Income Tax Benefit (WITB) on welfare households with earnings.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Don't miss the
Interactive Welfare Incomes 2009 Map
:
The interactive map of welfare incomes in 2009
appears in the lower portion of the NCW Home Page.
Move your cursor over a province or territory to see
the estimated 2009 income for four household types in that jurisdiction.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Create your own chart:
* Total Welfare Incomes
Use data from our Welfare Incomes report to create your own charts and data tables based on household type and province or territory.
* Adequacy of Welfare Incomes
Use data from our Welfare Incomes report to compare welfare incomes to several measures. Create your own charts and data tables based on household type, adequacy measures and province or territory.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[ earlier editions of the Welfare Incomes report ]

Source:
National Council of Welfare
The National Council of Welfare is an advisory group to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). Its
mandate is to advise the Minister regarding any matter relating to social development that the Minister may refer to the Council for its consideration or that the Council considers appropriate

Related link:

Working Income Tax Benefit (WITB)
The Working Income Tax Benefit (WITB) is a refundable tax credit intended to provide tax relief for eligible working low-income individuals and families who are already in the workforce and to encourage other Canadians to enter the workforce.
Source:
Canada Revenue Agency

---------

Media:

Welfare rules forcing people into destitution, report finds
By Laurie Monsebraaten
December 13, 2010
It is tougher to get welfare in Canada today than during the economic downturn of the early 1990s, the National Council of Welfare says in its latest report. That’s because Ontario and most other provinces force people to drain their bank accounts and spend all of their savings before they qualify for help, says the report, released in Ottawa Monday. As a result, it is almost impossible for those living on welfare to get back on their feet, says the council, created by Ottawa in 1969 to advise the minister of human resources on poverty in Canada.
(...)
“Canada’s welfare system is a box with a tight lid,” said TD Bank’s former chief economist Don Drummond, who is among numerous individuals and groups who have been urging provinces to ease up on asset limits. “Those in need must essentially first become destitute before they qualify for temporary assistance,” Drummond said in a statement. “But the record shows once you become destitute you tend to stay in that state.” The council recommends improving income support programs outside the welfare system, such as federal and provincial child benefits and the federal Working Income tax Benefit (WITB), which is available to those on welfare and tops up earnings to make work pay.

Selected 2009 welfare incomes* in Canada:
• Welfare income for an employable single person ranged from $3,773 in New Brunswick to $9,593 in Newfoundland.
• Welfare income for a single person with a disability ranged from $8,665 in New Brunswick to $12,905 in Ontario.
• Welfare income for a lone parent with one child ranged from $14,829 in Manitoba to $19,297 in Newfoundland.
• Welfare income for a couple with two children ranged from $19, 975 in New Brunswick to $24, 045 in Prince Edward Island.
[ * The territories are not included in the above highs and lows because of the high cost of living in the North. ]

Source:
Toronto Star

---

Welfare rules too severe: report
Many forced into destitution to qualify for assistance

By Norma Greenaway
December 14, 2010
Too many Canadians are being forced to deplete bank accounts, retirement savings and get rid of other assets to qualify for welfare, a new national report says.The rules imposed on welfare recipients in most provinces are overly restrictive and counterproductive, says the report released Monday by the National Welfare Council. The combination of low social assistance rates and low earning and asset limits produces a "perfect" poverty trap with no escape hatch, especially for single people, council chairman John Rook told a news conference.
Source:
Ottawa Citizen

- Go to the Key Provincial/Territorial Welfare Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare.htm

2. Release of the Fiscal Monitor for October 2010 - December 17
(Finance Canada)

Release of the Fiscal Monitor
News Release + Highlights
December 17, 2010
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, today released The Fiscal Monitor for October 2010.
Highlights:
October 2010 : Budgetary deficit of $4.1 Billion
April to October 2010 : Budgetary deficit of $21.5 Billion

Related document:

The Fiscal Monitor - October 2010

[ earlier editions of The Fiscal Monitor - going back to 1996 ]

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

3. Homeless in the Homeland : A Growing Problem For Indigenous People in Canada's North - November 2010
(Parity Magazine - Australia)

Homeless in the Homeland:A Growing Problem For Indigenous People in Canada's North
November 2010
By Frances Abele, Nick Falvo and Arlene Haché*
Today, homelessness and inadequate housing in northern Canada disproportionately afflicts Indigenous people. This is a striking fact in a region where Indigenous people lived very independently (though of course not autarkicly) until the second half of the twentieth century. In the years since then both economic development and state initiatives have transformed their lives.
Source:
Parity Magazine : November 2010 "Homelessness and Dispossession" Edition
Parity is the national homelessness publication of the Council to Homeless Persons in Australia
[ * Frances Abele is professor of Public Policy and Administration at Carleton University, Ottawa. Nick Falvo is a doctoral candidate in the same program. Arlene Haché is executive director of the Yellowknife Women’s Society. ]

[ More recent articles from Parity ]
[ Back issues of Parity
- back to 1998 ]

Council to Homeless Persons
Established in 1972, the Council to Homeless Persons is the peak Victorian body representing individuals and organisations with a stake or interest in homelessness.

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm
- Go to the Northwest Territories Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ntbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Nunavut Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nunavut.htm
- Go to the Yukon Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/yk.htm

4. Income inequality bad for everyone: Richard Wilkinson discusses The Spirit Level - December 17
(Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

Income inequality bad for everyone: Richard Wilkinson (video, duration 7:52)
December 17, 2010
The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) was pleased to co-sponsor a three-city lecture tour featuring Richard Wilkinson, co-author of the best selling book The Spirit Level, which examines income inequality among developed nations. During his stop in Toronto, he sat down with the CCPA's Trish Hennessy to talk about the book.

The Spirit Level:
Why Greater Equality Makes Societies Stronger
By Kate Pickett and Richard Wilkinson
January 2010
- more information about the book ($28) and where to buy it, as well as links to 17 reviews, commentaries and blog posts.
Source:
Bloomsbury Press

---

The Spirit Level from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The costs of inequality:
* Community life and social relations
* Mental health and drug use
* Physical health and life expectancy
* Obesity: wider income gaps, wider waists
* Educational performance
* Teenage births: recycling deprivation
* Violence: gaining respect
* Imprisonment and punishment
* Social mobility: unequal opportunities

CCPA Growing Gap project

More CCPA videos - this link takes you to the YouTube CCPA Channel, where you'll find videos on a wide range of subjects related to social and environmental policy and more...

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)
The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social and economic justice. Founded in 1980, the CCPA is one of Canada’s leading progressive voices in public policy debates. By combining solid research with extensive outreach, we work to enrich democratic dialogue and ensure Canadians know there are workable solutions to the issues we face.

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

5. A holiday gift from the CCPA: Enhanced publications access - December 17
(Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

Also from the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
:

A holiday gift from the CCPA: Enhanced publications access
December 17, 2010
For a limited time the CCPA is opening its entire cache of research free of charge — giving full public access to our publications via a database run by the Canadian Electronic Library. Browse our books, peruse chapters from our education journal Our Schools/Our Selves, and utilize the key-word search function that even scans inside our PDF reports end eBooks.
Enhanced access:
* All books published exclusively by the CCPA.
* Our Schools/Our Selves, the CCPA's quarterly education journal.
* Comprehensive key-word search inside PDFs and books

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

6. SOUNDBITES e-Bulletin - December 16
(Social Planning Toronto)

SOUNDBITES e-Bulletin - December 16, 2010
In this issue:
* Save The Date - Frances Lankin Community Tribute – February 16
* The Real Cost of Public Education
* Save the Census Campaign Update
* City Budget Watch – Mark Your Calendars
* SPT hosts “Can We Talk?” The Relationship between the Nonprofit Sector and the Ontario Government
* News From Our Partners
* Worth Repeating - Goar: Unease grows over inequality
* Get Involved in Social Planning Toronto
* About Social Planning Toronto
* Join us on Twitter & Facebook
[ SOUNDBITES Archive - links to 20 issues ]

Source:
Social Planning Toronto
For more than fifty years, SPT and its predecessor organizations have served as a vital voice for the non-profit community sector in Toronto – conducting research and supporting community mobilization that has made a real difference for our organizations, our communities, and the most vulnerable residents in our city.

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

7. New reports from the Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion in Québec:
--- Equivalence scales: an Empirical Validation - September 2010
---
From after-tax income to market basket measure (MBM) disposable income - September 2010
--- Les déterminants macroéconomiques de la pauvreté : Une étude de l’incidence de la pauvreté au sein des familles québécoises sur la période 1976-2006 - August 2009

Québec

New from the
Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion (CEPE)
(English home page):

Equivalence scales: an Empirical Validation (PDF, 178 KB, 23 pages)
By Fréchet, Guy, Pierre Lanctôt, Alexandre Morin and Frédéric Savard
September 2010
In its brief to the minister entitled Taking the Measure of Poverty: Proposed Indicators of Poverty, Inequality and Social Exclusion to Measure Progress in Québec, the Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion (CEPE) formulated numerous recommendations with respect to poverty indicators, inequality and exclusion. The fourth such recommendation concerns equivalence scales, which are tools that make it possible to adjust the various low income thresholds based on household size. These scales take into account economies of scale within a household and also presuppose a more or less equivalent level of well being. The recommendation reads as follows: “The Centre recommends using Statistics Canada’s 40/30 equivalence scale to account for economies of scale” (CEPE, 2009, p. 33). (...) Our working paper offers an empirical validation that will make it possible to understand the implications of choosing one of the scales, in this case the Statistics Canada scale.

[ Version française :
Échelles d’équivalence : une validation empirique
(PDF - 339Ko., 26 pages) ]

----

From after-tax income to market basket measure (MBM) disposable income (PDF, 80 KB, 8 pages)
By Guy Fréchet, Pierre Lanctôt and Alexandre Morin (2010)
July 2010
Comparisons of various low income thresholds are carried out using bases that are not entirely comparable: low income cut-offs (LICOs) and the low income measure (LIM) are based on before- or after-tax income (but before social contributions), whereas the market basket measure (MBM) is based on the cost of a market basket in a community of residence and disposable income for purposes of consumption (after taxes and social contributions). This begs the following question: How high must the average after-tax income of a given household be in order for it to have the means to acquire the basket in question, given that the cost of the basket must correspond to an equivalent income? The purpose of this working paper is to provide a detailed justification for a proposed 7% upward adjustment in the market basket measure (MBM) as a means of rendering the thresholds comparable to an after-tax income.

[ Version française:
Du revenu après impôt au revenu disponible aux fins de la mesure du panier de consommation
(PDF- 281Ko, 15 pages) ]

---

NOTE: The following report is available in French only,
but an excerpt from the abstract in English is copied below.

Les déterminants macroéconomiques de la pauvreté : Une étude
de l’incidence de la pauvreté au sein des familles québécoises
sur la période 1976-2006
(PDF - 147Ko, 41 pages)
Jean-Michel Cousineau
Août 2009
École de relations industrielles
Université de Montréal

Abstract [Excerpt]:
One of the most extraordinary change that affected Canada and Québec in the recent decenny is the dramatic decrease in their poverty rates. This paper estimates the contribution of the macroeconomic determinants of poverty for economic families in Québec and Canada. Such a study may help to understand year to year changes in poverty rates as well as the respective role of markets and governments over various sub-periods of our sample (1976-1989; 1989-1996 and lastly : 1996-2006).

---

Source:
Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion (CEPE) - Québec
The Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion (CEPE) is an observation, research and discussion centre entrusted with providing reliable and rigourous information, notably of a statistical nature, on poverty and social exclusion issues. The CEPE was created in the spirit of the Act to combat poverty and social exclusion in spring 2005 under the aegis of the ministère de l’Emploi et de la Solidarité sociale (MESS).

- Go to the Poverty Measures - Canadian Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty.htm
- Go to the Québec Links (English) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qce.htm
- Rendez-vous à la page de liens de recherche sociale au Québec: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qcbkmrk.htm

8. Canada Without Poverty Fall 2010 Newsletter - November 17

Canada Without poverty
Fall 2010 Newsletter

November 17, 2010
[ PDF version - small file]
Canada Without Poverty and the CWP Advocacy Network have prepared their Fall 2010 Poverty & Parliament Newsletter.
Highlights include:
* Review of “The Spirit Level: Why Greater Equality Makes Societies Stronger” by Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett
* Expansion of Dignity for All: The Campaign for a Poverty-free Canada to include Make Poverty History
* Updates on Bill C-304 [small PDF file], which calls for a national housing strategy, and Bill C-545, An Act to Eliminate Poverty in Canada
* A look at recent actions & events: Poverty & Punchlines, and the Red Tent Campaign
Source:
Canada Without Poverty (CWP)
Canada Without Poverty is a federally incorporated, non-partisan, not-for-profit and charitable organization dedicated to the elimination of poverty in Canada.(...) One of the special characteristics of Canada Without Poverty is that, since our inception in 1971, we have always been governed by people with direct, personal experience of living in poverty, whether in childhood or as adults. This lived experience informs and helps to guide our work. (...) Acting from the belief that poverty is a violation of human rights and that poverty elimination is a human rights obligation, our work includes raising awareness about poverty, participating in research to generate new knowledge about poverty, and striving to influence public policy to prevent and alleviate poverty.

CWP Advocacy Network
The CWP Advocacy Network is a new national non-profit but non-charitable organization. It exists to directly lobby politicians and other public policy makers, at all levels of government in Canada, for policies and legislation that help prevent, alleviate and eliminate poverty in Canada.

Dignity for All - Support the campaign for a poverty-free Canada
Dignity for All is a multi-year, multi-partner, non-partisan campaign. This campaign’s vision is to make a poverty-free and more socially secure and cohesive Canada a reality by 2020. The conviction behind this campaign is that Canadians must respect and defend the right of every person to dignity and security.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Organizations Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ngobkmrk.htm
- Go to the National/Federal and International Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty2.htm

9. Demand Ontario welfare reforms you would want as a recipient - December 8
(Social Assistance Review - Income Security Advocacy Centre)

Demand Ontario welfare reforms you would want as a recipient
December 8, 2010
By Joseph Jolley (Guelph Mercury Community Editorial Board)
About a week ago, the Ontario Government announced the creation of a panel to make recommendations for what is being described as the largest overhaul to Ontario’s welfare system in 20 years. (...) This effort might have been taken seriously, if it happened even a year ago. Now, it is a meaningless waste of time and effort. Next year is an election year in Ontario. If present polling trends continue to hold, that election will produce a Tory majority government. As some of you may recall, the Tories have their own version of welfare reform. The election will most likely happen even before Mr. Sheikh and Ms. Lankin have finished their work. (...)
It should be pointed out to the cheerleaders for the war against the poor that a good social assistance system is in their own best interest. These people don’t seem to realize that all it takes is a few twists of fate to put them into this little version of hell. Yes, it can happen to you. So, how would you want to be treated?
Source:
Social Assistance Review
[ Part of the Income Security Advocacy Centre ]

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

10. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]
--- Survey of Household Spending, 2009 - December 17
--- Employment Insurance, October 2010 - December 16
--- Women in Canada : Economic well-being, 2008 - December 16
--- Leading indicators, November 2010 - December 14
--- Canadian Economic Accounts Quarterly Review, Second quarter 2010 - December 14
--- Education Matters: Insights on Education, Learning and Training in Canada - December 2010 - December 13

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

December 17, 2010
Survey of Household Spending, 2009
Average household spending in Canada declined 0.3% to $71,120 in 2009, following the economic slowdown that began in the fall of 2008.
- includes three tables:
* Average total expenditure and shares of spending of major categories for provinces and territories, 2009
* Total average household expenditure by provinces and territories
* Budget share of major spending categories by income quintile, 2009
[ User Guide for the Survey of Household Spending, 2009 - click "View" for the latest edition ]

Related report:

Spending Patterns in Canada, 2009
*
Highlights
* Introduction
* Analysis
* Tables
* Data quality, concepts and methodology
* User information
* Related products
* PDF version (596K, 101 pages)

Source:
Spending Patterns in Canada - Product main page*
This publication presents statistical highlights and key tables from the Survey of Household Spending (SHS). This annual survey collects information about expenditures by households and families in Canada on a wide variety of goods and services, as well as their dwelling characteristics and possession of household equipment such as appliances, audio and video equipment, and vehicles. The publication also includes analytical text, summary-level tables, a detailed table, notes and definitions, and information about survey methodology and data quality.
[ * On the product main page,click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

Related subjects:

* Families, households and housing
* Household characteristics
* Housing and dwelling characteristics
* Income, pensions, spending and wealth
* Household spending and savings


December 16, 2010
Employment Insurance, October 2010
The number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits edged down by 5,200 in October to 683,300. Compared with the most recent low in March 2010, the number of beneficiaries edged up 1.5% or by 10,400.
- includes three tables:
* Employment Insurance: Statistics by province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by age group, sex, province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by census metropolitan areas

Related link:

Employment Insurance Statistics Maps, October 2010
- change in number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits in the last 12 months, by Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations.
(Intro to maps + link to October 2010 maps)

Related subjects
o Labour
o Employment insurance, social assistance and other transfers
o Non-wage benefits

[ earlier editions of this report ]


December 16, 2010
Women in Canada: Economic well-being, 2008
Between 2000 and 2008, average total income for Canadian women increased at almost twice the pace as it did for men, although women continued to have lower income levels. On average, total income for women was $30,100 in 2008, up 13% from $26,300 in 2000. During the same period, total income for men increased by 7% to $47,000.

Economic Well-being
by Cara Williams
PDF version (1.1MB, 34 pages)
Table of contents:
* The many determinants of economic well-being
* Income
* Earnings
* Low income
* Financial security
* Retirement savings
* Home ownership and shelter affordability
* Factors contributing to the decline in the gender wage gap

Source:
Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report - Product main page*
Understanding the role of women in Canadian society and how it has changed over time is dependent on having information that can begin to shed light on the diverse circumstances and experiences of women. Women in Canada provides an unparalleled compilation of data related to women's family status, education, employment, economic well-being, unpaid work, health, and more.
[ * On the product main page,click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

Related subjects:

* Income, pensions, spending and wealth
* Household assets, debts and wealth
* Household, family and personal income
* Low income and inequality
* Society and community
* Women and gender


December 14, 2010
Leading indicators, November 2010
The composite index rose 0.3% in November, the same as in October. Among the 10 components, 6 posted gains, 3 were unchanged and 1 declined.
- includes a table showing changes in leading indicators from June to November 2010

Related subjects:

* Business performance and ownership
* Current conditions
* Economic accounts
* Leading indicators


December 14, 2010
Canadian Economic Accounts Quarterly Review, Second quarter 2010
* GDP by income and by expenditure
* GDP by industry
* Balance of international payments
* Financial flows
* Labour productivity
* International investment position
* National balance sheet accounts

Canadian Economic Accounts Quarterly Review - main product page*
This publication presents an overview of the economic developments reported in Canada's national accounts for the most recent quarter. The overview covers several broad areas: 1) gross domestic product (GDP) by income and by expenditure; 2) GDP by industry; 3) balance of international payments accounts; 4) labour productivity and other related variables; 5) international investment position; and, 6) national balance
Click View for the latest issue of this periodical; click Chronological index for earlier editions.
[ * On the product main page,click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]


December 13, 2010
Education Matters: Insights on Education, Learning and Training in Canada - December 2010
This issue of Statistics Canada's free online publication, Education Matters: Insights on Education, Learning and Training in Canada, contains two articles.

Trade qualifiers in the skilled trades in Canada: An overview draws a profile of "trade qualifiers" in 2007, using data from the Registered Apprenticeship Information System. A trade qualifier is a person who has not completed an apprenticeship program, but has acquired enough practical work experience to pass exams leading to a certificate of qualification in their trade.

The second article, Trends in the age composition of college and university students and graduates examines changes in the age composition of college and university students and graduates over time. It also examines these changes by other student characteristics, including sex, status as an international student, and program level.

This issue also provides links to a series of new tables on population size, low income, public and private expenditure on education, elementary-secondary school enrolments and educators, enrolments and completions in postsecondary education, university educators, and transitions to postsecondary education and to the labour market, all part of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program. Also included are updates to the Handbook for the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program, which outlines the methodology for this set of indicators.

Source:
Education Matters - main product page*
This free online periodical provides summary information on issues and gives access to education indicators and Canadian education analysis. It presents information, statistics and analysis in a non-technical, highly readable format for teachers, students, parents, education associations, researchers and policy makers [ This free online periodical provides summary information on issues and gives access to education indicators and Canadian education analysis. It presents information, statistics and analysis in a non-technical, highly readable format for teachers, students, parents, education associations, researchers and policy makers
[ * On the product main page,click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

Related products:

* Learning Resources at Statistics Canada - For Teachers - For Students - For Kids - Postsecondary
* Education Indicators in Canada: Report of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program
* Education Indicators in Canada: Fact Sheets
* Statistics by Subject : Education, Training and Learning
* Education finance
Source:
Statistics Canada


The Daily Archives
- select a month and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

11. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - December 19

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
:

December 19, 2010

What's new online:
[This section archives documents that
have been featured on the CRRU homepage..]

Women in Canada: A gender-based statistical report 15 Dec 10 - Report from Statistics Canada finds employment rate for women with children more than doubled over past three decades. Women are more likely to work part-time than men and are still concentrated in traditional female occupations.
Welfare incomes 2009 15 Dec 10 - Report from the National Council on Welfare calls welfare design "outdated, counter-productive"; calls for "a comprehensive approach to both income support and the provision of appropriate services geared to income level rather than welfare status".
Webcast: The role of play in human learning 15 Dec 10 - Canadian Network for Leadership in Education and Early Learning & Care webcast features Dr. Janette Pelletier, Elizabeth Morley and Dianne Riehl discussing the role of play-based learning in integrated early childhood and school programs.
Investing in young children: New directions in federal preschool and early childhood policy 15 Dec 10 - Report from the National Institute for Early Education Research explores the state of the US' early childhood programs -- Head Start, Early Head Start, and home visiting -- and proposes reforms.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news
[This section features interesting and noteworthy
news about ECEC and related issues in Canada and internationally.]

· Province to scrap key piece of full-day kindergarten plan
[CA-ON] 15 Dec 10

· Ontario alters kindergarten program, opening door to private daycares
[CA-ON] 15 Dec 10

· $25M for autism, 'raises a lot of questions'
[CA-ON] 15 Dec 10

· Taking back the playground
[CA-BC] 14 Dec 10

· Welfare income rose in 2009 but still too low: report
[CA] 13 Dec 10

· Ruling expands family rights
[CA-ON] 11 Dec 10

· Why women fared better in the recession
[CA] 10 Dec 10

· We must do better for our children
[CA-BC] 3 Dec 10

more CC IN THE NEWS »

-------------

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

12. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

December 17:
American Community Survey
2009 Child Maltreatment Report
Honolulu Star Advertiser Series on Special Education

December 16:
State Budget Cuts and Social Services - Massachusetts
Spending Cuts and Child Poverty - UK
Medicaid Expansion - Minnesota

December 15:
American Community Survey
Student Achievement Gaps

December 14:
Boston Globe Series on Supplemental Security Income (SSI)
American Community Survey
Minimum Wage Increase - Colorado

December 13:
Homelessness in Los Angeles, CA
Teen Pregnancy and Birth Control Access - Colombia
Welfare and Asset Limits - Canada
Racine Journal Times Series on Child Homelessness

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

13. [U.S.] The Other Welfare : The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program for children
(Series in the Boston Globe)

The Other Welfare (December 12-14, 2010)
This three-part series of articles in The Boston Globe by Patricia Wen examines the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program for children, which was created mainly for those with severe physical disabilities. But the $10 billion in federal benefit checks now goes primarily to indigent children with behavioral, learning and mental conditions.
NOTE: to see all three articles you must register (free).
Source:
Boston Globe

COMMENT:
My purpose in linking to this series of articles wasn't to highlight a U.S. Government initiative that appears to be facing some criticism, but rather to present a situation that we often see occurring here in Canada that's commonly known as "the welfare wall". That's when a client of the welfare system finds it daunting or even impossible to leave that system to accept a job because "breaking free" from welfare means losing some important benefits, such as the drug assistance, dental and vision coverage that are vital to some welfare households, particularly those with kids. The absence of universal, subsidized day care is another barrier for parents trying to leaving welfare --- day care costs can quickly eat up a low-income worker's take-home pay, sometimes leaving them with less household income than they would receive on welfare to meet the cost of basic necessities. Another significant barrier to welfare clients who find a job is the earnings exemption policy of the welfare system where they live. In some Canadian jurisdictions, new applicants to the program face a dollar reduction in their welfare entitlement for every dollar of work income --- pretty low incentive to find a job, if you ask me...
This last point about the earnings exemption policies under provincial and territorial welfare programs is the link with the Boston Globe series of articles on SSI for children --- in the states, too many young SSI beneficiaries feel that they can't work because their family's financial well-being might be jeopardized by the treatment of income from work under SSI rules.

Related links:

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) - Government website

Supplemental Security Income - from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Supplemental Security Income (or SSI) is a United States government program that provides stipends to low-income persons who are either aged (65 or older), blind, or disabled. SSI is administered by the Social Security Administration and funded from general tax revenues in the United States.
SSI was created in 1974 to replace federal-state adult assistance programs that served the same purpose. The restructuring of these programs was intended to standardize the eligibility requirements and level of benefits. Today, the program provides benefits to 7.9 million American adults and children.

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

14. Australian Policy Online - selected content
--- Poverty versus inequality (July 2009)
--- Welfare quarantining: reversing the burden of truth (February 2010)

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia.
[ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page.

17 December 2010

On the APO Home Page:
* Top Economics reports 2010 * Top Justice reports 2010 * Top Environment & Planning reports 2010 * Top Politics reports 2010 * Top Indigenous reports 2010 * Top Social Policy reports 2010 * Top Creative & Digital reports 2010 * Top International reports 2010 * Top Education reports 2010 * Top Health reports 2010

---------------

Top Social Policy reports 2010
Australian Policy Online
The five most read reports and commentary pieces in the Social Policy area in 2010 were:
1. Who will benefit from the 1 July 2010 tax cuts?
2. Asylum seekers and refugees: what are the facts?
3. Boat arrivals in Australia since 1976: January 2010 update
4. Poverty versus inequality (July 2009)
5. Welfare quarantining: reversing the burden of truth (February 2010)
Source:
New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social Inclusion * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

--------------

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

15. CRINMAIL
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
:

Latest issue of CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter):

15 December 2010, CRINMAIL issue 1205
In this issue:
* Update: CRC Complaints Mechanism meeting
* Latest news and reports
--- Global progress on corporal punishment
--- Female genital mutilation: losing its grip?
--- Unequal opportunities (European Union, Central Asia)
--- Failing States
--- Freedom of expression update
* Employment
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Laws * Issues
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

NOTE: see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm for the table of contents for, and links to, several months' worth of issues of CRINMAIL.

------------------------------------------

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL (from CRINMAIL)
- links to earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


 


 


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com


****************************

The night d'avant Noel

****************************


The Night Before Christmas dans les deux langues officielles:
A special Christmas treat pour mes amis bilingues.

------------------------------

T'was the Night d’avant Noël
By Clement C. Moore et/and Léonce Gallant

T'was the night before Christmas et dans tout le logis
Not a creature was stirring, même pas une souris.
The stockings were hung le long d’la cheminée
In hopes that St. Nicholas ne va pas oublier.
The children were nestled dans leurs petits lits
While visions of sugar plums excitent l’appétit.

And mama in her kerchief et moi dans ma jaquette
Had just settled down dans la grande couchette,
When out on the lawn j’entendis un vacarme,
I sprang out of bed pour sonner l’alarme. 
Away to the window je me dépêchai,
Tore open the shutter et le rideau je haussai.
......
(...)<===[Click the source link below for six more paragraphs]
......
He spoke not a word et avec toute vitesse
He filled all the stockings, puis tourna d’un geste.
And laying his finger sur le bout de son nez
And giving a nod, il commença à monter.
He sprang to his sleigh, s’empara des cordons
And away they all flew, comme le duvet d’un chardon.

But I heard him exclaim d’une voix très douce :
“Merry Christmas to all et Bonne Année à tous!”

Source:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/XMAS/Twas.htm

************************

Wishing you and your loved ones good times
 and warm memories during this holiday season.
 

Joyeux Noel* à tous and Happy New Year to all!


Gilles Séguin
The Canadian Social
Research Links Guy

-----------------

* If Noel isn't your bag, please read my
Politically-Correct Winter Solstice Holiday Wish:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/XMAS/greeting.htm

-----------------

NINE versions of White Christmas, from Bing Crosby to Billy Idol
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/XMAS/noel.htm
(Also includes Steve Martin's  holiday wish...)

-----------------------

Canadian Social Research Links Staff Party:
http://elfyourself.jibjab.com/view/mK9AyuZgu2jqD9aS
(Just before the police arrived)

-----------------------

And, in closing...

-----------------------

Some Black Humour
http://tinyurl.com/28279xb