Canadian Social Research Newsletter
May 20, 2012

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

This week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,555 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. [Ontario] Five questions with John Stapleton [re. the working poor] (Hamilton Spectator) - May 16
2. The Human Development Index in Canada: Estimates for the Canadian Provinces and Territories, 2000-2011 (Centre for the Study of Living Standards
) - May 18
3. Research Funded by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Contradicts Key Argument For New Employment Insurance Policy (Andrew Jackson in the Progressive Economics Forum) - May 18
4. Poverty Amongst Plenty : Waiting for the Yukon Government to Adopt a Poverty Reduction Strategy (Nick Falvo) - May 17
5. United Nations food envoy blasts inequality, poverty in Canada (Toronto Star) - May 16
6. “There is no bad job — the only bad job is not having a job.” (Federal Finance Minister Jim Flaherty) - May 14
7. [Ontario] Report on Youth Leaving Care Hearings Team Delivered to Ontario Legislature (Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth) - May 14
8. New Yukon Social Assistance Regulations - effective May 2012
9. From The Tyee (Vancouver):
--- What About Just Guaranteeing Everyone a Basic Income? (May 15)

--- Is the 'Living Wage' Enough?(May 14)
10. [Ontario] Hamilton covering $1.8m in provincial cuts to welfare recipients (Hamilton Spectator) - May 14
11. 2012 Queen's (University) Institute on Social Policy : August 20-22, 2012

12. Coalition of Child Care Advocates of British Columbia urges BC Govt. to reconsider commercial child care - May 3
13.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Consumer Price Index, April 2012 - May 18
--- Canadian Economic Observer, May 2012 - May 18
--- Canadian Social Trends, Summer 2012 - May 17
--- Health Reports, May 2012 - May 16
14. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

15. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
16.
[U.S.] The Number of Those Working Past 65 Is at a Record High (New York Times) - May 18
17. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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Go to the home page of the
Canadian Social Research Links website:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/index.htm


1. [Ontario] Five questions with John Stapleton [re. the working poor] - May 16
(
Hamilton Spectator)

Five questions with John Stapleton [re. the working poor]
http://www.thespec.com/news/local/article/725371
May 16, 2012
John Stapleton has spent a lot of time crunching census numbers and studying population maps, and one of his key discoveries is that working poverty is on the rise. Stapleton, a policy consultant and Metcalf Foundation Fellow, used data from the 2000 and 2006 censuses to analyze income trends in Toronto’s census metropolitan area, which includes most of Halton.

The five questions:
- What do the working poor look like?
-
What is the biggest misconception about the working poor?
-
How has working poverty changed in Halton?
-
Why do you think these changes occurred?
- What role does policy-making play?
John Stapleton will be at the Oakville Public Library on Wednesday evening (May 16) to discuss his findings on the working poor in Halton, and how the demographics have changed.

Source:
Hamilton Spectator

http://www.thespec.com/

Related link:

Open Policy - John Stapleton's website
http://www.openpolicyontario.com/

---- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

2. The Human Development Index in Canada: Estimates for the Canadian Provinces and Territories, 2000-2011 - May 18
(
Centre for the Study of Living Standards
)

From the
Centre for the Study of Living Standards:

CSLS Releases Study on Estimates of the Human Development Index
for the Canadian Territories and Provinces: Alberta Ranks First
(PDF - 168K, 2 pages)
http://csls.ca/PressReleaseMay182012.pdf
May 18, 2012
The Centre for the Study of Living Standards today released a major study entitled “The Human Development Index in Canada: Estimates for the Canadian Provinces and Territories.” This is the first study that has developed estimates of the Human Development Index (HDI) for the provinces and territories that are consistent with the official HDI estimates for Canada produced by the United Nations. The HDI is based on life expectancy, average years of education attainment, expected years of education, and Gross National Income.

Selected key findings:

* In 2011, Alberta ranked as the jurisdiction with the highest HDI in Canada, closely followed by Ontario, the Northwest Territories, and British Columbia. Nunavut ranked last, and Prince Edward Island second last.

* For both life expectancy and average educational attainment, British Columbia ranked first among the 13 provinces and territories and Nunavut ranked last. For expected years of schooling, Quebec ranked at the top and Nunavut came in last, while for GNI per capita, Northwest Territories was in first place and Prince Edward Island was in last place.
(...)

The report provides a comprehensive picture of developments in life expectancy, average education attainment, expected years of schooling, and Gross National Income per capita for all provinces and territories over the 2000-2011 period.

---

Complete report:

The Human Development Index in Canada:
Estimates for the Canadian Provinces and Territories, 2000-2011
(PDF - 1.7MB, 79 pages)
http://www.csls.ca/reports/csls2012-02.pdf

---
Comment (by Gilles):
Further down on this page, you'll find a collection of links around the issue of possible changes to the Employment Insurance program, including federal Finance Minister Jim Flaherty's dismissive rebuttal to the observations of Olivier de Schutter, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food. Flaherty got all huffy about the rapporteur's critical observations regarding food security in Canada, bragging that Canada ranked high in the Human Development Index (6th in 2011).
According to the CSLS study, the HDI is based on life expectancy, average years of education attainment, expected years of education, and Gross National Income."
I see very little correlation between ranking 6th on the HDI and ensuring food security for all Canadians.
---

Source:
Centre for the Study of Living Standards
http://csls.ca/
The Centre for the Study of Living Standards is a non-profit, national, independent organization that seeks to contribute to a better understanding of trends in and determinants of productivity, living standards and economic and social well-being through research.

---

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

- Go to the United Nations Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/un.htm

3. Research Funded by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Contradicts Key Argument For New Employment Insurance Policy- May 18
(Andrew Jackson in the
Progressive Economics Forum)

Research Funded by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
Contradicts Key Argument For New Employment Insurance Policy
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/2012/05/18/hrsdc-funded-research-contradicts-ei-policy/
B
y Andrew Jackson
May 18, 2012
According to today’s Globe, the government says that the major target of pending changes to EI is frequent claimants, who are disproportionately to be found in the high unemployment regions. This focus seems to reflect the common belief that supposedly “overgenerous” EI benefits stop some people from moving from high to low unemployment regions.

Interesting to note, then, that research commissioned by HRSDC finds that the EI program has almost no impact on inter-regional labour mobility. Here is the summary and link to the full paper, taken from the latest EI Monitoring and Assessment Report:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/employment/ei/reports/eimar_2011/annex/annex6.shtml

Source:
Progressive Economics Forum
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/

---

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm

4. Poverty Amongst Plenty : Waiting for the Yukon Government to Adopt a Poverty Reduction Strategy - May 17
(Nick Falvo)

[Yukon]
Poverty Amongst Plenty:
Waiting for the Yukon Government to Adopt a Poverty Reduction Strategy

http://goo.gl/4hMqn
May 17, 2012
On May 24, Nick Falvo, a doctoral candidate at Carleton University’s School of Public Policy and Administration, will deliver the report, Poverty Amongst Plenty: Waiting for the Yukon Government to Adopt a Poverty Reduction Strategy, in Whitehorse. The report examines how the Yukon government helps the poor and makes recommendations for change. The study touches on important issues of health, strategy, food, shelter, child care, education and relations with the federal government.
[Click the link above for more information on the location and time of this presentation.]

Video (duration 2:14):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ilOdLcosKc
Nick Falvo speaks about poverty in Yukon and the need for a poverty reduction strategy.

---

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

- Go to the Yukon Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/yk.htm

5. United Nations food envoy blasts inequality, poverty in Canada - May 16
(Toronto Star)

United Nations food envoy blasts inequality, poverty in Canada
Olivier De Schutter, the UN right-to-food envoy, said in Ottawa on Wednesday that Canada's "rates of food insecurity are unacceptable."
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1179208--jason-kenney-blasts-un-food-envoy
May 16, 2012
By Sean Kilpatrick
OTTAWA—Despite Canada’s riches, many Canadians are suffering from poverty, inequality and the inability to afford daily food needs, says a scathing United Nations report released Wednesday
[ http://goo.gl/tLwmj ]. “What I’ve seen in Canada is a system that presents barriers for the poor to access nutritious diets and that tolerates increased inequalities between rich and poor, and aboriginal non-aboriginal peoples,” Olivier De Schutter, the UN right-to-food envoy, said. “Canada has long been seen as a land of plenty. Yet today one in 10 families with a child under 6 is unable to meet their daily food needs. These rates of food insecurity are unacceptable, and it is time for Canada to adopt a national right-to-food strategy,” said De Schutter. His report was based on an 11-day mission to Canada, his first investigation of what he called “a rich, developed country.”
(...)
He also said the situation in many aboriginal communities is desperate [ http://goo.gl/WkjxT ]. “A long history of political and economic marginalization has left many indigenous peoples (in Canada) with considerably lower levels of access to adequate food relative to the general population,” he said in his report.
(...)
Immigration Minister Jason Kenney said it’s a waste of the UN’s money to be investigating developed countries like Canada. (...) Kenney said Canada ranks as one of the best developed countries in the world in the UN’s own rankings. As well, Canada gives billions of dollars a year to developing nations. Kenney dismissed De Schutter’s mission as a political exercise.

But the official parliamentary opposition urged the Conservatives to act quickly to put together a national food strategy in the wake of the UN study.
“Like it or not, the situation is bleak for millions of Canadians. Food security is a right. Hunger and malnutrition are unacceptable anywhere, but especially in a country as wealthy as Canada,” said NDP aboriginal affairs critic Jean Crowder. “It’s the least fortunate who must choose between paying their rent and putting food on the table. That’s not a choice Canadians should have to make,” Crowder added. The NDP said the government must do more to address food affordability issues among First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities.

Source:
Toronto Star

http://www.thestar.com/

Related link:

UN envoy full of beans on food file
http://www.nationalpost.com/envoy+full+beans+food+file/6634351/story.html
By John Ivison
May 17, 2012Olivier De Schutter, the UN Special Rapporteur on the right to food, came to Canada at the behest of the various despots and potentates who make up the UN Human Rights Council, in order to point out what he called "unacceptable" rates of food insecurity in this country.
His visit was justified by three false premises:
One, that "malnutrition" in Canada is getting worse.
(...)
Two, that the poor are getting poorer.
(...)
Three,
that there is a right to food in Canada.
It's true that Canada ratified the Universal Declaration of Human Rights at the General Assembly in 1948 (...). Article 25 states that everyone has the right to standard of living "adequate for health and well-being ... including food, clothing, housing and medical care." But this is not part of binding international law*. More importantly, there is nothing in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms that grants Canadians the right to food.
Source:
National Post

http://www.nationalpost.com/

---
* [By Gilles:] And there you have the Conservative view of Canada's international obligations under the Universal Declaration of Human Rights:
" Just because the Canadian Government signed the Declaration back in 1948, we (the 2012 Harper Government™) don't *have* to do anything about it.
Why?
Because the Declaration wasn't tied in to binding international law.
How disingenuous can you get?
Harper disingenuous.
---

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm

6. “There is no bad job — the only bad job is not having a job” (Federal Finance Minister Jim Flaherty) - May 14

Conservatives’ wage model will hurt all workers, unions say
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1178645
May 15, 2012
At the heart of the Harper government’s 2012 budget is a “pay-less wage model” that is unfair to temporary workers from abroad and is designed to provide business with a pool of low-paid employees across Canada, labour activists said Tuesday. Union representatives held a news conference in Ottawa to shed light on the impact on workers of far-reaching changes to Employment Insurance (EI) and the Temporary Foreign Worker Program buried in the federal government’s controversial budget legislation.
(...) Of greatest concern, say critics, is the government’s move to allow employers to pay temporary highly-skilled foreign workers up to 15 per cent less (for low-skilled workers, it’s up to 5 per cent less) than the prevailing local wage under some circumstances.
(...) Concerns were also raised about measures in the budget legislation intended to pressure EI recipients to loosen their criteria for suitable employment. On Monday, Flaherty confirmed the government intends to clamp down on EI claimants. Flaherty said the government will expand the threshold for what is considered a suitable job for EI recipients. That means that those who pass up such employment could lose their EI benefits.“There’ll be a broader definition and people will have to engage more in the workforce,” Flaherty told reporters. He also indicated that he has little sympathy for EI recipients who are too picky about the jobs they will accept. “There is no bad job — the only bad job is not having a job,” he said.

108 comments about this article:
http://goo.gl/I1c2M

Source:
Toronto Star

http://www.thestar.com/

Related links:

Kicking them while they’re down
http://framedincanada.com/2012/05/15/kicking-them-when-theyre-down/
May 15, 2012
By Trish Hennessy
Four years after a global economic meltdown threw scores of Canadians out of work during one of the worst recessions ever, followed by a tepid recovery that has us still biting our fingernails, Canada’s federal Finance Minister Jim Flaherty made himself available to reporters to talk jobs. Was it to announce a new jobs training program? Better income supports for the unemployed? A plan to address the hard reality that there are more unemployed than there are job vacancies? No, it was not. Instead, The finance minister took to the unbecoming practice of blaming the unemployed for their inability to find a job.
(...) That Flaherty’s remarks reveal a government out of touch with and insensitive to the reality of Canadians – especially youth shut out of the opportunities of work that their baby boomer parents never in their lifetime faced – is one thing. That any government would promote the perpetuation of bad jobs over good ones is quite another.
Source:
Framed in Canada - Trish Hennessy's blog
http://framedincanada.com/

Trish is with the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

---

By Andrew Jackson in the
Progressive Economics Forum:

Memo to Ministers: The Issue is Unemployment Not Labour Shortages
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/2012/05/16/memo-to-ministers-the-issue-is-unemployment-not-labour-shortages/
May 16, 2012
The federal government is basing labour market policy on the belief that, as Jason Kenney pithily puts it in today’s Globe and Mail [ http://goo.gl/nZYxB ], there are “large and growing labour shortages.” Hence moves to bring in even more temporary foreign workers at lower than average wages, and to push EI claimants into supposedly available jobs. Not that the facts appear to matter, but it is surely notable that – even after two months of strong job growth – we still have an unemployment rate of 7.3%. The “real” unemployment rate in April – which includes involuntary part-time workers – was 10.7%, down only marginally from 11.3% a year earlier. The “real” unemployment rate for youth is still 20.4%, down a tad from 21.2% a year ago.

The most recent Statscan data on job vacancies [ http://goo.gl/HUoJP ] for the three months ending in January, 2012 show that there were 6.4 unemployed workers for every reported job vacancy. That is actually worse than the previously reported number for September when ther were 5.4 unemployed workers for every reported vacancy.

Tightening the Screws on the Unemployed
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/2012/05/15/tightening-the-screws-on-the-unemployed/
May 15, 2012
The significant changes to the Employment Insurance (EI) program which are to be quickly implemented through Budget 2012 with very little consultation have not received enough critical attention. First, a word on what is not in the Budget. It is disappointing, to say the least, that the government is failing to respond to the fact that less than 40% of unemployed Canadians are now qualifying for EI, well below the already low pre-recession rate. And, for all of the talk about skills shortages in Canada, it is notable that there is NO increased investment at all in EI supported training which would assist unemployed workers to find good jobs. Instead, the focus is on tightening discipline over those workers who have managed to qualify for a claim. (...) the major intent is to tighten the system to get the unemployed back to work, any work, much faster. At a minimum, these changes demand much closer consideration than they will get before the Budget Bill is passed.

Job Shortages? What Shortages?
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/2012/02/08/job-shortages-what-shortages/
February 8, 2012
Sigh. Here we go again. More evidence-free corporate policy advocacy. The Canadian Chamber of Commerce [ http://www.chamber.ca/ ] put out a report today [ http://chambertop10.ca/ ] which points with alarm to labour and skills shortages, and calls for a less generous EI program to get workers to move to the supposedly available jobs.
“A growing shortage of highly skilled labour is becoming desperate, threatening our ability to keep up in a global, knowledge-based economy… Our Employment Insurance Program perpetuates regional disparity and discourages Canadians from relocating to where work is available.” Problem is that there are clearly – based on the new job vacancy data – many more unemployed workers than there are job vacancies.

Source:
Progressive Economics Forum

http://www.progressive-economics.ca/

---

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm

7. [Ontario] Report on Youth Leaving Care Hearings Team Delivered to Ontario Legislature - May 14
(Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth)

From the
Office of the Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth:

(Government of Ontario)

Young People in Care Call for Fundamental Changes to Child Welfare System
Youth Leaving Care Hearings Team to Deliver Report to Ontario Legislature Today
(PDF - 44K, 2 pages)
http://www.provincialadvocate.on.ca/documents/en/ylc/YLC_Hearings_Report_Press_Release_EN.pdf
[ Version française:
http://www.provincialadvocate.on.ca/documents/en/ylc/YLC_Hearings_Report_Press_Release_FR.pdf ]
May 14, 2012
News Release
TORONTO - Young people in and from care who held public hearings last November will deliver a report to the Ontario Legislature today that includes a strong call for fundamental change to the existing child welfare system. The report entitled, My REAL Life Book, stems from almost 200 submissions from young people and others across the province about how to improve outcomes for the Province’s children. The report provides deeply personal insights into the care system, in the words and experiences of youth themselves.
(...)
Concerns were also raised about measures in the budget legislation intended to pressure EI recipients to loosen their criteria for suitable employment.
On Monday, Flaherty confirmed the government intends to clamp down on EI claimants. Flaherty said the government will expand the threshold for what is considered a suitable job for EI recipients. That means that those who pass up such employment could lose their EI benefits. (...) He also indicated that he has little sympathy for EI recipients who are too picky about the jobs they will accept. “There is no bad job — the only bad job is not having a job,” he said.

 

---

My REAL Life Book (PDF - 2.4MB, 36 pages)
http://www.provincialadvocate.on.ca/documents/en/ylc/YLC_REPORT_ENG.pdf
[ version française:
http://www.provincialadvocate.on.ca/documents/en/ylc/YLC_REPORT_FR.pdf
]

For some time now, across the province, youth in and from care have been speaking out about the many issues now contained in this report. After voicing those concerns to Irwin Elman, the Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth, we decided to plan and hold two days of public hearings on the issues facing youth as we age out of care. On November 18th and 25th, 2011, the Youth Leaving Care Hearings took place at Queen’s Park, home of the Ontario Legislature. This is the report that came out of the submissions we received. The purpose of this report is to improve the experiences and lives of youth in and leaving care.
(...)
On page 20 : "Comprehensive health and dental benefits, including prescriptions, should be extended to youth to the age of 25 to allow them to complete their education and gain employment before coverage ends." (Mary Ballantyne, Executive Director, Ontario Association of Children’s Aid Societies)

---

Youth Leaving Care Hearings
http://www.provincialadvocate.on.ca/main/en/hearings/pages/home.html
The Youth Leaving Care Hearings were the first public hearings organized and run by young people at Queen’s Park, the home of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario. The Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth partnered with dozens of volunteers — all young people in and from care — to hold hearings designed to address the issues faced by many of the 8,300 children and youth who are Crown Wards in Ontario.

In November 2011, children and youth from across the province spoke about their experiences and had the opportunity to help make changes. Professionals, families, and friends added their voices to help build understanding about what young people in care need to succeed as adults. Members of the Provincial Parliament, ministry staff, service providers and members of the public attended to listen and learn.

Source:
Office of the Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth

http://www.provincialadvocate.on.ca/
The Office of the Provincial Advocate reports directly to the Legislature and provides an independent voice for children and youth, including children with special needs and First Nations children.

Related links:

25 Is The New 21:
The Costs and Benefits of Providing Extended Care
and Maintenance to Ontario Youth in Care Until Age 25
(PDF - 1.2MB, 70 pages)
http://www.provincialadvocate.on.ca/documents/en/25istheNew21.pdf
March 2012
Seven cost-benefit analyses have been undertaken in the United States and Australia to examine the costs to society of providing extra supports to youth in care after the age of 18. The studies reveal vastly different approaches, assumptions, and data sources. Yet all reach the same conclusion: increased investment in services for youth transitioning from care yield benefits in the long term. This is the first such study to be done in Canada. The analysis is based on the best and most promising aspects of the seven cost-benefit analyses mentioned above. The report examines available Ontario data, as well as Canadian and international sources, to estimate the cost of a program extension in Ontario. It also estimates the savings that could be achieved by bettering the lives of youth aging out of care.
Source:
Office of the Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth
http://www.provincialadvocate.on.ca/

---

Youth in Care Canada
http://www.youthincare.ca/
The National Youth In Care Network is a national charitable organization driven by youth and alumni of care across Canada. The NYICN exists to voice the opinions and concerns of youth in and from care and promote the improvement of services for this group.

---

Canadian Child Welfare Research Portal
http://www.cecw-cepb.ca/
The Canadian Child Welfare Research Portal (CWRP) provides access to up-to-date research on Canadian child welfare programs and policies.

---

Ontario:

Why do we enforce the most stringent ‘adult entry’ rules on the most vulnerable?
http://openpolicyontario.com/why-do-we-enforce-the-most-stringent-adult-entry-rules-on-the-most-vulnerable/
May 13, 2012
By John Stapleton
We all know that Canada is an aging society. (...) Our working lives used to end at age 65 but mandatory retirement laws have been scrapped and our federal government is postponing the receipt of Old Age Security to age 67. And no one is surprised by the phenomenon of adult children living at home, less able to pay for expensive post-secondary educations or a new home or to secure a good paying job without an advanced diploma. Clearly, the years of our childhood and youth have been extended and moved forward just like the other phases of our lives. So if we have postponed and elongated every phase of life in Canada and everyone knows it, why do we still have laws that pretend that adulthood starts between ages 16 and 21? Why do the ages of adulthood stay frozen in our laws?
(...) in 1994, when the median age of Canada was 36, six years younger than now, that Ontario provided Extended Care and Maintenance (ECM) to crown wards up to the age of 21. Eighteen long years have passed since then and obligations for support have changed over the years. A parent now has a support obligation to provide for an unmarried child attending post-secondary education. Such education can typically extend up to age 25 for the majority of students. But curiously, in the instance of Crown wards where the province is legally in the place of the parent, the Ontario government does not understand itself to have the same obligations it places on parents on itself. It will not provide ECM beyond age 21 while telling the province’s natural and adoptive parents that they must do more.
One aspect of leadership is ‘leading by example’. Ontario should choose it.

Source:
Open Policy - John Stapleton's website
http://openpolicyontario.com/

Related link:

The Extended Care And Maintenance Contract (ECM)
http://www2.oacas.org/pubs/building_bridges/en/13.html
Source:
Ontario Association of Children's Aid Societies
http://www2.oacas.org/user.php

---

Need doesn’t end at 18
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/opinion/2018/6619697/story.html
Editorial
May 15, 2012
Being a ward of the Crown is a tough start in life. Children who are taken into the government’s care don’t have parents or their parents are incapable of doing the job. They will never have the lifelong support system that a good family provides.
Children’s Aid societies and foster parents do their best to help those children, but on the day the government deems they have become adults, it all comes to an end. The system expects them to be self-reliant at 18. They can get partial support until 21 if they are in school. Once those ages are reached, support is cut off and the Crown wards are on their own. Happy birthday.

Source:
Ottawa Citizen
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

8. New Yukon Social Assistance Regulations - effective May 2012

Yukon Social Assistance Regulations (PDF file - 576K, 45 pages)
http://www.gov.yk.ca/legislation/regs/oic2012_083.pdf
Order-in--Council 2012/83
(Effective May 2012)

Repealed Social Assistance Regulation (PDF - 145K, 42 pages)
http://www.gov.yk.ca/legislation/regs/oic2008_068.pdf
Order-in-Council 2008/68
NOTE: The link to the repealed regulation is for hard-core welfare researchers who will no doubt want to compare the old and the new in detail.
I'm saying this affectionately, because I was a hard-core welfare researcher for close to 30 years, and I *would* have wanted to do a section-by-section crosscheck. I did a quick check of the new regulation, and noted the following changes:
* Sections 24-26 : the old "Appeals" section has been re-named "Review requests" - no formal appeals route for clients after an internal hearing
* Section 56 : benefit levels will be indexed annually in accordance wth the Consumer Price Index.
NOTE : only Quebec and Newfoundland & Labrador have this commendable indexation provision; let's hope it catches on elsewhere in Canada!
* Schedule A : benefit levels (items of basic maintenance) - rates are increased (by modest percentages)

Key welfare links in Yukon
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare.htm#yk_nt
This link takes you to the Yukon section of the Key Welfare Links page of this website

---

- Go to the Key Provincial/Territorial Welfare Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare.htm

- Go to the Yukon Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/yk.htm

9. From The Tyee (Vancouver):
--- What About Just Guaranteeing Everyone a Basic Income? (May 15)

---
[British Columbia] Is the 'Living Wage' Enough?(May 14)

New from The Tyee:

What About Just Guaranteeing Everyone a Basic Income?
Doing so for all Canadians could almost erase poverty, or dry up labour sources, depending on whom you ask.
http://thetyee.ca/News/2012/05/15/Guaranteed-Basic-Income/
May 15, 2012
By Katie Hyslop
When it comes to countering poverty, economists and social policy groups have no shortage of ideas.
Today, the contrarian case that a guaranteed annual income -- what some might call that economic phantom, the "free lunch" -- might just be the most cost-effective way to end poverty.
(See "A Glossary of Anti-Poverty Policies", a sidebar on the above page.)

Is the 'Living Wage' Enough?
http://thetyee.ca/News/2012/05/14/Living-Wage-Enough/
Fair wages bring equality to workers. But what is fair? And what about people who can't work?
First in a Tyee Solutions Society series on tackling poverty.
May 14, 2012
By Katie Hyslop
British Columbia's lowest-paid workers finally got a raise last spring, when Premier Christy Clark announced the first increase to the province's minimum wage in 11 years. The wage increased by $1.50 to $10.25 an hour, in one year bringing it up from the lowest in the country to tie for second highest with Ontario, just behind Nunavut's $11 per hour. But even with an increase, full-time minimum wage workers in B.C. aren't earning enough to meet Statistics Canada's low-income cut-off line (commonly cited as Canada's poverty line) for families.

Source:
TheTyee.ca
http://thetyee.ca/

---

Related links:

From the British Columbia Office of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives:

Living Wage for Metro Vancouver rises to $19.14
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/newsroom/updates/living-wage-metro-vancouver-rises-1914
April 26, 2012
For families with young children, the costs of basic necessities like food, rent and child care quickly add up. Even with full-time work year round, both parents in a family of four must earn at least $19.14 to escape severe financial stress in Metro Vancouver. This is the Metro Vancouver living wage rate for 2012, according to a report we released today with First Call: BC Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition, and the Metro Vancouver Living Wage for Families Campaign. This is the third annual update of the original Metro Vancouver living wage calculation published in 2008.

The report:

Working for a Living Wage 2012
Making Paid Work Meet Basic Family Needs in Metro Vancouver
(PDF - 1.4MB, 8 pages)
http://goo.gl/Pm3Iu

Related materials:

* Living Wage Calculation Guide 2012 (PDF File, 861 KB)
http://goo.gl/3eflo

* Living Wage Calculation Spreadsheet - April 2012 (VND.MS-EXCEL File, 66 KB)
http://goo.gl/SMA4E

* Working for a Living Wage 2008 - Original Full Report 2008 (PDF File, 2915 KB)
http://goo.gl/ILv1A

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives-BC

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/bc/

---

It takes $19.14 an hour - from both parents - to raise a family
http://goo.gl/yl0eJ
By Michael McCarthy Flynn
April 27, 2012
For families with young children, the costs of basic necessities like food, rent and child care quickly add up. Even with full-time work year round, both parents in a family of four must earn at least $19.14 an hour to escape severe financial stress in Metro Vancouver. This is the Metro Vancouver living wage rate for 2012, according to a new report released by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, First Call: B.C. Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition, and the Metro Vancouver Living Wage for Families Campaign.
Source:
Vancouver Sun
http://www.vancouversun.com

---

A Living Wage for Families
http://livingwageforfamilies.ca/
The Living Wage for Families Campaign is guided by an Advisory Committee of representatives from community organizations and other partners and supporters in Metro Vancouver.
- incl. links to : Home - What is a Living Wage? - Get Involved - Learn More - Living Wage Employers - Living Wage Calculator - About Us

---

Living Wage Employers - Investing in the long term prosperity of our community
http://www.lwemployers.ca/
- incl. links to : Living Wage Employers - How to Apply - Calculator - Policy - Myths & Truths - About Us / Contact

---

- Go to the Minimum Wage / Living Wage Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/minwage.htm

10. [Ontario] Hamilton covering $1.8m in provincial cuts to welfare recipients- May 14
(Hamilton Spectator)

Hamilton covering $1.8m in provincial cuts to welfare recipients
http://www.thespec.com/news/local/article/724221
May 14, 2012
By Emma Reilly
The City of Hamilton will pick up the tab for $1.8 million worth of healthcare and support for needy Hamiltonians to fill a gap left by provincial budget cuts.
Councillors on the emergency and community services committee voted unanimously to shoulder the cost of some benefits for Ontario Works recipients. These benefits -- which are called "discretionary benefits" because the city isn't provincially mandated to provide them -- cover things like funerals, glasses, dental care, cribs and baby supplies.
(...)
In this year's provincial budget, the province put a cap on the amount of money it gives to municipalities to fund discretionary benefits. The cap meant the city had to choose between to scaling back the assistance it provides to people on Ontario Works or absorb the extra cost.

Source:
The Hamilton Spectator

http://www.thespec.com/

---

- Go to the 2012 Canadian Government Budgets Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets_2012.htm

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

11. 2012 Queen's (University) Institute on Social Policy : August 20-22, 2012

2012 Queen's (University) Institute on Social Policy ("QIISP 2012")
Where Are We Going? The Changing Social Model in Canada
http://www.queensu.ca/sps/events/conferencesandworkshops/qiisp/201213.html
August 20-22, 2012
Kingston, Ontario
The Canadian social model is changing. In recent decades, shifting economic and social pressures and changing political priorities, have led to the restructuring of important social programs. What is the new trajectory in Canadian social policy? How different is the Canadian social model today from that in the past? Have we established a new balance in the roles of the market, families, the voluntary sector and governments in meeting the social needs of Canadians? How sustainable is the current model in fiscal and political terms? What are the implications for the priorities and challenges in the years to come?

QIISP 2012 examines the trajectory of change in social policy over the last 20 years. It places the Canadian trajectory in international perspective, comparing our experience with that of other OECD countries. The aim is to identify the principles underpinning the emerging social model, and the implications for the future agenda in social policy.

Conference program (PDF - 416K, 3 pages)
http://www.queensu.ca/sps/events/conferencesandworkshops/qiisp/201213/QIISP12Agenda.pdf

Register online for this event
http://goo.gl/Clytg
Fees:
General Conference Participant : $600.00
Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) Participant : $300.00

Hotel information
http://www.queensu.ca/sps/events/conferencesandworkshops/qiisp/201213/accommodations.html

---

- Go to the Canadian Universities and Colleges Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/univbkmrk.htm

12. Coalition of Child Care Advocates of British Columbia urges BC Govt. to reconsider commercial child care- May 3

From the
Coalition of Child Care Advocates of British Columbia (CCCABC):

Letter from the CCCABC to Honourable Mary McNeil,
BC Minister of Children and Family Development
(PDF - 68K, 2 pages)
http://www.cccabc.bc.ca/cccabcdocs/pdf/CCCABC_Moratorium_CCOF_May12.pdf
May 3, 2012
Dear Minister McNeil,
The purpose of this letter is to request that the Ministry of Children and Families immediately implement a moratorium on new approvals of Child Care Operating Funds (CCOF) for commercial child care chains operating in BC. This moratorium is required in order to put "families at the forefront" of decision-making, as committed under your government's "Families First Agenda for Change".
[Click the link above to read the complete letter.]

Backgrounder (PDF - 124K, 3 pages)
http://www.cccabc.bc.ca/cccabcdocs/pdf/CCCABC_Moratorium_CCOF_backgrounder.pdf

Media Release (PDF - 76K, 1 page)
http://www.cccabc.bc.ca/cccabcdocs/pdf/CCCABC_Moratorium_CCOF_MediaRel.pdf

Source:
Coalition of Child Care Advocates of British Columbia
http://www.cccabc.bc.ca/

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

13. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Consumer Price Index, April 2012 - May 18
---
Canadian Economic Observer, May 2012 - May 18
--- Canadian Social Trends, Summer 2012 - May 17
--- Health Reports, May 2012 - May 16

What's new from The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

May 18, 2012
Consumer Price Index, April 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120518/dq120518a-eng.htm
Consumer prices rose 2.0% in the 12 months to April, following a 1.9% increase in March. On a seasonally adjusted monthly basis, the Consumer Price Index increased 0.2% in April.
- includes links to three tables:
* Consumer Price Index and major components, Canada
* Consumer Price Index by province, and for Whitehorse, Yellowknife and Iqaluit
* Consumer Price Index and major components

Source:
The Consumer Price Index
- product main page*
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=62-001-X&lang=eng
This monthly release of the The Consumer Price Index (CPI) for Canada, the provinces, Whitehorse and Yellowknife, provides a descriptive summary of retail price movements, inflation rates and the factors underlying them. The CPI also contains the following tabular information: latest price index movements for the eight major components; price index changes on one and 12-month bases for an extensive number of components and groups; historical monthly information; and price indices reclassified according to categories of goods and services.
---
* On the product main page, click View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

[ earlier editions of this report:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=62-001-X&chropg=1&lang=eng ]

Guide to the Consumer Price Index (1998)
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=62-557-X&lang=eng

Related subjects:

* Prices and price indexes
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=3956&lang=eng&more=0

* Consumer price indexes
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=3956&id=2178&lang=eng&more=0

May 18, 2012
Canadian Economic Observer, May 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-010-x/11-010-x2012005-eng.htm
Sections:
1. Current economic conditions
2. Economic events
3. Recent feature articles
4. National accounts
5. Labour markets
6. Prices
7. International trade
8. Goods-producing industries (manufacturing, construction and resources)
9. Services (trade, transportation, travel and communications)
10. Financial markets
11. Provincial (latest Unemployment rates and Consumer Price Index)
Tables
Charts
Appendices
User information
Related products

Source:
Canadian Economic Observer - Product main page*
This monthly periodical is Statistics Canada's flagship publication for economic statistics. Each issue contains a monthly summary of the economy, major economic events and a feature article. A statistical summary contains a wide range of tables and graphs on the principal economic indicators for Canada, the provinces and the major industrial nations.
[ * Click "View" for the latest issue of this periodical; click "Chronological" index for earlier editions. ]

Related subjects:

* Business performance and ownership
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=2239&lang=eng&more=0

* Current conditions
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=2239&id=712&lang=eng&more=0

* Economic accounts
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=3764&lang=eng&more=0

* Leading indicators
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=3764&id=1880&lang=eng&more=0

May 17, 2012
The Summer edition of Canadian Social Trends has just been released.
It contains the following two articles:

Employer support of volunteering
By Matt Hurst
May 17, 2012
This article examines employer support of volunteering in Canada. It focuses on volunteers who are employed, examining the different types of employer support they receive. It also looks at the number of hours volunteered by supported employees, as well as the type of activities they engage in and work-related skills they acquire through volunteering. Possible effects of employer support are explored, including how it relates to employees’ perceptions that volunteering increases their chances of job success.

HTML version : http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-008-x/2012001/article/11670-eng.htm
PDF version (136K ) : http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-008-x/2012001/article/11670-eng.pdf

---

Giving and volunteering among Canada’s immigrants
By Derrick Thomas
May 17, 2012
This article examines donating and volunteering among immigrants in Canada: their reasons for doing so or not, the amounts of money and time they give and the types of organizations that they support. It compares immigrants to other Canadians and considers how the philanthropic behaviour of immigrants changes as they establish themselves in Canada. The data are from the 2010 Survey of Giving Volunteering and Participating.

HTML version : http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-008-x/2012001/article/11669-eng.htm
PDF version (145K) : http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-008-x/2012001/article/11669-eng.pdf

Source:
Canadian Social Trends
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-008-x/11-008-x2012001-eng.htm

Canadian Social Trends - Product main page*
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=11-008-x&lang=eng
This publication discusses the social, economic, and demographic changes affecting the lives of Canadians
[ * Click "View" for the latest issue of this periodical; click "Chronological index" for earlier editions. ]

Related subjects:

Society and community
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=75&id=75&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Volunteering and donating
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=75&id=80&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

May 16, 2012
Health Reports, May 2012

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120516/dq120516b-eng.htm

The May 2012 online issue of Health Reports, released today, contains two articles:
(Click the link above to access these articles.)

* Abdominal obesity and cardiovascular disease risk factors within body mass index categories
* Measures of abdominal obesity within body mass index categories, 1981 and 2007-2009

Source:
Health Reports - product main page*
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=82-003-x&lang=eng
Health Reports, published by the Health Analysis Division (HAD) of Statistics Canada, is a peer-reviewed journal of population health and health services research. It is designed for a broad audience that includes health professionals, researchers, policymakers, and through media coverage, the general public. The journal publishes articles of wide interest that contain original and timely analyses of national or provincial/territorial surveys or administrative databases.
---
* Click the product main page link, then "View"
to read the latest issue or "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:

* Health
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=2966&lang=eng&more=0

* Diseases and health conditions
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=2966&id=1887&lang=eng&more=0

Related subject:

Health
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2966&id=2966&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

14. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
http://www.childcarecanada.org

May 19, 2012

What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

Letter to request that the Ministry of Children and Families immediately implement a moratorium on new approvals of Child Care Operating Funds (CCOF) for commercial child care chains operating in BC
http://goo.gl/XTM9J
16 May 2012 | British Columbia
Letter from the Coalition of Child Care Advocates of BC highlights recent fee increases in large commercial child care chain in Vancouver. Argues that "commercial child care chains that are prepared to charge such exorbitant parent fees should not receive additional public funding through CCOF."

Early learning: Policy for children's first 3 years
http://goo.gl/bX4Ma
15 May 2012 | Europe
Policy brief from Start Strong Ireland addresses the 'policy vacuum' for services for under-3s, describes that "in comparison with the care and education of over- 3s, the care and education of under-3s in Ireland is of less certain quality, less affordable and more fragmented."

Nutrition in the first 1000 days: State of the world's mothers 2012
http://goo.gl/KY7tQ
15 May 2012 | International
Annual report from Save the Children "shows which countries are doing the best - and which are doing the worst - at providing nutrition during the critical window of development that starts during a mother's pregnancy and goes through her child's second birthday." Canada ranks 19th.

Welcome to our world: Early childhood education and care services for children under three
http://goo.gl/C6R7L
15 May 2012 | Europe
Special issue of Children in Europe "draws on examples and practice from the UK, Portugal, Italy, Hungary, and elsewhere to illuminate ways of supporting the transition from home to formal services, offering opportunities and environments for active and creative learning, building relationships with families, and developing evaluation on a participatory and collective basis."

Expecting better: A state-by-state analysis of laws that help new parents
http://goo.gl/vdkpg
9 May 2012 | United States
Report from the National Partnership for Women & Families (US) "includes a snapshot of laws that help parents and other family caregivers meet the needs of both older and younger members of their families."

MORE research, policy & practice
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice

2. Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad.

Government investment in Canadian children and families "worrisome", expert says 1
http://goo.gl/w8pse
6 May 2012 | Canada

Saskatchewan divvies up 500 child care spaces
http://goo.gl/lH2iS
16 May 2012 | Saskatchewan

Parental leave is good for growth. And that includes fathers
http://goo.gl/TQkMf
15 May 2012 | Europe

Child-care crunch hits Niagara homes
http://goo.gl/zDld9
15 May 2012 | Ontario

Have you got what it takes to get your kid into daycare?
http://goo.gl/LF61O
15 May 2012 | Ontario

MORE child care in the news
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

------

NOTE: For links to earlier (weekly) issues of this weekly alert going back to June 2009,
check out the CRRU Links Archive on this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/crru_links_archive.htm

------

Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
http://www.childcarecanada.org/res/enews/index.html
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere
http://www.childcarecanada.org/links/index.html

CRRU Publications
http://www.childcarecanada.org/pubs/
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

ISSUE files
http://www.childcarecanada.org/resources/issue-files
- theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
http://www.childcarecanada.org
CRRU is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

15. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.. The Dispatch is distributed by the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. News articles from online newspapers are posted here in a number of general categories, and are tagged with more specific keywords relevant to each article.

Tags
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/tags/
Clicking on a word or expression in the list of tags will call up all relevant news items from past Dispatches under that tag. The list contains a tag for each U.S. state so you can view jurisdiction-specific news, and tags for a huge list of topics, including :
* Basic needs * Canada * Caseloads * Cash assistance * Cellular phones * Census * Charities * Child care * Child hunger * Child poverty * Child support * Child welfare * Child well-being * Chronic homelessness * Cohabitation * Cost of living * Crime * Crimes against the homeless * Debt * Deep poverty * Disability * Early childhood education * Earned income tax credit * Electronic benefit transfers * Eligibility * Food insecurity * Food programs * Foster care* Fuel poverty * Health care costs * Health insurance coverage * Homeless children * Homeless families * Homeless veterans * Housing First * Housing subsidies * Immigrant workers * Income * Income inequality * Jobless benefits * Juvenile justice * Legal aid * Low-income housing * Low-wage work * Medicaid * Microfinance * Minimum wage * Newly poor * No Child Left Behind * Ontario * Paid family leave * Payday lending * Persistent poverty * Poverty measurement * Poverty rate * Prisons * Privatization * Public Housing * Rural poverty * Safety net * SCHIP * Section 8 (Housing) * Seniors * Single parents * SNAP/Food Stamps * Supplemental Security Income * Taxes * Teen pregnancy * Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) * Unemployment rate * Uninsured * Urban poverty * Utilities * Welfare reform * Welfare-to-work * Women Infants and Children (WIC) * Work requirements * Youth employment * many more tags...

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

May 18:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/05/18/
Cross-National Social Mobility
Mortgage Settlement Being Used to Help State Budgets

May 17:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/05/17/
State Minimum Wage - Illinois
High School Graduation Rates - Wisconsin
Drug Testing and Assistance Programs - Ohio, Oklahoma

May 16:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/05/16/
General Assistance Program - Pennsylvania
CDC US Health Report 2011

May 15:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/05/15/
Unemployment and Older Workers
American Community Survey
Earned Income Tax Credit - Michigan

May 14:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/05/14/
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
State Cuts to Programs for the Poor - Maine

---------------------------------

Earlier Poverty Dispatches (back to July 2006):
1. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/
2. Click on a date in the calendar (top right-hand corner of the page) to see the links for that date.
Change the month by clicking the link at the bottom of the calendar.
OR
3. Click on a category or a tag (right-hand margin) to access all relevant links.
[ e.g., 588 links under the category "Poverty" - http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/categories/poverty/ ]
OR
4. Scroll down the home page to the Archives section, where you can view the full content of the dispatches by month back to July 2006 (although *some* media links tend to go 404 after awhile)...
NOTE: I highly recommend this excellent U.S. media resource!
The only shortcoming I encountered was the lack of a table of contents for each daily dispatch, which forces visitors to click each date in the calendar to see the contents of the daily dispatch for that day. So I've created my own archive (the link below), starting in mid-December of 2011, that is a table of contents of each dispatch as per the latest dispatches above, that lets you scan contents without opening each damn dispatch:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/povdispatch_archive.htm

---

NOTE : You can subscribe to this email list or RSS feed
by clicking "Subscribe" in the right-hand margin on any page of the Poverty Dispatch website

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)

http://www.irp.wisc.edu

University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://www.wisc.edu/

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

16 [U.S.] The Number of Those Working Past 65 Is at a Record High - May 18
(New York Times)

[U.S.] The Number of Those Working Past 65 Is at a Record High
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/19/business/economy/number-of-those-working-past-65-is-at-a-record-high.html
By Floyd Norris
May 18, 2012
The retirement dream seems further away for a lot of baby boomers, and they appear to be responding to that by holding on to their jobs if they can. But that may have worsened the employment prospects for younger workers. Labor Department figures indicate that the percentage of workers over the traditional retirement age of 65 is at a record high. But, the figures show, job totals fell sharply for men under 55 during the recession and have only started to recover, while the proportion of women ages 25 to 54 with jobs also slid and is close to the lowest level of the last two decades. “The fact of the matter is that this aging-but-not-yet-aged segment of the baby boomer class can’t afford to retire,” said David A. Rosenberg, the chief economist of Gluskin Sheff, a Canadian firm, noting that overall household net worth was 15 percent lower than at the prerecession peak.
(...)
For the first time since the government began keeping track of the numbers in 1981 — and probably the first time ever — one in nine American men over the age of 75 was working in April. About one in 20 women over that age have jobs.

Source:
New York Times

http://www.nytimes.com/

---

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

17. CRINMAIL (Newsletter of the Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):
http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

The latest information on children's rights around the world:
CRINMAIL
http://www.crin.org/email/
CRIN publishes several email lists on children's rights issues in English, French, Spanish and Arabic. We also issue thematic editions on armed conflict, violence against children and strategic litigation. You can subscribe to any of these email lists and unsubscribe at any time.

CRINMAIL - Children's Rights Newsletter (weekly)
Latest issue:

16 May 2012 - CRINMAIL Issue 1276
Children's rights and the other kind of drug use
http://www.crin.org/email/crinmail_detail_popup.asp?crinmailID=4222
In this issue:
Editorial : Children's rights & the other kind of drug use
Latest news and report
- ASEAN - hiding its face in shame?
- Round in bloody circles!
- Reprisals against UN cooperators
- In other news
Children's Rights Wiki: Spotlight on the Caribbean
Upcoming events
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Issues * Law
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

-----------------------------------------------

CRINMAIL Archive (earlier issues):

Option 1: (WITH table of contents)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/CRINMAIL_archive.htm
- includes a table of contents for each issue, as above, back to 2009-2010:

Option 2: (WITHOUT table of contents)
http://goo.gl/C0JNx
- On the CRINMAIL website --- does *not* include the table of contents for each issue (so you must click on each link to see its contents), but it goes back much further (pre-2006). Follow this link to see hundreds of earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

--------------------------------------------------

NOTE:
The CRINMAIL Children's Rights Newsletter is only ONE of several weekly newsletters produced and distributed by CRIN.
See the complete list of newsletters:
http://www.crin.org/email/

Source:
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):

http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

---

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
http://www.cupe.ca/
Thanks, CUPE!

------------------------

If you wish to receive this weekly newsletter by email, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly newsletter.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

 

Daily Quotes
from Operation Maple:

" What is the difference between a cactus and a conservative caucus? On a cactus, the pricks are on the outside."
John Diefenbaker, former Prime Minister

"After all, religion has been around a lot longer than Darwinism."
George Bush

"He’s the greatest argument for birth control that I’ve ever come across"
Mel Lastman referring to Toronto City Councilor Michael Walker

"The only way to reduce the number of nuclear weapons is to use them."
Rush Limbaugh

"They misunderestimated me."
George Bush, Nov 2000

"Canadians better hope the United States does not roll over one night and crush them. They are lucky we allow them to exist on the same continent."
Ann Coulter, Fox News, 2004

Agriculture Minister Minister James Gardiner: “What do you know about farming? You’re not a farmer.”
Tommy Douglas: “I never laid an egg either, but I know more about making an omelet than a hen does.”

"I want to help clean up the state that is so sorry today of journalism. And I have a communications degree."
Sarah Palin

"No, a proof is a proof. What kind of a proof? It's a proof. A proof is a proof, and when you have a good proof, it's because it's proven."
Jean Chretien

"If God had not intended for us to eat animals, how come He made them out of meat?"
Sarah Palin, in "Going Rogue"

"There's an old saying in Tennessee — I know it's in Texas, probably in Tennessee — that says, fool me once, shame on — shame on you. Fool me — you can't get fooled again."
George Bush, Sept. 17, 2002

And, for comic relief (!?!):

"I like travelling to overseas places, like Canada"
Britney Spears

Source:
http://www.operationmaple.com/daily-quotes
[Click the link for more quotes]

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And, in closing...
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My latest little addiction: Eight-ball pool
http://www.miniclip.com/games/8-ball-quick-fire-pool/en/
My best score : 13025
Beat the Canadian Social Research Links Guy!
...if you can.

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Rita Hayworth is Stayin' Alive (video, duration 4:48)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mz3CPzdCDws
If you like Rita Hayworth and/or the Bee Gees, you're in for a treat!

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Kitty Vacuum Service (video, 37 seconds)
http://www.wimp.com/catservice/

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Dog with Perfect Pitch (video, 6:57)
http://www.wimp.com/dogpitch/
Wow.
Notice how the pooch doesn't even appear to look down at the piano keys before touching them...

***

Ethnic Joke Alert!

An Englishman, a Scotsman, an Irishman, a Welshman, a Latvian, a Turk, a German, an Indian, several Americans, an Argentinean, a Dane, an Australian, a Slovak, an Egyptian, a Japanese, a Moroccan, a Frenchman, a New Zealander, a Spaniard, a Russian, a Guatemalan, a Colombian, a Pakistani, a Malaysian, a Croatian, a Uzbek, a Cypriot, a Pole, a Lithuanian, a Chinese, a Sri Lankan, a Lebanese, a Cayman Islander, a Ugandan, a Vietnamese, a Korean, a Uruguayan, a Czech, an Icelander, a Mexican, a Finn, a Honduran, a Panamanian, an Andorran, an Israeli, a Venezuelan, an Iranian, a Fijian, a Peruvian, an Estonian, a Syrian, a Brazilian, a Portuguese, a Liechtensteiner, a Mongolian, a Hungarian, a Canadian, a Moldovan, a Haitian, a Norfolk Islander, a Macedonian, a Bolivian, a Cook Islander, a Tajikistani, a Samoan, an Armenian, an Aruban, an Albanian, a Greenlander, a Micronesian, a Virgin Islander, a Georgian, a Bahaman, a Belarusian, a Cuban, a Tongan, a Cambodian, a Canadian, a Qatari, an Azerbaijani, a Romanian, a Chilean, a Jamaican, a Filipino, a Ukrainian, a Dutchman, a Ecuadorian, a Costa Rican, a Swede, a Bulgarian, a Serb, a Swiss, a Greek, a Belgian, a Singaporean, an Italian, a Norwegian and 2 Africans...

...all walk into a fine restaurant.

"I'm sorry," says the maître d', after scrutinizing the group.

"You can't come in here without a Thai. "