Canadian Social Research Newsletter
November 20, 2011

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail alert for this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,502 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. Harper Government Introduces the Pooled Registered Pension Plans Act - November 17
2. [Ontario] Information Bulletin : Tax Filing, Tax Credits & Tax Refunds (Income Security Advocacy Centre) - November 17
3. Recent releases from the Institute for Research on Public Policy:
--- Many Degrees of Policy Freedom:The Federal Government’s Role in Care for Seniors - November 17
--- Supporting Caregivers and Caregiving in an Aging Canada - November 15
--- Population Aging and the Evolving Care Needs of Older Canadians: An Overview of the Policy Challenges - October 19
4. Your Legal Rights- New resource site from Community Legal Education Ontario - November 15
5. Rest in Peace, Tom Kent and Fraser Mustard - November 16, 17
6. Final Recommendations of the Mowat Centre Employment Insurance Task Force (Mowat Centre for Policy Innovation) - November 16
7. Esurio: Journal of Hunger and Poverty, 2008-2009 (Ontario Association of Food Banks)
8. 3M Health Leadership Award Recipient and Finalists Announced (November 8); 3M Health Leadership Symposium in Toronto on December 5
9.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Consumer Price Index, October 2011 - November 18
--- Leading indicators, October 2011- November 18
--- Employment Insurance, September 2011 - November 17
--- Survey on Living with Chronic Diseases in Canada, 2011 (impact of diabetes and respiratory conditions on quality of life) - November 14
10. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

11. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
12. [U.S.] Reading Between the Poverty Lines (New York Times) - November 2011
13. [U.S.] Spotlight on the States (50-State Resource Map) (Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity) - November 14
14. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

[ Go to Canadian Social Research Links Home Page ]



1. Harper Government Introduces the Pooled Registered Pension Plans Act - November 17

From
Finance Canada:

Harper Government Introduces the Pooled Registered Pension Plans Act
November 17, 2011
Legislation was introduced today in Parliament, implementing the federal portion of the Pooled Registered Pension Plan (PRPP) framework. Since PRPPs are particularly applicable to small business, Minister Menzies delivered his remarks at a small radio station without a company pension plan. (...) PRPPs are the outcome of several years of cooperation, research and consultations by Canada’s finance ministers on the best ways to ensure the long-term strength of Canada’s retirement income system. (...) Provincial enabling legislation will need to be introduced for the framework to become fully operational.

Related Documents:

* Backgrounder: The Retirement Income Landscape in Canada
* Backgrounder: How Pooled Registered Pension Plans Will Address Gaps in Canada’s Retirement Income System
* Helping Canadians Save for their Retirement with Pooled Registered Pension Plans (includes links to seven more online related resources)
In December 2010, Canada’s Finance Ministers agreed on a framework for defined contribution Pooled Registered Pension Plans (PRPPs) to provide Canadians with a new, low-cost, efficiently managed, portable and accessible savings vehicle that will help them meet their retirement objectives.

Source:
Finance Canada

---

Related links:

Ottawa launches pooled pension plan
By Michael Lewis
November 18, 2011
The Harper government has tabled its framework for a pooled pension plan that it says will help fill the gap for the nearly two-thirds of Canadian workers without the security of a company sponsored pension. (...) But Liberal finance critic Scott Brison called the PRPP a half measure that will give maximum benefit to the banks and insurance companies who will earn transaction fees for administering the plan. He also called it a poor substitute for expansion of the defined benefit Canada Pension Plan that provides secure benefits for all Canadians. (...) Canadian Labour Congress President Ken Georgetti called PRPPs privately administered workplace pension plans that resemble group RRSPs. As such, he said they will fail to secure predictable benefits in retirement indexed against inflation, won’t match the CPP’s low cost and will lack the CPP’s survivor and disability benefits and universal portability.

Source:
Moneyville.ca
[ Toronto Star ]

---

Harper Conservatives failing to address retirement income crisis
November 17, 2011
Legislation creating pooled registered pension plans is an ineffective and woefully inadequate way to address Canada’s retirement income security crisis. Canada’s largest union is calling on the federal government to quit stalling with half-measures and to start acting with the provinces on urgently needed reforms to public pensions.
Source:
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE)

---

- Go to the Pension Reforms Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/pensions.htm

2. [Ontario] Information Bulletin : Tax Filing, Tax Credits & Tax Refunds - November 17
(Income Security Advocacy Centre)

Ontario Tax Credits and Tax Refunds
November 17, 2011

The way that certain tax credits are being paid to low income people by the province has changed and will continue to change in the next several months – and this means that these credits are no longer being paid in lump-sum tax refunds.
ISAC has prepared an Information Bulletin about this issue.

Information Bulletin:
Tax Filing, Tax Credits & Tax Refunds
(Microsoft Word file - 74K, 3 pages)
November 17, 2011
(...) Since July 2010, the government has been paying these tax credits* in smaller amounts every three months instead of as a lump-sum at the end of the year.
The goal is to give people with low incomes a more stable and steady source of income throughout the year. You would have received the tax credits in cheques or by direct deposit to your bank account. This money is exempt as income from Ontario Works (OW) and the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP).
---
* Tax credits include the Ontario Sales Tax Credit, the Energy and Property Tax Credit, and the Northern Ontario Energy Credit.
---

Source:
Income Security Advocacy Centre (ISAC)
The Income Security Advocacy Centre works with and on behalf of low income communities in Ontario to address issues of income security and poverty.

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

3. Recent releases from the Institute for Research on Public Policy:
---
Many Degrees of Policy Freedom:The Federal Government’s Role in Care for Seniors - November 17
---
Supporting Caregivers and Caregiving in an Aging Canada - November 15
--- Population Aging and the Evolving Care Needs of Older Canadians: An Overview of the Policy Challenges - October 19

Faces of Aging

The Institute for Research on Public Policy has recently released the following series of three studies on seniors’ care issues under IRPP's Faces of Aging research project. Harvey Lazar's study, released today (Nov. 17), focuses on the strategic role that the federal government must play in the area of care for seniors. The study released earlier this week by Janice Keefe looks at current and future caregiving needs in an aging Canada and presents the policy implications. Neena Chappell’s study, released last month, provides a timely overview of the main health and social policy challenges presented by population aging in three areas: informal care, formal care and prevention.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Many Degrees of Policy Freedom:
The Federal Government’s Role in Care for Seniors
(PDF - 325K, 76 pages)
By Harvey Lazar
November 17, 2011
(...) Lazar points out that the next opportunity to make meaningful policy decisions on aging and care will be during the upcoming renegotiation of the health and social transfers due for renewal in 2014. In his view the onus is on the federal government to provide projections of seniors’ care needs nationally and to articulate what future role it sees for itself, taking full account of how its interventions might influence the success of provincial care programs.

News Release (PDF)
November 17, 2011
Ottawa has at its disposal a full range of sound policy options that would help address the growing and underfunded care needs of seniors without undermining the leadership role of the provinces and territories in this area.

Summary
--- HTML
--- PDF

Interview (Podcast)

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Supporting Caregivers and
Caregiving in an Aging Canada
(PDF - 402K, 40 pages)
By Janice Keefe
November 15, 2011
This IRPP study is an overview of caregiving in Canada today, including the costs incurred by caregivers and the type and extent of public support they receive.
Table of contents:
* Summary * Care in the Community: An Overview * Future Demand for and Supply of Caregivers: Projection to 2031 * Planning for the Short Term: Reinforcing Support for Caregivers * Planning for the Longer Term: Enhancing the Labour Force to Support Care in the Community * Conclusion * Appendix: Eligibility for Federal Tax Benefits * Notes and References * Other Related IRPP Publications * About This Study

News Release (PDF)
Author Janice Keefe presents projections of future care needs and examines potential improvements in policy for income security programs, labour market regulation and human resource management in health and home care.

Summary
--- HTML

--- PDF

Interview (Podcast)

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Population Aging and the Evolving Care Needs
of Older Canadians: An Overview of the Policy Challenges

By Neena Chappell
October 19, 2011
As the first members of Canada’s baby boom generation turn 65, the official age of retirement, this study by gerontologist Neena Chappell provides a timely overview of the main health and social policy challenges presented by population aging in three areas: informal care, formal care, and prevention.

News Release (PDF)
Canadian governments need to plan how they will address the increasing care
needs of an aging population, particularly as they prepare to renew the federal provincial health
accord in 2014

Summary
--- HTML
--- PDF

Interview (Podcast)

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Source:
Faces of Aging<=== incl. links to related reports
[
Institute for Research on Public Policy (IRPP) ]
Founded in 1972, the Institute for Research on Public Policy is an independent, national, bilingual, nonprofit organization. The IRPP seeks to improve public policy in Canada by generating research, providing insight and sparking debate on current and emerging policy issues facing Canadians and their governments.

---

- Go to the Seniors (Social Research) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/seniors.htm

4. New from New from Community Legal Education Ontario : Your Legal Rights - November 15

Ontario
New from CLEO (Community Legal Education Ontario /
Éducation juridique communautaire Ontario:

Your Legal Rights Rights here. Rights now.
November 15, 2011
CLEO announces launch of Your Legal Rights website, a new online source of legal information for people across Ontario. Your Legal Rights is the new face of CLEONet, CLEO's highly successful legal information portal.

Legal topics covered:
* Abuse and Family Violence * Employment and Work * Housing Law * Social Assistance and Pensions * Consumer Law * Environmental Law * Human Rights * Wills and Estates * Criminal Law * Family Law * Immigration and Refugee Law * Education Law * Health and Disability * Legal System * Legal topics A-Z

The Your Legal Rights site contains the following features:

* Resources: Legal information covering a wide range of legal topics, in a variety of formats, and available in dozens of languages
* Common Questions: Questions and answers to everyday legal problems
* Find Services: Interactive map of key legal and social services across Ontario
* Training: Public legal education training webinars for service providers
* News & Events: The latest headlines and community events about the law and access to justice

Your Legal Rights is a project of CLEO (Community Legal Education Ontario / Éducation juridique communautaire Ontario)
and is funded by the Law Foundation of Ontario.

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm

5. Rest in Peace, Tom Kent and Fraser Mustard - November 16, 17

Canada lost two great progressive social thinkers this past week : Tom Kent and Fraser Mustard.
Read on to find out why we owe them both a great debt of gratitude.

Former Liberal mandarin Tom Kent dies
November 16, 2011
Tom Kent, former Liberal Party mandarin and one of the key figures in 1960s Canadian public policy, has died. He was 89.
(...) Kent [became] the intellectual driving force behind the federal Liberal party's shift toward a more active role in social policy in the 1960s, helping to create the features of Canada's modern welfare state. He helped organize the party's famous Kingston Conference in 1960 that attracted 200 leading thinkers. His speech at the policy conference contained many of the radical ideas that later became party policies, such as medicare and federal funding for welfare.
Source:
Canada.com

COMMENT: Supporters of progressive social policy recognize and applaud the contributions of Tom Kent to the kinder, more compassionate Canada that we knew from the mid-1960s until the roof caved in in the mid-1990s with the demise of the Canada Assistance Plan --- but that's a whole other eulogy. Interesting how the relationship between Tom Kent and the Prime Minister of the day, Lester Pearson, led to some major social policy advances, just like the relationship between Tom Flanagan and Stephen Harper. <sarcasm>

Selected writings of Tom Kent for the
Caledon Institute of Social Policy:

Health Care in a Renewed Federalism (67K, 19 pages)
April 2011

Federalism Renewed (PDF - 135K, 45 pages)
March 2007

A Short Path to Revitalized Federalism (PDF file - 118K, 5 pages)
January 2004

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
TIP: Click on the Caledon link above, then click "Publications Search" and enter Tom Kent (NO quotation marks!) for 10 articles by Tom Kent about federalism, health care, taxation and the future of social policy.

Rest in peace, Tom Kent.
You will be fondly remembered.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dr. Fraser Mustard, world renowned for work in early childhood development
November 17, 2011
By Kristin Rushowy
He got the world talking about the importance of early childhood.
Dr. Fraser Mustard’s impassioned campaign calling attention to the crucial first years of life — and how brain development during that time sets the stage for health and wellbeing — inspired economists, educators and politicians around the globe. Closer to home, the Ontario government’s recent move to full-day kindergarten can also be traced to his influence. Mustard died at home Wednesday night after battling cancer. He was 84.
Source:
Toronto Star

J.Fraser Mustard : Biography
NOTE : Scroll to the bottom of Dr. Mustard's biography for
links to almost three dozen reports, articles, speeches, etc.

---

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

6. Final Recommendations of the Mowat Centre Employment Insurance Task Force - November 16
(Mowat Centre for Policy Innovation)

Making it Work : Final Recommendations of the
Mowat Centre Employment Insurance Task Force
(PDF - 859K, 122 pages)

November 16, 2011
In Spring 2010, the Mowat Centre convened the Employment Insurance Task Force.
The Task Force’s mandate was to review the current Employment Insurance (EI) system, consult about its relevance to contemporary realities, and make recommendations about improving Canada’s support system for the unemployed. At the outset, we committed that any recommendations would be evidence-based and principled. We also committed that this process would be transparent, non-partisan, and incorporate a diversity of perspectives.

To this end, we held extensive consultations with employers, workers, and civil society. We commissioned research from Canada’s top experts. We hosted a series of technical consultations to vet our proposals. (...) Based on our research and consultation, we propose a blueprint for a strengthened national program to support the unemployed. (...)
Our 18 recommendations are organized around four themes:
- a nationally standardized system,
- active employment measures (i.e. training),
- special benefits, and
- financing and management.
We recommend transformational changes, as well as smaller changes that address long-standing irritants in the EI system.

Source:
Mowat Centre Employment Insurance Task Force
The Mowat Centre EI Task Force is examining Canada's support system for the unemployed and will propose a blueprint for a strengthened national system.
The EI Task Force is part of:
The Mowat Centre
The Mowat Centre for Policy Innovation is an independent, non-partisan public policy research centre located at the School of Public Policy and Governance at the University of Toronto. The Mowat Centre undertakes collaborative applied policy research and engages in public dialogue on Canada’s most important national issues, and proposes innovative, research-driven public policy recommendations, informed by Ontario’s reality.

---


On a related note...

Happy 25th Anniversary,
Forget Commission of Inquiry on Unemployment Insurance!

Commission of Inquiry on Unemployment Insurance
November 1986

Chair: Claude Forget
[ Version française de ce document ]

Summary Report

Table of Contents [PDF 29 KB]
Pages 1 – 42
[PDF 7.0 MB]
Pages 43 – 85
[PDF 3.5 MB]

Complete Report

Table of Contents [PDF 233 KB]
Part I Chapter 1 – Part II Chapter 5
[PDF 11.9 MB]
Part II Chapter 6 – Part IV Chapter 11
[PDF 10.4 MB]
Part IV Chapter 12, Appendices, Biographies of Commissioners, List of Staff and Consultants
[PDF 5.4 MB]
Part V
[PDF 6.4 MB]

Source:
Index to Federal Royal Commissions
[ Library and Archives Canada - LAC]

Related LAC link, even older:

Unemployment Insurance Act
Date: 1962
Chair: Ernest C. Gill
[ Version française de ce document ]

Table of Contents [PDF 123 KB]
Chapters 1 – 3 [PDF 5.0 MB]
Chapters 4 – 5, Appendices [PDF 5.1 MB]

---

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm

7. Esurio: Journal of Hunger and Poverty (2008-2009)
(Ontario Association of Food Banks)

From the Look-what-I-found file:

I was poking my way through some links when I stumbled upon this journal site called Esurio.
Even though the content of the two only issues of the journal date back to 2008 and 2009, I felt it was worth sharing with subscribers because there's some excellent information in these articles.

Esurio: Journal of Hunger and Poverty
Esurio is a student refereed academic journal published by the Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB) with the proud support of Direct Energy.

Esurio publishes articles on issues of hunger and poverty through a youth lens. The journal features articles written and reviewed by graduate and undergraduate students and is published twice annually.

Vol 1, No 2 (2009)
Table of Contents:
Invited Contributions:
* The Future of Food Charity - By Valerie Tarasuk
* The Crisis of Food Security: Building a Public Food System - By Debbie Field
* What is Poverty? - By Susan Eckerle Curwood, Ph.D.
Student Articles:
* Disrupting the "Traditional Student" Discourse: Poverty, Education, and the State - By Jennifer Ajandi
* Immigrant Settlement and the Use of Food Banks - By Chen Che
* To Feed A City - By Zsuzsi Fodor
* Motivations of Volunteers in a Food Bank Program: A Pilot Investigation - By Vivien E. Runnels
* The Influence of New Public Management on Three Ontario Municipal Governments and its Impact on Poverty Reduction and Social Service Programming - By Zac Spicer
* Canadian Women and Children Hit Hard by the Impacts of Food Insecurity - By Leisha Zamecnik

----------------------

Vol 1, No 1 (2009)
Introductory Issue

Table of Contents:
Welcome from Premier Dalton McGuinty [PDF] and Deb Matthews, Chair of Ontario's Cabinet Committee on Poverty Reduction
Student Articles:
* Struggles, strengths and solutions: Exploring food security with young Aboriginal moms - By Cyndy Ann Baskin et al.
* Energy Poverty as Ideological Poverty in Canada - By Kristen Meredith Forbes Cairney
* Housing as a Human Right: Understanding the Need to Align Toronto's Legal Planning Framework with City Council's Vision to End Homelessness & the Affordable Housing Crisis - By Caroline Cormier
* The Orphaned Child: Homelessness as Social Policy in Ontario - By Greg Mann
* Causes and Consequences of an Unsustainable Food System - By Chryslyn Pais
* Community Responsibility For Social Welfare: A Beneficial or Negative Shift for Communities? - By Meaghan Ross
* Food reclamation as an approach to hunger and waste: A conceptual analysis of the charitable food sector in Toronto, Ontario - By Helen Thang
* Canadian Women and Children Hit Hard by the Impacts of Food Insecurity (Part One) - By Leisha Zamecnik
Invited Contributions:
* Welcome Message & Notes from Richard Florida - By Vass Bednar
* Energy Poverty is Poverty - By Deryk King
* Welcome Message - Judith Maxwell
* Why Food Banks? - By Geoffrey Lougheed
* A Response To: Why Food Banks? - By Robert White and Karyn Cooper
* Welcome Message - Toronto Food Policy Council - By Wayne Roberts
* A Vision for Esurio: Change the World with Words - By Adam Spence

---

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm

8. 3M Health Leadership Award Recipient and Finalists Announced (November 8);
3M Health Leadership Symposium in Toronto on December 5

3M Health Leadership Award
[ Version française :
Prix 3M de leadership en santé
]
The 3M Health Leadership Award recognizes an outstanding community leader who has had an impact on the health of their community by addressing at least one of the social determinants of health (housing, food security, inclusion, education, income). In its inaugural year, this award celebrates those who have enhanced their community through dedicated contribution and inspiring change. The award recognizes an individual from the non-profit sector who works outside of the formal health care field. The deadline for nominations for this year's award was September 15th, 2011. The next call for nominations will be in March 2012.

Award Recipients and Finalists
November 8, 2011
We were amazed by the variety of leadership styles and community initiatives represented in the 56 nominations received in the Award’s inaugural year. There is an inspiring amount of work underway across the country.

We are pleased to announce that the recipient of the 3M Health Leadership award is Joyce Rock, formerly from the Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood House in Vancouver, British Columbia. Ms. Rock was instrumental in the creation of the Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood House in downtown Vancouver. In addition to recognizing Joyce’s exceptional leadership style, we would also like to recognize the award’s two finalists: Gordon Smith from Go for Health Windsor-Essex and Walter Hossli from Momentum in Calgary, Alberta. (Click the above link for more information about all three).

The recipient and two finalists will be honoured at the 3M Health Leadership Symposium in Toronto on December 5th, 2011. In addition to learning more about these outstanding leaders, the afternoon will be a forum for discussion on leadership in health facilitated by Juno nominated pianist and facilitator Michael Jones.
Registration
for that event is now open.

Source:
Health Nexus

---

- Go to the Health Links (Canada/International) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/health.htm

9. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Consumer Price Index, October 2011 - November 18
--- Leading indicators, October 2011- November 18
--- Employment Insurance, September 2011 - November 17
--- Survey on Living with Chronic Diseases in Canada, 2011 impact of diabetes and respiratory conditions on quality of life - November 14

What's new from
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]:

---

November 18, 2011
Consumer Price Index, October 2011
Consumer prices rose 2.9% in the 12 months to October, led by higher prices for gasoline and food. This follows a 3.2% increase in September. On a seasonally adjusted monthly basis, consumer prices rose 0.3% in October.
- includes links to three tables:
* Consumer Price Index and major components, Canada
* Consumer Price Index by province, and for Whitehorse, Yellowknife and Iqaluit
* Consumer Price Index and major components

Source:
The Consumer Price Index - product main page*
This monthly release of the The Consumer Price Index (CPI) for Canada, the provinces, Whitehorse and Yellowknife, provides a descriptive summary of retail price movements, inflation rates and the factors underlying them. The CPI also contains the following tabular information: latest price index movements for the eight major components; price index changes on one and 12-month bases for an extensive number of components and groups; historical monthly information; and price indices reclassified according to categories of goods and services.
* On the product main page, click View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

[ earlier editions of this report ]

Guide to the Consumer Price Index (1998)

Related subjects:
* Prices and price indexes
* Consumer price indexes

---

November 18, 2011
Leading indicators, October 2011
The composite leading index rose 0.2% in October, after a gain of 0.1% in September. In October, 5 of the 10 components increased, the same as the month before, while 4 declined, 1 fewer than in September. Household spending remained the strongest sector of the economy, while manufacturing remained the weakest.
* This release will be reprinted in the December 2011 issue of The Canadian Economic Observer (Click "View" for the latest issue)

Table 1 : Leading Indicators, May 2011-October 2011

Related subjects:

* Business performance and ownership
* Current conditions
* Economic accounts
* Leading indicators

---

November 17, 2011
Employment Insurance, September 2011
Following an increase in August, the number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits fell by 15,400 (-2.7%) to 549,300 in September. The number of beneficiaries has been on a year-long downward trend.
- includes three tables:
* Employment Insurance: Statistics by province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by age group, sex, province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by census metropolitan areas

Related link:

Employment Insurance Statistics Maps, September 2011
- change in number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits in the last 12 months, by Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations.
- incl. Intro to maps + link to September 2011 maps [in the left margin]

Source:
Employment Insurance Statistics Maps - Product main page*
Set of maps presenting Employment Insurance Statistics. The maps show the percentage change in the number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits in the last 12 months, by Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) and Census Agglomerations (CAs), using 2001 Census geography. Data are also shown in a tabular format.
---
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue
of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:
* Labour
* Employment insurance, social assistance and other transfers
* Non-wage benefits

[ earlier editions of this report ]

---

November 14, 2011
Survey on Living with Chronic Diseases in Canada, 2011
- looks at the impact of diabetes and respiratory conditions (asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) on quality of life.
Data from the 2011 Survey on Living with Chronic Diseases in Canada are now available. The objective of the survey (sponsored by the Public Health Agency of Canada) was to assess the impact of diabetes and respiratory conditions (asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) on quality of life and to provide more information on how Canadians manage their chronic condition. Data were collected in the fall of 2010 and the spring of 2011. Approximately 6,500 individuals in the 10 provinces were interviewed.

Definitions, data sources and methods (survey number 5160)

Related subjects:
* Health
* Diseases and health conditions

---

The Daily Archives
- select a month and year from the drop-down menus and click on a date for that day's Daily

-----------------------------

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

10. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
:

November 20, 2011

What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

What research says about quality in for-profit, non-profit and public child care
16 Nov 2011
New Briefing Note from CRRU reviews the literature on quality in for-profit, non-profit and public child care.

Roots of big box child care
16 Nov 2011
This week's Know Thy History looks back at a U.S. child care company's move into Canada in 1982.

When families eligible for child care subsidies don't have one: A case study
15 Nov 2011
A new case study from the Centre for Children's Initiatives offers real life examples from families in New York City that highlight the frustrations parents and caregivers face after being eligible for a child care subsidy but not receiving one.

Institutional stickiness and ideational resistance to paradigm change: Canada and early childhood education and care (ECEC) policy
15 Nov 2011
Presentation by Linda White for the Canadian Political Science Association examines the emergence of a new paradigm for ECEC policy in liberal welfare states; examines Canada and 'highlights the institutional and ideational barriers encountered by political actors supportive of new ECEC ideas'.

Toronto First Duty Phase 3: The Bruce WoodGreen case study
15 Nov 2011
Report on phase 3 of Toronto First Duty research project highlights 'that teamwork within an integrated early learning environment requires both program and pedagogical leadership'.

MORE research, policy & practice

2. Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad.

Education minister defends province’s child-care spending after Mammoliti complaint
17 Nov 2011 Ontario

Why Obama's plan to fix Head Start is not enough
16 Nov 2011 United States

City child care task force asks province for $74.4 million
15 Nov 2011 Ontario

Just who’s looking after your kids?
15 Nov 2011 Canada

Child-care subsidies in demand
14 Nov 2011 Ontario

MORE child care in the news

------

Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

11. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.. The Dispatch is distributed by the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. News articles from online newspapers are posted here in a number of general categories, and are tagged with more specific keywords relevant to each article.

Tags
Clicking on a word or expression in the list of tags will call up all relevant news items from past Dispatches under that tag. The list contains a tag for each U.S. state so you can view jurisdiction-specific news, and tags for a huge list of topics, including :
* Basic needs * Canada * Caseloads * Cash assistance * Cellular phones * Census * Charities * Child care * Child hunger * Child poverty * Child support * Child welfare * Child well-being * Chronic homelessness * Cohabitation * Cost of living * Crime * Crimes against the homeless * Debt * Deep poverty * Disability * Early childhood education * Earned income tax credit * Electronic benefit transfers * Eligibility * Food insecurity * Food programs * Foster care* Fuel poverty * Health care costs * Health insurance coverage * Homeless children * Homeless families * Homeless veterans * Housing First * Housing subsidies * Immigrant workers * Income * Income inequality * Jobless benefits * Juvenile justice * Legal aid * Low-income housing * Low-wage work * Medicaid * Microfinance * Minimum wage * Newly poor * No Child Left Behind * Ontario * Paid family leave * Payday lending * Persistent poverty * Poverty measurement * Poverty rate * Prisons * Privatization * Public Housing * Rural poverty * Safety net * SCHIP * Section 8 (Housing) * Seniors * Single parents * SNAP/Food Stamps * Supplemental Security Income * Taxes * Teen pregnancy * Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) * Unemployment rate * Uninsured * Urban poverty * Utilities * Welfare reform * Welfare-to-work * Women Infants and Children (WIC) * Work requirements * Youth employment * many more tags...

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

November 18:
State Unemployment Insurance Debt
Medicaid Program - Utah
Welfare Overpayment Collections - Ohio
Poverty Rate - Israel

November 17:
Supplemental Poverty Measure
Census Data on Mobility
Immigrants and the Foster Care System

November 16:
Neighborhoods and Income Segregation
States and Medicaid Cuts

November 15:
Health Insurance Coverage - Colorado
Unemployment Benefits - Delaware, Iowa

November 14:
Supplemental Poverty Measure

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NOTE : You can subscribe to this email list or RSS feed
by clicking "Subscribe" in the right-hand margin on any page of the Poverty Dispatch website

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Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

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- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

12. [U.S.] Reading Between the Poverty Lines - November 2011
(New York Times)

[U.S.]

Reading Between the Poverty Lines
By Teresa Tritch
November 19, 2011
A new and improved gauge of poverty, released this month by the Census Bureau, shows that 49.1 million Americans are poor, and that the ranks of those just above poverty are larger than previously believed. The middle class is under pressure, too, battered by stagnating incomes and unavoidable expenses like medical bills. The older, official poverty line is still used to determine eligibility for government benefits, but the new formula offers a broader view of life both in and out of poverty.
Source:
New York Times

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- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

13. [U.S.] Spotlight on the States (50-State Resource Map) - November 2011
(Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity)

[U.S.]

From
Spotlight on
Poverty and Opportunity:

Spotlight on the States
50-State Resource Map Compiles Data,
Research, News and Policy Information

State and local governments, community-based organizations and other non-profits play a significant role in implementing policies and programs to reduce poverty and promote opportunity. Click the link above, then hover your mouse over a state to get a snapshot of poverty statistics in the state, then click or use the drop-down menu to access information and resources, news articles, and links to learn more about state efforts to reduce poverty.
-
includes:
State poverty data and statistics: A compilation of data, including poverty, unemployment and asset poverty rates, and information on housing. Each data point links to
its source.
State policies: A listing of key state tax, asset-building and work support policies that help support low-income families; includes links to state or national organizations that track the issue.
Research: A compilation of relevant state research reports on issues related to poverty and opportunity.
News: A news feed of articles about poverty in a given state.

At a time when federal, state and local governments are seeking to reduce deficits by cutting programs for the needy, this resource provides vital up-to-date information for advocates, researchers, policymakers and foundations working to reduce poverty and promote opportunity.

Source:
Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity:
The Source for News, Ideas and Action

Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity: The Source for News, Ideas and Action is a non-partisan initiative that brings together diverse perspectives from the political, policy, advocacy and foundation communities to find genuine solutions to the economic hardship confronting millions of Americans. Through the ongoing exchange of ideas, research and data, Spotlight seeks to inform the policy debate about reducing poverty and increasing opportunity in the United States.

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- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Social Statistics Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm

14. CRINMAIL (Newsletter of the Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
:

CRINMAIL - children's rights newsletter
Latest issue:

16 November 2011 - CRINMAIL Issue 1251
CRC Communications procedure: Breaking news!
Latest news and reports
- Restricting NGOs: Israel
- Child abuse: United States, Indonesia
- Ensuring accountability: Malta
- Unlawful detention: Australia
- State violence: Syria
- In other news: Nicaragua, India, Wales
- Calls for submissions
Upcoming events
Employment
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Issues * Law
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

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See http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm
for the table of contents for, and links to, a large collection of issues of CRINMAIL.
NOTE : The CRIN "Links to Issues of CRINMAIL" (next link below) doesn't include the table of contents for each issue.

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL (from CRIN)
- links to earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL (incl. subscription info)

[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

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- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter alert using software on the web server of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE)
.
Thanks, CUPE!

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If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail alert for this newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

In September 2011, I discontinued the plain-text e-mail version (i.e., no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) of this newsletter that I'd created to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. In reality, the text-only format caused as many problems as it solved.

LONG STORY SHORT:
Every week, I send out a brief email alert to all subscribers to say that I've posted the latest newsletter to my site; in that alert, you'll find both the table of contents for, and the link to, that week's newsletter.


Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly newsletter alert.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

 

Ten Popular Myths Debunked

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10. Irregardless is not a word.

Oh, but it is. You might not like it, and your English teacher might not like it, but just don’t make any bets that it’s not in the dictionary. Of course, it’s considered non-standard and most people would probably prefer “regardless” or “irrespective”, but that is a matter of preference.

9. Poinsettias are lethal.

Poor Poinsettias, everyone steers clear of them. The myth was started sometime in the 20th century shortly after they were brought over from Mexico. The child of a military officer allegedly died upon consuming a poinsettia leaf. As a result of this rumor the toxic properties of this plant have been highly exaggerated. Of course, you may want to keep it away from your pets because consumption can result in an upset stomach, but trust us, they’ll live.

8. Humans have five senses.

This is common knowledge right? Well, in the realm of academia a dispute rages and it has yet to be settled. There is no doubt that we have five primary senses. This has been known since the time of Aristotle. But go ahead and ask a Harvard Medical School researcher and you’ll get a wide variety of answers. Depending on their stance they may include any of the following: equilibrioception, nociception, proprioception, thermoception, interoception, the list goes on…

7. Hydrogen Peroxide helps wounds heal.

Well this can be a painful myth, quite literally. Heck, even your pediatrician might recommend it if they’re not up to date on their research. The truth, however, is that it doesn’t help your wound at all. That bubbling you see? Its probably the hydrogen peroxide attacking you. Not only that, it causes cellular damage and extends the healing process. But hey, placebos work, right?

6. Bats are blind.

Au contraire, they do pretty well for themselves. While they can’t see in color, at night they certainly see better than we do. Of course, many species also use echolocation, so long story short, they know where they’re going.

5. Seasons are caused by the distance of Earth from the Sun.

Seasons are actually caused by the 23.45 degree tilt of the earth’s axis. This means that different parts of the earth are oriented towards the sun at different times of the year. Its all about direct sunlight.

4. You should drink eight glasses of water every day.

While this is probably good advice for some people, especially if you live in a really dry area, it should not be followed as a rule. Moreover, nobody is really even sure where this advice originated. Just remember, if you’re thirsty, drink.

3. Sushi is raw fish.

Although this may be true it is not necessarily true. Raw fish is probably the most popular variety but there are several other types. To be even more accurate sushi is actually the “rice-vinegar” whereas sashimi is the raw fish. Usually sashimi is used as a topping but so is nori (dried seaweed) and various other vegetables.

2. Dropping a penny from the Empire State Building would kill someone

Pennies only weigh about a gram and they tumble as they fall so the air resistance on is significant. If it reaches its terminal velocity it would be falling at about 100 miles/hour. So when it finally hit you on the head with about 1 foot-pound of energy it would hurt a little but you would quickly forget about it.

1. A toilet’s flush will change direction depending upon which hemisphere it is in.

This is one of the most ridiculous yet staunchly defended myths to date. Proponents will attribute this to the Coriolis Effect which is derived from the rotation of the Earth. While this effect does influence air masses or other large environmental structures it has absolutely no effect on the direction your toilet drains.

Source:
25 Popular Myths Debunked
http://list25.com/25-popular-myths-debunked/
(Click the link for all 25 myths)

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And, in closing...

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Canadian Black Book (for new and used cars - not women.)
http://www.canadianblackbook.com/

Find the resale or trade-in value of the car you wish to purchase or get a sense of how much you should be asking for that old clunker of yours.

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FREE full-length movies on YouTube!
http://www.youtube.com/movies
For example:
* The End of Poverty? (2008) (Duration 1:44:34)
* Marlon Brando in One-Eyed Jacks (Nominated for an Oscar in 1961)
* Gulliver's Travels (classic animation, 1939)
* The Cabinet of Dr Caligari (1921)
* White Zombie (1932)
* The Phantom of the Opera (1925)

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Mahjong 24-7
www.123bee.com/play/mahjong_247_game/233.html

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S'matter - never saw a guy exercizing his dog before?
http://www.pinkbike.com/video/227689/