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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
December 20, 2009

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,166 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian content

1.  Government of Canada Support to Provinces and Territories at an All-Time High (Department of Finance Canada) - December 18
2. Release of The Fiscal Monitor for October 2009 (Department of Finance Canada) - December 18
3. [Ontario] Time to transform social assistance ... to give Ontario's poor a better life (The Hamilton Spectator) - December 18
4. [Ontario] Governments must work to lift people out of poverty (The Record - Kitchener) - December 15
5. New Estimates of Index of Economic Well-being for Canada and OECD Countries (Centre for the Study of Living Standards) - December 3
6. The Cost of Eating in BC, 2009 (Dietitians of Canada and the Community Nutritionists Council of BC) - December 15
7. How are Canadians Really Doing? A Closer Look at Select Groups (Institute of Wellbeing) - December 16
8. [Ontario] York Region Equity Campaign Report (Council of Agencies Serving South Asians) - December 2009
9. Hugh Segal: A real fix for poverty (National Post) - December 15
10. No time like now to raise British Columbia’s minimum wage (Smithers Interior News) - December 16, 2009
11. British Columbia government website home page relaunched; same old Campbell spin, says pundit David Schreck - December 15
12. Recession Watch Bulletin # 3 - Fall 2009 (Canadian Labour Congress) - December 15
13. Cancer claims Toronto City Summit Alliance Chair David Pecaut at age 54 - December 14
14. [Newfoundland and Labrador] First Progress Report Shows Significant Results in Province’s Fight Against Poverty - December 14
15. Auditing the Ontario Auditor General (by Reuel Amdur) - December 14
16. Basic Income Earth Network Canada (BIEN Canada)
17.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Survey of Household Spending, 2008 - December 18
--- Consumer Price Index, November 2009 - December 17
--- Health Reports, December 2009 - December 16
--- Labour productivity, hourly compensation and unit labour cost, Third quarter 2009 - December 15

18. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - December 20

International content

19. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs (Institute for Research on Poverty - U. of Wisconsin-Madison)
20. [U.S.] Deal on health bill is reached (Washington Post) - December 20
21. The American Juvenile Justice System - coming to a youth detention centre near you? - December 14
22. [U.S.] State-Level Data Show Recovery Act Protecting Millions from Poverty (Center on Budget and Policy Priorities) - December 17
23. [New York City] Welfare Rolls Grow in City, but Increase Is Modest (New York Times) - December 16
24. Minimum-Income Benefits in OECD Countries: Policy Design, Effectiveness and Challenges (Institute for the Study of Labor) - December 2009
25. Principles and Practicalities for Measuring Child Poverty in the Rich Countries (Institute for the Study of Labor) - April 2005
26. [International, Guaranteed Annual Income] - NewsFlash 59, December 2009 (Basic Income Earth Network) - December 15
27. Australian Policy Online - recent content
28. CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter) - December 2009

Have a great week!
Gilles

************************
Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net


E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com

1. Government of Canada Support to Provinces and Territories at an All-Time High - December 18
(Department of Finance Canada)

Government of Canada Support to Provinces and Territories at an All-Time High
December 18, 2009
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, announced today that total transfers to provinces and territories will increase by $2.4 billion in 2010-11, bringing total federal support to $54.4 billion, the highest level ever. “Our Government is pleased to be providing unprecedented and growing federal transfer support that will help to provide the services, programs and assistance that Canadians rely upon, particularly in these difficult economic times,” said Minister Flaherty. “Transfers in support of health care and social services are a top priority for our Government as we transition our economy through the current challenging economic times.” Equalization payments to provinces for 2010-11 will total $14.4 billion, an increase of $187 million. The overall program is growing in line with the economy, with provincial amounts reflecting changes in the ability of provinces to raise revenues.
- includes a table showing Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories for 2009-2010 and 2010-11.
Source:
Department of Finance Canada

Related link from Finance Canada:

Federal Transfers to Provinces and Territories
There are four main transfer programs: the Canada Health Transfer (CHT), the Canada Social Transfer (CST), Equalization and Territorial Formula Financing (TFF).

- Go to the Canada Assistance Plan / Canada Health and Social Transfer / Canada Social Transfer Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/cap.htm
- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

2. Release of The Fiscal Monitor for October 2009 - December 18
(Department of Finance Canada)

Release of The Fiscal Monitor for October 2009
December 18, 2009
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, today released The Fiscal Monitor for October 2009.

Highlights:
October 2009: budgetary deficit of $3.3 billion
April to October 2009: budgetary deficit of $31.9 billion

Related document:

* The Fiscal Monitor for October 2009
[ earlier issues of The Fiscal Monitor ]

Source:
Department of Finance Canada

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

3. [Ontario] Time to transform social assistance ... to give Ontario's poor a better life - December 18
(The Hamilton Spectator)

Time to transform social assistance
As this recession wanes, let's ensure we give Ontario's poor a better life
December 18, 2009
By Jennefer Laidley and Deirdre Pike
Whether he meant to or not, the auditor general's analysis of social assistance lets a dysfunctional welfare system off the hook and erroneously lays blame with the people who have nowhere else to turn for basic support. It's not the people who are the problem. The real problem is the patchwork of more than 800 rules that trap people in poverty, limit their options, and compromise their health with punishingly low levels of income support. While some have seized on the report to renew a round of poor-bashing reminiscent of the mid-1990s, what Ontario really needs is swift movement on its promised social assistance review.
Source:
The Hamilton Spectator
[Jennefer Laidley, of the Income Security Advocacy Centre,
and Deirdre Pike, of the Social Planning and Research Council
of Hamilton, are members of the 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction.]

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

4. [Ontario] Governments must work to lift people out of poverty - December 15
(The Record - Kitchener)

Governments must work to lift people out of poverty
December 15, 2009
By John Stapleton and Greg deGroot-Maggetti
Following the sharpest and deepest recession since the 1930s, Ontario now faces a major debate over how governments should respond.
Source:
The Record (Kitchener)

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

5. New Estimates of Index of Economic Well-being for Canada and OECD Countries - December 3
(Centre for the Study of Living Standards)

New Estimates of Index of Economic Well-being for Canada and OECD Countries
December 3, 2009
On December 3, the Centre for the Study of Living Standards (CSLS) released updated estimates of the Index of Economic Well-being and its four domains (consumption flows, stocks of wealth, economic equality and economic security) for Canada and the provinces and for selected OECD countries. Both in Canada and across the OECD, economic well-being has increased over the past quarter century as a result of growing per-capita consumption and wealth. However, rising economic inequality and insecurity have dampened the growth of overall economic well-being. The Index of Economic Well-being is consistent with most of the recommendations of the recently released Commission for the Measurement of Economic Performance and Social Progress (the Stiglitz report) on what aspects of economic reality an index of economic well-being should capture.

The CSLS also released a third report addressing the measurement of economic security in the Index of Economic Well-being. All three reports are now available in the CSLS Research Reports section of the website.

Measuring Economic Security in Insecure Times: New Perspectives, New Events, and the Index of Economic Well-being (PDF - 870K)
December 2009

New Estimates of the Index of Economic Well-being for Selected OECD Countries, 1980-2007 (PDF - 3.5MB)
(December 2009
Appendix Tables (PDF - 1.5MB)
Press release - December 3, 2009

New Estimates of the Index of Economic Well-being for Canada and the Provinces, 1981-2008 (PDF - 3.2MB)
December 2009
Appendix Tables (PDF - 1.5MB)
Press release
- December

Related link:

More information
about the Index of Economic Well-being
(from CSLS)

Source:
CSLS Research Reports <=== links to dozens of reports back to 1997
[ Centre for the Study of Living Standards ]
The Centre for the Study of Living Standards (CSLS) was established in August 1995 to undertake research in the area of living standards. The two main objectives of CSLS are to contribute to a better understanding of trends in living standards and factors determining trends through research and to contribute to public debate on living standards by developing and advocating specific policies through expert consensus.

- Go to the Poverty Measures - Canadian Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty.htm

6. The Cost of Eating in BC, 2009 - December 15
(Dietitians of Canada and the Community Nutritionists Council of BC)

Low-income families in BC can’t afford healthy food
December 15, 2009
Vancouver, British Columbia – Imagine being $127 ‘in debt’ after your monthly rent is paid and you’ve bought groceries for you and your family, leaving no money for other necessities such as clothing, transportation and school supplies. According to the latest The Cost of Eating in BC report, this is the situation for a family of four living on income assistance in this province.

The Cost of Eating in BC 2009 by the Dietitians of Canada and the Community Nutritionists Council of BC demonstrates that it is impossible for families or individuals on income assistance or earning a low wage to afford enough healthy food. While shelter and food costs have risen significantly over the past decade, income assistance rates have remained virtually unchanged and minimum wage, once the highest in the country, has remained at $8.00/hour.

Complete report:

The Cost of Eating in BC 2009 (PDF - 4.6MB, 12 pages)
December 2009
Why do dietitians publish The Cost of Eating in BC report?
The purpose of the report is to bring attention to the fact that not all residents of British Columbia have enough money to purchase healthy food.
The facts in BC:
• The 2009 monthly cost of the nutritious food basket for a family of four is $872
• A family of four on income assistance would need more than 100% of their income for shelter and food only

Source:
Dietitians of Canada (includes links to a one-page media backgrounder and to earlier reports in this series (2001-2007)
[The Community Nutritionists Council of BC doesn't appear to have a website]

Related link:

‘It makes a huge difference’
By Kelly McManus
December 17, 2009
(...) With a monthly disposable income of $1,773, a family of four living on income assistance spends 49 per cent of its monthly income on food and 58 per cent of that cash on shelter. That leaves them $127 in the red, the [Cost of Eating] report says. The report also found that for those on low incomes, high costs for housing leave little money left over for food each month. In more remote communities, food can be more expensive and healthy choices can be limited.
Source:
North Shore Outlook - "Bringing BC’s Communities together"

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm
- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm

7. How are Canadians Really Doing? A Closer Look at Select Groups - December 16
(Institute of Wellbeing)

How are Canadians Really doing?
A Closer Look at Select Groups

December 16, 2009
News Release / Report Highlights
On June 10, 2009, the Institute of Wellbeing released its First Report: How are Canadians Really doing? (PDF - 4.4MB, 41 pages) The Report summarized the trends, highlights and interconnections among three related areas of wellbeing – Living Standards, Healthy Populations and Community Vitality. The Report identified a number of groups whose wellbeing was significantly worse than that of most Canadians. As a follow-up, the Institute has taken a closer look at the wellbeing of four of these groups - Canadians with low incomes, Aboriginal peoples, racialized groups and youth. The paper whose link appears below provides further evidence that low-income, Aboriginal, racialized and youth population groups are being left behind and are not sharing in the wealth, health and strong community that Canada has worked to develop.

Complete report:

How are Canadians Really doing? A Closer Look at Select Groups (PDF - 329K, 46 pages)
December 2009
People with low incomes, Aboriginal peoples, racialized groups and youth are falling behind on key quality of life indicators, says a report released today by the Institute of Wellbeing, How are Canadians Really doing? A Closer Look at Select Groups. Women in poor neighbourhoods have 25% higher odds of having a premature birth; Aboriginal people are almost four times more likely to live in a crowded dwelling; visible minority or racialized groups are three times more likely to be poor due to low wages, social exclusion and racialization in the labour market; and earnings of young adults relative to other earners have been falling over the past 20 years.

Source:
Institute of Wellbeing
The Institute of Wellbeing was launched on June 10, 2009, by the Honourable Roy J. Romanow. Its mission is to promote a new understanding of wellbeing and a dialogue that reshapes the way we talk about wellbeing. It encourages policy makers to make evidence-based choices that respond to the values and needs of Canadians in a way that improves their quality of life. The Institute is independent and nonpartisan.

- Go to the Poverty Measures - Canadian Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty.htm

8. [Ontario] York Region Equity Campaign Report - December 2009
(Council of Agencies Serving South Asians)

Putting Equity on the Agenda : Are We Being Heard? (PDF - 1.1MB, 30 pages)
York Region Equity Campaign Report
December 2009
The Council of Agencies Serving South Asians (CASSA) initiated Putting Equity on the Agenda – Are We Being Heard? in York Region in 2009; it emerged out of the Welcoming Communities Initiative (WCI). The local partners for this campaign were Social Services Network and the Social Planning Council of York Region. Working within a framework of access, equity and inclusion, the campaign invited community members to share their views on education systems, police and justice, service provision, municipal and regional service delivery, representation and more as they relate to newcomers and immigrants. Using a participatory community engagement model that views residents as partners in decision-making processes, the campaign used a number of methods to interact with community members through the spring of 2009.
Source:
Council of Agencies Serving South Asians (CASSA)
CASSA is a social justice umbrella organization working with Ontario’s diverse South Asian communities.

Related link:

Welcoming Communities Initiative (WCI)
WCI is a 3-year project funded by Citizenship & Immigration Canada that aims to bring multi-stakeholders from government, education, employment, settlement services, community groups and residents together to address the needs of access, equity and inclusion. The long-term goal of this project is to engage immigrants as partners in the community building process through a more equitable, accessible and inclusive approach.

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm

9. Hugh Segal: A real fix for poverty - December 15
(National Post)

Hugh Segal: A real fix for poverty
Canada’s welfare system is stuck in the Victorian era, wasting billions. It’s time to drop the old, failed approach
December 15, 2009
By Senator Hugh Segal
Any company, domestic or international, that invested $150-billion annually in a specific project and saw no change in the quality of results would initiate a serious review or serious staff changes at the top. And if it did not, investors, both individual and institutional and shareholders generally would justifiably complain. That is where the federal and provincial governments now find themselves on the challenge of poverty. StatsCan reports that Ottawa and the provinces have, since 2007, spent $150-billion annually on transfers in a range of income security programs unrelated to education and health care. This is serious taxpayer coin — funds that might better be used in tax cuts, defence, research and development and other productive investments for economic or national security in the future. (...) Governments have a rare opportunity to break out of the old path dependency on Victorian-age welfare programs and embrace a simpler, tax-based radical re-cast of how we address poverty.

Source:
National Post

- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

10. No time like now to raise British Columbia’s minimum wage - December 16, 2009
(Smithers Interior News)

No time like now to raise B.C.’s minimum wage
December 16, 2009
In times of such financial uncertainty very few people are asking for raises. Among those people are Canada’s lowest paid workers – those making under $10 an hour. Since November 2001, the Campbell government has frozen the $8 minimum and the “loophole” training wage of $6 was introduced in 2002. British Columbia holds the record for the lowest minimum wage, lowest training wage and the longest time since the minimum wage has been updated.
Source:
Smithers Interior News

Related link from the
Labour Program, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada:

Current And Forthcoming Minimum Hourly Wage Rates For Adult Workers in Canada
(this is the best resource for info on current and upcoming minimum wage levels)

- Go to the Minimum Wage /Living Wage Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/minwage.htm
- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

11. British Columbia government website home page relaunched; same old Campbell spin, says pundit David Schreck - December 15

Lies, damn lies and government websites:
David Schreck is an independent watchdog of the British Columbia government.
In the article below, he "reviews" the new BC Government Home Page by systematically debunking several of the self-congratulatory factoids (found in the section entitled For the Record: Facts on Current B.C. Issues) from the govt. site.

BC Government's Revised Website
December 15, 2009
"(...) British Columbians have learned the hard way after the last election that the B.C. Liberals suffer an enormous credibility gap. Whether it is their claims about the HST, promises about the deficit, commitments to protect health and education or simply statistical facts about child poverty and employment, you have to check the facts for yourself because you can't believe what the government tells you, updated website or not."
- includes half a dozen links to authoritative sources of data that contradict or correct statements found in the For the Record page, notably with respect to the government's claims about poverty reduction and job creation.

Source:
StrategicThoughts.com
This is the personal website of David Schreck - political pundit, former MLA and former Special Advisor to the (NDP) Premier, among other accomplishments.

Related link:

Government of British Columbia Home Page

- Go to the BC Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

12. Recession Watch Bulletin # 3 (Fall 2009) - December 15
(Canadian Labour Congress)

One Year In and Still Waiting for a Recovery (PDF - 226K, 20 pages)
Recession Watch Bulletin (Issue 3 - Fall 2009)
Canada’s “Great Recession” began in October 2008, the month in which the global economy fell off a cliff and the national unemployment rate began to rise rapidly from 6.3%. Even before the recession, of course, there had been major layoffs in manufacturing because of a high Canadian dollar and an already slowing U.S. economy. The year from October 2008 to October 2009 saw a major deterioration in Canada’s job market. And the worst is not yet over. Most commentators expect that the job market will continue to worsen for a while, even if economic growth begins to recover. As of October 2009, the pace of job loss was slowing, but unemployment was still rising. Many commentators expect the national rate to go over 10% this winter.

Related links:

Recession Watch Bulletin #2
Posted: Wednesday, 1 July 2009

Recession Watch Bulletin #1
Posted: Sunday, 1 March 2009

Source:
Canadian Labour Congress

The Canadian Labour Congress represents the interests of more than three million affiliated workers in every imaginable occupation from coast to coast to coast. The CLC is the umbrella organization for dozens of affiliated Canadian and international unions, as well as provincial federations of labour and regional labour councils

- Go to the Union Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/unionbkmrk.htm

13. Cancer Claims Toronto City Summit Alliance Chair David Pecaut - December 14

From The Toronto Star:

'The greatest mayor we never had,' David Pecaut dies at 54
December 14, 2009
Passionate city-builder and co-founder of Toronto's Luminato Festival, David Pecaut has succumbed to cancer. He was 54.
"(...) Inspired by Pecaut, more than 6,000 people became involved in Alliance projects, tackling everything from immigrant integration to income security reform to cultivating emerging leaders."

David Pecault's message to the city
December 9, 2009
Toronto City Summit Alliance Chair, David Pecaut, shares his inspiring vision of collective leadership and city-building to ensure the future success of the Toronto region.

--------------

Comment:
I don't generally include death notices in my site and newsletter, but I was saddened by the passing of David Pecaut. I had the pleasure of meeting him a few years ago and watching him at work in the context of the Task Force on Modernizing Income Security for Working Age Adults ("MISWAA").
He was an inspiring civic leader, and he will be sorely missed.
May he rest in peace.

---------------

Related links:

Toronto City Summit Alliance
The Toronto City Summit Alliance is a coalition of civic leaders in the Toronto region. The Alliance was formed to address challenges to the future of Toronto such as expanding knowledge-based industry, poor economic integration of immigrants, decaying infrastructure, and affordable housing.

Task Force on Modernizing Income Security for Working Age Adults ("MISWAA")
MISWAA was formed in the fall of 2004 by the Toronto City Summit Alliance, a broad-based coalition of civic leaders in the Toronto region, and by St. Christopher House, a multi-service neighbourhood centre that works with low-income people in Toronto. The Task Force is a diverse group made-up of over fifty experts and leaders from major employers, policy institutes, labour unions, academia, community organizations, advocacy groups, foundations and governments, as well as individuals with first-hand knowledge of income security programs.

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

14. [Newfoundland and Labrador] First Progress Report Shows Significant Results in Province’s Fight Against Poverty - December 14

Newfoundland and Labrador:

First Progress Report Shows Significant Results in Province’s Fight Against Poverty
News Release
December 14, 2009
Newfoundland and Labrador has realized significant improvement in the overall level of poverty since 2003. In fact, Newfoundland and Labrador has moved from being a province with one of the highest levels of poverty in Canada to the province with the third lowest level.
Today, the Honourable Susan Sullivan, Minister of Human Resources, Labour and Employment and lead Minister for the Poverty Reduction Strategy, released Empowering People - Engaging Community - Enabling Success: First Progress Report on the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador’s Poverty Reduction Strategy. This document demonstrates that through the Poverty Reduction Strategy, the Williams Government is meeting its commitment to prevent, reduce and alleviate poverty in Newfoundland and Labrador.

Complete report:

Empowering People - Engaging Community - Enabling Success:
First Progress Report on the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador’s Poverty Reduction Strategy
(PDF - 4MB, 76 pages)
December 2009
This report provides a summary of progress achieved towards meeting the goals and objectives of the 2006-10 Poverty Reduction Strategy Action Plan:
1. Progress towards improved access to and coordination of services for people with low income
2. Progress towards a stronger social safety net
3. Progress towards improved earned incomes
4. Progress towards an increased emphasis on early childhood development
5. Progress towards a better educated population

Source:
Dept. of Human Resources, Labour and Employment

---------------

Related media reports (Dec. 14-15):

Province Making Progress on Reducing Poverty: Report
http://www.vocm.com/newsarticle.asp?mn=2&ID=3174

N.L. report on poverty says there are 30,000 fewer poor people in province
http://www.canadaeast.com/rss/article/889226

Report indicates province winning in fight against poverty
http://www.thetelegram.com/index.cfm?sid=310583&sc=79

Poverty down in Newfoundland and Labrador
http://dailygleaner.canadaeast.com/rss/article/890138

N.L. poverty levels down significantly: report
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/newfoundland-labrador/story/2009/12/14/nl-poverty-down-1214.html

[ Thanks to Jennefer Laidley of the Income Security Advocacy Centre (ISAC) for finding and sharing these media links. ]

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the Newfoundland and Labrador Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nfbkmrk.htm

15. Auditing the Ontario Auditor General - December 14
(by Reuel Amdur)

Auditing the Ontario Auditor General
December 14, 2009
by Reuel Amdur
Social worker and freelance writer Reuel Amdur asks some pointed questions about the 2009 Ontario Auditor General's report.
Source:
Peacock Poverty
PeacockPoverty is a Canadian collective of individuals with an experience of poverty who join together to share knowledge, strength, talent and wisdom with each other and friends. The collective is autonomous, independent of agency affiliation, by and for poor people and friends.

- Go to the Ontario Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

16. Basic Income Earth Network Canada (BIEN Canada)

Basic Income Earth Network Canada (BIEN Canada) - "Towards income security for all Canadians"
BIEN Canada is the Canadian affiliate of the Basic Income Earth Network. BIEN Canada was founded at the 2008 international BIEN Congress to promote dialogue, public education and networking about basic income in Canada. BIEN Canada is composed of individuals and organizations interested in promoting dialogue around basic income.

["Basic income" = guaranteed annual income]

November 10, 2009
Basic Income conference at Université de Montréal (April 15-16, 2010)
BIEN Canada will be co-organising a major conference in collaboration with the US Basic Income Guarantee network (USBIG) on 15-16 April 2010 at the Unversity of Montréal, hosted by the Centre de recherche en éthique de l’Université de Montréal. This first collaboration between the US and Canadian chapters of the Basic Income Earth Network (BIEN) on Basic Income at a Time of Economic Upheaval: A Path to Justice and Stability? aims to compare the prospects and challenges faced by the BIG proposal in the context of both Canada and the US, two countries that share many similarties and yet are profoundly different in terms of their economic, social and political background.?

- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

17. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Survey of Household Spending, 2008 - December 18
--- Consumer Price Index, November 2009 - December 17
--- Health Reports, December 2009 - December 16
---
Labour productivity, hourly compensation and unit labour cost, Third quarter 2009 - December 15

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

December 18, 2009
Survey of Household Spending, 2008
On average, each Canadian household spent $71,360 in 2008, up 2.0% from 2007. This was slightly below the rate of inflation of 2.3% as measured by the Consumer Price Index.
- includes three tables:
* Average total expenditure and shares of spending of major categories for provinces, 2008
* Total average household expenditure by province, 2007-2008
* Budget shares of major spending categories by income quintile, 2008
[ Related link: Spending Patterns in Canada 2008 ]

Related subjects
* Families, households and housing
* Household characteristics
* Housing and dwelling characteristics
* Income, pensions, spending and wealth
* Household spending and savings

---

December 17, 2009
Consumer Price Index, November 2009
Consumer prices rose 1.0% in the 12 months to November, following a 0.1% increase in October. On a seasonally adjusted monthly basis, consumer prices increased 0.6% from October to November.
[ TIP: scroll to the bottom of the page for three CPI tables. ]

Related subjects:
o Prices and price indexes
o Consumer price indexes

---

December 16, 2009
Health Reports - December 2009
Special 20th Anniversary Edition

A Canadian peer-reviewed journal of population health and health services research

The December 2009 online edition of Health Reports contains three articles.

* Mortality of Métis and Registered Indian adults in Canada: An 11-year follow-up study describes mortality patterns among these groups, compared with the non-Aboriginal population.
* Smokers' use of acute care hospitals: A prospective study links health survey data to hospitalization data at an individual level for people aged 45 to 74, permitting prospective measures of hospital use by smoking status and age.
* Area-based indicators are commonly used to measure and track health outcomes by socio-economic group, largely because of the absence of information about individuals in health administrative databases. A comparison of individual and area-based socio-economic data for monitoring social inequalities in healthcompares area-based and individual indicators.

[ Links to articles in earlier issues of Health Reports ]

---

December 15, 2009
Labour productivity, hourly compensation and unit labour cost, Third quarter 2009
The labour productivity of Canadian businesses fell 0.2% in the third quarter, after fluctuating between increases and declines of 0.1% since the second quarter of 2008. In each of the preceding five quarters, real gross domestic product (GDP) and hours worked declined in tandem, and as a result, there was very little change in productivity during that period.
- includes a table entitled Business sector: Labour productivity and related variables for Canada and the United States

A more comprehensive analysis comparing labour productivity growth
in manufacturing between Canada and the United States, as well as additional
charts and tables, is now available in the third quarter 2009 issue of Canadian Economic Accounts Quarterly Review, Vol. 8, no. 3

Related subjects
o Economic accounts
o Productivity accounts
o Labour
o Hours of work and work arrangements
o Wages, salaries and other earnings

---

Check The Daily Archives
- select a month and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

18. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - December 20

What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

December 20, 2009

Child's play
16 Dec 09
- Article from BC Business looking at the economic value of investing in early child care and education.

A bit rich: Calculating the real value to society of different professions
16 Dec 09
- Report from The New Economics Foundation examining the economic value of six professions in the UK, one being childcare workers.

Models of earning and caring: Trends, determinants and implications
16 Dec 09
- Report commissioned by the Policy Research Directorate at HRSDC looking at the division of earning and caring activities in Canadian households.

Children in immigrant families in eight affluent countries: their family, national and international context
16 Dec 09
- Report from the unicef Innocenti Research Centre looking at eight affluent countries and the situation of immigrant children.

The 2009 R.W.B. Jackson Lecture
16 Dec 09
- Mediacast of speakers from the R.W.B. Jackson Lecture held at OISE on November 18, 2009.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news

· Cleaners [and childcare workers] more valuable than bankers
[GB] 16 Dec 09

· Child care centres continue to deliver strong investment returns
[AU] 16 Dec 09

· Gender roles still loom large in modern parenting
[CA] 16 Dec 09

· Kindy programs for childcare
[AU] 15 Dec 09

· All-day kindergarten: a teachable moment
[CA-ON] 15 Dec 09

· Caught in a conundrum
[CA-BC] 8 Dec 09

more CC IN THE NEWS »

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Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

19. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest content from the Poverty Dispatch:

December 16:
States and the Federal Poverty Guidelines - Vermont
Measuring Unemployment - Detroit, MI
Extending Jobless Benefits - Florida, Wisconsin, Michigan
State Health Insurance Programs - Wisconsin
Payments to Foster Care Providers - California
Cancer Screenings for the Low-income
Louisville Courier-Journal Series on Child Abuse and Neglect
Kids Count Reports - Louisiana, Kansas

December 15:
Error in Food Stamp Reporting Rate - Missouri
Report: Foster Care - Nebraska
Child Welfare Systems - Pittsburgh and Milwaukee
Poverty Measurement - Vietnam
Poll of Unemployed Adults

December 14:
Report: Juvenile Prison System - New York
Child Hunger in the US
Welfare Delivery System - Indiana
Children on Medicaid and Antipsychotic Prescription Drugs

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To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

20. [U.S.] Deal on health bill is reached - December 20
(Washington Post)

Deal on health bill is reached
By Shailagh Murray and Lori Montgomery
December 20, 2009
Senate Democrats said Saturday that they had closed ranks in support of legislation to overhaul the nation's health-care system, ending months of internal division and clearing a path for quick Senate passage of President Obama's top domestic policy priority.
Source:
Washington Post

Also from the Washington Post:

Health-Care Reform 2009:
Tracking the National Health-Care Debate

Related link:

Health Care:
The President's Plan

In an address to a joint session of Congress in September 2009, President Obama explained how health insurance reform will provide more security and stability to those who have health insurance, coverage for those who don’t, and will lower the cost of health care for our families, our businesses, and our government.
* Read the full transcript of the President's remarks.
* Watch the full video of the President's remarks.
* Read the full plan for health insurance reform.
* Download a concise, printable version.

Source:
The White House

- Go to the Health Links (Canada/International) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/health.htm
- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

21. The American Juvenile Justice System - coming to a youth detention centre near you? - December 14

New York Finds Extreme Crisis in Youth Prisons
By
Nicholas Confessore
December 13, 2009
ALBANY — New York’s system of juvenile prisons is broken, with young people battling mental illness or addiction held alongside violent offenders in abysmal facilities where they receive little counseling, can be physically abused and rarely get even a basic education, according to a report by a state panel.The problems are so acute that the state agency overseeing the prisons has asked New York’s Family Court judges not to send youths to any of them unless they are a significant risk to public safety, recommending alternatives, like therapeutic foster care.
Source:
New York Times

Related link:

Draft Report on New York State's Juvenile Prisons
December 2009

---

Jailing juveniles: Sensible fixes
to youth crime and delinquency policies
December 14, 2009
The Senate Judiciary Committee should embrace a bill scheduled for debate on Thursday that institutes needed reforms in how the nation deals with youth who run afoul of the law. The Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Reauthorization Act does not impose federal strictures on state and local entities, but it provides funds for those that choose to comply with the legislation's guidelines. In this way, the Justice Department, which administers the act, can provide incentives to states to comply with what it considers best practices. Perhaps the most important provision in the legislation is one that calls on states to keep juveniles -- even those charged as adults -- separate from alleged adult offenders.
Source:
Washington Post

22. State-Level Data Show Recovery Act Protecting Millions from Poverty December 17
(Center on Budget and Policy Priorities)

State-Level Data Show Recovery Act Protecting Millions from Poverty
December 17, 2009
By Arloc Sherman
The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is keeping large numbers of Americans out of poverty in states across the country, according to new data covering 36 states and the District of Columbia. In addition to boosting economic activity and preserving or creating jobs, the recovery act is softening the recession’s impact on poverty by directly lifting family incomes.

View the full report online:
HTML - http://www.cbpp.org/cms/?fa=view&id=3035
PDF (181K, 5pp.) http://www.cbpp.org/files/12-17-09pov.pdf

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals. The Center conducts research and analysis to help shape public debates over proposed budget and tax policies and to help ensure that policymakers consider the needs of low-income families and individuals in these debates. We also develop policy options to alleviate poverty.

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

23. [New York City] Welfare Rolls Grow in City, but Increase Is Modest - December 16
(New York Times)

New York City:
Welfare Rolls Grow in City, but Increase Is Modest
By Julie Bosman
December 16, 2009
As the number of New Yorkers applying for food stamps, enrolling in Medicaid and checking into homeless shelters climbed last year, the welfare rolls presented something of a riddle: they continued to fall. But last month, nearly 355,000 people in the city received welfare payments, a 4 percent increase over the year before, according to city officials, who predict that if the economy does not recover, the growth will continue for at least 18 months. City welfare officials and advocates for the poor disagree on why it took so long for the rolls to grow — the rise began in the summer — but the trend is a reflection of the national welfare reform of the 1990s, which also may be a factor in why the growth has been so slow. Even with the increases, the caseloads are still 23 percent lower than when Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg took office in 2002 and are just a third of the number at the enrollment peak in 1995.
Source:
New York Times

[ Other NY Times articles about welfare ]

__________________________

So how does that
compare to Canada, you ask?
__________________________

Toronto welfare caseload stabilizing
December 14, 2009
By Rebecca Ryall
Toronto's welfare caseload is stabilizing as unemployment dips, but there are warnings the city's struggling economy isn't out of the woods yet.
Source:
The National Post

---

The Silence of the Lines:
Poverty reduction strategies and the crash of 2008
(PDF - 135K, 5 pages)
February 2009
By John Stapleton
"(...) people who once could successfully apply for welfare during a rough patch (along with all the people turned away from EI) are going to be turned away at the welfare office. The reason for this is that since the last major recession, governments have brought in four significant sets of changes:
• Lower social assistance rates;
• Much lower assets limits;
• Earning exemptions policies that do not apply to new applicants; and
• ‘Workfare’ — now called ‘community participation’.
Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

24. Minimum-Income Benefits in OECD Countries: Policy Design, Effectiveness and Challenges - December 2009
(Institute for the Study of Labor)

[Social assistance] Minimum-Income Benefits in OECD Countries: Policy Design, Effectiveness and Challenges (PDF - 685K, 52 pages)
December 2009
By Herwig Immervoll
Almost all OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries operate comprehensive minimum-income programmes for working-age individuals, either as last-resort safety nets alongside primary income replacement benefits, or as the principal instrument for delivering social protection. Such safety-net benefits aim primarily at providing an acceptable standard of living for families unable to earn sufficient incomes from other sources. This paper provides an overview of social assistance and other minimum-income programmes in OECD countries (including Canada), summarises their main features, and highlights a number of current policy challenges.
Source:
Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
IZA is a private, independent research institute, which conducts nationally and internationally oriented labor market research. Operating as a non-profit limited liability company, it draws financial support from the research-sponsoring activities of the Deutsche Post Foundation.(...) IZA sees itself as an international research institute and a place for communication between academic science, politics, and economic practice.

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

25. Principles and Practicalities for Measuring Child Poverty in the Rich Countries - April 2005
(Institute for the Study of Labor)

Principles and Practicalities for
Measuring Child Poverty in the Rich Countries
(PDF - 231K, 69 pages)
April 2005
By Miles Corak
[The author is Director of Family and Labour Studies at Statistics Canada.]
This paper has three objectives. The first is to discuss the major issues involved in defining and measuring child poverty. The choices that must be made are clarified, and a set of six principles to serve as a guide for public policy are stated. The second objective is to take stock of child poverty and changes in child poverty in the majority of OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries since about 1990 when the Convention on the Rights of the Child came into force. Finally, the third objective is to formulate a number of suggestions for the setting of credible targets for the elimination of child poverty in the rich countries. This involves a method for embodying the ideal of children having priority on social resources into a particular set of child poverty reduction targets, it involves the development of appropriate and timely information sources, and finally it involves the clarification of feasible targets that may vary across the OECD.

* Recommended reading in the context of the ongoing debate between absolute and relative poverty lines!
[ Excerpt: "The contradiction in relying upon an 'absolute' poverty threshold in terms of commodities or incomes is evident by the empirical observation that these necessities are seen to change through time as communities experience economic growth and changes occur in both the goods that are available and the consumption patterns of the majority. This suggests that in some fundamental way it is not a simple task to gauge even the basics of survival without reference to the wider community." ]

Source:
Institute for the Study of Labor

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

26. [International, Guaranteed Annual Income] - NewsFlash 59, December 2009 - December 15
(Basic Income Earth Network)

Basic Income Earth Network (BIEN)
The Basic Income Earth Network was founded in 1986 as the Basic Income European Network. It expanded its scope from European to the Earth in 2004. It is an international network that serves as a link between individuals and groups committed to or interested in basic income, and fosters informed discussion of the topic throughout the world.
- incl. links to: * About BIEN * About Basic Income * NewsFlash * Congresses * Papers and Resources * Membership * Links * Contact

["Basic income" = guaranteed annual income]

NewsFlash - the BIEN newsletter:

NewsFlash 59, December 2009 (PDF - 146K, 18 pages)
December 15, 2009
* Editorial: Call for Papers, BIEN Congress July 2010
* Events
* Glimpses of National Debates --- including Canada
* Publications
* New Links
* About BIEN
Source:
NewsFlash - newsletter (incl. archives)
BIEN's NewsFlash is mailed electronically every two months to over 1,500 subscribers throughout the world.
Free subscription : send a request by email to bien@basicincome.org

[ earlier issues of this newsletter - back to 2006]

BIEN links to other relevant websites
- incl. links to National Affiliates and general GAI/Basic Income resources

Source:
BIEN - Basic Income Earth Network

- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

27. Australian Policy Online - recent content

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia. [ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week
appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page, and the downloads vary depending on the topic you select.

-------------------------------------------------------

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

28. CRINMAIL - December 2009
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)

Latest issues of CRINMAIL:

17 December 2009 - CRINMAIL 1135
* COMPLAINTS MECHANISM: Report from 1st Working Group meeting
* CRC: Report on the 52nd session of the Committee [publication]
* NEPAL: UN and Nepal sign action plan for release of nearly 3,000 Maoist child soldiers [news]
* SRI LANKA: UN child soldier call [news]
* ARGENTINA: "Myth" of egalitarian society for children and young people [news]
* UNITED KINGDOM: Jewish school 'discriminated against child' [news]
* EMPLOYMENT: Save the Children International
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

15 December 2009 - CRINMAIL 1134
* UNITED STATES: New York finds extreme crisis in youth prisons [news]
* UNICEF: Children and AIDS: Fourth Stocktaking Report 2009 [publication]
* UGANDA: Female circumcision banned [news]
* CLIMATE CHANGE: Children on climate change frontline denied a voice, says NGO [news]
* UN: Survey
* EMPLOYMENT: For Our Children Foundation
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

---

Earlier issues of CRINMAIL
- links to 200+ earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm






Disclaimer/Privacy Statement


Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com



*****************************

Christmas Cookie Rules

*****************************


 1.      If you eat a Christmas cookie fresh out of the oven, it has no calories because everyone knows that the first cookie is the test and thus calorie free.

 2.      If you drink a diet soda after eating your second cookie, it also has no calories because the diet soda cancels out the cookie calories.


 3.      If a friend comes over while you're making your Christmas cookies and needs to sample, you must sample with your friend.  Because your friend's first cookie is calories free, (rule #1) yours is also.  It would be rude
to let your friend sample alone and, being the friend that you are, that makes your cookie calorie free.

  4.      Any cookie calories consumed while walking around will fall to your feet and eventually fall off as you move.  This is due to gravity and the density of the caloric mass.


5.      Any calories consumed during the frosting of the Christmas cookies will be used up because it takes many calories to lick excess frosting from a knife without cutting your tongue.


 6.      Cookies colored red or green have very few calories.  Red ones have three and green ones have five - one calorie for each letter.  Make more red ones!


 7.      Cookies eaten while watching "Miracle on 34th Street" have no calories because they are part of the entertainment package and not part of one's personal fuel.

8.       As always, cookie pieces contain no calories because the process of breaking causes calorie leakage.


9.      Any cookies consumed from someone else's plate have no calories since the calories rightfully belong to the other person and will cling to their plate.  We all know how calories like to CLING!


10.     Any cookies consumed while feeling stressed have no calories because cookies used for medicinal purposes NEVER have calories.  It's a rule!

Source:
Terrie

----------------------------

And, in closing...

----------------------------

Attention English Lit majors and Journalism students:

The Elements of Style: 50 Years of Stupid Grammar Advice
http://chronicle.com/article/50-Years-of-Stupid-Grammar/25497/
April 17, 2009
Gilles' comment:
If, like me, you have dog-eared copy of The Elements of Style on your bookshelf, you'll recognize it as the bible of English grammar (arguably alongside Fowler's Modern English Usage).
The author of the above article doesn't think that the grammar guide should be held in such high esteem.
The book is available online; click the link below.

The Elements of Style Online
http://www.bartleby.com/141/

***

A Holiday Wish
by Steve Martin
http://www.livevideo.com/video/A2497688B9864E8DA2DAF0FDC2767FE2/-a-holiday-wish-by-steve-martin.aspx

***

Joyeux Noel!
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/XMAS/noel.htm
- includes selected Christmas light videos, my politically-correct solstice wish,
an excellent bilingual poem entitled
T'was the Night d’avant Noël and more.
(Jingle dogs/cats, anyone?)


***

Season's greetings to all.
Love, Peace and Joy.
And Social Justice.
Gilles