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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
January 22, 2006

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter, a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 1565 subscribers.
Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes and a disclaimer.


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IN THIS ISSUE:

1. Election 2006 resources --- make up your mind, eh.
2.
The Fiscal Monitor : Highlights of financial results for November 2005 - Department of Finance Canada
3. Minimum wages going up:
--- January 1 : Newfoundland and Labrador + New Brunswick
--- February 1 : Ontario
4. New from the Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services:
--- Accessibility News (monthly online disability e-zine) - January 2006 issue
--- Accessibility Standards Advisory Council Launched - December 13/05
--- Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 : Frequently Asked Questions
5. What's New from Statistics Canada - January 18, 2006
--- Consumer Price Index, December 2005
6. New Releases from the Caledon Institute of Social Policy - January 2006
7. What's New from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (University of Toronto) - January 20

International Content

8. Poverty Dispatch Digest : U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs --- January 19

Have a great  week!

Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net

E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com

1. Links to Election 2006 Resources

2006 Federal Election Resources
This Canadian Social Research Links page offers close to 300 links to resources to confuse you OR help you to make up your mind before you make your mark January 23.

If you're still undecided about how to cast your ballot, try the 2006 VoteSelector quiz below to see how the major parties' platforms fit in with your views, and then [Attention : Gilles Bias Alert!] read what a Conservative government's policies would mean for Canadians, according to the Think Twice Coalition.

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The 2006 VoteSelector Quiz - from PoliticsWatch.com
Complete the 18 questions in the multiple-choice quiz and the analysis will tell you how you rank with the thinking of each the main party leaders. The analysis is based on a comparison of official party platforms.
If you're not sure which party deserves your vote on January 23, this is a good place to start...

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What would Conservative policies mean for Canadians?
"(...) privatization and deregulation, and more cuts to social programs, the end of the national child care programme, abandonment of the agreement just achieved with First Nations at the Aboriginal Summit, more greenhouse gas emissions, the end of the domestic Kyoto plan, a health care system based on commercialization, not patient needs...
We are standing up for Canada. We want a Canada with strong social programs, environmental protection, and fairness for everyone. Canadians need to think twice."

ThinkTwice
Think Twice is a newly formed coalition of social advocacy and citizens' organizations wanting to express their concern about the implications for Canadian social programs and equality rights of a potential Conservative victory in the upcoming federal election. The Think Twice coalition is formed by representatives from numerous citizens' organizations, including: health care, environmental, human rights, women's rights, child care, arts, housing, aboriginal, trade union, disability, and minority advocacy groups.

- Go to the 2006 Federal Election and General Political Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics.htm

2. The Fiscal Monitor : Highlights of financial results for November 2005
(Department of Finance Canada)

The Fiscal Monitor:
Highlights of financial results for November 2005
HTML version
PDF version (107K, 8 pages)

Highlights:
November 2005 --- budgetary deficit of $3.1
billion (including an adjustment of $3.7 billion for the first 11 months of 2005 resulting from changes announced in the November 2005 Economic and Fiscal Update. If you don't count these tax measures, there was a surplus of $0.5 billion in November 2005, down $1.2 billion from the $1.7-billion surplus reported in November 2004.
April to November 2005 --- budgetary surplus of $6.3 billion
Source:
The Fiscal Monitor 2005 (separate reports for each month)

Related Link:

The Economic and Fiscal Update
November 14, 2005

Source:
Department of Finance Canada

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

3. Minimum wages going up:
- January 1 : Newfoundland and Labrador + New Brunswick
- February 1 : Ontario

Ontario Government Raises Minimum Wage
Increase Helps Lowest Paid And Most Vulnerable Workers

News release
January 11, 2005
"TORONTO--The Ontario government is raising the minimum wage on February 1, 2006, for the third time since taking office, Labour Minister Steve Peters announced today.'We are providing Ontario’s lowest-paid and most vulnerable workers with the third increase in the minimum wage in three years,' said Peters. 'It is to Ontario’s economic advantage to see that our workers are paid a fair wage.' The general minimum wage will be raised to $7.75 per hour on February 1, 2006, and there will be a further increase to $8 per hour on February 1, 2007."
Source:
Ontario Ministry of Labour

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Newfoundland and Labrador Minimum Wage Increasing:
Another 25 cent increase in the minimum wage as of January 1, 2006

"Paul Shelley, Minister of Human Resources, Labour and Employment (HRLE) would like to remind businesses and workers in the province that the minimum wage will increase from $6.25 to $6.50 an hour effective Sunday, January 1, 2006."
Source:
Government of Newfoundland and Labrador News Releases

---------------------------------------------

New Brunswick Minimum wage to increase Jan. 1, 2006
Dec 15, 2005
FREDERICTON (CNB) - An increase to the provincial minimum wage will take effect Jan. 1, 2006, Training and Employment Development Minister Margaret-Ann Blaney announced today. The wage rises to $6.50 per hour from the current $6.30, and further increases are planned to bring it up to $7.10.
Source:
Employment Standards Branch,
Training and Employment Development

---------------------------------------------

Related Links:

Current and forthcoming minimum wage levels for all jurisdictions
Hourly Minimum Wages in Canada for Adult Workers
- 1965 to 2014
(this information is broken up into five files - one for each decade. The link takes you to the latest ten-year period)
Source:
Labour Program of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

- Go to the Minimum Wage /Living Wage Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/minwage.htm
- Go to the New Brunswick Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Newfoundland and Labrador Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nfbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Ontario Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm

4. New from the Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services:
--- Accessibility News (monthly online disability e-zine) - January 2006 issue
--- Accessibility Standards Advisory Council Launched - December 13/05
--- Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 : Frequently Asked Questions

From the Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services:

Accessibility News
Online Newsletter (monthly)
January 2006 issue
* The Demographic Change – Impacts of New Technologies
* Helping Hard of Hearing Access City Services
* Marketing to Audiences with Disabilities
* Workplace Trends Forecasts Mental Health Action in 2006
* Introduction to Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0
* Children with Special Needs and the Workplace: A Guide for Employers
* The Freedom Tent
Newsletter Archive - back to November 2001
Source:
Paths to Equal Opportunity
[ Accessibility Ontario ]
[ Ministry of Community and Social Services ]

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December 13, 2005
McGuinty Government Launches New Accessibility Council
News Release
"TORONTO — The McGuinty government’s commitment to accessibility is getting a big boost today with the appointment of CITY-TV veteran David Onley and community leader Tracy MacCharles to lead the province’s new Accessibility Standards Advisory Council, Minister of Community and Social Services Sandra Pupatello announced today."

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Frequently Asked Questions about the
Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005

- Go to the Disability Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/disbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Ontario Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm

5. What's New from Statistics Canada - January 18, 2006
--- Consumer Price Index, December 2005

What's New from The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

January 18, 2006
Consumer Price Index, December 2005
The 12-month change in the Consumer Price Index edged up from 2.0% in November to 2.2% in December.

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

6. New Releases from the Caledon Institute of Social Policy
January 2006

What's New from the Caledon Institute of Social Policy:
January 2006

The Choice in Child Care Allowance: What you See Is Not What You Get (PDF file - 63K, 7 pages)
Ken Battle, January 2006
The Conservatives’ plan for a “Choice in Child Care Allowance” is seriously flawed. Because the new program will trigger reductions in federal and provincial/territorial income-tested benefits and increases in income taxes, most families will end up with less – for modest-income families in the $30,000-$40,000 range, much less - than the gross $1,200 annual payment for every child under 6. The Child Care Allowance also will favour one-earner couples over single parents and two-earner families. The proposed scheme is really a child benefit, not a child care program. Caledon contends that it would be better to invest in further increases to the existing Canada Child Tax Benefit, a modern and effective social program that suffers from none of the failings of the proposed Choice in Child Care Allowance.

There's Madness to this Method (PDF file - 18K, 4 pages)
Sherri Torjman, January 2006
The November 2003 Report of the Auditor General, released in February 2004, set in motion a chain of events that led to an obsession with accountability. The November 2005 report of the Auditor General, by contrast, barely created any interest – despite several important recommendations that could help the federal government and voluntary organizations do their jobs more effectively. The latest audit looked at federal policies and practices around the creation, coordination and oversight of ‘horizontal initiatives.’ The Auditor General instructed central agencies to provide more explicit guidance for horizontal practice related to common application procedures, funding instruments, data collection, reporting practices and evaluation frameworks.

Evaluation Framework for Federal Investment in the Social Economy: A Discussion Paper (PDF file - 97K, 33 pages)
Eric Leviten-Reid and Sherri Torjman, January 2006
This paper was prepared on behalf of Social Development Canada to support the department and its partners in developing an evaluation framework for potential federal investment in the social economy. It also informed the efforts of government partners in their formulation of a horizontal Results Based Accountability Framework for the social economy initiatives announced in the 2004 federal Budget. The report discusses the nature of the social economy, identifies issues and challenges involved in evaluating its activities and proposes a learning-oriented approach to its evaluation. The paper also presents a logic model for conceptualizing the work of the social economy, including the broad societal objectives it seeks to achieve, major types of investment and support to sustain this activity, and results for households, organizations, communities and the social economy sector as a whole.

Vibrant Communities Calgary: Awareness, Engagement and Policy Change (PDF file - 36K, 9 pages)
Anne Makhoul and Eric Leviten-Reid, January 2006
By educating Calgarians about the complex realities of poverty and influencing the development of responsive public policies, Vibrant Communities Calgary is trying to create a profound shift in thinking. It seeks to move from a climate that sees poverty as a personal problem to one in which systemic change makes it possible for individuals and households to improve their circumstances. This is the second in a series of stories which describe the poverty reduction work of the six Vibrant Communities Trail Builders.

Strategies for Achieving Equity and Prosperity in Saskatchewan (PDF file - 50K, 15 pages)
Rick August, January 2006
This paper focuses on the coexistence of strong labour demand in Saskatchewan, and a chronically underemployed segment of the population that is not achieving full economic citizenship. It argues that these circumstances afford an opportunity to strengthen the province’s labour force and economy, while at the same time increasing the economic inclusion of its disadvantaged citizens. The paper proposes a strategy to reduce economic disadvantage through employment and productivity growth. On a practical level, it argues for a partnership between government and employers that would help potential workers to prepare for entry-level employment, and from this base of employment, to improve their employment security and income through productivity growth. The analysis relies on enabling approaches to public policy that are designed to influence market forces towards more equitable outcomes, and harness human motivations and energies to improve personal and societal outcomes. The paper argues that a fair distribution of wealth is achievable within the context of a competitive market economy, and that an employment inclusion and productivity growth strategy could lead to sustainable gains in both Saskatchewan’s aggregate wealth and its distributional equity.

NOTE: For links to 400+ Caledon reports, go to the home page of their website and click on "Publications By Date" in the left margin.

- Go to the 2006 Federal Election and General Political Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics.htm
- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

7. What's New from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - January 20
(University of Toronto)


What's New - from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) - University of Toronto

Each week, the Childcare Resource and Research Unit disseminates its "e-mail news notifier", an e-mail message with a dozen or so links to new reports, studies and child care in the news (media articles) by the CRRU or another organization in the field of early childhood education and care (ECEC). What you see below is selected content from the most recent issue of the notifier.

ELECTION UPDATE:
NEW POSTINGS AVAILABLE ON CRRU’S WEBSITE
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

20-Jan-06


>> Child care: What will be lost?
Document from the Child Care Advocacy Association of Canada demonstrates that the potential loss of the bilateral agreements would have "significant implications for children and families who need and want quality child care."

>> Anything left for "beer and popcorn"?
Press release from the Manitoba Child Care Association stresses the importance of federal funding to Manitoba’s child care system.

>> Think Twice Canada Coalition launches website
http://www.thinktwicecanada.ca/

With election day fast approaching on January 23, Think Twice Canada, a coalition of social advocacy and citizens' organizations, has launched a website in order to encourage dialogue between concerned Canadians prior to the vote. The website features audio clips from the Coalition's press conference, held in Toronto last week. It provides a mechanism through which Canadians can take action by asking their friends and family to "Think Twice" about critical issues such as child care, women's reproductive rights, our environment, affordable housing, equality issues and many more before casting their ballot.

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FEDERAL ELECTION NEWS
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>> Callwood speaks but few listen [CA]
by Goar, Carol / Toronto Star, 20 Jan 06

>> Child care key issue for youth at TV debate [CA]
by Russell, Jonathan / Charlottetown Guardian, 20 Jan 06

>> Children's future [CA]
Letter to the editor
by Rodgers, Ann / Leader-Post, 20 Jan 06

>> Child care plan subject to taxation [CA]
Letter to the Editor
by MacGregor, Donna / Toronto Star, 20 Jan 06

>> Address our social deficits before cutting taxes [CA]
Letter to the Editor
by Dick, Peter / Toronto Star, 20 Jan 06

>> It's about day care [CA]
Letter to the Editor
by Staff of Terrace Campus Child Care Centre / Terrace Standard, 18 Jan 06

>> Quality child care is simply good sense [CA]
by Austin, Janet, Turner, Denise & Kershaw, Paul / Vancouver Sun, 17 Jan 06

>> Harper's day care plan out-of-reach for many [CA]
Letter to the Editor
by Hannon, Dorothy / Star-Phoenix [Saskatoon], 17 Jan 06

>> Social investment: Not a matter of either/or [CA]
by Lazar, Eva / Toronto Star, 17 Jan 06

>> Child care splits parties, parents [CA]
by Monsebraaten, Laurie / Toronto Star, 16 Jan 06

>> A national day care dream dies [CA]
Maude Barlow’s Election Blog
Maclean’s Magazine, 15 Jan 06

>> Child care plan flawed [CA]
Letter to the Editor
by Rogerson, Diana P. / Edmonton Journal, 15 Jan 06

>> How can Canadian parents ever expect child care, when politicians
still don’t get it [CA]

by Binks, Georgie / CBC News, 13 Jan 06

>> Pillow talk from Charmboy pits family against family [CA]
by Sommerfeld, Lorraine / Hamilton Spectator, 13 Jan 06

>> How elections have changed – for the worse [CA]
by Westell, Anthony / CBC News – Viewpoint, 10 Jan 06

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FEDERAL ELECTION ISSUE FILE
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>> Issue File: Early learning and child care in the 2006 federal election

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
This message was forwarded through the Childcare Resource
and Research Unit e-mail news notifier. For information on the
CRRU e-mail notifier, including instructions for (un)subscribing,
see http://www.childcarecanada.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Related Links:

What's New? - Canadian, U.S. and international resources from Jan 2000 to the present.
Child Care in the News - media articles from January 2000 to the present
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info
Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere
CRRU Publications
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

Also from CRRU:

Towards a national system of early learning and child care
Regularly updated
NOTE: this is a large (and growing) collection that includes government and non-governmental reports, press releases, news articles and other documents dealing with the new federal-provincial-territorial arrangements for early learning and child care in Canada.

Current developments in Early Childhood Education and Care: Provinces and territories
Regularly updated

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

8. Poverty Dispatch Digest :
U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs --- January 19

POVERTY DISPATCH Digest
Institute for Research on Poverty - U. of Wisconsin
This digest offers dozens of new links each week to full-text articles in the U.S. media (mostly daily newspapers) on poverty, poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, and much more...
The Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison offers a free e-mail service that consists of an e-mail message sent to subscribers each Monday and Thursday, containing a dozen or so links to articles dealing with the areas mentioned above. The weekly Canadian Social Research Links Poverty Dispatch Digest is a compilation, available online, of the two dispatch e-mails for that week --- with the kind permission of IRP.

Here's the complete collection of U.S. media articles in this week's Poverty Dispatch Digest:
(click the link above to read all of these articles)

January 19, 2006
Today's subjects include:  Economic Inequality // Poverty And Wealth Creation – Opinion // Low-Income Heating Assistance // Child Welfare // Food Stamps - New York City // Income Support For Working Poor – Connecticut // Low-Income Tax Credit Proposal – Wisconsin // Job Growth  - Wisconsin // Unemployment Rate  - Minnesota // Living Wage – Idaho, Washington // Minimum Wage – Maryland // Child Care Assistance – Florida // Early Childhood Education Funding – Ohio

January 16, 2006
Today's subjects include: Poverty and Race - Opinion // Living Wage // Encouraging the Poor to Save // Homelessness // IRS Audits of Returns from Low-Income Taxpayers // Suit over Federal Faith-Based Initiative // Slipping into Poverty - New Jersey // Rural Poverty - Central Illinois // Self-Sufficiency Program - Maryland // Welfare Reform and Barriers to Work - New York // Program for Young, Low-Income Mothers - Pennsylvania // Proposal to Expand Health Care Program - Wisconsin // Rising Copays for Health Care Program - Colorado // Homelessness - Iowa, Los Angeles

Each of the weekly digests offers dozens of links or more to media articles that are time-sensitive.
The older the link, the more likely it is to either be dead or have moved to an archive - and some archives [but not all] are pay-as-you-go.
[For the current week's digest, click on the POVERTY DISPATCH Digest link above]

The Poverty Dispatch weekly digest is a good tool for monitoring what's happening in the U.S.; it's a guide to best practices and lessons learned in America.

Subscribe to the Poverty Dispatch!
Send an e-mail message to John Wolf [ jwolf@ssc.wisc.edu ] to receive a plain text message twice a week with one to two dozen links to media articles with a focus on poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, health, Medicaid from across the U.S.
And it's free...

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

For the current week's digest, click on the POVERTY DISPATCH Digest link at the top of this section.
Recently-archived POVERTY DISPATCH weekly digests:

- January 12, 2006
-
January 5, 2006
- December 29, 2005
- December 15
- December 7

POVERTY DISPATCH description/archive - weekly issues back to January 2005, 50+ links per issue
NOTE: this archive is part of the Canadian Social Research Links American Non-Governmental Social Research page.

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm



Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

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Spoonerisms
http://rinkworks.com/said/spoonerisms.shtml

A common type of verbal blunder involves switching the initial sounds of a pair of words.
The term "Spoonerism" is an eponym of the late  Reverend William Archibald Spooner, who had a notorious penchant for this kind of error.

Attributed to Reverend Spooner:

* "Three cheers for our queer old dean!"

* "It is kisstomary to cuss the bride."

* "Those girls are sin twisters."

* "Is the bean dizzy?"

* "The Lord is a shoving leopard."

* "When the boys come back from France, we'll have the hags flung out."

* "Let me sew you to your sheet."

* "The enemy fled quickly from the ears and sparrows."

* "She joins this club over my bed doddy."

* "The old revival hymn, 'Shall We Rather At the Giver?'"

* "There is no peace in a home where a dinner swells."

* "I see before me tons of soil." -- A greeting to a group of  farmers; he meant to say, "sons of toil."

* "We all know what it is to have a half-warmed fish inside us." ---  when he meant to say, "Half-formed wish."

* "You have hissed my mystery lectures; you have tasted the whole worm."