Canadian Social Research Newsletter
January 22, 2012

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

This week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,518 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. Provincial-territorial departments responsible for welfare : recent name changes in four provinces
2. [Alberta] Provincial Government Invites Response to Social Policy Framework Discussion Guide (Calgary Chamber of Voluntary Organizations) - January 20
3. Growing income gap generates little blame, Environics poll suggests (CBC News) - January 19
4. Alberta : The Journey Towards a Provincial Poverty Reduction Strategy (Alberta Urban Municipalities Association) - January 18
5. Crown - First Nations Gathering - January 23 -24, 2012
6. From the Library of Parliament:
--- The Canada Health Transfer : Changes to Provincial Allocations
- February 25, 2011
--- Public Service Reductions in the 1990s: Background and Lessons Learned - April 12, 2010
7. New Brunswick pre-budget consultation submission (Common Front for Social Justice) - January 2012
8. SPAR Monitor - Monitoring Toronto's Social Change (City of Toronto) - January 18
9. Three news releases from the Council of the Federation - January 17:
--- Growing the Economy
--- Premiers Appoint Working Group on Fiscal Arrangements
--- Premiers Announce Health Care Innovation Working Group
10. Four-part special series on the growth of inequality in Canada (Vancouver Sun) - December 20
11. Poverty: A Huge Cost to Our Health-care System (Megan Yarema in Huffington Post Canada) - January 16
12. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Consumer Price Index, December 2011 - January 20
--- Employment Insurance, November 2011 - January 19
13. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

14. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
15. Right-Wing Talking Points Translated Into English (The Conservative Lie - blog) - August 19, 2010
16. Wikipedia U.S. 24-hr blackout January 18: What are SOPA and PIPA? (Toronto Star)
17. [U.S.] Five Things You Probably Don’t Know About Food Stamps (Center on Budget and Policy Priorities) - January 20
18. Inequality rises across the G20 as economic growth leaves the poor behind (OXFAM International) - January 18
19. Spain joins Italy, France and Germany in support of Robin Hood Tax (National Union of Public and General Employees) - January 18
20. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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Go to the home page of the
Canadian Social Research Links website:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/index.htm



1. Provincial-territorial departments responsible for welfare : recent name changes in four provinces

Provincial-territorial departments
responsible for welfare : name changes

Four Canadian provinces have changed the name of the government department responsible for welfare in the past six months, usually as part of a change in government and a shuffling of departmental mandate.

NOTE : Government websites are not always updated in a timely fashion,
often because they are unable to keep up with the pace of change of government itself.
The Alberta departmental URL below reflects the new dept. name, but the other three provinces
have yet to convert their URLs to their new dept names. Expect more changes to come...

The new department names are as follows:

Alberta : Human Services *(See Alberta Supports, below)
http://humanservices.alberta.ca/

Prince Edward Island : Community Services and Seniors
http://www.gov.pe.ca/sss/index.php3

Newfoundland and Labrador : Advanced Education and Skills
http://www.hrle.gov.nl.ca/hrle/

Manitoba : Family Services and Labour
http://www.gov.mb.ca/fs/
Oops --- I meant Entrepreneurship, Training and Trade (ET&T)


MANITOBA
January 24 Update/correction

In the most recent Canadian Social Research Newsletter (Jan.22, 2012)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/personal/news220112.htm
... I passed along the new name of Department responsible for welfare in Alberta, Manitoba, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador.
I incorrectly identified the Manitoba Department responsible for welfare as
Family Services and Labour [ http://www.gov.mb.ca/fs/ ].
I meant Entrepreneurship, Training and Trade (ET&T)

A Manitoba Government official notified me to correct an error in the name of their welfare department. In the Manitoba government departmental reshuffling, welfare (income assistance) was moved out of the Department of Family Services and Labour (formerly Family Services and Consumer Affairs) to the Department of Entrepreneurship, Training and Trade (ET&T):
http://www.gov.mb.ca/ctt/index.html
...but as at January 24, the Manitoba ET&T website had zero content on income assistance, welfare or Employment and Income Assistance (the provincial welfare program). The Manitoba Cabinet was announced just recently, though, so the Web updating team is still in the process of changing the Manitoba govt. websites to reflect the new ministrial responsibilities and the new mandates in existing departments.

The Bottom line:

Manitoba govt. websites are being updated to reflect new govt. mandates; this may take a few more weeks...
The Dept responsible for welfare in Manitoba is Entrepreneurship, Training and Trade.

---
* Related link :

Alberta Supports (part of Human Services)
- Seniors - Employment & Training - Persons with Disabilities - Lower Income - Children & Youth - Abuse & Bullying - Homeless - Making Life Decisions
NOTE : This link may not work in your browser, because the URL contains a "+" symbol that apparently converts into something else in some browsers. If the link doesn't work, go to the Alberta Human Services home page [ http://humanservices.alberta.ca/ ] and click the "Alberta Supports" link at the bottom of the list of programs and services on that page.

Accountability Alert:

I'm less concerned about the effective dates of the name changes (they're available from the relevant departmental/Ministry websites) than I am about the upheaval of website content and the confusion that result from frequent departmental name and mandate changes, both provincially and federally. For governments to be truly accountable, qualitative and quantitative information on their operations and programs must be available not only for the current government's mandate, but right back to the mid-nineties when governments first started posting annual reports and program information to the World Wide Web. If governments and mandates change - as they always do - then it's a governmental responsibility to ensure that their sites include links to comprehensive archival material from previous governments.
Gilles

---

- Go to the Provincial/Territorial Welfare Departments page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfdepts.htm

- Go to the Key Provincial/Territorial Welfare Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare.htm

2. [Alberta] Provincial Government Invites Response to Social Policy Framework Discussion Guide - January 20
(Calgary Chamber of Voluntary Organizations
)

From the
Calgary Chamber of Voluntary Organizations:

Provincial Government Invites Response to Social Policy Framework Discussion Guide
http://goo.gl/Uxi9P
The Government of Alberta is in the early stages of developing a social policy framework. In the broadest sense, this framework is about inclusion and supporting a high quality of life for all Albertans. The Ministry of Human Services has developed a discussion guide that is intended to engage stakeholders in the process of developing the social framework. Included in the discussion guide is a series of questions stakeholders are encouraged to contemplate, and to which the Ministry invites comment. We are pleased that the province is engaging the nonprofit sector and other stakeholders in this important policy matter. This discussion guide, along with some context that was recently provided in a memo to the Alberta Nonprofit/Voluntary Sector Initiative (ANVSI), are both available to view online.

Comments can be forwarded by February 6, 2012, to Shannon Marchand or Lora Pillipow, whose full contact information can be found on the last page of the discussion guide. We at CCVO are interested in stakeholder response to this discussion guide and encourage you to copy us at policy@calgarycvo.org. Finally, CCVO is considering hosting a forum in Calgary for interested parties to discuss the social policy framework. Please let us know by Wednesday, January 25th if you would be interested in attending.

Developing a Social Policy Framework for Alberta:
Discussion Guide
(PDF - 124K, 4 pages)
http://www.calgarycvo.org/sites/default/files/resources/201201_SPFDiscussionGuide.pdf
January 18, 2012

Context for the Alberta Social Policy Framework Discussion Guide (PDF - 60K, 1 page)
http://www.calgarycvo.org/sites/default/files/resources/201201_ContextABSPFDiscussionGuide.pdf

Source:
Calgary Chamber of Voluntary Organizations
http://www.calgarycvo.org/
The voluntary sector is on the front lines of every community issue in the city. We represent Calgary's community infrastructure - the volunteers, employees and supporters of Calgary's nonprofit organizations.

Related link:

Alberta Nonprofit/Voluntary Sector Initiative (ANVSI)
http://culture.alberta.ca/anvsi/
The Alberta Nonprofit/Voluntary Sector Initiative's (ANVSI) purpose is to improve the quality of life for Albertans' through a viable Non-profit/Voluntary Sector (NPVS) which supports strong and vibrant communities.

---

- Go to the Alberta Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/abkmrk.htm

3. Growing income gap generates little blame, Environics poll suggests - January 19
(CBC News)

Growing income gap generates little blame, poll suggests
Canadians see large wealth disparities but few believe corporate profits are a bad thing

http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/story/2012/01/19/pol-focus-canada-environics-poll.html
January 19, 2012
Canadians continue to believe there's a significant income gap between the rich and the poor in their country, a new poll suggests. But there's no clear agreement on who's to blame for this perceived disparity. And only one Canadian in five thinks large corporate profits are bad. Highlights from the annual Focus Canada national public opinion survey by the Environics Institute were released at the Canada 2020 conference in Ottawa on Thursday afternoon. The full report will be available in March.

[ Comments (241):
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2012/01/19/pol-focus-canada-environics-poll.html#socialcomments ]

Related CBC Links:

* CHART | The wage gap in Canada
http://www.cbc.ca/news/interactives/canada-income/

* MAP | Income inequality around the globe
http://www.cbc.ca/news/interactives/income-inequality/

* Wealth gap widens to 30-year high
http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/story/2011/12/05/oecd-rich-poor-gap.html

* MAP | The Occupy Canada movement
http://www.cbc.ca/news/interactives/occupy-canada/

* ANALYSIS | Occupy Economics: Is the system broken?
http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/story/2011/10/17/f-pittis-occupy-economics.html

Source:
CBC News
http://www.cbc.ca/news/

---

- Go to the Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

4. Alberta : The Journey Towards a Provincial Poverty Reduction Strategy - January 18
(Alberta Urban Municipalities Association)

Alberta

Attention: Mayors, Councillors & CAOs:
The Journey Towards a Provincial Poverty Reduction Strategy
http://www.auma.ca/live/MuniLink/Communications/Member+Notices?contentId=13564
Member Notice
January 18, 2012
The Alberta Urban Municipalities Association (AUMA) joined the Action to End Poverty Network in late June 2011. The Network consists of non-profit associations (Alberta College of Social Workers, Public Interest Alberta, and the Edmonton Social Planning Council), municipal representatives and community stakeholders. Action to End Poverty is supported by the Inter-City Forum on Social Policy and several other non-governmental organizations and is coordinated out of the office of the Family and Community Support Services Association of Alberta. The focus of the Network is to endorse a call for the Province to develop a poverty-reduction strategy. So far, 27 municipalities have joined the Network.
Source:
Alberta Urban Municipalities Association
http://www.auma.ca/
The Alberta Urban Municipalities Association was founded in 1905 and represents Alberta’s 277 urban municipalities including cities, towns, villages, summer villages, and specialized municipalities, as well as Associate and Affiliate members.
AUMA is a dynamic and evolving association which represents and advocates the interests of all members to both the provincial and federal governments as well as other provincial and federal organizations.

Thanks for this link to Jennefer Laidley of the
Income Security Advocacy Centre:
[ http://www.incomesecurity.org/ ]

---

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

5. Crown - First Nations Gathering - January 23 -24, 2012

Crown - First Nations Gathering
January 23 -24, 2012

From the
Assembly of First Nations:

2012 First Nations Plan:
Honouring our Past, Affirming our Rights, Seizing our Future
(PDF - 2.2MB, 71 pages)
http://www.afn.ca/uploads/files/2012firstnationsplanen.pdf
Indigenous peoples have the right to self-determination. By virtue of that right they freely determine their political status and freely pursue their economic, social and cultural development. (Source:  Article 3 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP).

Also from AFN:

Standing Up For First Nation Governments
It’s Our Time to ACHIEVE change TOGETHER
(PDF - 932K, 12 pages)
[Powerpoint presentation by National Chief Shawn Atleo]
http://www.afn.ca/uploads/files/national_chief_update.pdf
December 2011

Source:
Assembly of First Nations
http://www.afn.ca/
The Assembly of First Nations (AFN) is the national organization representing First Nations citizens in Canada. This includes more than 800,000 citizens living in 633 First Nations communities, as well as rural and urban areas.

---

Historic First Nations summit may not yield concrete outcomes
First Nations chiefs headed to Ottawa to meet Prime Minister Harper next week
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/2012/01/19/pol-cp-first-nations-harper.html
January 19, 2012
First Nations chiefs want to negotiate a cabinet-approved timeline with the federal government that would see concrete improvements for native communities, possibly within the year. The chiefs will hold their first summit ever with Prime Minister Stephen Harper next Tuesday, the culmination of years of behind-the-scenes discussions. Harper is downplaying expectations for the gathering, saying an incremental approach works best.
Source:
CBC News
http://www.cbc.ca/news/

---

Assembly of First Nations (AFN) Chief Shawn Atleo
meets with the Ottawa Citizen Editorial Board
(video, duration 9:35)
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/Video+Chief+Shawn+Atleo/6019799/story.html
The Ottawa Citizen's editorial board met Thursday, January 19 (2012), with the Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo. Tuesday Prime Minister Stephen Harper will meet with Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo.
Source:
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/

---

Chiefs upbeat on First Nations summit prospects
http://goo.gl/cWVOm
January 20, 2012
First Nations leaders remain optimistic about next week's meeting with top government figures despite the absence of Finance Minister Jim Flaherty and the limited availability of Prime Minister Stephen Harper. Harper said Friday his role will be largely ceremonial at the First Nations summit, leaving the bulk of the work to the 10 ministers and 50 government staff who will be on hand.
Source:
CTV Winnipeg
http://winnipeg.ctv.ca/

6. From the Library of Parliament:
--- The Canada Health Transfer : Changes to Provincial Allocations
- February 25, 2011
--- Public Service Reductions in the 1990s: Background and Lessons Learned - April 12, 2010

The Canada Health Transfer:
Changes to Provincial Allocations

HTML version
http://parl.gc.ca/Content/LOP/ResearchPublications/2011-02-e.htm
PDF version (PDF - 170K, 12 pages)
http://parl.gc.ca/Content/LOP/ResearchPublications/2011-02-e.pdf
25 February 2011
By James Gauthier
The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of recent and expected changes to the Canada Health Transfer (CHT), and to determine the impacts of these changes on by-province allocations over time. The paper begins by providing background information on the composition and calculation of the CHT, follows with an explanation of changes to the CHT introduced since Budget 2007 and Budget 2009, and ends with an analysis of the impacts of expected changes to the CHT in 2014–2015.

Contents:

1. Introduction
2. Background
3. Health Reform Fund
4. Budget 2007 Commitments Affecting the Canada Health Transfer
5. Budget 2009 Commitments Affecting the Canada Health Transfer
6. Expected Change to the Canada Health Transfer Formula in 2014

Source:
Parliamentary Information and Research Service:
http://www.parl.gc.ca/About/Library/VirtualLibrary/ResearchPublications-E.asp

[ Library of Parliament Research Publications:
http://www.parl.gc.ca/About/Library/VirtualLibrary/ResearchPublicationsCurrent-e.asp ]

---

- Go to the Canada Assistance Plan / Canada Health and Social Transfer / Canada Social Transfer Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/cap.htm

---

Also from
the Library of Parliament:

Public Service Reductions in the 1990s: Background and Lessons Learned
HTML version:
http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/LOP/ResearchPublications/2010-20-e.htm
PDF version (32K, 12 pages):

http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/LOP/ResearchPublications/2010-20-e.pdf
By
Lydia Scratch
12 April 2010

Contents:

1 Introduction
2 Program Review – 1994–1999
3 Hiring Freeze – 2003
4 Effects of Reductions on the Public Service
4.1 Size of the Public Service and Actual Expenditures on Personnel
4.2 Type of Public Service Employment
4.3 Demographic Changes
4.4 Morale in the Public Service
5 Lessons Learned from the Program Review
6 Conclusion
Source:
International Affairs, Trade and Finance Division
Parliamentary Information and Research Service
Library of Parliament
[ Parliament of Canada:

http://www.parl.gc.ca/Default.aspx?Language=E ]

7. New Brunswick pre-budget consultation submission - January 2012
(
Common Front for Social Justice)

New Brunswick, Close to our Heart:
Brief presented to
Minister Blaine Higgs
Government of New Brunswick
For consideration in the 2012-2013 Budget
(PDF - 240K, 14 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/Brief_2012-13 budget_final.pdf
January 2012
By The Common Front for Social Justice (CFSJ)
http://www.frontnb.ca/en/Home_en.htm
The Common Front for Social Justice (CFSJ) is a non-profit organization whose mandate is to lobby for more justice, better social policy and a greater solidarity within society, especially with those living in poverty.

-------------------

Version française:

J'ai ma province à coeur:
Mémoire présenté au
Ministre Blaine Higgs,
Gouvernement du Nouveau-Brunswick
Dans le cadre des travaux menant au budget 2012-2013.
(fichier PDF - 264K, 16 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/Memoire_budget- 2012-13_FR-final.pdf
par
Le Front commun pour la justice sociale (FCJS)
http://www.frontnb.ca/fr/home_fr.htm

---

- Go to the New Brunswick Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nbkmrk.htm

8. SPAR Monitor - Monitoring Toronto's Social Change - January 18
(City of Toronto)

From the
City of Toronto:

SPAR Monitor - Monitoring Toronto's Social Change
[SPAR = Social Policy Analysis & Research, City of Toronto]
This bi-weekly bulletin is a quick inventory of recent social research information. Its purpose is to promptly
disseminate the most current external and internal research relevant to social policy.

SPARmonitor : January 18, 2012 (PDF - 152K, 5pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_72.pdf
Table of contents of this issue:
(Click the link above to access all content below)
* The Canada We Want in 2020
* A 2011 Global Snapshot of Canada
* Labour Force Update
* Fixing the Fiscal House: Alternative Macroeconomic Solutions for Ontario
* What’s wrong with American Housing?
* Where Does Crime Go After Public Housing Projects Are Demolished?
* State of Knowledge: Female Drunk Drivers
* Drug Costs Driving B.C. Residents to Skip Medication
Source:
SPARmonitor - Monitoring Toronto's Social Change
- includes links to bulletins from January to March 2011 (more to come) and to all 33 issues of SPARmonitor for 2010.
[ Social Development, Finance & Administration ]
[ City of Toronto ]

Related links:

Social Policy, Analysis and
Research Information Resources:

* Wellbeing Toronto:
www.toronto.ca/wellbeing

* Neighbourhood Profiles:
http://www.toronto.ca/demographics/neighbourhoods.htm

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm

9. Three news releases from the Council of the Federation - January 17:
--- Growing the Economy
--- Premiers Appoint Working Group on Fiscal Arrangements
--- Premiers Announce Health Care Innovation Working Group

Three news releases from the
Council of the Federation:

Growing the Economy (small PDF file - 1 page)
http://www.councilofthefederation.ca/pdfs/Communique_Economy_Jan_17.pdf
VICTORIA, January 17, 2012 – Premiers emphasized the importance of growing the Canadian economy and focused on key actions to enhance prosperity [more...]

Premiers Appoint Working Group on Fiscal Arrangements (small PDF file - 1 page)
http://www.councilofthefederation.ca/pdfs/Communique_Finance_Jan_17.pdf
VICTORIA, January 17, 2012 – Mindful of both the uncertainty in the global economy and the economic value of Canada’s health systems, Canada’s Premiers committed to working together on fiscal arrangements to find solutions that will work for the benefit of all Canadians – in all provinces and territories. [more...]

Premiers Announce Health Care Innovation Working Group (small PDF file - 1 page)
http://www.councilofthefederation.ca/pdfs/Communique_Task%20Force_Jan_17.pdf
VICTORIA, January 17, 2012 – Premiers announced that Prince Edward Island Premier Robert Ghiz and Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall will co-chair a Health Care Innovation Working Group composed of all provincial and territorial health ministers. While acknowledging that Canada’s provinces and territories are pursuing innovation in their own jurisdictions, Premiers recognize that more can be done together

Source:
Council of the Federation
http://www.councilofthefederation.ca/
Version française du site:
Conseil de la Fédération
http://www.conseildelafederation.ca/

On December 5, 2003, Canada’s Premiers proudly announced in Charlottetown the creation of the Council of the Federation. It is a new institution for a new era in collaborative intergovernmental relations*. The Council of the Federation was created by Premiers because they believe it is important for provinces and territories to play a leadership role in revitalizing the Canadian federation and building a more constructive and cooperative federal system.
[ About Us:
http://www.councilofthefederation.ca/aboutcouncil/aboutcouncil.html ]

Related links:


Canadian Health Coalition
http://healthcoalition.ca/
The Canadian Health Coalition is a public advocacy organization dedicated to the preservation and improvement of Medicare. Our membership is comprised of national organizations representing nurses, health care workers, seniors, churches, anti-poverty groups, women and trade unions, as well as affiliated coalitions in nine provinces and one territory.

Provincial & Territorial Coalitions
http://healthcoalition.ca/main/about-us/provincial-territorial-coalitions/


10. Four-part special series on the growth of inequality in Canada - December 20
(Vancouver Sun)

From the
Vancouver Sun:

A four-part special series on the growth of inequality in Canada by David Green, Thomas Lemieux, Kevin Milligan, Craig Riddell and Nicole Fortin (all professors of economics at the University of B.C.)

Putting numbers on inequality : Part 1
http://www.vancouversun.com/business/Putting+numbers+inequality+Part/5858241/story.html
December 20, 2011
The Occupy movement occupied a lot of political attention this fall in Vancouver. While it often seemed muddled in its goals, the one message that did come through was a concern with growing inequality.
The media has talked a lot about U.S. inequality trends, but we may be more concerned about what is happening in Canada. Digging into Canadian trends can point us to how, as a society, we ought to respond.

The top one per cent aren’t all financiers : Part 2
http://www.vancouversun.com/business/cent+aren+financiers+Part/5862175/story.html
December 20, 2011

The forces that are driving income inequality : Part 3
http://www.vancouversun.com/business/forces+that+driving+income+inequality+Part/5868143/story.html
December 20, 2011

Redressing inequality with taxes : Part 4
http://www.vancouversun.com/business/Redressing+inequality+with+taxes+Part/5876902/story.html

Source:
Vancouver Sun

http://www.vancouversun.com/

---

- Go to the Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

11. Poverty: A Huge Cost to Our Health-care System - January 16
(Megan Yarema in Huffington Post Canada)

Poverty: A Huge Cost to Our Health-care System
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/megan-yarema/canada-health-care-transfers_b_1209145.html
January 16, 2012
By Megan Yarema

Today the premiers meet with the federal government to discuss the future of the Canada Health Transfer (CHT) and Canada Social Transfer (CST) which support provincial health and social systems. The transfers are critical funding streams that can improve the dismal welfare rates, long hospital wait times, and limited child care spaces that plague all provinces. As governments are expected to do more with less, it is important to talk about addressing poverty. Poverty equals poor health and costs society billions of dollars each year, making it a key component of any conversation on health and social programs. (...) While the debate on the future of the CHT has garnered media attention in the past few weeks, little commentary is surfacing on the funding of the CST, which directly impacts programs that benefit people with low-income. The CST specifically supports provincial and territorial social assistance, post-secondary education, and reaches other social programs such as housing and childcare. Adequately funding these programs and reducing poverty saves money -- the federal government could save $7.6 billion annually on health costs, and $2.9 billion in Ontario alone according to the Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB) Cost of Poverty report. (...) Both the CHT and CST will be renewed in 2014 and discussions around these investments are taking place this week in Victoria, B.C. at the Council of the Federation meeting amidst talk of budget cuts and austerity.

[ Author Megan Yarema is with Canada Without Poverty (CWP) : http://www.cwp-csp.ca/ ]

Source:
Huffington Post Canada
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Organizations Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ngobkmrk.htm

- Go to the Health Links (Canada/International) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/health.htm

12. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Consumer Price Index, December 2011 - January 20
--- Employment Insurance, November 2011 - January 19

What's new from The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

-----------------------------

January 20, 2012
Consumer Price Index, December 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120120/dq120120a-eng.htm
Consumer prices rose 2.3% in the 12 months to December, following a 2.9% increase in November. On a seasonally adjusted monthly basis, consumer prices fell 0.2% in December.
- includes links to three tables:
* Consumer Price Index and major components, Canada
* Consumer Price Index by province, and for Whitehorse, Yellowknife and Iqaluit
* Consumer Price Index and major components

Source:
The Consumer Price Index - product main page*
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=62-001-X&lang=eng
This monthly release of the The Consumer Price Index (CPI) for Canada, the provinces, Whitehorse and Yellowknife, provides a descriptive summary of retail price movements, inflation rates and the factors underlying them. The CPI also contains the following tabular information: latest price index movements for the eight major components; price index changes on one and 12-month bases for an extensive number of components and groups; historical monthly information; and price indices reclassified according to categories of goods and services.
* On the product main page, click View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

[ earlier editions of this report:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=62-001-X&chropg=1&lang=eng ]

Guide to the Consumer Price Index (1998)
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=62-557-X&lang=eng

Related subjects:

* Prices and price indexes
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=3956&lang=eng&more=0

* Consumer price indexes
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=3956&id=2178&lang=eng&more=0

 

January 19, 2012
Employment Insurance, November 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120119/dq120119b-eng.htm
In November, the number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits totalled 539,000, virtually unchanged from the previous month.
- includes three tables:
* Employment Insurance: Statistics by province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by age group, sex, province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by census metropolitan areas

Related link:

Employment Insurance Statistics Maps, November 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/73-002-x/73-002-x2011010-eng.htm
- change in number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits in the last 12 months, by Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations.
- incl. Intro to maps + link to November 2011 maps [in the left margin]

Source:
Employment Insurance Statistics Maps - Product main page*
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=73-002-X&lang=eng
Set of maps presenting Employment Insurance Statistics. The maps show the percentage change in the number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits in the last 12 months, by Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) and Census Agglomerations (CAs), using 2001 Census geography. Data are also shown in a tabular format.
---
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue
of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Tables by subject: Employment insurance, social assistance and other transfers
http://www40.statcan.gc.ca/l01/ind01/l3_2621_2627-eng.htm?hili_none

Related subjects:

* Labour
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=2621&lang=eng&more=0

* Employment insurance, social assistance and other transfers
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=2621&id=2627&lang=eng&more=0

* Non-wage benefits
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=2621&id=2628&lang=eng&more=0

[ earlier editions of this report:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=73-002-X&chropg=1&lang=eng ]

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm

 

The Daily Archives
- select a month and year from the drop-down menus and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

13. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
http://www.childcarecanada.org

January 21, 2012

What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

Hidden Value: Demonstrating the extraordinary impact of women's voluntary and community organisations
http://goo.gl/0Ezws
18 Jan 2012
Europe
Research by the Women’s Resource Centre (UK) finds that on average, over five years, for every £1 invested in women’s services, between £5 and £11 worth of social value is generated for women, their families and the State.

Families that work: Policies for reconciling parenthood and employment
http://goo.gl/j19qm
18 Jan 2012
United States
Book by Janet Gornick and Marcia Meyers "takes a close look at the family-work policies in the United States and abroad and calls for a new and expanded role for the U.S. government in order to bring this country up to the standards taken for granted in many other Western nations."

Right from the start: Transition strategies for establishing a strong preK-3 continuum
http://goo.gl/w29QC
17 Jan 2012
United States
Report from American Federation of Teachers addresses how to improve children's transition from preschool to kindergarten; profiles from 8 communities describe strategies to improve transitions for children.

Societal values and policies may curtail preschool children's physical activity in child care centers
http://goo.gl/QiLRC
17 Jan 2012
United States
Research identifies three main barriers to children's physical activity in child care centres as injury concerns, financial constraints, and a focus on academics; concludes that "societal priorities for young children-safety and school readiness-may be hindering children's physical development."

Are we doing enough? A status report on Canadian public policy and child and youth health
http://goo.gl/IaxAw
17 Jan 2012
Canada
Report from the Canadian Pediatric Society identifies the status of public policies affecting children and youth; calls on "the federal government to implement a national child care strategy, with an integrated system of services that are universal and publicly funded."MORE research, policy & practice
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice

2. Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad.

Benefits of high quality child care persist 30 years later
http://goo.gl/aT2UV
20 Jan 2012 | United States

Will childcare centres be axed?
http://goo.gl/JKdsS
20 Jan 2012 | Ontario

Public day care is best
http://goo.gl/efTu8
20 Jan 2012 | Canada

What publicly funded child care means to parents
http://goo.gl/tmTG2
20 Jan 2012 | Ontario

Govt. to expand free childcare services for children
http://goo.gl/yC5IY
19 Jan 2012 | Asia

MORE child care in the news
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

------

Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
http://www.childcarecanada.org/res/enews/index.html
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere
http://www.childcarecanada.org/links/index.html

CRRU Publications
http://www.childcarecanada.org/pubs/
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

ISSUE files
http://www.childcarecanada.org/resources/issue-files
- theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
http://www.childcarecanada.org
CRRU is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

14. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.. The Dispatch is distributed by the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. News articles from online newspapers are posted here in a number of general categories, and are tagged with more specific keywords relevant to each article.

Tags
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/tags/
Clicking on a word or expression in the list of tags will call up all relevant news items from past Dispatches under that tag. The list contains a tag for each U.S. state so you can view jurisdiction-specific news, and tags for a huge list of topics, including :
* Basic needs * Canada * Caseloads * Cash assistance * Cellular phones * Census * Charities * Child care * Child hunger * Child poverty * Child support * Child welfare * Child well-being * Chronic homelessness * Cohabitation * Cost of living * Crime * Crimes against the homeless * Debt * Deep poverty * Disability * Early childhood education * Earned income tax credit * Electronic benefit transfers * Eligibility * Food insecurity * Food programs * Foster care* Fuel poverty * Health care costs * Health insurance coverage * Homeless children * Homeless families * Homeless veterans * Housing First * Housing subsidies * Immigrant workers * Income * Income inequality * Jobless benefits * Juvenile justice * Legal aid * Low-income housing * Low-wage work * Medicaid * Microfinance * Minimum wage * Newly poor * No Child Left Behind * Ontario * Paid family leave * Payday lending * Persistent poverty * Poverty measurement * Poverty rate * Prisons * Privatization * Public Housing * Rural poverty * Safety net * SCHIP * Section 8 (Housing) * Seniors * Single parents * SNAP/Food Stamps * Supplemental Security Income * Taxes * Teen pregnancy * Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) * Unemployment rate * Uninsured * Urban poverty * Utilities * Welfare reform * Welfare-to-work * Women Infants and Children (WIC) * Work requirements * Youth employment * many more tags...

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

January 20:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/01/20/
Teen Pregnancy
Politics and Poverty
High School Dropout Age - Kentucky

January 19:
States and Children’s Health Care Coverage
Recession and Child Well-being
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/01/19/

January 18:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/01/18/
US Homelessness Rate
No Child Left Behind Waiver - Oregon

January 17:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/01/17/
Public Prekindergarten Programs
Child Poverty - Virginia
Public Program Overpayments - Wisconsin

---------------------------------

Earlier Poverty Dispatches (back to July 2006):
1. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/
2. Click on a date in the calendar (top right-hand corner of the page) to see the links for that date.
Change the month by clicking the link at the bottom of the calendar.
OR
3. Click on a category or a tag (right-hand margin) to access all relevant links.
[ e.g., 588 links under the category "Poverty" - http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/categories/poverty/ ]
OR
4. Scroll down the home page to the Archives section, where you can view the full content of the dispatches by month back to July 2006 (although *some* media links tend to go 404 after awhile)...
NOTE: I highly recommend this excellent U.S. media resource!
The only shortcoming I encountered was the lack of a table of contents for each daily dispatch, which forces visitors to click each date in the calendar to see the contents of the daily dispatch for that day. So I've created my own archive (the link below), starting in mid-December of 2011, that is a table of contents of each dispatch as per the latest dispatches above, that lets you scan contents without opening each damn dispatch:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/povdispatch_archive.htm

---

NOTE : You can subscribe to this email list or RSS feed
by clicking "Subscribe" in the right-hand margin on any page of the Poverty Dispatch website

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)

http://www.irp.wisc.edu

University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://www.wisc.edu/

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

15. Right-Wing Talking Points Translated Into English - August 19, 2010
(The Conservative Lie - blog)

Right-Wing Talking Points Translated Into English
http://cons-lie.com/2010/08/19/right-wing-talking-points-translated-into-english/
August 19, 2010
In an effort to serve the public, let me offer this handy translation of some of the current rightist talking points into a more understandable common English. These points are often heard on talk radio and Faux “News”, or are written in the conservative blogosphere or newspapers published by ultra-rich cult leaders.
Source:
The Conservative Lie
http://cons-lie.com/
A blog about the lies that the new conservative movement tell and how they use them to convince otherwise intelligent people in the U.S. to vote against their own self interests.

---

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

16. Wikipedia U.S. 24-hr blackout : What are SOPA and PIPA? January 16
(Toronto Star)

Wikipedia plans blackout Wednesday to protest piracy law
http://www.thestar.com/news/world/article/1116523
January 16, 2012
By Yinka Adegoke
Wikipedia [ http://en.wikipedia.org/ ], the popular community-edited online encyclopedia, will black out its English-language site for 24 hours to seek support against proposed U.S. anti-piracy legislation that Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales said threatens the future of the Internet. The U.S. service will be the highest profile name to join a growing campaign starting at midnight Wednesday that will see it black out its page so that visitors will only see information about the controversial Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and the Protect Intellectual Property Act (PIPA). (...) The bills pit technology companies like Google Inc. and Facebook against the bill’s supporters, including Hollywood studios and music labels, which say the legislation is needed to protect intellectual property and jobs.
Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

From the
New York Times:

Protest on Web Uses Shutdown to Take On Two Piracy Bills
By Jenna Wortham
January 17, 2012
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/18/technology/web-wide-protest-over-two-antipiracy-bills.html

17. [U.S.] Five Things You Probably Don’t Know About Food Stamps) - January 20
(
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities)

New from the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:

Five Things You Probably Don’t Know About Food Stamps
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/five-things-you-probably-dont-know-about-food-stamps/
January 20, 2012
The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as the Food Stamp Program, is in the news these days because of comments made by some Republican presidential candidates. Below are five things you probably don’t know about the program.
1. A large and growing share of SNAP households are working households.
2. SNAP responded quickly and effectively to the recession.
3. Today’s large SNAP caseloads mostly reflect the extraordinarily deep and prolonged recession and the weak recovery.
4. SNAP has one of the most rigorous quality control systems of any public benefit program.
5. SNAP’s recent growth is temporary.

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP)
http://www.cbpp.org/
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals.

---

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

18. Inequality rises across the G20 as economic growth leaves the poor behind - January 18
(Oxfam International)

Inequality rises across the G20 as economic growth leaves the poor behind
Strong economic growth since 1990 has failed to lift people out of poverty in almost every G20 country, according to a study by international agency Oxfam.

http://www.oxfam.ca/news-and-publications/news/inequality-rises-across-g20-economic-growth-leaves-poor-behind
News Release
18 January 2012
Left behind by the G20? shows the importance of policies to address inequality if growth is to benefit those living in poverty. (...) Since 1990, income inequality has increased in 14 of the 18 Group of 20 countries for which there are comparable statistics, says Oxfam’s report card. Inequality increased fastest in Russia, China, Japan and South Africa, with Canada following close behind.

The Oxfam report:

Left behind by the G20? How inequality and environmental degradation
threaten to exclude poor people from the benefits of economic growth
(PDF - 648K, 47 pages)
http://goo.gl/8x0qe
January 2012
Average global income per person has doubled over the last forty years.2 The proportion of the world’s population living in poverty has fallen significantly over the same period, but the absolute number remains high: 1.3 billion people still live on less than $1.25 a day. More than half of these women and men are in G20 countries. [Source : Introduction, p. 6]

Source:
Oxfam International
http://www.oxfam.org/
Oxfam is an international confederation of 15 organizations working together in over 90 countries and with partners and allies around the world to find lasting solutions to poverty and injustice.

See also:

Oxfam Canada
http://www.oxfam.ca/
Oxfam Canada is a member of the international confederation Oxfam. Oxfam has 15 national Oxfam agencies that together work in 92 countries. Oxfam Canada works with partner organizations in developing countries; tackling the root causes of poverty and inequity and helping people to create self-reliant and sustainable communities.

Oxfam Canada Annual Report 2011
http://www.oxfam.ca/news-and-publications/publications-and-reports/oxfam-canada-annual-report-2011
Accountability. It’s a commitment Oxfam takes very seriously – to our partners, to our donors, but most importantly, to women and men, girls and boys living in poverty.

Related link:

Poverty lingers in prosperous G20, Oxfam says
http://www.thestar.com/news/world/article/1117866
January 18, 2012
By Olivia Ward
The image of the G20’s rising giants is enticing: Chinese tourists trotting the globe, Indians lining up for electronic luxuries, Russian petrodollars fuelling designer boutiques. But the reality for many in the world’s most prosperous countries is far grimmer, says a report released Thursday by the international charity Oxfam. And economic growth numbers tell only a fraction of the story.
Source:
Toronto Star

http://www.thestar.com/

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Organizations Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ngobkmrk.htm

- Go to the Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

19. Spain joins Italy, France and Germany in support of Robin Hood Tax - January 18
(
National Union of Public and General Employees)

New Spanish Prime Minister backs Robin Hood Tax
http://www.nupge.ca/content/4764/new-spanish-prime-minister-backs-robin-hood-tax
With Italy, France and Germany already in support, the UK is now
the only centre-right Government amongst Europe's five biggest economies not to back the tax.

Madrid
18 Jan. 2012
On Jan. 16, new Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy said that Spain supports the introduction of a Financial Transaction Tax. Speaking at a joint press conference with French President Nicolas Sarkozy in Madrid, Rajoy confirmed that France could count on Spain's "political support", saying “I’m in favour of the tax on financial transactions.” He called for a quick decision on the implementation of the tax, and stressed that it was necessary to study "some details" of the initiative to ensure the tax would not affect consumers.
Source:
National Union of Public and General Employees (NUPGE)

http://www.nupge.ca/
NUPGE is one of Canada's largest labour organizations with over 340,000 members. Our mission is to improve the lives of working families and to build a stronger Canada by ensuring our common wealth is used for the common good.

Related links:

Robin Hood tax - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robin_Hood_tax

Canada:

robinhoodtax.ca
Every so often, a proposal comes along that would transform everything. Every so often, activists and people in power end up on the same side of an issue. Every so often, the solution isn’t complicated … just brilliant. Every so often, we get the chance to be part of something huge. We have that chance right now, and it’s called The Robin Hood Tax. A tiny fee on the trade in financial transactions – paid by banks, not by people – it would raise billions of dollars for fighting poverty and climate change at home and around the world.

* How the Robin Hood Tax works

---

- Go to the The Tobin Tax / Robin Hood Tax Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/tobin.htm

20. CRINMAIL (Newsletter of the Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):
http://www.crin.org/

CRINMAIL - children's rights newsletter
Latest issue:

18 January 2012 - CRINMAIL Issue 1259
http://www.crin.org/email/crinmail_detail_popup.asp?crinmailID=4061
In this issue:
Latest news and reports
- Challenging potential setbacks
- Children's Rights Wiki: Spotlight on Panama
- Land-grab and human safari
- Unveiling arbitrary powers
- 'No government obligation'
- UN news
- CRIN in Russian!
Upcoming events
Employment
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Issues * Law
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

-----------------------------------------------

See http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm
for the table of contents for, and links to, a large collection of issues of CRINMAIL.
NOTE : The CRIN "Links to Issues of CRINMAIL" (next link below) doesn't include the table of contents for each issue.

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL (from CRIN)
http://goo.gl/C0JNx
- links to earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL (incl. subscription info)
http://www.crin.org/email/

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
http://www.crin.org/

---

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
http://www.cupe.ca/
Thanks, CUPE!

------------------------

If you wish to receive this weekly newsletter by email, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly newsletter.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

 

More Animal Facts

* All porcupines float in water.
* The cells which make up the antlers of a moose are the fastest growing animal cells in nature.
* A hedgehog's heart beats 300 times a minute on average.
* You can tell a girl crab from a boy crab by their stomachs. A girl has a beehive and a boy has a lighthouse.
* The pH of cow's milk is 6.
* The world's smallest mammal is the bumblebee bat of Thailand, weighing less than a penny.
* The Dalmatian is the only dog that gets gout.
* You should not eat a crawfish with a straight tail. It was dead before it was cooked.
* The distance between an alligator's eyes, in inches, is directly proportional to the length of the alligator, in feet.
* Kiwi birds are the only birds with their nostrils at the end of their beak rather than the top.
* All elephants walk on tip-toe, because the back portion of their foot is made up of all fat and no bone.
* Giraffes have no vocal chords.
* A fullgrown bear can run as fast as a horse.
* When opossums are playing opossum, they are not "playing." They actually pass out from sheer terror.
* Rhinos are in the same family as horses, and are thought to have inspired the myth of the unicorn.
* Camels have three eyelids to protect themselves from blowing sand.
* A lion's roar can be heard from five miles away.
* The cheetah is the only cat in the world that can't retract it's claws.
* Dogs and humans are the only animals with prostates.
* The placement of a donkey's eyes in its' heads enables it to see all four feet at all times
* Roosters can't crow if they can't fully extend their necks.
* The fingerprints of koala bears are virtually indistinguishable from those of humans, so much so that they could be confused at a crime scene.
* Oak trees do not have acorns until they are fifty years old or older.
* Cat's urine glows under a blacklight.
* An iguana can stay under water for twenty-eight minutes.
* Ben and Jerry's send the waste from making ice cream to local pig farmers to use as feed. Pigs love the stuff, except for one flavor: Mint Oreo.
* Ostriches stick their heads in the sand to look for water.
* An eagle can kill a young deer and fly away with it.
* In the Caribbean there are oysters that can climb trees.
* Polar bears are left-handed.
* You can hold the mouth of an alligator shut with two fingers, but if you put a clenched fist in its mouth when it bites down it will break every bone in your hand.
* The platapus and the Echidna are the only mammals that don't give live birth.
* The world's termites outweigh the world's humans 10 to 1!

Source:
Unknown

---------------------------------------

And, in closing...

----------------------------------------

Top 20 Most Popular Canadian Websites
http://topsitesblog.com/canadian-websites/
Dang - didn't make the list again.

---

Interesting twist on 'Old McDonald Had a Farm'. (video, duration 6:11)
http://www.wimp.com/oldmcdonald/

---

1938 Dating Guide For Single Women
http://alligator-sunglasses.com/post/390543309/vintage-1938-dating-guide-single-women

---

How Spammers Get Email Addresses
Fighting spam is difficult.
How exactly does a spammer get your email address?
http://www.basiccomputerinformation.ca/how-spammers-get-email-addresses/

---

Email Spoofing
Here is a simple rule: You can no longer trust the sender's address on an e-mail.
It's as easy to fake as writing someone else's address on an envelope before dropping it in the mailbox.
http://www.webtech.on.ca/spoof.htm

---

FreeRice.com
http://freerice.com/
Each correct answer wins a donation of 10 grains of ricethrough the World Food Programme to help end hunger

.