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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
October 22, 2006

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 1707 subscribers.
Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes and a disclaimer.

I apologize for the extra copy of the newsletter that I sent out by accident last week...

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian Content

1. Victory possible in war on poverty (Oct. 21)... but Ontario still punishing poorest of its children (Oct. 22) - Toronto Star
2.  Tories prepare to change First Nation matrimonial property laws (Indian and Northern Affairs Canada) - October 20
3. What's New on the website of Québec's Ministère de l'Emploi et de la Solidarité sociale?
--- Financial Support Program - October 17
--- 2005-2006 annual management report of the Ministère de l’Emploi et de la Solidarité sociale
--- Year Two Report on the Government Action Plan to Combat Poverty and Social Exclusion

4. What's New from Human Resources and Social Development Canada:

--- Returns to college education: evidence from the 1990, 1995, and 2000 National Graduates Survey
--- Returns to University Level Education: Variations Within Disciplines, Occupations and Employment Sectors

5. Blueprint to End Homelessness [in Toronto] to be released October 26 (The Wellesley Institute)
6. Cycles of Homelessness: Understanding Eviction Prevention and its Relation to Homelessness (Acacia Consulting & Research for the National Homelessness Initiative) - March 2006
7. British Columbia Income-assistance cuts examined (The Georgia Straight) - October 19
8. What's New from Statistics Canada:
--- Consumer Price Index, September 2006 - October 20
--- Perspectives on Labour and Income - October 2006 edition
--- Leading indicators, September 2006 - October 18
--- Health Reports: Job satisfaction, stress and depression - October 17

9. Lower Health Costs by Helping the Hungry (British Columbia) StrategicThoughts.com - October 12

10. National Council of Welfare launches Canada-wide forum on anti-poverty work and income security - October 16

11. What's New from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (University of Toronto) - October 20

International Content

12. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
13. New plan says gender equality in the workforce makes economic sense (The World Bank)
- September/October 2006

Have a great week!

Gilles Séguin
Canadian Social Research Links

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net

E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com


1. Victory possible in war on poverty (Oct. 21)...
...but Ontario still punishing poorest of its children (Oct. 22).
(Toronto Star)

From The Toronto Star:

Ontario still punishing poorest of its children
October 22, 2006
Children living in families that receive welfare should be no less deserving of our help than any other poor children. Yet when the National Child Benefit Supplement was introduced in 1998, the Ontario government under former Conservative premier Mike Harris decided, in effect, there were two groups of families in the province — the deserving and the undeserving poor. It did that by clawing back the supplement from families that received welfare, and putting that money instead into child-care programs for working parents across the province. (...)
In British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Quebec, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, low-income families receive a separate, income-tested child benefit paid for all children in need. They receive the benefit regardless of whether the parents are working or, because of the circumstances they find themselves in, are forced to rely on welfare incomes that fall far below any measure of poverty. Ontario should adopt a similar program. Combined with federal funds, an Ontario Child Benefit could support all low-income families with children up to the age of 18.

Victory possible in war on poverty
October 21, 2006
In an effort to build a broad base of public support for a true national anti-poverty strategy, the National Council on Welfare launched a new website inviting Canadians to voice their opinions about the state of poverty in Canada and what politicians should do about it. (...) A reasonable and thorough program to start alleviating poverty has been developed through a co-operative effort of the Toronto City Summit Alliance, a broad-based coalition of civic leaders, and St. Christopher House, a Toronto neighbourhood centre that works with low-income people..."

More recent Toronto Star articles on poverty - 7-day archive search results from The Star ("Ontario AND poverty")
NOTE: the number of search results will vary depending on when you click the link - on October 22, there were links to 9 articles.

Related Links:

Time for a Fair Deal: Report of the Task Force on
Modernizing Income Security for Working-Age Adults
(PDF file - 271K, 67 pages)
May 2006
Source:
Task Force on Modernizing Income Security for Working Age Adults ("MISWAA")
- incl. links to : In the News · Press Releases · Task Force and Working Group Members · Contact Us · Reports · Frequently Asked Questions

The Task Force is a joint initiative of St. Christopher House and the Toronto City Summit Alliance.

St. Christopher House
“St. Chris has 92 years of experience working with diverse individuals, families and groups. We provide support to people of all ages, including immigrants and people who are lower-income. We are not a religious organization in any way. St. Christopher House is strongly committed to community development in all aspects of our work.”

Toronto City Summit Alliance
"The Toronto City Summit Alliance is a coalition of civic leaders in the Toronto region. The Alliance was formed to address challenges to the future of Toronto such as expanding knowledge-based industry, poor economic integration of immigrants, decaying infrastructure, and affordable housing."

----------------------------------------

From the National Council of Welfare:

Anti-Poverty Strategy:
Poverty advisory council launches Canada-wide forum
[Press Release - October 16, 2006]

Online Anti-Poverty and Income Security Questionnaire - ends mid-December
[Read the press release above first for more information about this consultation, and then click on the online questionnaire link]

----------------------------------------

Hands Off! Stop Taking Our Baby Bonus!
A campaign to stop the clawback of the National Child Benefit Supplement (NCBS)

"The Hands off! Campaign asks the Provincial and the Federal government to do 2 things:
* End the clawback of the National Child Benefit Supplement from families on social assistance, now!
* Fund the reinvestment programs that work for low-income families out of other provincial and federal revenues.
- includes links to : Take Action | Send an e-Card | Lobby MPP / MP | Endorse Campaign | Links | Income Security Advocacy Centre | Contact Us
Source:
Income Security Advocacy Centre (ISAC)
"The Income Security Advocacy Centre works with and on behalf of low income communities in Ontario to address issues of income security and poverty

----------------------------------------

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

2. Tories prepare to change First Nation matrimonial property laws - October 20
(Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
)

Tories prepare to change First Nation matrimonial property laws
October 20, 2006
The Conservative government has made its intention known that it will introduce a law this spring to protect the property rights of Aboriginal women in the event of separation or divorce, although some Aboriginal critics are wondering how the government will enforce the law on First Nation communities. "Our objective will be to remove the human rights vacuum existing for Aboriginal women," said Indian Affairs Minister Jim Prentice, in a recent press conference. "This will be about empowering First Nation women."
At present, when there is a breakdown of a marriage or common law relationship on reserve, there is no legal provision for an equitable division of the matrimonial real property, that is the family home and the land on which it is situated. The Indian Act, which governs most aspects of reserve life, is silent on the issue. The goal of the consultations is aimed at filling this legislative void and ensuring the welfare and security of families living on reserves.
Source:
The First Perspective and The Drum
"Aboriginal, First Nations and Native News in Canada, NW Ontario and Manitoba"
The First Perspective and The Drum are published together monthly by Taiga Communications Inc. at Brokenhead First Nation, Scanterbury, Manitoba.
Taiga Communications is politically independent and is Aboriginal owned and operated.

Related Links from Indian and Northern Affairs Canada:

Addressing Matrimonial
Real Property On-Reserve

- incl. links to : * Consultations * Background Information * Reference Documents * Partners * What's New * Contact Us * Make your voice heard!

Addressing Matrimonial Property Rights on Reserves:
Canada, AFN and NWAC Move Forward with Consultations

News Release
OTTAWA, ONTARIO (September 29, 2006) – The Honourable Jim Prentice, Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-status Indians, accompanied by Beverley Jacobs, President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC), and Phil Fontaine, National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations (AFN), today launched the second phase of a national consultation process on the issue of the division of matrimonial real property on reserve.
Source:
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Partners:
Native Women’s Association of Canada
Assembly of First Nations

Related Link from CBC News:

Ottawa, native groups tackle matrimonial property rights issue
September 29, 2006

- Go to the First Nations Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/1stbkmrk.htm

3. What's New on the website of Québec's Ministère de l'Emploi et de la Solidarité sociale?
--- Financial Support Program - October 17
---
2005-2006 annual management report of the Ministère de l’Emploi et de la Solidarité sociale
--- Year Two Report on the Government Action Plan to Combat Poverty and Social Exclusion

What's New on the website of the Ministère de l'Emploi et de la Solidarité sociale? <===this is the English home page of the Ministry
(Ministry of employment and social solidarity, responsible for welfare in Québec)

October 17, 2006
Financial Support Program
A new section of the Web site presents the financial support program to assist the overall mission of community development corporations working to combat poverty.

October 17, 2006
2005-2006 annual management report of the
Ministère de l’Emploi et de la Solidarité sociale now available on the Internet
The 2005-2006 annual management report of the Ministère de l’Emploi et de la Solidarité sociale was tabled in the National Assembly on October 17 and is now available on the Internet.
Annual report (French only, PDF file - 3.8MB, 112 pages)

Related Links:

Government Action Plan to Combat Poverty and Social Exclusion – Year One Report (PDF file - 601K, 47 pages)
June 2005
This document constitutes the first review of the measures implemented under the Government Action Plan to Combat Poverty and Social Exclusion. In addition to an overview of these measures and a first year activity report, an outlook for 2005-2006 is also provided.
NOTE: This report is the predecessor to
the Year Two report, which is available only in French (see "Bilan de la deuxième année" six links down from here).
This Year One report provides a good overview of the Québec Government's Action Plan to Combat Poverty and Social Exclusion.

Government Action Plan to Combat Poverty and Social Exclusion (PDF file - 394K, 66 pages)
April 2004
Detailed information on the Plan that is "built around two principles: economic security and social inclusion through employment, and increased protection for people with significant employment limitations." (excerpt from the Minister's Message)

National Strategy to Combat Poverty and Social Exclusion
- incl. links to : Overview * Summary of consultation process * Bill * Parliamentary committee * Useful links * Policy statement * Summary of policy statement * Report on government action
"With its National Strategy to Combat Poverty and Social Exclusion, under the theme, “The Will to Act, The Strength to Succeed”, the Québec government intends to progressively transform Québec, over a ten-year period, into one of the industrialized societies with the least poverty..."

------------------------------------
------------------------------------

Available in French only:

Quoi de neuf du Ministère de l'Emploi et de la Solidarité sociale:

Rapport annuel de gestion 2005-2006 du ministère
de l’Emploi et de la Solidarité sociale
(fichier PDF - 3,8Mo, 112 pages)
Le 17 octobre, le Rapport annuel de gestion 2005-2006 du ministère de l’Emploi et de la Solidarité sociale a été déposé à l’Assemblée nationale.

Journée internationale pour l'élimination de la pauvreté
- Bilan positif du gouvernement du Québec pour son engagement à lutter contre la pauvreté et l'exclusion sociale
Communiqué de presse
Le 17 octobre 2006
À l’occasion de la Journée internationale pour l’élimination de la pauvreté, la ministre de l’Emploi et de la Solidarité sociale a déposé, aujourd’hui, le bilan de la deuxième année du Plan d’action gouvernemental en matière de lutte contre la pauvreté et l’exclusion sociale. La deuxième année de mise en œuvre du plan d’action a été marquée par la poursuite des efforts déjà consentis et par la réalisation de nouvelles mesures.

Plan d’action gouvernemental en matière de lutte contre la pauvreté et l’exclusion sociale 2004-2009
Bilan de la deuxième année
(fichier PDF - 812Ko, 41 pages)
Octobre 2006

17 octobre 2006
Programme de soutien financier
Une nouvelle rubrique présente le programme de soutien financier en appui à la mission des corporations de développement communautaire intervenant...

Liens connexes:

Le Québec s’est donné l’objectif de l’année 2013 pour être parmi les nations industrialisées où il y a le moins de personnes pauvres
Communiqué : Journée internationale pour l’élimination de la pauvreté
Le mardi 17 octobre 2006
En cette Journée internationale pour l’élimination de la pauvreté, le Collectif rend hommage au courage des personnes qui vivent la pauvreté au quotidien et particulièrement les personnes seules, les grandes oubliées de l’action gouvernementale.
Source:
Collectif pour un Québec sans pauvreté

Plan d’action gouvernemental en matière de lutte
contre la pauvreté et l’exclusion sociale :
Bilan de la première année
(fichier PDF - 508Ko, 49 pages)
Juin 2005
"Ce document présente le premier bilan des mesures du Plan d'action gouvernemental en matière de lutte contre la pauvreté et l'exclusion sociale. En plus d'un sommaire du bilan et des résultats de la première année de mise en place du plan d'action, le document présente les perspectives pour l'année 2005-2006."

Au-delà de l’aide financière :
Sécurité du revenu - Plan d’action 2005-2006
(fichier PDF - 681Ko, 26 pages)
Juin 2005

Stratégie nationale de lutte contre la pauvreté et l'exclusion sociale
* Présentation * Bilan de la démarche de consultation * Loi * Commission parlementaire * Liens utiles * Énoncé de politique * Sommaire de l'Énoncé de politique * Bilan des actions gouvernementales
«Amener progressivement le Québec, d'ici dix ans, au nombre des nations industrialisées comptant le moins de pauvreté. Tel est l'objectif que le gouvernement du Québec s'est fixé avec la Stratégie nationale de lutte contre la pauvreté et l'exclusion sociale.»

La toile de fond pour les réformes les plus récentes :

Plan d’action gouvernemental en matière de
lutte contre la pauvreté et l’exclusion sociale
(fichier PDF - 484Ko. 69 pages)
Avril 2004

- Go to the Québec Links (English) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qce.htm
- Rendez-vous à la page de liens de recherche sociale au Québec: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qcbkmrk.htm

4. What's New from Human Resources and Social Development Canada:
---
Returns to college education: evidence from the 1990, 1995, and 2000 National Graduates Survey
--- Returns to University Level Education: Variations Within Disciplines, Occupations and Employment Sectors

What's New from Human Resources and Social Development Canada:

Returns to college education: evidence from the 1990, 1995, and 2000 National Graduates Survey
September 2006
Using data from the National Graduates Survey ant the Census, this research paper examines earnings of recent college graduates by field of study as well as estimates the internal rates of return to college education.
Table of Contents:
* Title Page * Executive Summary * Introduction * Literature Review * Data * Profile of College Graduates * An Overview of Earnings Trends * Earnings by Field of Study * College vs. University Earnings * Conclusions * References
* Appendix Tables

Returns to University Level Education: Variations Within Disciplines, Occupations and Employment Sectors
September 2006
Using data from the National Graduates Survey ant the Census, this research paper examines earnings of recent college graduates by field of study as well as estimates the internal rates of return to college education.
Table of Contents:
* Title Page * Abstract * Introduction * Data * Methodology * Results * Comparison to Previous Literature * Summary and Policy Implications * References

- Go to the Education Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/education.htm
- Go to the Human Resources and Social Development Canada Links page - http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/hrsdc.htm
- Go to the Canadian Universities and Colleges Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/univbkmrk.htm

5. Blueprint to End Homelessness [in Toronto] to be released October 26
(The Wellesley Institute)

The Blueprint to End Homelessness [Toronto]
October 19, 2006
"On October 26th we will be releasing the The Blueprint along with a detailed policy framework with more than 100 pages, including:
* current data on housing and homelessness in Toronto;
* a review of Toronto’s housing history, going back to 1918; and,
* a ward-by-ward review of housing, homelessness and poverty.
Builders use a detailed blueprint to guide them from a good idea to a finished structure. That’s the idea behind the Blueprint to End Homelessness in Toronto."
- incl links to : Home - About Us - Research - Public Policy - Capacity Building - Why We Need A Blueprint - Toronto’s Housing History - Recommendations From Past Studies - The New York Blueprint - Tri-Partite Agreement in Saskatoon - Tri-Partite Agreement in Vancouver - Tri-Partite Agreements in Winnipeg - Scotland Vows to End Homelessness by 2012
Source:
The Wellesley Institute
The Wellesley Institute advances the social determinants of health through
rigorous community-based research, reciprocal capacity building, and the informing of public policy.

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

6. Cycles of Homelessness: Understanding Eviction Prevention and its Relation to Homelessness - March 2006
(Acacia Consulting & Research for the National Homelessness Initiative)

Highlights Report - Cycles of Homelessness:
Understanding Eviction Prevention and its Relation to Homelessness
(PDF file - 1.15MB, 16 pages)
March 2006
- highlights of a report produced as a result of a year-long study on eviction prevention in Vancouver, Ottawa, and Halifax. Titled "Cycles of Homelessness", the study was commissioned by the National Homelessness Initiative, and it complements an earlier study, "Cost Effectiveness of Eviction Prevention Programs", which was funded by Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation.
- To obtain a copy of the complete report, to receive more information on the study, to provide further comment, or to arrange a presentation or dialogue on research findings, please contact Kate Murray of Acacia Consulting & Research: [ kate@acaciaconsulting.ca ]
NOTE: I found this highlights report in the Housing and Homelessness Research section of the Quality of Life Reporting System, which is part of Housing and Homelessness in HRM, which is part of Halifax Regional Municipality in Nova Scotia. Explore each of the links below for some interesting tidbits and useful homelessness resources in Halifax and in Canada.
Housing and Homelessness Research

- part of Quality of Life Reporting System
- part of Housing and Homelessness in Halifax Regional Municipality
- part of Halifax Regional Municipality

As a followup to the study, Acacia Consulting & Research is conducting an online survey, "seeking feedback from key stakeholders in order to strengthen and inform study recommendations." Share your vision for the role of government in effective homelessness prevention initiatives.
Complete the Online Survey
("The Housing & Homelessness Branch, Human Resources & Social Development Canada, have expressed a strong interest in further exploring the subject of tenant eviction. As a result, there is an opportunity to inform the future program and research role to be played by the Housing & Homelessness Branch in the area of tenant eviction.")

Related Links:

Cost Effectiveness of Eviction Prevention Programs (PDF file - 112K, 4 pages)
November 2005
This research study examined the cost-effectiveness and factors leading to the success or failure of different eviction prevention initiatives, and compared the costs of these approaches to the costs of eviction incurred by landlords, tenants and social services agencies.
Source:
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

National Homelessness Initiative
- part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada

Acacia Consulting & Research

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

7. British Columbia Income-assistance cuts examined - October 19
(The Georgia Straight)

Income-assistance cuts examined
By rob mcmahon
October 19, 2006
"(...) The total provincewide income-assistance caseload (one case consists of a single person or a family) has dropped by 36 percent since 2001, when the ministry began implementing a range of policy changes, including introducing more stringent eligibility criteria for income-assistance applicants and measures that allowed easier removal of cases, scaling back on staff, closing offices, and cutting social-assistance programs. The Income Assistance Project, a qualitative five-year study conducted by researchers from UBC, SFU, and UNBC, is keeping tabs on the effects of this policy. Researchers are investigating how low-income, lone-mother families have been affected by the 2002 policy changes. Beginning in 2003, researchers worked with 22 single mothers in urban Vancouver and the rural Bulkley Valley. So far, they have found that these parents have been hit hard."
Source:
The Georgia Straight (Vancouver)

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (C-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

8. What's New from Statistics Canada:
---
Consumer Price Index, September 2006 - October 20
--- Perspectives on Labour and Income - October 2006 edition
--- Leading indicators, September 2006 - October 18
--- Health Reports: Job satisfaction, stress and depression - October 17

What's New from The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

October 20, 2006
Consumer Price Index, September 2006
The 18.7% drop in gasoline prices substantially decreased the 12-month change of the All-items Consumer Price Index from 2.1% in August to 0.7% in September. However, excluding energy, the index increased from 1.5% to 1.8% during the same period.

October 20, 2006
Perspectives on Labour and Income - October 2006 online edition (PDF file - 478K, 27 pages)
The October 2006 online edition of Perspectives on Labour and Income, released today, features two articles.

"Earnings instability" looks at trends in the earnings instability of lone parents and unattached individuals in the past two decades. It also examines the role of government transfers and the tax system in reducing income instability among lone parents and unattached individuals.

"Training through the ages" uses the 2003 Adult Education and Training Survey to compare the job-related training rate of older workers (55 to 64 years old) with that of younger workers (25 to 34 years old). The comparison is based on personal and job-related characteristics associated with training, such as employer support, self-directed learning, barriers faced by older and younger employees, as well as the objectives and outcomes of training. The study found that training opportunities are not evenly distributed. For example, those who are younger and more highly educated tend to participate in job-related training at a higher rate.

Earlier issues of
Perspectives on Labour and Income
- back to January 2002

October 18, 2006
Leading indicators, September 2006
The composite leading index rose 0.4% in September, after an upward-revised gain of 0.3% in August.

October 17, 2006
Health Reports: Job satisfaction, stress and depression
The vast majority of Canadian workers were satisfied with their jobs in 2002, but about 1 in 12 (around 1.3 million) were not. For workers of both sexes, high stress on and off the job was associated with depression.
Source:
Canadian Economic Observer
This monthly periodical is Statistics Canada's flagship publication for economic statistics. Each issue contains a monthly summary of the economy, major economic events and a feature article. A statistical summary contains a wide range of tables and graphs on the principal economic indicators for Canada, the provinces and the major industrial nations.

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

9. Lower Health Costs by Helping the Hungry (British Columbia) - October 12
(StrategicThoughts.com)

Lower Health Costs by Helping the Hungry (British Columbia)
October 12, 2006
According to the Dietitians of Canada, about 10% of Canadians "lack the funds to purchase sufficient, safe and nutritious food to meet their dietary needs and food preferences for an active healthy life." BC's Provincial Health Officer elaborated on hungry British Columbians in his latest annual report. In the highlights of his report, he stressed that: "Factors affecting the ability to afford nutritious food in BC include higher costs of a basic "market basket" of items, higher housing costs, inadequate social assistance rates, increased levels of homelessness, and a minimum wage level that can result in even full-time workers in some BC communities falling below the federal low-income cut-off." By raising both income assistance rates and the minimum wage, the Campbell government might lower health care costs and stimulate the economy.
Source:
StrategicThoughts.com

Related Link:

Food, Health and Well-Being in British Columbia:
Provincial Health Officer's Annual Report for 2005
: (PDF file - 4.6MB, 166 pages)
October 2006
Source:
British Columbia Office of the Provincial Health Officer
[Related News Release
- October 4]

- Go to the BC Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (C-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

10. National Council of Welfare launches Canada-wide
forum on anti-poverty work and income security - October 16

From the National Council of Welfare:

Anti-Poverty Strategy
Poverty advisory council launches Canada-wide forum
Press Release
October 16, 2006
The National Council of Welfare today, on the eve of the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty, is launching an on-line questionnaire at www.ncwcnbes.net to find out what Canadians think about solutions to poverty and insecurity in Canada. For over 25 years the NCW has published detailed statistics on poverty, with its most recent reports released in July and August this year. During the past quarter century, poverty rates among seniors have improved dramatically. For all other age groups, including children, poverty is as widespread as ever and for some people, poverty is deeper as well. (..) The questionnaire will run until mid-December and the results will be made public. They will also guide the advice the NCW provides to the federal government.

Anti-Poverty and
Income Security Questionnaire

Open the questionnaire Intro page (the link immediately above), select the version of the questionnaire that's appropriate for you (as an individual or an organization), read the welcome message and then scroll down the page to click on "Continue" at the bottom to navigate through the questionnaire; the questionnaire is running from a secure server - that's why you see the "https://..." in the Address bar of your browser - the "s" means "secure". A secure server ensures your privacy as you answer the questions.

Ottawa urged to establish poverty strategy
October 17, 2006
Ireland has one.
So does Quebec, and Newfoundland.
So why doesn't Canada have an anti-poverty strategy?
It's a question the federally mandated National Council of Welfare has been asking since it released two reports last summer that show poverty rates in Canada haven't budged for a generation and the poorest in the country are getting poorer. As part of global anti-poverty events this week, the council is inviting Canadians to add their two cents by responding to an online survey on its website.
Source:
The Toronto Star

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

11. What's New from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - October 20
(University of Toronto)

What's New - from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) - University of Toronto

Each week, the Childcare Resource and Research Unit disseminates its "e-mail news notifier", an e-mail message with a dozen or so links to new reports, studies and child care in the news (media articles) by the CRRU or another organization in the field of early childhood education and care (ECEC). What you see below is selected content from the most recent issue of the notifier.

20-Oct-06

---------------------------------------------------
What's New
---------------------------------------------------

STARTING STRONG II: PUBLIC POLICY IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND CARE
Summary of the Starting Strong II report presented at the Dissemination Conference, Reggio Emilia, Italy.
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=92436

CHILD POVERTY AND EARLY LEARNING AND CHILD CARE
To mark the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty, CRRU has developed a new Issue File that collects Canadian and international documents about ELCC and poverty.
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=92372

FOCUSED PUBLIC INVESTMENT STRATEGY: CHILD CARE SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION MODEL
Document from the Child Care Advocacy Association of Canada aims to “support governments and communities to cost and plan the implementation of universal, quality, community-based child care services.”
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=92435

MOTHERS’ VIEWS ON USING FORMAL CHILD CARE
Article from Australian Institute of Family Studies’ Family Matters Journal “explores mothers' reasons for using or not using child care, and their views on the child care available to them.”
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=92433

LINKING LICENSING TO QUALITY IN CHILD CARE
Article from Child Care Connection NS’ mini-journal examines the licensing process and how it can be improved.
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=92434


--------------------------------------------------
Child Care in the News
--------------------------------------------------


The social welfare state, beyond ideology
Jeffrey Sachs
Scientific American, November 2006 issue
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=92431

One mother in three is unhappy with child care [GB]
Daily Telegraph, 16 Oct 06
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=92429

Leadership hopeful Doerksen promises parents day care cash [CA-AB]
Canadian Press, 15 Oct 06
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=92432

Editorial: Let's stand up to fight poverty [CA]
Toronto Star, 14 Oct 06
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=92354

Junk food in child care centres: Is Saint-Laurent an exception? [CA-QC]
Saint-Laurent News, 13 Oct 06
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=92430

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
This message was forwarded through the Childcare Resource
and Research Unit e-mail news notifier. For information on the
CRRU e-mail notifier, including instructions for (un)subscribing,
see http://www.childcarecanada.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Related Links:

What's New? - Canadian, U.S. and international resources
Child Care in the News - media articles
Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere
CRRU Publications
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm
- Go to the Work-Life Balance Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/work_life_balance.htm

12. Poverty Dispatch:
U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs

Poverty Dispatch - U.S.
- links to news items from the American press about poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.
NOTE: this is a link to the current issue --- its content changes twice a week.

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to two dispatches a week back to June 1 (2006) when the Dispatch acquired its own web page and archive.

Poverty Dispatch Digest Archive - weekly digest of dispatches from August 2005 to May 2006
For a few years prior to the creation of this new web page for the Dispatch, I was compiling a weekly digest of the e-mails and redistributing the digest to my mailing list with IRP's permission.
This is my own archive of weekly issues of the digest back to August 2005, and most of them have 50+ links per issue. I'll be deleting this archive from my site gradually, as the links to older articles expire.

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

13. New plan says gender equality in the workforce makes economic sense - September/October 2006
(The World Bank)

What's New from the World Bank:

Empowering Women, Boosting Economies
New plan says gender equality in the workforce makes economic sense.
Press Release (September 16)
At the Annual Meetings in Singapore World Bank Group President, Paul Wolfowitz announced a four-year, US$ 24.5 million plan to enhance women’s economic power in key economic sectors in the developing world.Earlier statements by Mr. Wolfowitz that “women’s economic empowerment is smart economics…and a sure path to development,” spurred the Bank to take the lead in a plan to invest in women’s economic activity in the Bank’s client countries.
Story (October 4)
Gender Action Plan (PDF file - 365K, 29 pages) - September 2006
Gender Website

- Go to the Links to International Sites about Women's Social Issues page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/womeninternat.htm



Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research
Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:

gilseg@rogers.com

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18 PERKS OF BEING OVER 50

If you are not yet over 50, this is what you can look forward to:

1. Kidnappers are not very interested in you.

2. In a hostage situation, you are likely to be released first.

3. No one expects you to run... anywhere!

4. People call at 9 pm and ask, " Did I wake you ???? "

5. People no longer view you as a hypochondriac.

6. There is nothing left to learn the hard way.

7. Things you buy today won't wear out.

8. You can eat dinner at 4 pm.

9. You can live without sex, but not without your glasses.

10. You get into heated arguments about pension plans.

11. You no longer think of the speed limit as a challenge.

12. You quit trying to hold your stomach in no matter who walks into the room.

13. You sing along with elevator music.

14. Your eyes won't get much worse.

15. Your investment in health insurance is finally beginning to pay off.

16. Your joints are more accurate meteorologists than the national weather service.

17. Your secrets are safe with your friends because they can't remember them either.

18. Your supply of brain cells is finally down to a manageable size.

Source:
http://www.fhs64.com/fhsold/perks.htm

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NOTE to Peter McKay:
Tie Domi is asking about you...
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Visit Crass Casualty (My blog)
http://canadiansocialresearch.net/mywordpress/