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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
November 22, 2009

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,142 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian content

1.  November 24 : Promise to Canada's children remains unkept after 20 years (Campaign 2000 )
2. New B.C. bill could cut off social assistance for minor offences (Victoria Times Colonist) - November 20
3. How to make real progress against poverty (Hugh Segal in The Globe and Mail) - November 17
4. Hunger Count 2009 - report on hunger and food bank use in Canada (Food Banks Canada) - November 17
5. What's new in Nova Scotia:
--- Nova Scotia Economic Advisory Panel offers no help to the poor - November 14
--- Addressing Nova Scotia's Fiscal Challenge : A report prepared by the Nova Scotia Economic Advisory Panel - November 2009
--- Premier : No balanced budget next year despite campaign promise - November 17
--- Province of Nova Scotia Financial Review Interim Report (Deloitte) - August 7
--- Nova Scotia 2009–2010 Budget - September 24

6. [Ontario] Endorse the Disability Declaration (ODSP [Ontario Disability Support Program] Action Coalition)
7. Ontario Social Assistance Rates Effective November / December 2009 (Income Security Advocacy Centre)
8. Support for New Brunswick's Poverty Reduction Plan (New Brunswick Telegraph-Journal) - November 16, 17
9. [Ontario] What's new from The Wellesley Institute:
--- Reality check: Ontario gives housing dollars with one hand, takes away with other - November 16
---
Communities Speak : A summary of the 2009 Provincial Housing Consultations - November 2009
10.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Leading indicators, October 2009 - November 19
--- 2006 Census maps - November 19
--- Consumer Price Index, October 2009 - November 18
--- Health Reports, November 2009 - November 18
----- Income disparities in health-adjusted life expectancy for Canadian adults, 1991 to 2001
----- Social class, gender and time use: Implications for the social determinants of body weight?
----- Risk factors and chronic conditions among Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations

11. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - November 21

International content

12. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs (Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)
13. New/recent from the U.S. Dept of Agriculture:
--- Household Food Security in the United States, 2008
-
November 16
--- A Comparison of Household Food Security in Canada and the United States - December 2008

14. The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2009 (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations) - October 14
15. Australian Policy Online - recent content
16. State of The World’s Children report commemorates 20 years of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNICEF) - November 19
17. CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter) - November 2009


Have a great week!
Gilles

************************
Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net


E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com

1. November 24 : Promise to Canada's children remains unkept after 20 years
(Campaign 2000 )

Happy 20th anniversary.
Shame on us.

November 24, 2009 - Marking 20 years of the all-party
House of Commons resolution to end child poverty by the year 2000 in Canada

Campaign 2000 and its partners will be releasing our annual Report Card on Child and Family Poverty on Nov. 24th, 2009 in cities across Canada, including the annual national Report Card in Ottawa, and 7 provincial Report Cards in Vancouver, Calgary, Regina, Winnipeg, Toronto, Halifax and Saint John.

You'll find links to download all Campaign 2000 report cards
as of 10am Nov. 24th this year from the Campaign 2000 home page.

To mark this special shameful day, there will be a series of community events being planned from coast to coast to draw attention to the situation and to call on our elected politicians and the public to take action.
Calendar of Events - list of 20th anniversary events happening across the country on or around Nov. 24

Media Advisory - Campaign 2000 to Release 2009 Report Card on Child Poverty in Canada
TORONTO, Nov. 20 - Campaign 2000 will release its annual Report Card on Child and Family Poverty on Tuesday, November 24th in Ottawa. This year marks 20 years since unanimous House of Commons' resolution to end child poverty in Canada by 2000. The 2009 report, entitled Keep the Promise: Make Canada Poverty-Free, reviews the trends of the past two decades, presents the latest statistics on child and family poverty, and makes recommendations for all political parties.

The report will be released November 24th, 10:00 a.m.
in the Charles Lynch Press Conference Room (130S) on Parliament Hill in Ottawa.
Federal party leaders have been invited to respond to the report card.

Speakers at the press conference:
- Laurel Rothman
- National Coordinator, Campaign 2000;
- Ed Broadbent - Public commentator and former leader, New Democratic Party
- Peggy Taillon - President, Canadian Council on Social Development (porte parole francophone)
- Sid Frankel - Social Planning Council of Winnipeg

Other Ottawa activities on November 24th:
- Breakfast for MPs and Senators 7:30 - 8:45 am; Room 200 West Block; contact Laurel Rothman for ore information (see contact information below)
- Rally at Centennial Flame on Parliament Hill 9:00 am

Source:
Campaign 2000
Campaign 2000 is a cross-Canada public education movement to build Canadian awareness and support for the 1989 all-party House of Commons resolution to end child poverty in Canada by the year 2000. Campaign 2000 began in 1991 out of concern about the lack of government progress in addressing child poverty. Campaign 2000 is non-partisan in urging all Canadian elected officials to keep their promise to Canada's children.

---

From the
National Film Board of Canada
*:
[ * In commemorating the 20th year of the all-party resolution to end child poverty, the National Film Board is working with a number of organizations and agencies, including Campaign 2000, in a series of film screenings and community forums of Four Feet Up. ]

Four Feet Up is an intimate portrayal of child poverty in Canada by award-winning photographer and documentary filmmaker Nance Ackerman.
Twenty years after the promise of the House of Commons "to eliminate poverty among Canadian children," 8-year-old Isaiah contemplates what "less fortunate" means as he finds his voice through his own magical drawings and photographs. Astute about the fact that his parents don't make a lot of money, Isaiah is unaware of their constant worry about putting food on the table, affording any after-school opportunities, and keeping stereotypes at a distance.
[Click the link for information about screenings on Nov. 23 & 24 in seven locations across Canada. ]

Related link:

Promise to world's children remains unkept after 20 years
Even in a rich country like Canada, poverty continues to stunt too many young lives
By Miles Corak
November 18, 2009
(... Over the last 20 years, the world of work has become increasingly challenging for young families. Labour market inequality has increased tremendously, with only the very very richest among us gaining from the almost 15 years of uninterrupted economic growth since 1993. Families are more stressed, and the lack of a comprehensive child care system has had the effect of making families convenient for the labour market, rather than the other way around. It is no wonder that separation and divorce rates are higher. And it is no wonder that just as many children find themselves poor as a generation ago. While our governments can't be held entirely accountable for this failure, they are not free from blame. Child poverty simply has not been a priority for public policy.
Source:
The Toronto Star
[Miles Corak is Professor of economics with the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Ottawa.
He was research coordinator and lead researcher of the 2005 UNICEF Report called Child Poverty in Rich Countries.]

- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

2. New B.C. bill could cut off social assistance for minor offences - November 20
(Victoria Times Colonist)

New B.C. bill could cut off social assistance for minor offences
By Rob Shaw
November 20, 2009
VICTORIA — People with outstanding warrants for relatively minor offences — such as shoplifting or property damage — could be denied income assistance in British Columbia under a newly-passed bill the provincial government had claimed was supposed to focus on serious criminals.The confusion marks the latest hiccup in legislation that's believed to be the first of its kind in Canada, but which critics say is almost sure to face a challenge under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
Source:
Victoria Times Colonist

Related link:

The legislation, as passed:

Bill 14 — 2009
Housing and Social Development
Statutes Amendment Act, 2009

Third Reading Copy
17th day of November, 2009

- Go to the BC Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk.htm

3. How to make real progress against poverty - November 17
(Hugh Segal in The Globe and Mail)

How to make real progress against poverty
The spread of food banks shows the dysfunction in Canadian income security programs
November 17, 2009
By Conservative Senator Hugh Segal
(...) A minimum income allowance for all would end poverty, expand human dignity and build Canadian society. And the savings in hospitals, prisons and police work, where the poor are wildly overrepresented, would produce real savings, less waste and a much more productive use of taxpayer money.
Source:
The Globe and Mail

More thoughts on
guaranteed income from Hugh Segal:

Moving to Basic Income - A right-wing political perspective (Word file - 60K, 22 pages)
June 2008

Guaranteed annual income:
why Milton Friedman and Bob Stanfield were right
(PDF - 172K, 6 pages)
April 2008

- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

4. Hunger Count 2009 - report on hunger and food bank use in Canada - November 17
(Food Banks Canada)

HUNGER COUNT 2009:
A comprehensive report on hunger and food bank use in Canada,
and recommendations for change
(PDF - 2MB, 44 pages)
November 17, 2009
In the month of March 2009, 794,738 people were assisted by a food bank in Canada.
This is an 18% increase compared to the same period in 2008 – the largest year-over-year increase on record.

[ previous Hunger Count reports - annual, back to 1997 ]

Source:
Food Banks Canada
Food Banks Canada is the national charitable organization representing the food bank community across Canada. Our Members, Affiliate Member food banks, and their respective agencies serve approximately 85% of people accessing emergency food programs nationwide. We continue to work to find short term and long term solutions for the over 700,000 hungry Canadians who are assisted by a food bank every month.

Related links:

Recession's toll seen in record food bank spike
2009 survey finds largest-ever increase in food bank use
November 17, 2009
By Richard J Brennan
OTTAWA – Canadians devastated by the recession are turning to food banks in record numbers. Results of the HungerCounts 2009 survey, released Tuesday, show that food banks across the country helped almost 800,000 individuals in March, representing an increase of 120,000 or 20 per cent more than March 2008. "This is the largest increase in food bank use on record," Katherine Schmidt, executive director of Food Banks Canada, told reporters. The need for food banks increased in every region with the biggest jump in Alberta, which experienced an increase of 61 per cent.
Source:
Toronto Star

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Non-Governmental Organizations Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ngobkmrk.htm

5. What's new in Nova Scotia:
---
Nova Scotia Economic Advisory Panel offers no help to the poor - November 14
--- Addressing Nova Scotia's Fiscal Challenge : A report prepared by the Nova Scotia Economic Advisory Panel - November 2009
--- Premier : No balanced budget next year despite campaign promise - November 17
--- Province of Nova Scotia Financial Review Interim Report (Deloitte) - August 7
--- Nova Scotia 2009–2010 Budget - September 24

No help for the poor
November 14, 2009
Blog entry posted by Bruce Wark
Friday November 13th was an unlucky day for poor Nova Scotians. That's the day four economists (three men and one woman) released their recommendations outlining the economic path the new NDP government should follow. The 94-page report had little to say about the perennial problem of poverty in Nova Scotia. It focussed instead on how the provincial government should balance its books --- not next year as the NDP promised during the spring election campaign --- but within the next four years.
Source:
Halifax Media Co-op
[ Dominion Newspaper Cooperative ]
The Dominion Newspaper Cooperative, a grassroots Canadian newspaper and website that has been publishing since May 2003, has entered into a new phase for the Co-op - and for journalism in Canada. In February 2009, we launched our first 'local' in Halifax. The Halifax Media Co-op is a member-funded media cooperative that aims to combine participatory, democratically produced media with professional standards.

---------------------------------------
The Advisory Panel's report:
---------------------------------------

Addressing Nova Scotia's Fiscal Challenge
A report prepared by the Nova Scotia Economic Advisory Panel
(PDF - 1.2MB, 95 pages)
November 2009
Table of contents:
* Assessing the Fiscal Challenges Facing the New Government - by Tim O’Neill
* Delivering on “Making Life More Affordable for Nova Scotia Families”—an Economic Perspective - by Lars Osberg
* Reviewing the Expenditure Budget: Lessons Learned - by Donald J. Savoie
* Shaping a Path for Growth and Prosperity in Nova Scotia - by Elizabeth Beale

Executive summary (PDF - 213K, 12 pages)

Source:
Office of Policy and Priorities
[ Government of Nova Scotia ]

--------------------
Related links:
-------------------

Newshounds grill Dexter
November 16, 2009
Blog entry posted by Bruce Wark
Nova Scotia Premier Darrell Dexter and his Finance Minister, Graham Steele underwent a sustained grilling today at the hands of the Halifax media. Reporters demanded to know why the pair could consider raising taxes, cutting spending and not balancing next year's budget when only a few months ago during the provincial election campaign, they promised a balanced budget with no tax hikes or major spending reductions."We did not have the information that we have today," a grim-faced Dexter told his inquisitors. "Six months ago, no one would have believed what we're facing today."
Dexter and Steele were reacting to the report of the Nova Scotia Economic Advisory panel released on Friday. The panel warned that trying to balance next year's budget would wreak havoc on the economy as well as on public services that people need. It also warned that tax increases and spending reductions would be needed to balance the budget in four years. Without such measures, the province would face a budget shortfall of $1.3 billion by 2013.
Source:
Halifax Media Co-op

Tax hikes, spending cuts on table in N.S.
No balanced budget next year despite campaign promise
November 17, 2009
Nova Scotians can expect taxes to rise and programs to be cut as part of the NDP government's fiscal plan. Those two strategies, along with spurring economic development, must be considered because of the province's dire finances, Premier Darrell Dexter said Monday. Dexter also said he won't be able to balance the books next year, despite vowing to do so while on the campaign trail last spring. ("... But there are economic realities that we are faced with today that we did not know six months ago")*.
Dexter was responding to the recommendations of a panel of economic advisers, released last Friday. The four-person panel, which Dexter appointed in August, urged the government to forget about eliminating the deficit until 2012, saying that introducing a balanced budget next year would further damage a weak economy.
---
* Sounds like a page from Dalton McGuinty's lament when his Liberals took over from the Tories in Ontario in 2003...
[ In its first budget after that election, the McGuinty government broke a key Liberal campaign pledge not to raise taxes, and it justified the about-face by railing at every opportunity about the previous (Conservative) government's "hidden deficit" of $5.6 billion dollars.]

--------------------------------------------------------------

Province of Nova Scotia Financial Review
Interim Report
7 August 2009
The people of Nova Scotia elected a new Government on 9th June 2009, and the newly appointed Executive Council was sworn in on 19th June, 2009. During the election campaign the new Government committed to an immediate review of the Province's finances upon entering office. Deloitte & Touche LLP has been contracted to assist the new Government of Nova Scotia with an independent review and analysis of the Province of Nova Scotia's current and future financial position.
Source:
Deloitte & Touche LLP

--------------------------------------------------------------

Nova Scotia Budget Address
For the fiscal year 2009–2010

September 24, 2009
HTML version
PDF version (119K, 17 pages)

NOTE: On May 4, 2009, Nova Scotia's Tory government was defeated on a money bill.
The new NDP government tabled its first budget on September 24, 2009.

2009-10 Budget Overview
September 24, 2009
The province of Nova Scotia is tabling a budget with a deficit of $592.1 million for 2009–10.

Highlights (PDF - 51K, 2 pages)

Budget Assumptions & Schedules (PDF - 438K, 94 pages)

Budget Bulletin: Tax Changes and Incentives for Nova Scotians

Budget Bulletin: Capital Spending

Budget Documents
- incl. links to : Budget Address - Executive Summary - Budget Facts - Budget Highlights - Estimates - Estimates Supplementary Detail - Crown Corporation Business Plans - Government Business Plan - links to previous years' budgets

- Go to the Nova Scotia Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nsbkmrk.htm
- Go to the 2009 Canadian Government Budgets Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets.htm

6. [Ontario] Endorse the Disability Declaration
(ODSP [Ontario Disability Support Program] Action Coalition)

Ontario:

ODSP Action Coalition
The ODSP [Ontario Disability Support Program] Action Coalition is made up of community clinic caseworkers, agency staff, and community activists. We undertake campaigns and activities designed to raise awareness of issues affecting persons in receipt of Ontario Disability Support Program benefits. The ODSP Action Coalition was formed in 2002 as a coalition of lawyers, community workers and consumers. The coalition is leading the campaign to document and publicize problems with ODSP and has engaged in lobbying and advocacy to encourage solutions to those problems.
- incl. links to: * About Us * Campaigns * Resources * Coalition Activities * Help for Recipients * Links * Contact Us

Endorse the Disability Declaration
October 6, 2009
The ODSP Action Coalition is requesting individuals and groups to endorse our Disability Declaration. The Declaration sets out some of the rights that people with disabilities have according to the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities, and then states what changes the Ontario government needs to make to ODSP to fulfill those rights. Although Canada has not yet ratified the Convention, the Coalition believes it is important for people with disabilities and organizations that work with them to use it in articulating how and why their needs must be met.

- Go to the Disability Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/disbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

7. Ontario Social Assistance Rates Effective November / December 2009
(Income Security Advocacy Centre)

FACT SHEET: Social Assistance Rates Effective November / December 2009 (PDF - 26K, 1 page)
- incl. current and new monthly Ontario Works (OW) and Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) benefit rate amounts. The changes will appear on ODSP cheques received in November and OW cheques received in December, 2009. Basic Needs and Maximum Shelter rates have been increased by 2%.
Source:
Income Security Advocacy Centre (ISAC)

- Go to the Ontario Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm
- Go to the Guide to Welfare in Ontario page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onwelf.htm
- Go to the Key Provincial/Territorial Welfare Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare.htm

8. Support for New Brunswick's Poverty Reduction Plan - November 16, 17
(New Brunswick Telegraph-Journal)

New Brunswick

From the
New Brunswick Telegraph-Journal:

Poverty plan deserves support
November 17, 2009
By Peter Smith
A
lmost lost amid the din of the war of words over the proposed sale of NB Power is a plan that has both the premier and the leader of the Opposition sitting at the same table. New Brunswick's first poverty reduction plan was announced in Saint John late last week. This represents a significant move towards helping some of the province's most vulnerable citizens. (...) The statistics on poverty change little from year to year and always seem grim. According to figures available on the Social Development website, more than 100,000 New Brunswickers live in poverty. More than 13,000 single parents live in poverty, and that figure represents 45 per cent of all single parents. More than 23,000 children are living in poverty in this province, which is about one in every six children. About one in 10 senior citizens live in poverty, and about 39,000 New Brunswickers are on social assistance.

Bring an end to poverty
November 16, 2009
In August, the provincial Poverty Reduction Initiative released a landmark report [ A Choir of Voices - The What Was Said Report ]. Drawing upon the testimony of more than 2,500 people, it gave voice to the frustration and isolation experienced by those living on marginal incomes. It also called attention to the degree to which public policy has backfired, trapping families and communities in lives of hardship. The intent is to reduce poverty through co-ordinated action. On Friday, co-chairs Gerry Pond, Léo-Paul Pinet and Social Development Minister Kelly Lamrock emerged from a two-day forum with a plan of action. Government, businesses, communities and non-profit groups must to pull together to accomplish its goal: a 25-per-cent reduction in poverty by 2015.

Related link:

Public engagement initiative:
Developing a poverty reduction plan
Official website of the New Brunswick government initiative to establish a poverty reduction plan
Source:
New Brunswick Social Development

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the New Brunswick Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nbkmrk.htm

9. [Ontario] What's new from The Wellesley Institute:
--- Reality check: Ontario gives housing dollars with one hand, takes away with other - November 16
---
Communities Speak : A summary of the 2009 Provincial Housing Consultations - November 2009

Ontario

New from
The Wellesley Institute:

Reality check: Ontario gives housing dollars with one hand, takes away with other
November 16, 2009
By Michael Shapcott
Reality check: Ontario is indeed matching the 2009 federal affordable housing investments, as housing minister Jim Watson notes in a story in today's Toronto Star (“Nearly homeless struggle to hang on"), but the province has also been steadily cutting spending at the Ontario Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing since 2005. Finance minister Dwight Duncan, in his October 22 fall economic update, (PDF - 1.7MB, 94 pages) reports spending at the housing ministry was $926 million in 2005 and is projected to be $703.9 million in 2009. That’s a cumulative cut of $657 in the past four years – which more than offsets the $585.3 million that the finance minister says the province will spend this year to match the federal housing dollars.
Source:
Wellesley Institute Blog
[ Wellesley Institute ]

---

Communities Speak
A summary of the 2009 Provincial Housing Consultations
(PDF - 653K, 15 pages)
November 2009
[ version française :
Les communautés parlent
Un résumé des consultations du logement de l’Ontario 2009
(PDF - 674Ko, 16 pages) ]

This Housing Network of Ontario report consolidates recommendations made by many hundreds of Ontarians who participated in almost 40 community meetings and consultations focussed on developing an affordable housing strategy, held from June to November 2009. The meetings included government-led consultations, convened by Minister Jim Watson and/or MPPs from ridings across the province. Meetings also included community-led forums with MPPs invited to participate, and public town hall meetings.

The main messages that emerged from these consultations included:

* Ontarians need a comprehensive, fully-funded long-term affordable housing strategy with bold targets.
* Housing insecurity, homelessness and poverty are inseparably linked.
* People with lived experience of housing insecurity and housing related poverty should be at the centre of any housing strategy.

Source:
Stableandaffordable.com
Stableandaffordable.com is an initiative of the Wellesley Institute and the Housing Network of Ontario.
We are a network of organizations dedicated to one goal: stable and affordable housing for all Canadians.

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

10. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Leading indicators, October 2009 - November 19
--- 2006 Census maps - November 19
--- Consumer Price Index, October 2009 - November 18
--- Health Reports, November 2009 - November 18
----- Income disparities in health-adjusted life expectancy for Canadian adults, 1991 to 2001
----- Social class, gender and time use: Implications for the social determinants of body weight?
----- Risk factors and chronic conditions among Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

November 19, 2009
Leading indicators, October 2009
The composite leading index increased 0.7% in October, its fourth straight advance. In October, 8 of the 10 components expanded, the same as in September. Housing remained the fastest-growing component. While the US leading indicator continued to recover, this has been slow to translate into higher demand for factories in Canada.
[ Leading indicators, May-Oct. 2009 - table ]
Source:
Canadian Economic Observer

Related subjects:
o Economic accounts
o Leading indicators

---

November 19, 2009
2006 Census maps
The Atlas of Canada, produced by Natural Resources Canada, in partnership with Statistics Canada, presents a series of maps and accompanying analysis of national and regional data results from the 2006 Census. The second release focuses on languages, the labour force and housing and shelter costs. Future releases will cover topics such as educational attainment, Aboriginal population and income.
The maps are available on the Atlas of Canada website:
http://atlas.nrcan.gc.ca/site/english/featureditems/index.html

---

November 18, 2009
Consumer Price Index, October 2009
Consumer prices rose 0.1% in the 12 months to October, following a 0.9% decrease in September. Excluding energy, the Consumer Price Index rose 1.4% on a year-over-year basis. On a seasonally adjusted monthly basis, consumer prices increased 0.4% from September to October.
[ TIP: scroll to the bottom of the page for three CPI tables. ]
[ Report: The Consumer Price Index October 2009 ]

Related subjects:
o Prices and price indexes
o Consumer price indexes

---

November 18, 2009
Health Reports, November 2009
The November 2009 online edition of Health Reports contains the following articles.

* Income disparities in health-adjusted life expectancy for Canadian adults, 1991 to 2001
The dramatic increase in life expectancy in Canada and other economically developed nations during the last century stands as testimony to the success of improvements in public health and advances in medical care. But despite these gains in longevity, inequalities in health outcomes across different subpopulations are still pervasive in Canada and other industrialized countries.(...) For both sexes, disparities in health-adjusted life expectancy between the highest and lowest income groups were substantially greater than those for life expectancy alone.

* Social class, gender and time use: Implications for the social determinants of body weight?
The social gradient in health refers to the consistent association between higher socioeconomic position and better health status across an array of health outcomes. The social gradient in body weight departs from this consistent
pattern. Recent Canadian studies suggest that the association between income and obesity is positive for men, and curvilinear (perhaps in transition) among women. This article examines time-use patterns by indicators of socioeconomic position and considers the implications of variations in time use for the social gradient in weight reported in other studies.

* Risk factors and chronic conditions among Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations
In Canada, the prevalence of behavioural risk factors and chronic conditions varies between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations, with Aboriginal people generally having less favourable outcomes. For example, obesity and overweight are more common among Aboriginal people than among other groups. Also, the likelihood of having at least one chronic condition and specific conditions such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes is higher among Aboriginal people, even when differences in sociodemographic characteristics are taken into account

---

Check The Daily Archives
- select a month and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

11. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - November 21

What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

November 21, 2009

Promise to world's children remains unkept after 20 years
18 Nov 09
- Opinion article in the Toronto Star about Canada's progress since ratifying the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child 20 years ago; recommendations for progress are provided.

Early years: From Reggio Emilia to the West Midlands
18 Nov 09
- Video on Teachers.tv focusing on the Reggio Emilia approach to ECEC rooted in a post-war history with examples of its influence on programs in the UK.

What future for social investment?
18 Nov 09
- Report from the Institute for Futures Studies discussing the feasibility and relevance of the social investment strategy in Europe.

Toward a Bolivian national policy for child friendly municipalities
18 Nov 09
- Article published by Focal Point discussing an initiative in Bolivia that makes children's rights an integral part of local governance.

A commitment to Ontario's children: Moving forward with full day early learning for four and five year olds
31 Oct 09
- Media and other documents focusing on Ontario's plan and the Premier's announcement to move forward with a full day of learning in Ontario for four and five year olds.

About Canada: Childcare
24 Jun 09
- A new book co-authored by CRRU director Martha Friendly and University of Manitoba Sociologist Susan Prentice.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news

· ABC Learning execs may get bonuses
[AU] 16 Nov 09

· Quality universal childcare for 9bn pounds a year? A bargain
[GB] 16 Nov 09

· Gordon Brown does U-turn over childcare tax break
[GB] 14 Nov 09

· For-profit child care is the wrong model
[CA-BC] 14 Nov 09

· 20 hrs free early childhood education for the chop
[NZ] 11 Nov 09

· Strike a deal for Quebec child care, too
[CA-NB] 6 Nov 09

more CC IN THE NEWS »

---

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

12. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest content from the Poverty Dispatch:

November 20, 2009
States’ October Jobless Rates
Utility Shut-offs - California
States and Medicaid Coverage - Tennessee, New Mexico

November 19, 2009
Tobacco Addiction Treatment and the Low-income - Massachusetts
Census Poverty Data for School Districts

November 18, 2009
State Budgets and Programs for the Poor
Extension of Jobless Benefits
Food Security and Poverty in the US
Self-governed Schools - Minneapolis, MN

November 17, 2009
Report: Food Security in the US
Health Insurance Coverage and Trauma Patients
Health Care Reform and Medicaid
State Government Delivery of Social Services - North Dakota

November 16, 2009
Report: Food Security in the US
Section 8 Housing Vouchers - Nevada
Medicaid and Dental Coverage
State Spending on Programs for the Poor - South Dakota

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

13. New/recent from the U.S. Dept of Agriculture:
--- Household Food Security in the United States, 2008
-
November 16
--- A Comparison of Household Food Security in Canada and the United States -
December 2008

Household Food Security in the United States, 2008
By Mark Nord, Margaret Andrews, and Steven Carlson
November 16, 2009
By Mark Nord, Margaret Andrews, and Steven Carlson
Eighty-five percent of American households were food secure throughout the entire year in 2008, meaning that they had access at all times to enough food for an active, healthy life for all household members. The remaining households (14.6 percent) were food insecure at least some time during the year, including 5.7 percent with very low food security—meaning that the food intake of one or more household members was reduced and their eating patterns were disrupted at times during the year because the household lacked money and other resources for food.

USDA Report reveals highest rate of food insecurity since report was initiated in 1995
Economic Research Service Report Demonstrates Need for Action
News Release
WASHINGTON, November 16, 2009

Summary of the report (HTML)

Complete report (PDF - 403K, 66 pages)
November 2009
Download the complete report in one PDF file, or see the table of contents and download individual sections of the report (also in PDF format)
Table of contents:
* Abstract, Contents, and Summary
* Introduction
* Household Food Security
* Household Spending on Food
* Use of Federal and Community Food and Nutrition Assistance Programs
* References
* Appendix A—Household Responses to Questions in the Food Security Scale
* Appendix B—Background on the U.S. Food Security Measurement Project
* Appendix C—USDA’s Thrifty Food Plan
* Appendix D—Food Security During 30 Days Prior to the Food Security Survey

[ USDA Briefing Room: Food Security in the United States ]
[ Food Security in the United States: Recommended Readings - includes links to previous food security annual reports and technical reports]

Source:
Household Food Security in the United States
[ Economic Research Service ]
[ U.S. Dept of Agriculture ]

Related links:

America's economic pain brings hunger pangs
USDA report on access to food 'unsettling,' Obama says
By Amy Goldstein
November 17, 2009
The nation's economic crisis has catapulted the number of Americans who lack enough food to the highest level since the government has been keeping track, according to a new federal report, which shows that nearly 50 million people -- including almost one child in four -- struggled last year to get enough to eat.
At a time when rising poverty, widespread unemployment and other effects of the recession have been well documented, the report released Monday by the U.S. Department of Agriculture provides the government's first detailed portrait of the toll that the faltering economy has taken on Americans' access to food
Source:
Washington Post

Also found on
the USDA website:

A Comparison of Household Food Security in Canada and the United States
By Mark Nord and Heather Hopwood
December 2008
Food security—consistent access to enough food for an active, healthy life—is essential for health and good nutrition. The extent to which a nation’s population achieves food security is an indication of its material and social well-being. Differences in the prevalence of household-level food insecurity between Canada and the United States are described at the national level and for selected economic and demographic subpopulations. Associations of food security with economic and demographic characteristics are examined in multivariate analyses that hold other characteristics constant. Comparable measures of household food security were calculated from the nationally representative Canadian Community Health Survey Cycle 2.2 (2004) and the U.S. Current Population Survey Food Security Supplement (2003-05). Based on the standard U.S. methodology, the percentage of the population living in households classified as food insecure was lower in Canada (7.0 percent) than in the United States (12.6 percent). The difference was greater for the percentage of children living in food-insecure households (8.3 percent vs. 17.9 percent) than for adults (6.6 percent vs. 10.8 percent). These differences primarily reflected different prevalence rates of food insecurity for Canadian and U.S. households with similar demographic and economic characteristics. Differences in population composition on measured economic and demographic characteristics account for only about 15 to 30 percent of the overall Canada-U.S. difference.

Report summary (HTML)

Complete report (PDF - 917K, 50 pages)
December 2008

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

14. The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2009 - October 14
(Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)

From the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization:

Economic crisis is devastating for the world's hungry
1.02 billion hungry people in 2009 - FAO hunger report published
Number of hungry people "intolerable"

14 October 2009, Rome

The sharp spike in hunger triggered by the global economic crisis has hit the poorest people in developing countries hardest, revealing a fragile world food system in urgent need of reform, according to a report released today by FAO and the World Food Programme (WFP). The combination of food and economic crises has pushed the number of hungry people worldwide to historic levels — more than one billion people are undernourished, according to FAO estimates. Nearly all the world's undernourished live in developing countries. In Asia and the Pacific, an estimated 642 million people are suffering from chronic hunger; in Sub-Saharan Africa 265 million; in Latin America and the Caribbean 53 million; in the Near East and North Africa 42 million; and in developed countries 15 million, according FAO's annual hunger report, The State of Food Insecurity, produced this year in collaboration with WFP. The report was published before World Food Day, to be celebrated on 16 October 2009.

The report:

The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2009
Economic crises - impacts and lessons learned

Rome, 2009
HTML version - table of contents and links to individual sections of the report
PDF Version (2.1MB, 61 pages)
"(...) As a result of the economic crisis, estimates reported in this edition of The State of Food Insecurity in the World show that, for the first time since 1970, more than one billion people – about 100 million more than last year and around one-sixth of all of humanity – are hungry and undernourished worldwide."

Source:
Food and Agriculture Organization
of the United Nations (FAO)

Related link:

United Nations World Food Programme (WFP)
Among the Millennium Development Goals which the United Nations has set for the 21st century, halving the proportion of hungry people in the world is top of the list. (...) WFP is the United Nations frontline agency in the fight against global hunger.

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

15. Australian Policy Online - recent content

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia. [ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week
appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page, and the downloads vary depending on the topic you select.

---

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

16. State of The World’s Children report commemorates 20 years of the Convention on the Rights of the Child - November 19
(UNICEF)

The State of the World’s Children
On 20 November 1989, the United Nations adopted the Convention on the Rights of the Child. To commemorate this landmark, UNICEF is dedicating a special edition of its flagship report, The State of the World’s Children, to child rights. The report and accompanying video address the progress that has been made in the last 20 years and the role the Convention can fulfill moving forward into the future.

UNICEF’s State of The World’s Children report commemorates 20 years of the Convention on the Rights of the Child
Press release
NEW YORK, 19 November 2009 – A special edition issue of UNICEF's flagship The State of the World's Children report, tracking the impact of the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the challenges that remain, was released today on the eve of the 20th anniversary of the Convention’s adoption by the UN General Assembly.

State of the World's Children - Celebrating 20 Years
of the Convention on the Rights of the Child

November 2009
Full report
(PDF - 4MB, 100 pages)
Executive Summary
(PDF - 715K, 16 pages)
Statistical tables for 2009
Panels

Source:
UNICEF

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

17. CRINMAIL - November 2009
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)

Latest issues of CRINMAIL:

19 November 2009 - Special CRINMAIL on the
20th anniversary of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC)
Table of contents:
* Editorial
* 1989: Beyond the CRC
* The birth of a Convention
* Establishing a communications procedure for the Convention on the Rights of the Child
* ENOC: Statement on 20th Anniversary of the CRC
* Quiz! CRC20 special
**News in Brief**

Factsheet on child rights (PDF - 148K, 5 pages)
http://www.crin.org/docs/factsheet.pdf
The aim of this factsheet is to clarify the meaning of child rights, and to challenge some of the popular arguments used to obstruct their implementation. It may help as an information or advocacy tool, although it is not intended as a comprehensive guide to the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

More links to info
about the CRC from CRIN

http://www.crin.org/resources/treaties/CRC.asp

CRC20: CRIN's dedicated webpage
http://www.crin.org/crc20/

***

17 November 2009 - CRINMAIL 1126
* INTER-AMERICAN COMMISSION: Report on session 137 [publication]
* CHILD-FRIENDLY JUSTICE: Call for examples
* CRC: From moral imperatives to legal obligations [news]
* AUSTRALIA: Arrest of 12-year-old highlights criminalisation of indigenous children [news]
* GLOBAL: Children and young people in care – Discover your rights! [publication]
* VIEWPOINT: Realising children’s rights requires more than rhetoric – systematic and concrete actions are now needed [publication]
* REPORT: Count Every Child - the right to birth registration [publication]
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

---

Earlier issues of CRINMAIL
- links to 200+ earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm




Disclaimer/Privacy Statement


Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com



*****************************************************

How to tell if someone lives in Canada...

*****************************************************


According to comedian Jeff Foxworthy, you *may*  live in Canada:



1. If your local Dairy Queen is closed from September through May.

2. If someone in a Home Depot store offers you assistance and they don't work there.

3. If you've worn shorts and a parka at the same time.

4. If you've had a lengthy telephone conversation with someone who dialed a wrong number.

5. If "Vacation" means going anywhere south of North Bay for the weekend.

6. If you measure distance in hours.

7. If you know several people who have hit a deer more than once.

8. If you have switched from "heat" to "A/C" in the same day and back again.

9. If you can drive 90 kms/hr through 2 feet of snow during a raging blizzard without flinching.

10. If you install security lights on your house and garage, but leave both unlocked.

11. If you carry jumper cables in your car AND your wife knows how to use them.

12. If you design your kid's Halloween costume to fit over a snowsuit.

13. If the speed limit on the highway is 100km, you're going 110 and everybody is passing you.

14. If driving is better in the winter because the potholes are filled with snow.

15. If you know all 4 seasons: almost winter, winter, still winter and road construction.

16. If you find 2 degrees "a little chilly".

***

Gilles' personal favourite (which didn't make the Foxworthy list):

17. If you can go to the supermarket to buy homo milk by the bag.

Source:
http://notalwaysaboutme.blogspot.com/2008/01/jeff-foxworthy-goes-canadian.html



----------------------------

And, in closing...

----------------------------


The pre-taped call in show (YouTube video)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HrlS9_n8GX4&




25 Classic Beatles Songs
http://www.popmatters.com/pm/feature/115710-re-meet-the-beatles-25-classics



Top 100 downloads / Top 100 authors
http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/scores/top
All free to download

- from Project Gutenberg
http://www.gutenberg.org/