Canadian Social Research Newsletter
December 22, 2013

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

This week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,672 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
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Season's Greetings!
May the peace and blessings of this special time of year be yours.
Take time away from work or studies (if you can...) to enjoy the company of family and friends.

Gilles



IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. The Mowat Centre's Top 8 Reports That Will Change Canada As We Know It - December 20
2. Limited Revenue? If yes, where to shop? (cost of a healthy diet in Moncton, New Brunswick) (New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice, Inc) - December 19
3. Income Inequality and Basic Income : Update
(Rob Rainer, Basic Income Canada Network) - December 18
4. SPARmonitor - Monitoring Toronto's Social Change - December 4 + December 18 issues [SPAR = Social Policy Analysis & Research, City of Toronto]
5. Making Every Job a Good Job : A Benchmark for Setting Ontario's Minimum Wage (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - Ontario Office) - November 14
6. Federal minister James "Grinch" Moore says child poverty not Ottawa’s problem (News Radio 1130, Vancouver) - December 15
7. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Consumer Price Index, November 2013 - December 20
--- Provincial and territorial economic accounts, 1981 to 2006 - December 20
--- Employment Insurance, October 2013 - December 19
--- Homicide in Canada, 2012 - December 19
--- Pension plans in Canada, as of January 2012 - December 19
--- Canada's population estimates, third quarter 2013 - December 19
--- Job vacancies, three-month average ending in September 2013 - December 19
--- Financial information of community colleges and vocational schools, 2011/2012 - December 16
8. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

9. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
10. [U.S.] In the War on Poverty, a Dogged Adversary (New York Times) - December 17
11. [U.S.] Census Bureau Introduces New Interactive Mapping Tool along with Latest American Community Survey Statistics (U.S. Census Bureau) - December 17
12. Why Shopping at Walmart Is No Bargain (AlterNet.org) - December 12
13. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/personal.htm ]
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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Go to the home page of the
Canadian Social Research Links website:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/index.htm


1. The Mowat Centre's Top 8 Reports That Will Change Canada As We Know It - December 20

The Mowat Centre's Top 8 Reports That Will Change Canada As We Know It:
Here are the eight reports that will fundamentally change our country. Forever.
(Each link takes you to an abstract and a link to the PDF file)

* Why Are Shrinks Taking a Closer Look At Public Servants?
http://mowatcentre.ca/research-topic-mowat.php?mowatResearchID=98

* You Won't Believe What the Mowat Centre Is Saying About Oil And Gas Pipelines
http://mowatcentre.ca/research-topic-mowat.php?mowatResearchID=96

* One Cool Trick To Fix Economic Development Programs
http://mowatcentre.ca/research-topic-mowat.php?mowatResearchID=97

* Five Things You Need To Know About Your Next Non-Profit Boss
http://mowatcentre.ca/research-topic-mowat.php?mowatResearchID=94

* Everything You Know About Equalization Payments is Wrong. Here's why.
http://mowatcentre.ca/research-topic-mowat.php?mowatResearchID=79

* Nine Things That Will Change Everything You Know by 2030
http://mowatcentre.ca/research-topic-mowat.php?mowatResearchID=95

* Twelve Ways We’re Wasting Canada’s Most Valuable Economic Resource
http://mowatcentre.ca/research-topic-mowat.php?mowatResearchID=91

* One Big Idea That Might Save the Senate, And Why You Should Care
http://mowatcentre.ca/research-topic-mowat.php?mowatResearchID=81

Source:
The Mowat Centre
http://www.mowatcentre.ca/
At the Mowat Centre, we have established new connections between government decision-makers, public policy researchers, and groups and social innovators in the broader community in order to help shape better policy outcomes for Canada. Although government remains the crucial player, others no longer have to wait. Through new forms of knowledge creation, organizations such as the Mowat Centre can suggest new ways to reconstruct outdated policy architecture to strengthen Canada, its regions and its citizens.

---

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

2. Limited Revenue? If yes, where to shop? (cost of a healthy diet in Moncton, New Brunswick) - December 19
(New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice, Inc.)

NOTA BENE : La version française du texte et des liens ci-dessous suit la version anglaise.

From the
N.B. Common Front for Social Justice, Inc.:

Limited Revenue?
If yes, where to shop?
(small PDF file - 2 pages)
http://frontnb.ca/uploads/file/New%20release_2_.pdf
News release
December 19, 2013
The Common Front for Social Justice is unveiling its report today: Limited revenue? If yes, where to shop?
The report is the result of a month long survey at the three major food chain stores in the Greater Moncton region [ Sobeys, Co-op and Atlantic Superstore ], researching the cost of the 67 foods items featured in the Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide [ http://goo.gl/r2Q5 ]. Co-op is where the cost of the nutritious food basket for the 67 items is least expensive ($259.56) followed by Atlantic Superstore ($268.61) and Sobeys ($271.97).

The Common Front for Social Justice has also analysed the cost of the food basket for four households; a family of four at Minimum Wage, a single parent with one child receiving social assistance and a single man receiving social assistance and a senior. According to the Common Front : "Eating well for the first three households would mean spending 50 % of their monthly revenue, an impossibility. This is certainly one of the reasons why food banks have seen an increase in their numbers."

The Common Front for Social Justice is making a series of recommendations, one of which is to have more vegetables and fruits on sale.

Complete report:

Limited Revenue?
If yes, where to shop?
(PDF - 828K, 15 pages)
http://frontnb.ca/uploads/file/Limited%20revenue_%20If%20yes,%20where%20to%20shop.pdf

Source:
N.B. Common Front for Social Justice, Inc.
http://www.frontnb.ca/

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Nouvelle recherche du
Front commun pour la justice sociale du Nouveau-Brunswick inc.

Revenu limité? Si oui, où magasiner?

http://frontnb.ca/uploads/file/Communiqu%C3%A9%20de%20presse-Enqu%C3%AAte%20nourriture.pdf
Communiqué de presse
Le 19 décembre 2013
Le Front commun dévoile aujourd’hui le rapport : Revenu limité? Si oui, où magasiner?
Ce rapport est le résultat réalisé pendant le mois de novembre sur les 67 aliments du panier d’aliments nutritifs du Guide alimentaire canadien.dans les trois chaînes de magasins d’alimentation de la grande région de Moncton ``Le magasin CO-OP est celui où le panier de provisions nutiritf est le moins dispendieux (259,56 $) , suivi de Atlantic Superstore (268,81 $) et enfin Sobeys (271,97 $).

Le Front commun a (également) analysé le coût de l’alimentation pour certains ménages soit une famille de quatre personnes au salaire minimum, une mère monoparentale
avec un enfant et un homme seul recevant du bien-être social et enfin une femme âgée. Bien se nourrir exigerait que les trois premiers ménages dépensent près de 50
% de leur budget mensuel pour bien se nourrir; une impossibilité. C’est une des raisons majeures qui explique (pourquoi) la fréquentation aux banques alimentaires est en croissance dans notre province.

Le Front commun pour la justice sociale fait des recommandations dans le rapport, entre autres pour une augmentation du nombre de ventes dans les aliments comme les légumes et les fruits.

Étude complète :

Revenu limité? Si oui, où magasiner? (PDF - 796Ko., 16 pages)
http://frontnb.ca/uploads/file/Revenu%20limit%C3%A9,%20si%20oui,%20o%C3%B9%20magasiner-1.pdf

Source:
Front commun pour la justice sociale du Nouveau-Brunswick inc.
http://frontnb.ca/Default.asp/fr

---

- Go to the New Brunswick Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nbkmrk.htm

3. Income Inequality and Basic Income : Update - December 18
(Rob Rainer, Basic Income Canada Network)

Income Inequality and Basic Income : Update
December 18, 2013

Just before the recent conclusion of the Second Session of the 41st Parliament, the House’s Finance Committee quietly released “Income Inequality in Canada: An Overview” [ PDF - http://goo.gl/rcjVXM ].

Yet while the report further validates income inequality’s steep rise in recent decades, the recommendations for remedy are, on the whole, exceptionally weak, even misguided. (Read journalist Carol Goar’s scathing critique : http://goo.gl/4Lyzo3 )

Meanwhile, on December 10th (Human Rights Day) the New York Times contained an article asking “Does Rising Inequality Make Us Hardhearted?”
[ http://goo.gl/gIejPF ]

Evidently, it does indeed. And this in turn helps understand, at least in part, how federal Industry Minister James Moore could rhetorically question why government should be responsible for the food security of children. (See journalist Thomas Walkom’s analysis [ http://goo.gl/1BEsMg ], in the wake of Minister Moore’s apology [ http://goo.gl/SD2tPp ]

Basic income [ http://www.thebigpush.net/faqs.html ] can at best make but a small contribution towards reducing income inequality. Basic income’s greater potential, however, is to help close the gap in opportunity inequality, by providing a firmer, more stable floor of income from which opportunity is within closer reach.

Indeed, it was the freedom-enhancing promise of basic income which so enthused Martin Luther King Jr. Commenting on it he said: “A host of positive psychological changes inevitably will result from widespread economic security. The dignity of the individual will flourish when the decisions concerning his life are in his own hands, when he has the assurance that his income is stable and certain, and when he knows that he has the means to seek self-improvement.”

Happily, the idea of basic income appears to be catching on worldwide, for example witness sizeable citizen support movements in Europe. See also another New York Times article from December 10th, profiling how basic income is gaining favour with some American libertarians (Rethinking the Idea of a Basic Income for All : http://goo.gl/r8qQqf ).

The BIG Push campaign [ http://www.thebigpush.net/ ] was founded in April 2013 to secure a Basic Income Guarantee for Canadians. Find out more by visiting our web site. Follow the campaign via Twitter. Please consider getting involved. And this Holiday Season, please consider investing in this historic push for income security in Canada. Thank you.

Encouraging sign of national support for basic income
A recent national survey [ Sept/Oct 2013, PDF : http://goo.gl/EDpnjl ] for The Trudeau Foundation, by the Environics Institute for Survey Research, found that 46% of Canadians are in favour of a "guaranteed annual income" (i.e., basic income)...

By Rob Rainer
Director, The BIG Push

http://www.thebigpush.net/

On Twitter: @Push_for_BIG

Basic Income Canada Network
http://biencanada.ca/

Bien Canada is the Canadian affiliate of Basic Income Earth Network:
http://www.basicincome.org/

Related infographic:

The Canadian Welfare System vs Guaranteed Livable Income (PDF - 721K, 1 page)
http://www.cpj.ca/sites/default/files/docs/files/GLI_Infographic_CPJ.pdf
The case for a Guaranteed Income:
Lifting People from poverty : Fairly, Efficiently and Effectively

... comparing and contrasting administration, work incentitves &disincentives, adequacy of incomes and program effectivenness
Source:
Citizens for Public Justice
http://www.cpj.ca/

---

- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

- Go to the Income and Wealth Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

4. SPARmonitor - Monitoring Toronto's Social Change - December 4 + December 18 issues
[SPAR = Social Policy Analysis & Research, City of Toronto]

From the
City of Toronto:

SPARmonitor - Monitoring Toronto's Social Change
[SPAR = Social Policy Analysis & Research, City of Toronto]

This Bulletin is a quick inventory of current social research information.
Its purpose is to promptly disseminate to interested staff recently produced
research materials and initiatives relevant to social policy.

------------------------------

Latest issues of the
SPARmonitor
:

SPARmonitor : December 18 (2013) - issue 120 (PDF - 124K, 3 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_120.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Measuring Up: Canadian Results of the OECD PISA Study
Ø Building on Evidence
Ø The “Welfareization” of Disability Incomes in Ontario
Ø Noble Frustration: The Many Practical Problems with Municipal Poverty Initiatives
Ø Welfare in Canada 2012
Ø Economic Freedom of North America 2013
Ø The Glass Floor: Education, Downward Mobility, and Opportunity Hoarding

------------------------------

SPARmonitor : December 4 (2013) - issue 119 (PDF - 148K, 4 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_119.pdf

This issue covers the following:

Ø Canada's REAL Economic Action Plan Begins with Poverty Eradication
Ø Hunger Report 2013
Ø Youth Gang Prevention Fund Projects (2007 – 2012)
Ø Quality: Shifting the Focus
Ø Labour Force Survey, October 2013
Ø Priced Out: Understanding the Factors Affecting Home Prices in the GTA

---

Source:
SPARmonitor
- Monitoring Toronto's Social Change
http://www.toronto.ca/sdfa/spar-archives.htm
- includes links to bulletins from January to March 2011 and to all 33 issues of SPARmonitor for 2010.
But curiously, nothing since then...

[ Social Development, Finance & Administration
http://www.toronto.ca/sdfa/index.htm ]
[ City of Toronto
http://www.toronto.ca/ ]

---

Selected earlier issues of the SPARmonitor
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm#toronto
(This link will take you partway down the Ontario NGO Links page of this site, where you'll find links to two dozen earlier issues of the SPARmonitor going back to June 2011.)

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm

5. Making Every Job a Good Job : A Benchmark for Setting Ontario's Minimum Wage - November 14
(Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - Ontario Office)

From the Ontario Office of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives:

Making Every Job a Good Job:
A Benchmark for Setting Ontario's Minimum Wage

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/node/11938
By Trish Hennessy, Kaylie Tiessen and Armine Yalnizyan
November 14, 2013
In the summer of 2013 — three years after the provincial government froze Ontario’s minimum wage at $10.25 an hour — the Ministry of Labour struck an advisory panel to “examine the current approach to setting the minimum wage and to provide advice on how to adjust Ontario’s minimum wage.” Upon striking the panel, the government stated: “Addressing the minimum wage is a key part of the Ontario government’s strategy to build a stronger economy, a more prosperous province and help the most vulnerable.” (Ministry of Labour, 2013). The panel consists of representatives from business, worker, labour and youth organizations. After consulting with Ontarians across the province, the panel will report to the Ontario government by December 2013. This paper [click the link below] proposes a core benchmark against which to set the minimum wage: 60% of the average industrial wage, which would be roughly $14.50 today. Once the benchmark is reached, it proposes that the minimum wage be adjusted annually for inflation. This is an approach that balances the needs of vulnerable workers with the dual goal of shared prosperity and ensuring that every job in Ontario is a good job.

Complete paper:

Making Every Job a Good Job:
A Benchmark for Setting Ontario’s Minimum Wage
(PDF - 391K, 36 pages)
http://goo.gl/66iHX9
By Trish Hennessy, Kaylie Tiessen and Armine Yalnizyan

Contents:
* Executive Summary
* Introduction
* Ontario’s Minimum Wage: Historical Norms
* Ontario’s Shifting Labour Market
* Relative Measures
* Determining the Minimum Wage Rate
* Getting From Here to There
* The Business Case for Raising the Minimum Wage
* Conclusion

--------------------------------------

Related Fact Sheets & Infographics from CCPA-ON:
(PDF files - each one-pager below is just over 500K)

Raising Ontario's Minimum Wage: The Workers Case
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/facts-infographics/raising-ontarios-minimum-wage-workers-case
December 18, 2013

How To Raise Ontario's Minimum Wage: An Explainer
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/facts-infographics/how-raise-ontarios-minimum-wage-explainer
December 18, 2013

Raising Ontario's Minimum Wage: The Business Case
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/facts-infographics/raising-ontarios-minimum-wage-business-case
December 18, 2013

What Difference Would $14/hr Make?
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/facts-infographics/what-difference-would-14hr-make
November 14, 2013

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - Ontario Office
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/ontario

Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - National Office
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

Related links:

Back to scratch: The gap between the minimum wage
and the welfare rate is as wide as it was during the Depression.
http://pioneers.themarknews.com/articles/1240-back-to-scratch
By John Stapleton
March 31, 2010

Income from Ontario Social Assistance and
Minimum Wage for a Single Employable Person
(Excel chart, 101K)
http://openpolicyontario.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/ONTARIO-SA-rates-and-Minimum-Wage-Single-Person-1967-to-2013.xls
By John Stapleton
2013
- includes three charts:
* Annual income from social assistance vs full-time employment at minimum wage, 1967 to 2013
* Annual income from social assistance as a percentage of annual income from minimum wage employment , 1967 to 2013
* Social assistance as a percentage of minimum wage (37.5-hr week)
... and two tables:
* data and input to charts
* preliminary data

Source:
Open Policy Ontario
- John Stapleton's website
http://openpolicyontario.com/

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm

6. Federal minister James "Grinch" Moore says child poverty not Ottawa’s problem - December 16
(News Radio 1130 - Vancouver)

Federal minister says child poverty not Ottawa’s problem:
James Moore says child poverty falls under provincial jurisdiction
BC again the worst in Canada for child poverty rates
http://www.news1130.com/2013/12/15/federal-minister-says-child-poverty-not-ottawas-problem/
By Sara Norman
December 15, 2013
VANCOUVER (NEWS1130) – It appears the federal government won’t be helping BC get out of the top spot when it comes to child poverty. “Is it my job to feed my neighbour’s child? I don’t think so.” That from Federal Minister of Industry James Moore, who ... says it’s the responsibility of the provinces to deal with child poverty, and Ottawa has no plans to step in.

The federal government has been criticized for not meeting a unanimous motion passed in the House of Commons back in 1989 to end poverty by the year 2000. Nothing was done, but the motion was renewed in 2009. Child Poverty Watchdog Campaign 2000 [ http://www.campaign2000.ca/ ] says to this date there has been no movement from Ottawa on helping the estimated 1 in 7 kids living in poverty in our country.

Excerpt from YouTube Interview
of Federal Minister of Industry James "Grinch" Moore
(Audio only, duration 1:09)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sqVu6iSVXTo#t=20

Source:
News Radio 1130 (Vancouver)
http://www.news1130.com/

Mister Moore, may I please have more, Sir?
---
"I don’t think so."

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Also from
News Radio 1130:

Child poverty watchdog blasts James Moore
http://www.news1130.com/2013/12/15/child-poverty-watchdog-blasts-james-moore/
December 15, 2013
Industry Minister James Moore is taking plenty of criticism for comments he made to News1130 this weekend about a report that finds BC once again leads the country in child poverty. In an interview with reporter Sara Norman, he was asked whether Ottawa has a responsibility to alleviate the problem.

He had this to say when asked about the growing number of children going to school hungry. “Obviously, nobody wants kids to go to school hungry, but yeah, certainly we want to make sure that kids go to school with a full belly, but is that always the government’s job, to be there to serve people their breakfast? Is it my job to feed my neighbour’s child? I don’t think so.”

The group behind the BC Child Poverty Report Card finds the Minister's comments disappointing, saying James Moore is dismissive of the problem after his reaction to questions about child poverty.

“He’s dismissive of the problem and he’s dismissive of his responsibility,” says Adrienne Montani, provincial coordinator of First Call.

---

First Call: BC Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition
http://www.firstcallbc.org/
Our Mission : To mobilize British Columbians to work together to ensure our children and youth have the rights, opportunities and resources required to achieve their full potential. We believe all children and youth in BC should have first call on society’s resources.

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Related links:

From the House of Commons Committee on Human Resources,
Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities:

Federal Poverty Reduction Plan:
Working in Partnership Towards Reducing Poverty in Canada
(PDF - 1.7MB, 316 pages)
http://www.parl.gc.ca/content/hoc/Committee/403/HUMA/Reports/RP4770921/humarp07/humarp07-e.pdf
Seventh Report of the House of Commons
Standing Committee on Human Resources,
Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities
Chair: Candice Hoeppner, MP
November 17, 2010

-----------------------------------------------------

From the
Parliamentary Research Library:
http://www.parl.gc.ca/common/library_prb.asp?Language=E
(Government of Canada)

Poverty Reduction in Canada - The Federal Role
By Chantal Collin (Political and Social Affairs Division)
23 October 2007
HTML version : http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/LOP/researchpublications/prb0722-e.htm
PDF version
(118K, 12 pages) : http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/LOP/researchpublications/prb0722-e.pdf
[ version française : http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/LOP/researchpublications/prb0722-f.htm ]

-------------------------------------------------

The federal role in poverty reduction in Canada
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ottawa_poverty.htm
By Gilles Séguin
On June 22, 2009, the Ottawa Poverty Reduction Network invited community members living in poverty to participate in an information/action planning meeting about the latest poverty reduction initiatives happening across Canada, Ontario and in Ottawa. I was invited to sit on a panel and to speak about "the federal role in poverty reduction in Canada". Click the link above to access my speaking notes and some background and contextual information.

Excerpt:
The federal government sends billions of dollars each year (total $11.2 billion in 2010-2011) to provinces and territories in a lump sum known as the Canada Social Transfer or CST, as its contribution to provincial costs related to social assistance or welfare. However, the lump sum also covers post-secondary education, social services, and early learning and childcare, and the provinces are free to re-allocate amounts among those components as they see fit. The result is NO accountability by provincial governments to the people of Canada (i.e., Parliament) with respect to federal dollars for welfare programs.

The federal govt must establish a national standard of accountability by prov. govts for the money it spends on provincial welfare programs, and the best way is to create a dedicated federal fund specifically earmarked for provincial welfare. There *was* such a national standard in place from 1967 until 1996: it was called the Canada Assistance Plan [ http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/cap.htm ].

-------------------------------------------------

For more links to online information re. the federal government's role in poverty reduction,
see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty2.htm#federal_role

---

- Go to the National/Federal and International Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty2.htm

7. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Consumer Price Index, November 2013 - December 20
---
Provincial and territorial economic accounts, 1981 to 2006 - December 20
--- Employment Insurance, October 2013 -
December 19
---
Homicide in Canada, 2012 - December 19
--- Pension plans in Canada, as of January 1, 2012 -
December 19
---
Canada's population estimates, third quarter 2013 - December 19
--- Job vacancies, three-month average ending in September 2013 - December 19
--- Financial information of community colleges and vocational schools, 2011/2012 -
December 16

What's new from The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

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December 20, 2013
Consumer Price Index, November 2013
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/131220/dq131220a-eng.htm
Consumer prices rose 0.9% in the 12 months to November, following a 0.7% increase in October. On a seasonally adjusted monthly basis, the Consumer Price Index increased 0.2% in November after decreasing 0.1% in October.

December 20, 2013
Provincial and territorial economic accounts, 1981 to 2006
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/131220/dq131220h-eng.htm
This release incorporates comprehensive revisions to the provincial and territorial gross domestic product by income and by expenditure accounts for the 1981 to 2006 period.

December 19, 2013
Employment Insurance, October 2013

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/131219/dq131219a-eng.htm

Following a decline in September, the number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits was little changed in October at 510,500. Compared with 12 months earlier, the number of beneficiaries fell 8.4%.

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm

December 19, 2013
Homicide in Canada, 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/131219/dq131219b-eng.htm
Police recorded 543 homicides in Canada in 2012, 55 fewer than the previous year. The homicide rate in 2012 was 1.56 victims per 100,000 population, down 10% from 2011 and the lowest homicide rate recorded since 1966.

December 19, 2013
Pension plans in Canada, as of January 1, 2012

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/131219/dq131219c-eng.htm
Membership in registered pension plans (RPPs) in Canada reached 6,114,600 in 2011, up 49,000 or 0.8% from the same date a year earlier.

December 18, 2013
Canada's population estimates, third quarter 2013
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/131218/dq131218f-eng.htm
Demographic estimates by province and territory are now available for the third quarter.

December 17, 2013
Job vacancies, three-month average ending in September 2013
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/131217/dq131217b-eng.htm
December 17, 2013
Canadian businesses reported 229,000 job vacancies in September, down 41,000 from September 2012. For every job vacancy, there were 6.0 unemployed people, up from 5.2 one year earlier. The increase in the unemployment-to-job vacancies ratio was the result of fewer job vacancies, as the number of unemployed people was little changed.

December 16, 2013
Financial information of community colleges and vocational schools, 2011/2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/131216/dq131216f-eng.htm
Data for the 2011/2012 academic year from the Financial Information of Community Colleges and Vocational Schools Survey are now available. The survey provides financial information (income and expenditures) on all community colleges and public vocational schools in Canada.

Check past issues of The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/DAILY/daily.cgi?s=last
Select a month and year from the two drop-down menus to access all issues of The Daily for a particular month.

StatCan Blog
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/blog-blogue/eng
The goal of the StatCan Blog is to pull back the curtain to explain some of the agency’s inner workings, and to show the links between quality statistics and the lives of Canadians.
Source:
The Daily

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

8. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
http://www.childcarecanada.org

December 22, 2013
What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

Social investment - Growth, employment and financial sustainability: Economic and fiscal effects of improving childcare in Austria
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/13/12/social-investment-growth-employment-and-financial-sustainab
18 Dec 2013 | Europe
Report from the Austrian Federal Chamber of Labour illustrates the positive effects of investments in social services using the example of the Austrian government's recent funding to childcare.

Promote family engagement: Charting progress for babies in child care
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/13/12/promote-family-engagement-charting-progress-babies-child-ca
18 Dec 2013 | United States
Brief is part of CLASP's "Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care" project, an effort to link research to policy ideas to help states make the best decisions for infants and toddlers in child care.

Expanding access to pre-k is sound public policy
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/13/12/expanding-access-pre-k-sound-public-policy
18 Dec 2013 | United States
Working paper from NIEER (US) argues that, "while it would be foolish to assume that we know everything about how to make pre-K highly effective, we do know how to create more effective policies with continuous improvement and accountability systems that will generate the information each teacher, community,and state needs to improve from there on".

The Condition of Britain: Interim report
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/13/12/condition-britain-interim-report
18 Dec 2013 | Europe
Report from Institute for Public Policy Research [UK] argues that the UK needs "universal childcare, advanced through community institutions such as children's centres...rather than cash benefits or tax-free vouchers".

Income inequality in Canada: An overview
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/13/12/income-inequality-canada-overview
11 Dec 2013 | Canada
Report of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance recommends that "federal government take steps, in consultation with the provincial and territorial governments, to make early childhood education and child care more accessible and affordable in all areas of the country, including through increased support for affordable early childhood education and care programs."

MORE research, policy & practice
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice

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2. Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad

Parliament finally shines a light on the politics of inequality
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/13/12/parliament-finally-shines-light-politics-inequality
19 Dec 2013 | Canada

Poverty costs Canada billions of dollars every year
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/13/12/poverty-costs-canada-billions-dollars-every-year
18 Dec 2013 | Canada

Extended day program numbers low in low-income neighbourhoods
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/13/12/extended-day-program-numbers-low-low-income-neighbourhoods
18 Dec 2013 | Ontario

Investing in families to eliminate child poverty makes sense
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/13/12/investing-families-eliminate-child-poverty-makes-sense
18 Dec 2013 | British Columbia

Labour moves towards promise for free childcare for all preschoolers
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/13/12/labour-moves-towards-promise-free-childcare-all-preschoolers
18 Dec 2013 | Europe

MORE child care in the news
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

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CRRU Archive

All newer content from January 2013 to date is archived in a special section of the Early Childhood Development Links page of this site.
Click the link immediately below to go there:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm#crru

For links to weekly issues of this weekly alert from June 2009 to December 2012*,
check out the CRRU Links Archive on this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/crru_links_archive.htm

* NOTE (by Gilles):
In December 2012, my HTML editing software was crashing whenever I would open the above archive page to add or edit something.
After several hours of tinkering in a vain attempt to make everything work, I finally decided to go with Plan B : you can still click the link above to access the CRRU archive (including contents of each issue from June 2009 to December 2012), but all new content since then is archived on the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page : http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm.

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Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
http://www.childcarecanada.org/res/enews/index.html
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere
http://www.childcarecanada.org/links/index.html

CRRU Publications
http://www.childcarecanada.org/pubs/
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

ISSUE files
http://www.childcarecanada.org/resources/issue-files
- theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

http://www.childcarecanada.org
CRRU is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

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- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

9. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.. The Dispatch is distributed by the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. News articles from online newspapers are posted here in a number of general categories, and are tagged with more specific keywords relevant to each article.

Tags
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/tags/

Clicking on a word or expression in the list of tags will call up all relevant news items from past Dispatches under that tag. The list contains a tag for each U.S. state so you can view jurisdiction-specific news, and tags for a huge list of topics, including :
* Basic needs * Canada * Caseloads * Cash assistance * Cellular phones * Census * Charities * Child care * Child hunger * Child poverty * Child support * Child welfare * Child well-being * Chronic homelessness * Cohabitation * Cost of living * Crime * Crimes against the homeless * Debt * Deep poverty * Disability * Early childhood education * Earned income tax credit * Electronic benefit transfers * Eligibility * Food insecurity * Food programs * Foster care* Fuel poverty * Health care costs * Health insurance coverage * Homeless children * Homeless families * Homeless veterans * Housing First * Housing subsidies * Immigrant workers * Income * Income inequality * Jobless benefits * Juvenile justice * Legal aid * Low-income housing * Low-wage work * Medicaid * Microfinance * Minimum wage * Newly poor * No Child Left Behind * Ontario * Paid family leave * Payday lending * Persistent poverty * Poverty measurement * Poverty rate * Prisons * Privatization * Public Housing * Rural poverty * Safety net * SCHIP * Section 8 (Housing) * Seniors * Single parents * SNAP/Food Stamps * Supplemental Security Income * Taxes * Teen pregnancy * Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) * Unemployment rate * Uninsured * Urban poverty * Utilities * Welfare reform * Welfare-to-work * Women Infants and Children (WIC) * Work requirements * Youth employment * many more tags...

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

December 20, 2013
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2013/12/20/
American Community Survey (4 articles)
Long-Term Unemployment Benefits
Minimum Wage Increases (3 articles)
Child Welfare and Foster Care (3 articles)

December 19, 2013
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2013/12/19/
Income Inequality in the US
National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Trial Urban District Assessment (4 articles)

December 18, 2013
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2013/12/18/
Poverty Measurement in the US

December 17, 2013
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2013/12/17/
Kids Count Report – Michigan (2 articles)

December 16, 2013
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2013/12/16/
Hunger and Homelessness in US Cities (4 articles)
Drug Testing and Assistance Programs – Minnesota

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Earlier Poverty Dispatches (back to July 2006):
1. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page: [ http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/ and click on a date in the calendar in the top right-hand corner of the page. Change the month by clicking the link at the bottom of the calendar.
OR
3. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page and click on a category or a tag in the right-hand margin.
4. See http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/povdispatch_archive.htm (more complete listing, but only goes back to December 2011)

---

NOTE : You can subscribe to this email list or RSS feed
by clicking "Subscribe" in the right-hand margin on any page of the Poverty Dispatch website

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)

http://www.irp.wisc.edu

University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://www.wisc.edu/

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

10. [U.S.] In the War on Poverty, a Dogged Adversary - December 17
(New York Times)

In the War on Poverty, a Dogged Adversary
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/18/business/economy/in-the-war-on-poverty-a-dogged-adversary.html
By Eduardo Porter
December 17, 2013
When President Lyndon Johnson declared his War on Poverty [ http://goo.gl/aFgQ1 ] on Jan. 8, 1964, almost exactly 50 years ago, 19 percent of Americans were poor. “The richest nation on earth can afford to win it,” he reasoned, as he proposed a clutch of initiatives from expanding food stamps to revamping unemployment insurance. “We cannot afford to lose it.”

A half-century later, our priorities have changed.
In November, food benefits were cut for approximately 48 million Americans by an average of 7 percent. Next month, 1.3 million jobless workers are scheduled to stop receiving an unemployment check, after Congress’s refusal to prolong the extension of emergency jobless benefits to up to 73 weeks, from 26. The official poverty rate today is 15 percent.

(...)
Without the panoply of government benefits — like food stamps, subsidized school lunches and the earned-income tax credit, which provides extra money to household heads earning low wages — the nation’s poverty rate last year would have reached almost 31 percent, up from 25 percent in 1967, according to the research at Columbia.
(...)
Welfare reform in the mid-1990s, to a large extent, replaced cash payments with food stamps and an expanded earned-income tax credit. But the tax credit is of no use to those without jobs.

Source:
New York Times
http://www.nytimes.com/

---

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

11. U.S. Census Bureau Introduces New Interactive Mapping Tool along with Latest American Community Survey Statistics - December 17
(U.S. Census Bureau)

United States

Census Bureau Introduces New Interactive Mapping Tool along with Latest American Community Survey Statistics
http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/american_community_survey_acs/cb13-215.html
December 17, 2013
The U.S. Census Bureau released Census Explorer [ http://www.census.gov/censusexplorer ], a new interactive mapping tool that gives users easier access to neighborhood level statistics. The mapping tool uses updated statistics from the 2008-2012 American Community Survey (ACS) [ http://www.census.gov/acs/www/ ], which were also released today.

American Community Survey News Media Tool Kit
http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/american_community_survey_acs/newsmediakit.html

Source:
U.S. Census Bureau

http://www.census.gov/

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

12. Why Shopping at Walmart Is No Bargain - December 12
(AlterNet.org)

Why Shopping at Walmart Is No Bargain
http://www.alternet.org/activism/walmart-not-bargain-you-might-think
December 12, 2013
Despite 1,500 protests nationwide against Walmart, the world's biggest retailer claimed its most lucrative Black Friday ever in 2013. Our friends and neighbors flock there. They do - even those who have seen mom-and-pop stores shut down when Walmart moved into town, who miss being able to pick up one or two items and be out of a store in 10 minutes, who personally know Walmart employees relying on food stamps and who have heard how much money the Walton family continues to accumulate.

Walmart is the poster child for how huge corporations have undermined people's ability to make a living. It does this by sending manufacturing abroad to countries where labor is cheap, at the same time paying its own employees less than a living wage, using other unfair labor practices in numerous locations in the United States, and undercutting locally owned enterprises right out of business. It harms Main Streets and local commerce centers across the country and further drives people to malls.

So why do people go there? When asked this question, Walmart shoppers uniformly respond that "it's cheap and convenient, and I can't afford to shop at [other places]."


Feature length documentary:

WAL-MART: THE HIGH COST OF LOW PRICE (video, duration 1:37:38)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jazb24Q2s94
This hour-and-a-half feature length documentary uncovers a retail giant's assault on families and American values. The film dives into the deeply personal stories and everyday lives of families and communities struggling to fight a goliath. A working mother is forced to turn to public assistance to provide healthcare for her two small children. A Missouri family loses its business after Wal-Mart is given over $2 million to open its doors down the road. A mayor struggles to equip his first responders after Wal-Mart pulls out and relocates just outside the city limits. A community in California unites, takes on the giant, and wins! Producer/Director Robert Greenwald and Brave New Films take you on an extraordinary journey that will change the way you think, feel -- and shop.

Source:
AlterNet.org
http://www.alternet.org/

---

- Go to the Banks and Business Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bookmrk3.htm

13. CRINMAIL (Newsletter of the Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):
http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

The latest information on children's rights around the world:
CRINMAIL
http://www.crin.org/email/
CRIN publishes several email lists on children's rights issues in English, French, Spanish and Arabic. We also issue thematic editions on armed conflict, violence against children and strategic litigation. You can subscribe to any of these email lists and unsubscribe at any time.

CRINMAIL - Children's Rights Newsletter (weekly)

Link to the latest issue of CRINMAIL:

18 December 2013 - CRINmail issue 1358
http://www.crin.org/email/crinmail_detail_popup.asp?crinmailID=4979

In this issue:
Latest news and reports
- Children with disabilities left out of Georgia's reform
- Bahrain arresting and torturing child protesters
- Latest wave of violence claims children’s lives
- New report reviews corporal punishment in 2013
- Concern over HIV hospital infections in Kyrgyzstan
- Japan court legally recognises child’s transgender father
- New report on birth registration trends and inequalities
Children's Rights Wiki: Spotlight on Kiribati
Upcoming events
Employment
CRIN announcements
Also in this issue:
- World news
- Reports
- Events
- Issues
- Law
- Advocacy
- Challenging breaches
- Take action
- Campaigns

---------------------------------------------

CRINMAIL Archive (earlier issues)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/CRINMAIL_archive.htm
- includes a table of contents for each issue, as in the above, back to 2009-2010

NOTE : The official CRINMAIL archive [ http://goo.gl/C0JNx ] --- does *not* include the table of contents for each issue as in the most recent issue above. Users must click on the link to each issue to see its contents, but the collection of links goes back much further (pre-2006).

--------------------------------------------------

The CRINMAIL Children's Rights Newsletter is one of several weekly newsletters produced and distributed by CRIN.
See the complete list of newsletters:
http://www.crin.org/email/

Source:
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):

http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

---

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong to me, Gilles Séguin.
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/personal.htm

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
http://www.cupe.ca/
Thanks, CUPE!

------------------------

If you wish to receive this weekly newsletter by email, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter online subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly newsletter.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

Seven Foods You Should Avoid at All Costs
http://www.mydiet.com/7-foods-you-should-avoid-at-all-costs/

Here are some foods that are so bad for you that they should be permanently eliminated from your diet.
Click the source link above to read more about each of the seven items below and to see alternatives or substitutes.

1. Coleslaw

It contains a disproportionate amount of calories per serving, and it is full of fatty mayonnaise. The average portion of coleslaw will provide you with at least 260 calories, and more than 20g of fat.

2. Frosting in a can/jar

Frosting typically contains trans fats, which are hazardous food additives that undermine weight loss and promote a range of health problems. In truth, it is so terrible for your body that you should avoid consuming even small amounts.

3. Packaged Sandwiches

The average pre-packaged sandwich sandwich contains over 400 calories, and these sandwiches contain large amounts of fat and saturated fat, as most of them are stuffed full of mayonnaise or cheese.

4. Tomato sauce for pasta or chili

A large jar of tomato sauce are often packed full of refined sugars, promoting weight gain and increasing your risk of developing diabetes at some point in your life.

5. Soy sauce
Soy sauce has a low calorie content and it is a source of some healthy vitamins, so it can look utterly harmless at first glance. However, just one spoonful contains around 900 milligrams of sodium, about half of an average adult's daily recommended salt intake.

6. Multigrain products
The law regarding ingredient descriptions actually allows companies to label their products as ‘multigrain’ foods even when their primary ingredient is refined grains.
Refined grains lack nutritional value, and they are strongly correlated with weight gain.

7. Foods containing artificial sweeteners
Aspartame and other artificial sweeteners cause serious health problems, including weight gain. Aspartame and other artificial sweeteners seem to impair the body’s ability to detect whether your stomach is full, triggering overeating and stronger cravings that can thwart a person's attempts to lose weight. Artificial sweeteners also impair kidney function.

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Surfly
http://www.surfly.com/

Have you ever tried to give a friend specific instructions for what to do and where to go on a website? Perhaps you wanted to show them a series of navigations but were unsure about how to tell them using written instructions. Surfly makes helping from a distance possible, "by showing what to do from your perspective." After registering on the site, visitors can create a unique URL that contains all of the navigation details involved with a set of site explorations. It's a great way to collaborate and share information with family, friends, or work colleagues. This version is compatible with all operating systems.

Source:
The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout 1994-2013

https://www.scout.wisc.edu/

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And, in closing...

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Happy Winter Solstice!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winter_solstice

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Hello (name here)!: ‘Forgotten’ Duffy fundraising clips resurrected
Ottawa Citizen article :
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/technology/Hello+name+here+Forgotten+Duffy+fundraising+clips+resurrected/9314879/story.html

It's the Old Duff:
http://app.kevino.ca/duffy/?name=nigel

If you'd rather hear Duffy salute someone else than some guy named Nigel, scroll down the page and click on one of the 800 names. You can even download an MP3 file for your own name , to install on your smartphone as a personalized ringtone!

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27 Problems Only Introverts Will Understand
http://www.buzzfeed.com/erinlarosa/problems-only-introverts-will-understand

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A Choir of Silent Monks? (video, duration 2:57)
http://www.godvine.com/What-a-Choir-of-Silent-Monks-Does-Will-Make-You-Laugh-2484.html

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The 20 Worst Christmas Songs Ever
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/12/16/worst-christmas-songs-ever_n_4408927.html
- includes "All I Want For Christmas Is You" --- the sexed-up version by Mariah Carey and Justin Bieber, wherein Mariah Carey gets all flirty with the Bieber-boy. Turns out that Carey is six years older than Bieber's own mother.
Ooooooh, Babeeee.

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