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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
January 23, 2011


Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,376 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:


Canadian content

1. Canada's Universal Periodic Review : Report of the House of Commons
Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development
(International Human Rights) - Presented in the House November 3, 2010
2. Annonce de programme télé /TV Alert:
--- Lundi le 24 janvier à 20h, heure de l'est à RDI : Naufragés des villes (L'aide sociale à Montréal)
--- Monday, January 24 at 8pm Eastern Time on RDI: 10-part series about life on welfare in Montreal (in French only)
3. The federal contribution to reducing poverty in Canada (House of Commons Standing Committee on Human Resources, Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities - HUMA) - April 2008
4. Census battle too important to give up (Eric Sager in the Victoria Times-Colonist) - January 19
5. Let’s refocus on a guaranteed annual income (Senator Hugh Segal in The Globe and Mail) - January 19
6. Slim bridge between Toronto’s two solitudes (Carol Goar in the Toronto Star) - January 17
7.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Employment Insurance, November 2010 - January 20
--- Canadian Health Measures Survey : Physical activity of youth and adults, 2007 to 2009- January 19

8. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - January 23

International content

9. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
10. [U.S.] Health and Human Services Poverty Guidelines
for 2010 and 2011
11. [U.S.] Poverty and Recovery (New York Times) - January 18
12. Links to 150+ Anti-Poverty Proposals in the U.S. (Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity
13. Wikipedia celebrates its 10th year and looks to the future (The Scout Report)

14. Australian Policy Online - selected recent content
15. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!
Gilles

[ gilseg@rogers.com ]



1. Canada's Universal Periodic Review : Report of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development (International Human Rights) - Presented in the House November 3, 2010

Canada's Universal Periodic Review:
Report of the House of Commons Standing Committee on
Foreign Affairs and International Development (International Human Rights)
- Presented in the House November 3, 2010
- Posted to the Parliamentary website January 18, 2011

NOTE : If you're not familiar with the UN human rights "Universal Periodic Review", I suggest that you start reading this section (above the red divider below ) from the bottom. The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights site offers information on the UPR in general as well as content that is specific to Canada. Above that you'll find links to UPR content on the Heritage Canada (govt.) website. And finally, immediately below this paragraph, the latest report from the House of Commons Subcommittee whose long name appears under "Source" below.
----------------------------------------------------------------
WARNING - Spoiler !
Don't read the next four bullets
if you want to be surprised when you read the 44-page report.

* Effective Consultation Between Government and Civil Society : NOT.
* Government Transparency : NOT.
* Good track record of monitoring and reporting on human rights in Canada : NOT.
* Good track record of implementing and enforcing Canada's international human rights obligations domestically : NOT.

----------------------------------------------------------------

New on the Parliamentary
website January 18, 2011:

Canada’s Universal Periodic Review and Beyond—Upholding
Canada’s International Reputation as a Global Leader in the Field of Human Rights
(PDF - 633K, 44 pages)
Report of the House of Commons Standing Committee on
Foreign Affairs and International Development

(Adopted by the Committee on October 21, 2010; Presented to the House on November 3, 2010; posted on the Parliamentary website January 18, 2011)
(...)
The report has three main sections. The first section deals with the Universal Periodic Review (UPR) process as well as with Canada’s other reporting obligations in the UN system. The second section focuses on the concerns raised by a number of parties regarding the way in which Canada monitors and reports on its domestic human rights situation. The third section focuses on concerns raised regarding the way in which Canada implements and enforces its international human rights obligations domestically.
Alex Neve (Secretary-General for Amnesty International Canada) said in his testimony : "When it comes to any country’s human rights record, the real value lies not in the treaties that have been ratified, the promises that have been made, or the review processes undertaken. The proof lies in compliance and implementation... This has long been a troubling shortcoming for Canada."
The Subcommittee is troubled by this and acknowledges that many Canadians are unaware of this situation. However, these concerns have not gone unnoticed by its peers in the international community. It is time for Canada to stop falling short on its human rights obligations and work fastidiously toward upholding its international reputation as a global leader in the field of human rights.
Source:
Subcommittee on International Human Rights (SDIR)
[ SDIR is part of the
House of Commons Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development (FAAE) ]

___________

From
Canadian Heritage
:

* Canada's Universal Periodic Review
* Reports on UN Human Rights Treaties and Other Documents
* Human Rights Links

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From the
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights:

United Nations Universal Periodic Review (UPR)
The Universal Periodic Review is a unique process which involves a review of the human rights records of all 192 UN Member States once every four years. The UPR is a State-driven process, under the auspices of the Human Rights Council, which provides the opportunity for each State to declare what actions they have taken to improve the human rights situations in their countries and to fulfill their human rights obligations. As one of the main features of the Council, the UPR is designed to ensure equal treatment for every country when their human rights situations are assessed. [Created in March 2006] through the UN General Assembly, (...) the UPR is one of the key elements of the new Council which reminds States of their responsibility to fully respect and implement all human rights and fundamental freedoms. The ultimate aim of this new mechanism is to improve the human rights situation in all countries and address human rights violations wherever they occur. [More...]
Source:
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) represents the world's commitment to universal ideals of human dignity. We have a unique mandate from the international community to promote and protect all human rights.

Also from OHCHR:

Universal Periodic Review (UPR) - Canada
- includes links to versions in six languages of:
* the National report
* the Compilation of UN information
* Summary of stakeholders' information
* Questions submitted in advance
* Outcome of the review :
--- Report of the Working group
--- Addendum 1
--- Decision on the outcome
--- Draft Report of the eleventh session of the Human Rights Council

[ UPR Canada is part of the OHCHR Canada Homepage - recommended reading! ]

- Go to the Human Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/rights.htm

2. Annonce de programme télé /TV Alert:
*** Lundi le 24 janvier à 20h, heure de l'est à RDI : Naufragés des villes (L'aide sociale à Montréal)
*** Monday, January 24 at 8pm Eastern Time on RDI: 10-part series about life on welfare in Montreal (in French only)

Lundi le 24 janvier à 20h, heure de l'est à RDI : Naufragés des villes

Documentaire : La série Naufragés des villes explore la réalité de la pauvreté
Peut-on vivre à Montréal avec 19,47 $ par jour?
Autrement dit, est-il possible de survivre avec une prestation d'aide sociale?
Cette question est à l'origine de la série documentaire Naufragés des villes qui prendra l'affiche le 24 janvier à RDI. La série suit pendant deux mois deux volontaires livrés à eux-mêmes au coeur de Montréal avec la somme de 19,47 $ par jour.
Source:
Radio-Canada

Aperçu du premier programme (Lundi le 24 janvier à 20h, heure de l'est)

__________________

English version:

Monday, January 24 at 8pm Eastern Time on RDI: 10-part series about life on welfare in Montreal (in French only)
Naufragés des villes
(Gilles' unofficial translation : Urban Castaways)
NOTE: this series of ten one-hour programs is available only on the French RDI network.
If you understand French, I highly recommend the series, because there will be many comparisons throughout the ten programs between life on welfare in Montreal and elsewhere in Canada.
English abstract:
What exactly does it mean to be poor in Canada today?
We find out as two volunteers leave behind their status, résumé, network of friends and bank cards. Throughout the two-month experiment, they will have no financial resources except the $19 a day we provide them – the equivalent of welfare benefits for a person living alone. With handpicked experts and social workers watching and analyzing, their journey will be the main focus of a 10-episode series documenting their efforts to find housing, food, medical care, clothing, jobs . . . and deal with prejudice. Using hidden cameras and daily check-ins, we document their progress.
Source:
Radio-Canada (French home page)

- Go to the Québec Links (English) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qce.htm
- Rendez-vous à la page de liens de recherche sociale au Québec: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qcbkmrk.htm

3. The federal contribution to reducing poverty in Canada - April 2008
(
House of Commons Standing Committee on Human Resources, Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities (HUMA)

The federal contribution to reducing poverty in Canada:
EVIDENCE - Meeting No. 23 of the
Standing Committee on Human Resources, Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities
(39th PARLIAMENT, 2nd SESSION)
April 10, 2008

Recommended reading --- this transcript is over 40 printed pages of valuable information concerning the federal contribution to reducing poverty in Canada, including an extended discussion of the relative merits of the low-income measures in use in Canada (LICOs, LIMs and MBMs ) and elsewhere in the world.

Witnesses:

Frank Fedyk (Associate Assistant Deputy Minister, Strategic Policy and Research, Department of Human Resources and Social Development)
Sylvie Michaud (Director, Income Statistics Division, Statistics Canada)
Garnett Picot (Director General, Socio-Economic and Business Analysis Branch, Statistics Canada)
Sheila Regehr (Director, National Council of Welfare)
Doug Murphy (Assistant Director, Economic Security Policy, Department of Human Resources and Social Development)
Shawn Tupper (Director General, Social Policy Development, Department of Human Resources and Social Development)

Source:
House of Commons Standing Committee on
Human Resources, Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities (HUMA)

[ Parliament of Canada website ]

< Begin researcher rant #1 of 2011. >

Special Message to whoever is responsible for the Parliamentary website, on behalf of anyone who has ever cited a URL in his/her research, or maintained a web directory (like Canadian Social Research Links):

Please offer permanent URLs for your site content.

The Committees section of the Parliamentary website is already a nightmare to navigate without having the URLs to all site content changing after the beginning of the next session. Changing URLs to site content after each session of Parliament means that the original link is dead for any student or researcher and for anyone who updates link directories (like me.).

....and that makes us do one of these ===> [ *&@%)$?* ]

A large number of universities and other organizations use database engines in their web presentation, and many of those offer stable (permanent) URLs specifically so their visitors can bookmark a particular report or other item. Surely, the federal government could explore the possibility of including stable URLs for researchers who wish to link to a particular file without having to worry that the URL will have changed by the next time they try to access the item...

Here's another example of how frustrating the Parliamentary website hyperlinking system is:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/huma.htm#2008

< /End researcher rant #1 of 2011. >

BTW...
If you're a researcher who is frustrated with reports that vanish from government websites when they roll out their latest common look and feel standards and change all their URLs, you may find the Government of Canada Web Archive a useful resource. This archive allows you to dig for content from old versions of federal govt. websites --- but only back to December 2005 when the service started. It's a Canadian government version of The Wayback Machine (Internet Archive).
[ Read a review that I did about both of the
archiving services mentioned in the previous paragraph.
]

BTW II...
Social Research Tip:
The 2009 Meetings of the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities ("HUMA") offer a goldmine of information about how well we were doing in 2009 as a country from a number of angles. In those meeting transcripts, you'll find evidence in the form of written submissions and presentations by representatives from dozens and dozens of non-governmental organizations, unions, social advocacy groups, etc.
Each presentation/submission offers a snapshot of the prevalence and impact of poverty on various groups and on Canadian society in general.

- Go to the National/Federal and International Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty2.htm

4. Census battle too important to give up - January 19
(Eric Sager in the Victoria Times-Colonist)

Remember?

Saskatchewan woman guilty of census refusal
January 14, 2011
A Saskatoon woman who refused to fill out a long-form census has been found guilty of violating Canada's census law. A provincial court judge ruled Thursday that community activist Sandra Finley's privacy rights were not violated by the requirement to fill out the long form in 2006.
Source:
CBC News

The Dénouement:

No penalty for Sask. woman who refused census
January 20, 2011
Sandra Finley was found guilty of violating the Statistics Act that required her to fill out the 2006 census. The Saskatoon woman found guilty after refusing to fill out a long-form census has received an absolute discharge. Sandra Finley was found guilty last week in provincial court of violating the Statistics Act and faced a maximum fine of $500 and a jail sentence of three months. Instead, Judge Sheila Whelan granted a discharge Thursday, which means there will be no penalty.
Source:
CBC News

So the Census long form battle is lost?
NO.

Census battle too important to give up
By Eric W. Sager
January 19, 2011
(...)
Prime Minister Stephen Harper has decided that taxpayers will pay $80 million for a survey that may be of little use. Instead we will get ongoing debates over the validity of the results, expensive efforts to compensate for bias and more outrage from those who require reliable data for efficient planning.
(...)
Of course the long-form census can be an intrusion on our time. But since it goes to only a fifth of households, the odds are that you would be asked to fill it out only once in 25 years. Is half an hour of your time, once every 25 years, too high a price for efficient policy planning and the other public benefits the census provides? The fuss over the census is not over, because the prime minister's decision is an attack on cost-effective planning, on evidence-based policy making and on the right of Canadians to high-quality statistical knowledge of their country. Canadians will continue to protest, and so they should.
[
Eric W. Sager is a member of the history department at the University of Victoria. ]
Source:
Victoria Times-Colonist

- Go to the Census 2011 questionnaire links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/2011_census_questionnaire.htm

5. Let’s refocus on a guaranteed annual income - January 19
(Senator Hugh Segal in The Globe and Mail)

Let’s refocus on a guaranteed annual income
Senator Hugh Segal
January 19, 2011
It was 40 years ago that a former mayor of Windsor, former provincial minister and Ontario senator issued one of the greatest challenges to Canada’s citizens and leaders. Sadly, however, the centrepiece of the lifelong work of David Croll remains unfulfilled and his challenge remains unaddressed.

In the introduction to his 1971 report of the Senate committee on poverty, Mr. Croll stated bluntly: “Poverty is the great social issue of our time. The poor do not choose poverty. It is at once their affliction and our national shame. No nation can achieve true greatness if it lacks the courage and determination to undertake the surgery necessary to remove the cancer of poverty from its body politic.”

Mr. Croll, one of Canada’s greatest Liberal parliamentarians, made his clarion call for the establishment of a guaranteed annual income (GAI) in that report. It was, the committee concluded, the most efficient and least wasteful mechanism for lifting millions of Canadians out of poverty. He was right four decades ago, and he is still right today.
(...)
Forty years ago Mr. Croll said: “The children of the poor (and there are many) are the most helpless victims of all, and find even less hope in a society where welfare systems from the very beginning destroy their chances of a better life.” Forty years later, the time for action on the GAI is upon us. Leaving the challenge of poverty to the side is to deny the essential decency and balance Canadians have always shared.
Source:
Globe and Mail

Related G&M articles:
* To end poverty, guarantee everyone in Canada $20,000 a year. But are you willing to trust the poor? (Nov. 19, 2010)
* What if we gave the poor $20,000 a year? (Nov. 19, 2010)

- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

6. Slim bridge between Toronto’s two solitudes - January 17
(Carol Goar in the Toronto Star)

Slim bridge between Toronto’s two solitudes
January 17, 2011
By Carol Goar
(...) The United Way depicts this reality [decay of the "inner suburbs") in graphic detail in its latest report, Vertical Poverty. It shows how Toronto’s pockets of poverty have spread, now forming a ring around the city core. It urges the city, the province and the federal government, along with the private sector and community agencies to rehabilitate these apartment towers, which not only pose risks to residents but to the vitality of Canada’s largest city. (...) The recommendations in Vertical Poverty echo the proposals of anti-poverty activists and social agencies. The report calls for a national housing strategy; an Ontario Housing Benefit to help low-income tenants stave off eviction; an increase in funding for non-profit housing; a zoning amendment requiring developers to include affordable housing in residential highrises; a public investment in retrofitting aging apartments and an industry-government task force to tackle the problem of chronic elevator breakdown. In an era of retrenchment, this is going to be a hard sell.
Source:
Toronto Star

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

7. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Employment Insurance, November 2010 - January 20
--- Canadian Health Measures Survey : Physical activity of youth and adults, 2007 to 2009- January 19

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

January 20, 2011
Employment Insurance, November 2010
In November, 673,700 people received regular Employment Insurance benefits, down by 5,700 (-0.8%) from October. The number of beneficiaries edged down in five provinces.
- includes three tables:
* Employment Insurance: Statistics by province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by age group, sex, province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by census metropolitan areas

Related link:

Employment Insurance Statistics Maps, November 2010
- change in number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits in the last 12 months, by Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations.
- incl. Intro to maps + link to November 2010 maps [in the left margin]
Source:
Employment Insurance Statistics Maps - Product main page*
Set of maps presenting Employment Insurance Statistics. The maps show the percentage change in the number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits in the last 12 months, by Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) and Census Agglomerations (CAs), using 2001 Census geography. Data are also shown in a tabular format.
---
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue
of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects
o Labour
o Employment insurance, social assistance and other transfers
o Non-wage benefits

[ earlier editions of this report ]

-------------------------------------------------------

January 19, 2011
Canadian Health Measures Survey: Physical activity of youth and adults, 2007 to 2009
New international and proposed Canadian guidelines recommend that to obtain substantial health benefits, adults should accumulate at least 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity a week. According to new data from the Canadian Health Measures Survey, 15% of Canadian adults attain this level of activity. Levels of physical activity are lower for young people.
[ Related articles (2) : Physical activity levels of Canadian adults and children, January 2011 ]
Source:
Health Reports - product main page*
Health Reports, published by the Health Analysis Division (HAD) of Statistics Canada, is a peer-reviewed journal of population health and health services research. It is designed for a broad audience that includes health professionals, researchers, policymakers, and through media coverage, the general public. The journal publishes articles of wide interest that contain original and timely analyses of national or provincial/territorial surveys or administrative databases.
---
* Click the product main page link, then "View" to read
the latest issue or "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:

* Children and youth
* Health and well-being (youth)
* Health
* Diseases and health conditions
* Health care services
* Lifestyle and social conditions

-------------------------------------------------------

The Daily Archives
- select a month and year from the drop-down menus and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

8. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - January 23

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
:

-------

January 23, 2011

What's new online:
[This section archives documents that
have been featured on the CRRU homepage..]

Death by indifference
19 Jan 11
- Op-ed in the Toronto Star by CRRU's Martha Friendly says "government's failure to build a child care system has again proved fatal."

Media releases and news coverage of recent death in unregulated care
19 Jan 11
- In the wake of a tragic death in an unregulated child care home, advocates are calling for a coroner's inquest and are citing systemic failures in Ontario's and Canada's provision of child care. CRRU has collected media releases and news coverage of this pressing issue.

Alberta's day care controversy: From 1908 to 2009 and beyond
19 Jan 11
- Book by Dr. Tom Langford traces the development of child care policies and programs in Alberta. Chapters discuss history of Alberta child care, the emergence of corporatized chains, and issues for the future. Full book available online!

Sweden's National Agency for Education's statistics
19 Jan 11
- Skolverket (the Swedish National Agency for Education) has put a large selection of educational statistics online. These include enrolment, staffing and cost data for preschool and family child care.

The New Mexico PreK evaluation: Impacts from the fourth year (2008-2009) of New Mexico's state-funded PreK program
19 Jan 11
- Report from the US National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) finds that "children who attend the state-funded Pre-K program have significant positive effects in vocabulary, math, and literacy skills at the beginning of kindergarten."

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news
[This section features interesting and noteworthy
news about ECEC and related issues in Canada and internationally.]

· MP Graham Allen calls for early years intervention
[GB] 19 Jan 11

· Child care funding a concern
[CA-ON] 18 Jan 11

· Parents give thumbs up to new kindergarten classrooms
[CA-BC] 18 Jan 11

· Parental leave system puts unfair burden on mothers, says Nick Clegg
[GB] 17 Jan 11

· Lessons from baby's daycare death?
[CA-ON] 17 Jan 11

· No choice for working parents
[CA-ON] 14 Jan 11

· Lack of resources blamed for problems in Scots nurseries
[GB] 7 Jan 11

· Joined-up services are the key to our children's future
[GB] 21 Dec 10

more CC IN THE NEWS »

------

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

9. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

January 21:
State Medicaid Programs - Arizona, Minnesota
State Unemployment Funds

January 20:
States and Medicaid Funding - California
Unemployment Benefit Debit Cards
Tax Cut Legislation and the Working Poor

January 19:
Foster Care Placements - Utah
Opinions: Poverty Measurement
Suburban Poverty and Schools - Des Moines, IA

January 18:
Achievement Gap - Connecticut
Fast Food Ban - South Los Angeles, CA

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

10. [U.S.] Health and Human Services Poverty Guidelines (2010 and 2011)

The 2011 HHS Poverty Guidelines
The 2011 HHS poverty guidelines are scheduled to
be published in the Federal Register on January 20, 2011.
Additional information will be posted after the guidelines are published.
The 2011 HHS Poverty Guidelines for the 48 contiguous states* and the District of Columbia are as follows:
# of Persons in Family --------- Poverty Guideline
1 ------------------------------------- $10,890
2 ------------------------------------- $14,710
3 ------------------------------------- $18,530
4 ------------------------------------- $22,350
5 ------------------------------------- $26,170
6 ------------------------------------- $29,990
7 ------------------------------------- $33,810
8 ------------------------------------- $37,630
For each additional person, add - $3,820
[ *The HHS Poverty Guidelines are higher in Alaska and Hawaii.]

---

The HHS Poverty Guidelines for the Remainder of 2010
(August- December 2010)
Legislation enacted in late 2009 and early 2010 prohibited publication of 2010 poverty guidelines before May 31, 2010, and required that the 2009 poverty guidelines remain in effect until publication of updated guidelines. [ Link to 2009 guidelines ].

Legislation to further delay publication of the 2010 guidelines did not pass. The procedure for updating the 2010 guidelines was modified to take into account the Consumer Price Index (CPI-U) for the period for which their publication was delayed. The poverty guideline figures for the remainder of 2010 were the same as the 2009 poverty guideline figures.

***

There are two slightly different versions of the federal poverty measure: the poverty thresholds and the poverty guidelines.

The poverty thresholds are the original version of the federal poverty measure. They are updated each year by the Census Bureau (although they were originally developed by Mollie Orshansky of the Social Security Administration). The thresholds are used mainly for statistical purposes — for instance, preparing estimates of the number of Americans in poverty each year. (In other words, all official poverty population figures are calculated using the poverty thresholds, not the guidelines.)

The poverty guidelines are the other version of the federal poverty measure. They are issued each year in the Federal Register by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The guidelines are a simplification of the poverty thresholds for use for administrative purposes — for instance, determining financial eligibility for certain federal programs. (The full text of the August 3 (2010) Federal Register notice with the 2010 poverty guidelines is available.)

The poverty guidelines are sometimes loosely referred to as the “federal poverty level” (FPL), but that phrase is ambiguous and should be avoided, especially in situations (e.g., legislative or administrative) where precision is important.

Key differences between poverty thresholds and poverty guidelines are outlined in a table under Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).
See also the discussion of this topic on the Institute for Research on Poverty’s web site..

***

Related links:

[ Prior Poverty Guidelines and Federal Register References Since 1982 ]
[ Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) ]
[ Further Resources on Poverty Measurement, Poverty Lines, and Their History ]
[ Computations for the 2010 Poverty Guidelines ]
[
2009 Annual Update of the Health and Human Services Poverty Guidelines ]

Source:
Office of Human Services Policy
[Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning & Evaluation ]
[ Department of Health and Human Services ]

-------------------------------------------
COMMENT:
There's an important distinction between the Canadian and American government poverty measurement --- in the U.S., a person's or household's eligibility for certain programs is actually tied to an official federal government poverty measure. (However, eligibility for state welfare programs that fall under the federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families umbrella is means-tested and not related to any poverty measure.) In Canada, eligibility for all provincial and territorial welfare programs for individuals and families is "needs-tested". Needs-testing and means-testing mean the same thing in this context --- they both involve a test that takes into account a household's financial resources and its needs.

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

11. [U.S.] Poverty and Recovery - January 18
(New York Times)

Poverty and Recovery
Editorial
January 18, 2011
In 2008, the first year of the Great Recession, the number of Americans living in poverty rose by 1.7 million to nearly 47.5 million. While hugely painful, that rise wasn’t surprising given the unraveling economy. What is surprising is that recent census data show that those poverty numbers held steady in 2009, even though job loss worsened significantly that year. (...) Clearly, the sheer scale of poverty — 15.7 percent of the country’s population — is unacceptable. But to keep millions more Americans from falling into poverty during a deep recession is a genuine accomplishment that holds a vital lesson: the safety net, fortified by stimulus, staved off an even more damaging crisis.

President Obama must explain to the American people that the country needs to continue relief and recovery efforts, especially programs to create jobs. Without that, tens of millions of Americans stuck in poverty will have little hope of climbing out — and many more could join their ranks.

[ Other Selected Editorials on Jobs and Unemployment (Series) ]

Source:
The New York Times

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

12. Links to 150+ Anti-Poverty Proposals in the U.S.
(Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity)

Anti-Poverty Proposals in the U.S.
Links to 150+ reports, some as recent as a few months old and some going back to the early 2000s, from a variety of sources (ranging ideologically from the Cato Institute to the Brookings Institute) dealing with a broad range of subjects related to poverty and poverty reduction in the U.S..

Source:
Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity
Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity was launched in October 2007 by major U.S. foundations to foster non-partisan debate during the 2008 campaign season about policy approaches for addressing poverty and opportunity. Today, Spotlight provides a platform for ongoing discussion about how best to address the needs of those who have fallen into poverty during the Great Recession and those who have struggled for generations to move up the economic ladder. (...) Spotlight has attracted interest from public figures of all political stripes who write for the website’s exclusive commentary section, participate in webcasts and rely on the one-stop shop website for the latest news, research, data and commentary about poverty and opportunity.
- incl. links to : * Characteristics of Poverty * Poverty Measurement * Consequences of Poverty * Mobility and Opportunity * Anti-Poverty Proposals * Immigration and Poverty * Asset Poverty * Place and Poverty * Polling

- Go to the National/Federal and International Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty2.htm

13. Wikipedia celebrates its 10th year and looks to the future
(The Scout Report)

Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Wikipedia is a multilingual, web-based, free-content encyclopedia project based on an openly editable model. The name "Wikipedia" is a portmanteau of the words wiki (a technology for creating collaborative websites, from the Hawaiian word wiki, meaning "quick") and encyclopedia. Wikipedia's articles provide links to guide the user to related pages with additional information.

January 14, 2011

Wikipedia celebrates its 10th year and looks to the future
http://news.cnet.com/8301-13772_3-20028451-52.html

Wikipedia-an unplanned miracle
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2011/jan/14/wikipedia-unplanned-miracle-10-years

In praise of Wikipedia
http://www.economist.com/node/17902943?story_id=17902943&CFID=159815051&CFTOKEN=41373080

Wikipedia Comes of Age
http://chronicle.com/article/Wikipedia-Comes-of-Age/125899/

The State of Wikipedia
http://www.thestateofwikipedia.com/

Wikipedia-Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia

On January 15, 2001, Larry Sanger and Jimmy Wales began a new project with the words "Hello, world." Their next entry was "Humor me. Go there and add a little article. It will take all of five or ten minutes." Since then, Wikipedia has become the go-to online reference source for stumped college students, trivia fans, and the generally curious. Of course, there have been many critics, and some have claimed that many of the entries are merely sounding boards for those who may be singularly possessed by a certain subject, and not in an altogether objective fashion. Today, Wikipedia is the fifth-most popular online destination in the world, and it draws in 410 million unique visitors a month. One area of concern in recent years is that growth of new and discrete entries on the site has slowed significantly. This may be expected due to the fact that with 17 million articles, quite a bit of knowledge has been covered over the past decade. Andrew Lih, who wrote the book "The Wikipedia Revolution", commented that it will be integral for the Wikimedia Foundation to reach out to large cultural institutions in the coming years in order to provide the site with new, high-quality material. [KMG]

The first link will take visitors to a piece from CNET's Daniel Terdiman on the history of Wikipedia. The second link leads to an opinion piece from the Guardian's Clay Shirky on the enduring popularity of Wikipedia. Moving along, the third link leads to a humorous and insightful article from last week's Economist about the future of Wikipedia. The fourth link leads to a bit of reflection on the recent transformation of the reference world from Casper Grathwohl, the vice president and publisher of digital and reference content for Oxford University Press. The fifth link leads to a short graphic presentation narrated by Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Wales that talks about Wikipedia's past, present, and future. Finally, the last link is a bit of a "meta" offering, as it leads to the Wikipedia entry on Wikipedia.
Source:
The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2011.
http://scout.wisc.edu/

---------------------------------------------

Selected Poverty and Welfare Resources from Wikipedia *
Subjects include:
Poverty - Welfare state - welfare - Welfare reform - Social safety net - Human Development Index - Human Poverty Index - Measuring poverty - Poverty reduction - Social Welfare in Canada - Poverty in Canada - Poverty reduction - Homelessness in Canada.
* Recommended reading!

- Go to the Reference Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/reference.htm

14. Australian Policy Online - selected recent content

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia.
[ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page.

Most viewed this week (ending January 23) on APO:

1. POLITICS - Coalition still favourite for the poll
2. Garma Festival 2009 key forum address
3. Draft national curriculum in English, maths, science and history
4. The Rudd government: Australian Commonwealth administration 2007–2010
5.No quick fix

[You'll find these links on the APO home page.]

-------------------------------------------------------

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social Inclusion * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

Most viewed this week (ending January 23)
in the Social Policy section:

1. ACOSS 2011 National Conference
2. Teens and social media
3. Social media and young adults
4. Senior Policy Officer, Policy, Office of Gaming and Racing
5. Paternalism in social policy: when is it justifiable?

[You'll find these links on the APO Social Policy page.]

--------------

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

15. CRINMAIL
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
:

Latest issue of CRINMAIL
(children's rights newsletter):

18 January 2011, CRINMAIL issue 1209
In this issue:
Latest news and reports
- UPDATE on inhuman sentencing: Yemen
- Limiting citizenship rights: Nepal
- Coercive birth control: Tibet
- Curbing child labour: India
- Unlawful detention: United Kingdom
- Youth participation: Kenya
- Promoting equality: Spain
- Developments in child rights: Estonia, Turkey & Czech Rep.
- Regression in child rights: France
Employment
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Laws * Issues
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

NOTE: see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm for the table of contents for, and links to, several months' worth of issues of CRINMAIL.

------------------------------------------

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL (from CRINMAIL)
- links to earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

 


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com


****************************

Useless Measurement
Conversion Table

****************************


The world contains many things in need of measurement to which official measures do not apply.
Here's a short list of unofficial measures and their equivalents.

4 lawyers = 2 paralegals

2 untruths = 1 paralyze

33.8 oz of a case of soft drinks = 1 liter of the pack

1 first-date kiss = 1 peck

Ratio of an igloo's circumference to its diameter = 1 Eskimo Pi

2000 pounds of Chinese soup = Won ton

1 millionth mouthwash = 1 microscope

16.5 feet in the Twilight Zone = 1 Rod Serling

1000 aches = 1 megahurtz

Weight an evangelist carries with God = 1 billigram

Basic unit of laryngitis = 1 hoarsepower

Time between slipping on a peel and smacking the pavement = 1 bananosecond

A half bathroom = 1 demijohn

2200 mockingbirds = two kilomockingbirds

1 dialog = 2 monologs

Source:
http://www.alphadictionary.com/fun/measurement_conversions.html


-----------------------

And, in closing...

-----------------------

 
If It Were My Home.com
http://www.ifitweremyhome.com/
The lottery of birth is responsible for much of who we are. If you were not born in the country you were, what would your life be like?
Would you be the same person?


---

Dogsledding video  (Mush!)
http://www.wimp.com/dogsledding/
Awwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww.......


Equal-time kitty photo:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/images/tommy_wants_a_cracker.jpg
(My cat Tommy on my shoulder, pretending he's a parrot)
Awwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww.......

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Smooth Criminal on Two Cellos (video)
http://www.wimp.com/twocellos/


More crazy cello rock? (video)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IliwQImJrYE&feature=related

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Is your Blackberry working?
(Ronnie Corbett video)
http://www.flixxy.com/my-blackberry-is-not-working.htm