Canadian Social Research Links logo 
Canadian Social Research Newsletter
May 23, 2010

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,272 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

************************************************************************

Haiti Earthquake

Haiti still needs our help.
Source:
Canadian Red Cross

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Haiti Relief - from the CBC
- links to information resources, more organizations accepting donations

************************************************************************

IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1.  Income Security Programs and Educational Planning for Children in Care in Ontario (Laidlaw Foundation) - May 2010
2. [Ontario] Social Assistance, Pension and Tax Credit Rates, April to June 2010 (Ministry of Community & Social Services)
3. What's new from Ontario's 25-in-5 Network for Poverty Reduction:
--- Five Principles for a New Nutritional Supplement Program - May 20
--- Premier McGuinty's template response to the 25 in 5 open letter - May 6
4. Poverty Profile Bulletin No. 7: Poverty and Paid Work (National Council of Welfare) - Posted May 2010
5.
The state of charities across Canada (Imagine Canada) - April 2010
6. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Consumer Price Index, April 2010 - May 21
--- Employment Insurance, March 2010 - May 20
--- Leading indicators, April 2010 - May 20
--- Public school indicators for Canada, the provinces and territories, 2001/2002 to 2007-2008 - May 20
--- Juristat Spring 2010 issue:
***** The processing of divorce cases through civil court in seven provinces and territories
- May 18, 2010
***** Knives and violent crime in Canada, 2008 - April 27, 2010
***** Youth custody and community services in Canada, 2008/2009 - April 27, 2010
***** Police-reported robbery in Canada, 2008 - March 25, 2010
***** Maintenance enforcement by neighbourhood income in seven reporting census metropolitan areas
- March 25, 2010
7. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - May 22

International content

8. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs (U. of Wisconsin-Madison)
9. New from the Centre for Economics Policy Research (Australia):
--- Do rising top incomes lift all boats?
- April 2010
--- The distribution of top incomes in five anglo-saxon countries over the twentieth century - April 2010

10. Australian Policy Online (recent content)
11. CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!
Gilles
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]


1. Income Security Programs and Educational Planning for Children in Care in Ontario - May 2010
(Laidlaw Foundation)

New from
The Laidlaw Foundation:

Benefits for Children in Ontario Incomplete and Unfair
News Release
May 17, 2010
A new report says children not living with their parents are denied financial benefits that other children get. Not so Easy to Navigate, a report written by social policy experts John Stapleton and Anne Tweddle for the Laidlaw Foundation, reveals that the most vulnerable children in Ontario - those living in state care - don’t benefit from federal programs like the Canada Learning Bond and Canada Education Savings Grant the same way that children living with their families do.

Complete report:

‘Not so Easy to Navigate’:
A Report on the Complex Array of Income
Security Programs and Educational Planning for
Children in Care in Ontario
(PDF - 511K, 40 pages)
By John Stapleton & Anne Tweddle
Toronto
May 2010
Young people who have been taken into state care report that the most difficult issue they faced when leaving care was the lack of emotional, financial, and educational support. This paper describes the major financial supports currently available in Ontario and proposes ways to improve the financial and educational well-being of youth once they leave care.

Two pamphlets by the same authors
released with the above report:

* 7 Things you Should Know (PDF - 291K, 14 pages)
May 2010
Do you know a child who is in the care of a Children’s Aid Society?
Are you concerned about their financial and educational future?
This fact sheet tells you about financial benefits from the government for children in Ontario, with special emphasis on programs that build savings for a child in care. It also explains some of the changes that happen to benefits when a child goes into care.

* A message to all mothers in Ontario:
March 2010
Collect child benefits of up to $8,400 and more every year!

There are four things you should do when you give birth
in order to obtain the benefits that you are entitled to:

1. Go to Service Ontario to get a birth certificate and a Social Insurance Number for your child.
2. Apply for Canada Child Tax Benefits (CCTB).
3. Fill out a tax return and send it in.
4. Go to any bank and setup a Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP)
- includes links to online resources

Source:
The Laidlaw Foundation
The Laidlaw Foundation promotes positive youth development through inclusive youth engagement in the arts, environment and in community.

Related earlier report
from The Laidlaw Foundation:

Youth Leaving Care – How Do They Fare?
Briefing Paper
(PDF file - 242K, 31 pages)
September 2005
By Anne Tweddle
Source:
Task Force on Modernizing Income Security for Working Age Adults (they produced the report)
Laidlaw Foundation
(they funded the report)

[ More reports from The Laidlaw Foundation - click "Resources" in the left margin for links to all Laidlaw Foundation reports by theme.]

---

Related links from
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada:

* Canada Learning Bond
The Canada Learning Bond (CLB) is a grant offered by the Government of Canada to help parents, friends, and family members save early for the post-secondary education of children in modest-income families. (...)
The Government of Canada will make a one-time payment of $500 into the RESP of children who qualify for the Canada Learning Bond and a $100 deposit each subsequent year the child’s primary caregiver receives the National Child Benefit Supplement, to a maximum of $2,000. Canlearn.ca offers more information regarding the amount of CLB the child could receive.

* Canada Education Savings Grant
When you, as a parent, friend or family member, open a Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP) on behalf of a child and apply for the Canada Education Savings Grant (CESG), the Government of Canada will deposit a percentage of your own contribution directly into the RESP. To date, more than three million children have benefited from the Canada Education Savings Grant.

See also:

Open Policy - John Stapleton's website

---------------------------------------

From CBC Toronto:

Ont. youth in state care need RESPs: foundation
May 17, 2010
An Ontario youth foundation is calling on Ottawa to set up education savings accounts for the 18,000 Ontario children in state care. The Laidlaw Foundation has released a new report that suggests Ontario children living in foster care don't benefit from federal programs like the Canada Learning Bond and the Canada Education Savings Grant the same way that children living with their families do.

---

From The Toronto Star:

Youth in state care need RESPs
By Laurie Monsebraaten
May 17, 2010
Ontario should press Ottawa to give children in foster care the same educational support as children who live with their families. A report being released Monday says it would cost the federal government about $8 million a year to set up educational savings accounts for the approximately 18,000 Ontario children in state care. “Parents with children living at home often use their federal child benefits to open Registered Education Savings Plans for their children,” said social policy expert John Stapleton, co-author of report by the Laidlaw Foundation. The investments trigger the $2,000 federal learning bond and the education savings grant, which matches parental contributions to a maximum of $7,200. (...) Ontario should press for a change in federal policy so that all children in care can have access to the federal money to use toward a post-secondary education, says the report. The province should also extend financial support to youth in care to age 25 says the report entitled Not So Easy to Navigate.
Source:
The Toronto Star

Hazardous passage for at-risk youth
Foster children should be allowed to stay at home until they are 21
Virginia Rowden
May 21, 2010
This is a story told in numbers. There are nearly 4,700 young people — aged 16 to 20 — in the care of Children’s Aid Societies in Ontario. Fewer than 600 are enrolled in college, trade schools or university — less than 13 per cent compared with 60 per cent of young people who have grown up with their own families
[ Virginia Rowden is director, social policy, and mentor for the YouthCAN program, Ontario Association of Children’s Aid Societies. ]

A better idea for foster kids
May 23, 2010
Editorial
(...) By [Ontario] provincial law, children in the care of the state must move out of their foster or group homes before their 18th birthday, whether they have finished high school or not. They are given financial assistance to live on their own, but that is cut off at 21, regardless of their circumstances. (...) Last week, a report by the Laidlaw Foundation urged Ottawa to establish registered education savings plans (RESPs) for children in foster care, similar to those that parents set up for their own children. The report rightly identifies the transforming effect that making college financially possible could have on Crown wards. (...) Children's aid agencies have long urged the province to let children stay in their foster or group homes until they are 21. The Laidlaw Foundation's report argues that financial assistance should be extended to 25. Both measures would provide a more supportive and gradual transition into adulthood – similar to what most children get from their parents.

Source:
The Toronto Star

--------------------------------------------

The U.S. Perspective
_________________________

Recent release from
Human Rights Watch:

California: From Foster Children to Homeless Adults
State Fails to Prepare Foster Youth for Adulthood
News Release
May 12, 2010
(LosAngeles) - California is creating homeless adults by failing to ensure that youth in foster care are given the support to live independently as adults and by ending state support abruptly, Human Rights Watch said in a new report. Human Rights Watch said that the state should provide financial support, connections with adults, shelter, and other safety nets for young people as they make the transition towards independence.

The 70-page report, My So-Called Emancipation: From Foster Care to Homelessness for California Youth (PDF - 1.3MB), documents the struggles of foster care youth who become homeless after turning 18, or "aging out" of the state's care, without sufficient preparation or support for adulthood. California's foster care system serves 65,000 children and youth, far more than any other single state. Of the 4,000 who age out of the system each year, research suggests, 20 per cent or more become homeless.

Source:
Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch is one of the world’s leading independent organizations dedicated to defending and protecting human rights. By focusing international attention where human rights are violated, we give voice to the oppressed and hold oppressors accountable for their crimes.

- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm
- Go to the Education Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/education.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm
- Go to the Human Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/rights.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

2. [Ontario] Social Assistance, Pension and Tax Credit Rates, April to June 2010
(Ministry of Community & Social Services
)

Social Assistance, Pension and Tax Credit Rates, April to June 2010 (PDF - 160K, 2 pages)
Prepared by the
Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services

Recommended reading/saving/printing!
All in two pages, (just about) everything you ever
wanted to know about federal and provincial social program benefit levels in Ontario.
[This factsheet is mostly benefit levels and rates - to find corresponding program information, do a Google search using any program name from the list below...]

This factsheet contains current rate information (benefit levels)
for the following federal and Ontario programs:

* Federal Income Security programs
----- Old Age Security, Guaranteed Income Supplement, the Allowance (formerly Spouse's Allowance)
----- Canada Pension Plan
----- Goods and Services Tax Credit
----- Medical Expense Tax Credit
----- War Veterans Allowance
----- Employment Insurance
----- Canada Child Tax Benefit (inc. the National Child Benefit Supplement and Child Disability Benefit)
* Ontario Works - Social Assistance rates (eff. August 2009) + earnings exemptions and incentives
* Ontario Disability Support Program - Social Assistance rates (eff. July 2009)
* Ontario Guaranteed Annual Income System (provincial top-up for Ontario seniors receiving the Guaranteed Income Supplement under the federal Old Age Security program)
* Ontario Child Benefit
* Ontario Child Care Supplement for Working Families
* Ontario Sales and Property Tax Credits

Found in:
Tip Sheet List - (check this link for more recent updates)
[ Community Advocacy & Legal Centre - a non-profit community legal clinic
serving low income residents of Hastings, Prince Edward and Lennox & Addington counties.]

Kudos to the Community Advocacy & Legal Centre for posting this valuable resource on their website.
A Bronx Cheer to the Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services for NOT posting this valuable resource on its own website.

- Go to the Ontario Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm
- Go to the Guide to Welfare in Ontario page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onwelf.htm

3. What's new from Ontario's 25-in-5 Network for Poverty Reduction:
---
Five Principles for a New Nutritional Supplement Program - May 20
--- Premier McGuinty's template response to the 25 in 5 open letter - May 6

New from the
Ontario 25-in-5 Network for Poverty Reduction:

Five Principles for a New Nutritional Supplement Program
May 20, 2010
The Ontario government is replacing the Special Diet Allowance Program with a new nutritional supplement program. As it designs this new program, the government must ensure that it is not viewed in isolation from other aspects of the social assistance system and the problems that people who rely on it experience on a regular basis. (...) Recognizing that the new program will be created before the [Social Assistance] Review can take place, we urge the Ontario government to use the following five principles as guideposts for the development of an “Ontario Nutritional Supplement”:
1. CLEAR POLICY OBJECTIVE
2. ACCESSIBILITY, ADEQUACY, AND EQUITY
*** Genuine accessibility to the program
*** Adequate levels of support
*** Regular adjustments to keep up with rising costs
*** Equity. This includes ensuring that all people on social assistance who have health challenges are given financial support appropriate to their needs.
3. MEETING THE NEED
4. RESPONSIBILITY FOR CURRENT RECIPIENTS
5. TAKE THE TIME TO GET IT RIGHT

TAKE ACTION!
Help us make sure the new Ontario Nutritional Supplement meets the test by:
1. Showing your support for these Five Principles by endorsing them online at http://www.25in5.ca/take-action/
Endorse as an individual or get your organization to endorse.

2. Sending an email to the government to show your support, using 25 in 5’s automatic email at http://www.25in5.ca/take-action/
Your email will go to Minister Deb Matthews, Minister of Health, who is responsible for setting up the new Nutritional Supplement program. It will also go to Laurel Broten, Minister Responsible for Poverty Reduction, and Dwight Duncan, Minister of Finance.

3. Sharing your support for these Five Principles with your MPP.
You can find out who your MPP is by going to http://fyed.elections.on.ca/fyed/en/form_page_en.jsp
After finding the name of your riding, click on “information about your MPP”.

4. Telling your story about the benefit you’ve had from being on Special Diet, by going to http://25in5.ca/without-special-diet/
Share what it will mean to you if the provincial government’s new Nutritional Supplement program doesn’t meet the Five Principles test. If you work with people currently receiving Special Diet, please tell them about this opportunity to tell their story.

---

Premier McGuinty Responds to 25 in 5
Posted to the 25 in 5 website May 17, 2010
On April 29, Michael Creek and Greg deGroot-Maggetti of 25 in 5 wrote to the Premier about the cancellation of the Special Diet Allowance (see below), which will have an impact on several thousand OW and ODSP recipients, and the 1% increase to social assistance rates, which falls short of the inflation rate. Predictably, the reply from the Premier (dated May 6) follows the dog-eared template that many advocacy groups know so well from past experience:
1. Thank you for your valuable feedback regarding [insert name of issue] in Ontario.
2. List McGuinty government's accomplishments in the area of [insert name of issue].
3. Reiteration of McGuinty government's firm commitment to reform and improve [insert name of issue].
4. Redirect letter/request to the Minister responsible for [insert name of issue] for further processing (read possible delay).

The letter from 25 in 5 to
Premier McGuinty:

Open Letter to Premier McGuinty
from the 25 in 5 Network for Poverty Reduction:

Budget Decisions on Social Assistance Call Commitment into Question

April 29, 2010

Source:
25-in-5: Network for Poverty Reduction
25 in 5 is a multi-sectoral network comprised of more than 100 provincial and Toronto-based organizations and individuals working on eliminating poverty.

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

4. Poverty Profile Bulletin No. 7: Poverty and Paid Work - Posted May 2010
(National Council of Welfare)

New from the
National Council of Welfare:

Poverty Profile 2007
Bulletin No. 7: Poverty and Paid Work
Page dated April 2010
Posted to the Council's website in May 2010
HTML
PDF version
(2.2MB, 4 pages)
Paid work keeps many Canadians out of poverty.
For others, having a job isn’t a ticket out of poverty. It’s simply admission into the ranks of the working poor.

Source:
Poverty Profile 2007 (series of bulletins)
Poverty Profile is a regular publication of the Council that is based on survey data from Statistics Canada. It includes detailed information about poverty rates and numbers, depth of poverty, duration of poverty, common sources of income for poor people, income inequality in Canada and poverty and the paid labour market.
- incl. links to earlier Poverty Profiles, from 1998 to 2004
.

NOTE:
Poverty Profile Bulletin No. 7 is the last of a series that began in September 2009 based on the latest information from Statistics Canada.
According to the Message from the Council Chairperson (Sept. 30/09) that introduces the series,
"...for the first time, the National Council of Welfare will release the latest findings of its signature publication, Poverty Profile, in a series of short, easy-to-read bulletins."
Below, you'll find a link to each bulletin in the series and its release date.

---

Complete list of
earlier Poverty Profile Bulletins:

* No. 1: Introduction to Poverty Trends in Canada, 1976-2007
September 2009
HTML version
PDF version
(1.9MB, 6 pages)

* No. 2: Poverty Trends by Family Type
November 2009
HTML version
PDF version
(1MB, 8 pages)

* No. 3: Poverty Trends by Province
January 2010
HTML version
PDF version
(626K, 4 pages)
--- Tables (PDF - 99K, 6 pages)
--- Charts (PDF - 117K, 11 pages)

* No. 4: A Snapshot of Children Living in Poverty
November 2009
HTML
PDF version
(656K, 4 pages)

* No. 5: Depth of Poverty
March 2010
HTML version
PDF version (2.4MB, 4 pages)

* No. 6: Duration of Poverty
March 2010
HTML version
PDF version (2.7MB, 6 pages)

---

* Methodology, Definitions and Data Sources
HTML
- none
PDF (2.1MB, 8 pages)

Source:
National Council of Welfare
The National Council of Welfare advises the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development in respect of any matters relating to social development that the Minister may refer to the Council for its consideration or that the Council considers appropriate.

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm
- Go to the Social Statistics Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm

5. The state of charities across Canada - April 2010
(Imagine Canada)

New from
Imagine Canada:

Sector Monitor Launch
May 13, 2010
We released our first Sector Monitor report from a new survey program designed to monitor the state of charities across the country and their ability to deliver their missions.

The first sector report:

Imagine Canada’s Sector Monitor (PDF - 870K, 16 pages)
By David Lasby and Cathy Barr
File date April 2010
Highlights:
* Many charities are experiencing challenges associated with the economic downturn.
* One in eight charities is experiencing high levels of stress.
* Operating charities are taking a range of actions in response to the economic downturn.
* Operating charities and foundations have different experiences.
* Charities remain confident about the future, particularly when they look further out.

Source:
Blog @ Imagine Canada
[ Imagine Canada ]
Imagine Canada is a national registered charity with offices in Toronto, Calgary and Ottawa. Our cause is Canada’s charities and nonprofits. It is our mission to support and strengthen charities and nonprofits so they can, in turn, support the Canadians and communities they serve.

Also on the Imagine Canada website:

Programs & Services:
* Canadian Directory to Foundations & Corporations * Caring Company Program * Ethical Code Program * Standards Initiative * Risk Management * Charity Tax Tools * Nonprofit Library * Awards Programs

Research & Public Policy:
* Public Policy * Giving & Volunteering * Charities & Nonprofit Organizations * Corporate Citizenship

Imagine Canada’s Nonprofit library
"Canada’s largest online collection of charitable and non-profit sector resources on topics that relate to operating and managing charities and nonprofits."

- Go to the Voluntary Sector Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/voluntary.htm

6. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Consumer Price Index, April 2010 - May 21
--- Employment Insurance, March 2010 - May 20
--- Leading indicators, April 2010 - May 20
--- Public school indicators for Canada, the provinces and territories, 2001/2002 to 2007-2008 - May 20
--- Juristat Spring 2010 issue:
***** The processing of divorce cases through civil court in seven provinces and territories
-
May 18, 2010
***** Knives and violent crime in Canada, 2008 - April 27, 2010
***** Youth custody and community services in Canada, 2008/2009 - April 27, 2010
***** Police-reported robbery in Canada, 2008 - March 25, 2010
***** Maintenance enforcement by neighbourhood income in seven reporting census metropolitan areas
- March 25, 2010

--- Voluntary sector statistics from Statistics Canada

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

May 21, 2010
Consumer Price Index, April 2010
Consumer prices rose 1.8% in the 12 months to April, following a 1.4% increase in March. Excluding energy, prices advanced 1.1% compared with a 1.0% increase in March. On a seasonally adjusted monthly basis, consumer prices rose 0.1% from March to April.

Related reports:

The Consumer Price Index, April 2010
PDF version (525K, 67 pages)
HTML version - Table of contents with links to each of the following sections of the report:
1. Highlights 2. Briefing notes 3. Analysis 4. Tables 5. Charts 6. Data quality, concepts and methodology 7. Appendices 8. User information 9. Related products

[ earlier editions of this report ]

Guide to the Consumer Price Index (1998)

Related subjects:
* Prices and price indexes
* Consumer price indexes

[ Commentary on the CPI by Erin Weir of
The Progressive Economics Forum - May 21 ]

---

May 20, 2010
Employment Insurance, March 2010
In March, 668,100 people received regular Employment Insurance benefits, down 24,200 from February and the sixth consecutive monthly decline. The number of beneficiaries fell in most provinces, with the largest declines in Ontario, Quebec and Alberta.
- incl. three tables:
* Employment Insurance: Statistics by province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by age group, sex, province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by census metropolitan areas

Related subjects
o Labour
o Employment insurance, social assistance and other transfers
o Non-wage benefits

Related link:

Employment Insurance Statistics Maps, March 2010
- set of maps presenting the number of regular Employment Insurance beneficiaries. These maps complete the analysis published simultaneously in The Daily. The maps show the percentage change in number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits in the last 12 months, by Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) and Census Agglomerations (CAs).

[ Commentary on the EI stats by Erin Weir of
The Progressive Economics Forum - May 20 ]

Source:
Relentlessly Progressive Economics Blog
[ The Progressive Economics Forum ]

---

May 20, 2010
Leading indicators, April 2010
The composite leading index rose 0.9% in April, continuing a stretch of 11 straight increases averaging 1.0% a month. Overall, 8 of the 10 components advanced, led by housing and the stock market, while 1 was unchanged and 1 fell.

Related subjects:
* Economic accounts
* Leading indicators

---

May 20, 2010
Public school indicators for Canada,
the provinces and territories, 2001/2002 to 2007-2008

Summary
Just over 5.1 million students were enrolled in publicly funded elementary and secondary schools in Canada during the academic year 2007/2008, down 0.9% from the previous year. This was the lowest level since 1998/1999 when data for the Elementary-Secondary Education Statistics Project were first collected. Enrolment peaked at nearly 5.4 million students in 2001/2002. Since then, it has declined in every year, as larger cohorts of graduating students were replaced by smaller cohorts of grade 1 students.

Summary Public School Indicators for Canada,
the Provinces and Territories, 2001/2002 to 2007/2008

by Riley Brockington
Indicators include : * Enrolments * Graduates * Graduation rates * Educators * Student-educator ratio * Total expenditures * Total expenditures per student * Average remuneration of educators
- includes nine charts on the above topics

Related subjects

* Education, training and learning

---

May 18, 2010
Juristat Spring 2010 issue
Click the link above to access the following articles:
* The processing of divorce cases through civil court in seven provinces and territories -
May 18, 2010
* Knives and violent crime in Canada, 2008 - April 27, 2010
* Youth custody and community services in Canada, 2008/2009 - April 27, 2010
* Police-reported robbery in Canada, 2008 - March 25, 2010
* Maintenance enforcement by neighbourhood income in seven reporting census metropolitan areas
- March 25, 2010
Source:
Juristat is a periodical that presents analysis and detailed statistics on a variety of justice-related topics and issues. There are annual articles on areas of recurring interest such as : * Crime * Homicide * Youth and adult courts * Correctional services
(Click "Chronological Index" on the Juristat page for links to earlier issues of this periodical)

---

Voluntary sector statistics
from Statistics Canada:

o Labour
o Unpaid work
o Society and community
o Social networks and civic participation
o Volunteering and donating

 

---------------------------------

The Daily Archives
- select a month and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm
- Go to the Education Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/education.htm

7. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - May 22

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
:

May 22, 2010

What's new online:
[This section archives documents that
have been featured on the CRRU homepage..]

International perspectives: Canada- A brave campaign for state provision
21 May 10
- Article by Helen Penn discussing her visit to Canada, our advocacy organization and the state of childcare in Canada and the UK.

Measuring the quality of early childhood education and care programs
20 May 10
- Presentations from the Atkinson Centre, OISE/UT symposium 'Monitoring quality in ECEC programs'.

Cutting through the fog: Why is it so hard to make sense of poverty measures?
20 May 10
- Paper from the Metcalf Foundation examining how we measure poverty levels, the working poor, child benefits, unemployment and Employment Insurance.

Canada at 150: The social agenda
19 May 10
- Paper from the Caledon Institute of Social Policy discussing our nation's main social challenges in the future: Canada as a productive, caring and aging society.

"Think big. Shape the world"
19 May 10
- Closing speech by Michael Ignatieff from the Canada at 150 conference in Montreal. Highlights include the need in Canada for a pan- Canadian learning plan that includes early learning and child care for every Canadian family that wants it.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

---

child care in the news:
[This section features interesting and noteworthy news
about ECEC and related issues in Canada and internationally.]

· San Anton and Edleun announce completion of the second tranche of subscription receipt financing
[CA] 19 May 10

· Good daycare key investment for Canada - businesswoman
[CA] 18 May 10

· Province eases stance on locking daycares
[CA-MB] 18 May 10

· Windsor day care workers to receive layoff notices
[CA-ON] 18 May 10

· Violations found at Halifax daycare
7 May 10

· Boy, 2, unharmed after daycare forgot him in north-end park [CA-NS] 5 May 10

more CC IN THE NEWS »

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

8. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

May 20:
Extension of Jobless Benefits
Self-Sufficiency Standard - Philadelphia, PA
Hate Crime Legislation and the Homeless - Florida
Voter Registration and Proof of Citizenship - Tennessee
Health Insurance Coverage and ER Use

May 19:
Commentary: Poverty Measurement
Head Start Centers and Eligibility

May 18:
Medicaid Reform - Florida
Reading Scores and Academic Achievement

May 17:
State Cuts to Programs for the Poor - California
State Children’s Health Insurance Program - Arizona
Minimum Wage - Australia
Lead Poisoning in Children - Detroit, MI

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

9. New from the Centre for Economics Policy Research (Australia):
--- Do rising top incomes lift all boats?
- April 2010
--- The distribution of top incomes in five anglo-saxon countries over the twentieth century - April 2010

New from the
Centre for Economics Policy Research
(Australia):

Do rising top incomes lift all boats?
By Andrew Leigh, Christopher Jencks, Dan Andrews
April 2010
Pooling data for 1905 to 2000, this paper finds no systematic relationship between top income shares and economic growth in a panel of 12 developed nations [including Canada] observed for between 22 and 85 years.

The distribution of top incomes in five anglo-saxon countries over the twentieth century
A.B. Atkinson, Andrew Leigh | Centre for Economic Policy Research
April 2010
This paper compares the tax systems of Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the UK and the US, and summarizes the evidence about top income shares.

Source:
Centre for Economics Policy Research
The CEPR began in the Research School of Social Sciences at the ANU in 1980, and was the initiative of the late Professor Fred Gruen. It was motivated by his view that there was a major gap in Australian universities with respect to research and education in the area of economic policy
[ The Australian National University ]

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

10. Australian Policy Online - recent content - May 22

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia.
[ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week
appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page, and the downloads vary depending on the topic you select.

Found in APO this week:

The best start: Supporting happy, healthy childhoods
By Jennifer Baxter, Matthew Gray, Alan Hayes
Australian Institute of Family Studies
20 May, 2010
To support the 2010 National Families Week, the Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) has prepared this Facts Sheet about the role that families and communities play in giving children the best possible start to life.

---

Most viewed this week on APO:

1. Garma Festival 2009 key forum address
2. Asylum seekers and refugees: what are the facts?
3. NAPLAN and the states: an intriguing result
4. Healing our communities, healing ourselves
5. Getting what we need: families' experiences of services

[You'll find these links on the APO home page.]

-------------------------------------------------------

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social Inclusion * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

Most viewed this week:

1. Asylum seekers and refugees: what are the facts?
2. Healing our communities, healing ourselves
3. Getting what we need: families' experiences of services
4. Fighting on the beaches - the battle for Australian history
5. Research evaluation and innovation: a study of Sydney-based community organisations

[You'll find these links on the APO Social Policy page.]

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

11. CRINMAIL
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)

Latest issue of CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter):

NOTE: The design of CRINMAIL is revamped starting with issue 1175.
Take a few minutes to check out this excellent resource on children's rights!

The week in children's rights:
19 May 2010, issue 1175

In this issue:
* Editorial: Banning the veil - the impact on children's rights
* Latest news and reports:
- Campaign for universal ratification of CRC Optional Protocols
- US Supreme Court limits juvenile life sentences
- Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Laws * Issues * Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

------------------------------------------

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL
- links to 200* weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.
NOTE: see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm for the table of contents for, and links to, several months' worth of issues of CRINMAIL.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

 


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com



***************************************

Top 25 Country and Western Song
Titles to Make you Cringe

***************************************

1. All My Exes Live In Texas
2. At the Gas Station of Love, I Got the Self Service Pump
3. Beauty is Only Skin Deep, but Ugly Goes Clean to the Bone
4. Cow Cow Boogie
5. Don't Believe My Heart Can Stand Another You.
6. Don't Come Home a-Drinkin' With Lovin' on Yo-mind
7. Don't Make Love To a Country Music Singer
8. Don't Roll Those Bloodshot Eyes at Me
9. Drop Kick Me Jesus (Through The Goal Posts Of Life.)
10. Feelin' Single and Drinkin' Doubles
11. Feelin' Single and Seein' Double
12. Four on the Floor and a Fifth Under the Seat
13. Get Off the Table, Mabel (The Two Dollars is for the Beer)
14. Get Your Biscuits In The Oven, And Your Buns In The Bed.
15. Guess My Eyes Were Bigger Than My Heart.
16. He's got a Way with Women...and He's Just got Away with Mine
17. Her Only Bad Habit Is Me
18. Here's A Quarter (Call Someone Who Cares)
19. How Can I Miss You if You Won't Go Away?
20. How Come My Dog Don't Bark (When You Come Around)?
21. How Come Your Dog Don't Bite Nobody But Me?
22. I Bought the Shoes that Just Walked Out on Me
23. I Changed Her Oil, She Changed My Life (courtesy of Charles)
24. I Gave Her My Heart And A Diamond And She Clubbed Me With A Spade
25. I Guess I Had Your Leavin' Coming

Source:

http://www.downstream.sk.ca/country1.htm
(Click the link for 240 more C&W song titles)


----------------------------

And, in closing...

-----------------------


Five things you use every day that may be killing you
http://tinyurl.com/28n6la2


Kayak fishing for MARLIN? (video)
http://tinyurl.com/34w3rdm


Top 10 Funny Cat Videos on YouTube
http://mashable.com/2010/04/07/funny-cat-videos-youtube/


Top 10 Funny Dog Videos on YouTube
http://mashable.com/2010/03/28/funny-dog-youtube-videos/