Canadian Social Research Newsletter
December 23, 2012

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

This week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,599 subscribers.

Merry Christmas and Season's Greetings to all!!

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. How do we begin a dialogue about inequality with conservative Canadians? (John Stapleton - Open Policy) - December 18
2. Release of the Fiscal Monitor for October 2012 (Finance Canada) - December 21
3. Social Planning Toronto : SOUNDBITES e-Bulletin - December 21
4. Department of Finance launches public consultation on international aid - December 20
5.Counting down to the end of the Community Start-Up and Maintenance Benefit (Wellesley Institute) - December 20
6. Revisiting work-life issues in Canada: The 2012 national study on balancing work and caregiving in Canada (By Linda Duxbury, PhD, and Christopher Higgins) - December 19
7. Corporate tax breaks are not the answer to hunger in Canada (Graham Riches et al. in the Toronto Star) - December 19
8. Two perspectives on income inequality in Canada : TD Economics / Andrew Coyne vs Miles Corak (+ Armine's two cents' worth!) - December 11, 14, 16 and 18
9. New from Finance Canada (December 17):
--- Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories for 2013–14
--- Backgrounder on Equalization and Territorial Formula Financing Renewal
10. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

--- Consumer Price Index, November 2012 - December 21
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, October 2012 - December 20
--- Employment Insurance, October 2012 - December 20
--- Health Reports, December 2012 contains two articles:
::::: Seniors' use of and unmet needs for home care, 2009

::::: Acute care hospital days and mental diagnoses
--- Fiscal Arrangements Certificates: Federal Equalization Program, 2013/2014 - December 19
11. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

12. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
13. [U.S.] The Fiscal Cliff : Update from the Center for Law and Social Policy - December 20
14. Active Ageing Index 2012 for 27 EU Member States (European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research) - December 2012
15. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/personal.htm ]
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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Go to the home page of the
Canadian Social Research Links website:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/index.htm


1. How do we begin a dialogue about inequality with conservative Canadians? - December 18
(John Stapleton - Open Policy)

How do we begin a dialogue about inequality with conservative Canadians?
http://openpolicyontario.com/how-do-we-begin-a-dialogue-about-inequality-with-conservative-canadians/

December 18, 2012
As someone who spent a career in social welfare, I have often been a sounding board for conservative acquaintances, particularly those who are advanced in years. “I say, let them starve,” one of my relatives declared to me at a family dinner. What he meant by that is:
“Why don’t these people behave? Why don’t they just do what they’re supposed to do? I went out, I worked hard, why shouldn’t they work hard? And if they don’t work hard, then they should starve.”

In pondering how to respond to sentiments like these, I have been much aided by Jonathan Haidt, author of The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion. Haidt himself is a liberal social democrat. But he has successfully analysed why conservatives and the conservative mindset wins in our current political climate. In a chapter called “The Conservative Advantage” Haidt compares the “moral palette” of conservatives and of liberal, progressive, social democrats.He says that people who are liberal, progressive, social democrats have a moral palette comprised of two great concerns. The first is care, care for others. We think about people who are less well off than we are. We think about people who are making a lot more money than we do. We are always thinking about equality. We want everyone to do well. He says that the other part of our moral palette is fairness. Our greatest concern is having a society that’s based on fairness and equity.

The moral palette of the conservative also has caring and fairness in it, but caring and fairness come at the bottom. Four other components of the conservative moral palette come first:
* Sanctity
* Loyalty
* Liberty
* Authority
(...)
Any of us who wish to reduce inequality will have to tackle the policy dilemma of turning the negative abstraction of ‘inequality’ into a positive and concrete course of action. We will have to recommend lasting, publicly acceptable ways in which equality should be achieved.

Source:
Open Policy
(John Stapleton's website)
http://www.openpolicyontario.com/

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

- Go to the Income and Wealth Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

2. Release of the Fiscal Monitor for October 2012 - December 21
(Finance Canada)

From
Finance Canada:

Release of the Fiscal Monitor for October 2012
http://www.fin.gc.ca/n12/12-173-eng.asp
December 21, 2012
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, today released The Fiscal Monitor for October 2012.

Highlights:

OCTOBER 2012: BUDGETARY DEFICIT OF $1.7 BILLION
There was a budgetary deficit of $1.7 billion in October 2012, compared to a deficit of $2.1 billion in October 2011.

APRIL TO OCTOBER 2012: BUDGETARY DEFICIT OF $10.6 BILLION
For the first seven months of the 2012–13 fiscal year, the budgetary deficit stood at $10.6 billion, compared to a deficit of $13.9 billion reported in the same period of 2011–12.

Related document:

The Fiscal Monitor - October 2012
http://www.fin.gc.ca/fiscmon-revfin/2012-10-eng.asp

[ earlier editions of the Fiscal Monitor back to 1996:
http://www.fin.gc.ca/pub/fm-rf-index-eng.asp ]

Source:
Finance Canada:
http://www.fin.gc.ca/fin-eng.asp

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

3. Social Planning Toronto : SOUNDBITES e-Bulletin - December 21

SOUNDBITES e-Bulletin
December 21, 2012 issue
http://goo.gl/WfL7b
In this issue:
* Social Planning Toronto’s 2013 Symposium
* "In School Out of School Time" Research and Policy Forum Summary
* Reporting Back from the “Action on Poverty” Community Forum
* Year-End Update on 2013 City Budget: Some Progress, More Work to Do
* Charity Garbage Fee Update: Reprieved for 2013!
* SPT Member Forums: "Fair Is Fair: Meet Toronto’s Ombudsman"
* Save The Date – 2013 Frances Lankin Community Service Award
* Farewell and Thanks
* Worth Repeating: Social Planning Toronto's Deputation to the City of Toronto Budget Committee
NOTE: For past issues of SOUNDBITES going back to November 2011, click the link above, and then (on the next page) click the "Past Issues" tab near the top of your screen.

Source:
Social Planning Toronto
http://www.socialplanningtoronto.org/
Social Planning Toronto is committed to independent social planning at the local and city-wide levels in order to improve the quality of life for all people in Toronto. It is committed to diversity, social and economic justice, and active citizen participation in all aspects of community life.

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

4. Department of Finance launches public consultation on international aid - December 20

Department of Finance launches public consultation on international aid
http://www.fin.gc.ca/n12/12-172-eng.asp
Ottawa, December 20, 2012
The Department of Finance today launched a public consultation on the international assistance payments it administers. The consultation is a requirement under the Official Development Assistance Accountability Act for all federal departments and agencies with foreign aid responsibilities. The feedback from the consultation will help ensure future assistance remains effective by providing the public with an opportunity to comment on the Department’s contribution to global poverty reduction, its consideration of the perspectives of those who live in poverty, and its adherence to international standards on human rights.

The consultation will run until January 31, 2013.

Related Document:

Backgrounder: Department of Finance Consultation
on Official Development Assistance, 2012

http://www.fin.gc.ca/n12/data/12-172_1-eng.asp

Source:
Finance Canada:
http://www.fin.gc.ca/fin-eng.asp

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

5. Counting down to the end of the Community Start-Up and Maintenance Benefit - December 20
(Wellesley Institute)

From the
Wellesley Institute:

December 20, 2012
Counting down to the end of the Community Start-Up
and Maintenance Benefit: there’s still time for Ontario to avoid a crisis

http://www.wellesleyinstitute.com/news/counting-down-to-the-end-of-the-community-start-up-and-maintenance-benefit-theres-still-time-for-ontario-to-avoid-a-crisis/
By Steve Barnes
We’re now less than two weeks away from the Government of Ontario terminating the Community Start-Up and Maintenance Benefit (CSUMB) and an impending and avoidable housing and homelessness crisis. The CSUMB helps people receiving social assistance to pay for large or unexpected housing-related costs, supporting them to become and remain housed. As of January 1st, this benefit will be terminated and 50 percent of its funding will be passed to municipalities to run their own programs, which as yet are mostly undefined; the remaining 50 percent will be cut.

---

Earlier impact analysis
by the Wellesley Institute:

November 14, 2012
The Real Cost Of Cutting the
Community Start-Up and Maintenance Benefit

http://www.wellesleyinstitute.com/publication/the-real-cost-of-cutting-csumb/
By Bob Gardner, Steve Barnes and Jennefer Laidley
In its 2012 budget, the Ontario government announced that it was eliminating the Community Start-Up and Maintenance Benefit (CSUMB) as of January 1, 2013. The CSUMB is designed to assist people receiving social assistance who have large or unexpected housing-related costs. Having access to this kind of immediate and flexible fund can often be the difference between getting a home and staying in a shelter or staying housed and losing one’s home. It can also be the critical support for people to leave abusive situations.
Access to housing that is safe and affordable is a key determinant of health and the cancellation of the CSUMB has the potential to increase the number of low income Ontarians who are precariously housed or who are homeless. This paper sets out some of the potential health implications of this decision through an equity lens.

The Real Cost of Cutting the Community Start-Up and Maintenance Benefit:
A Health Equity Impact Assessment
(PDF - 852K, 13 pages)
http://www.wellesleyinstitute.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/The-Real-Cost-of-Cutting-CSUMB1.pdf
November 2012

Source:
Wellesley Institute

http://www.wellesleyinstitute.com/

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

- Go to the Ontario Social Assistance Review Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/on_sa_review.htm

6. Revisiting work-life issues in Canada: The 2012 national study on balancing work and caregiving in Canada - December 19
(By Linda Duxbury, PhD, and Christopher Higgins)

Revisiting work-life issues in Canada: The 2012 national study on balancing work and caregiving in Canada
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/12/12/revisiting-work-life-issues-canada-2012-national-study-bala
19 Dec 2012 | Canada
Study of 25,000 Canadians finds that one in three respondents can be considered to be in the sandwich generation struggling to balance time each week in work, childcare and eldercare.

The complete study:

Revisiting Work-Life Issues in Canada : The 2012 National Study
on Balancing Work and Caregiving in Canada
(PDF - 148K, 14 pages)
http://www.healthyworkplaces.info/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/2012-National-Work-Long-Summary.pdf
By Linda Duxbury, PhD, and Christopher Higgins, PhD

Related links:

Why not talk about work?
The topic is critical to all. Which is why the powerful pretend it's not worth exploring.

http://thetyee.ca/Opinion/2012/12/17/Work-Life-Balance/
By Murray Dobbin
December 17, 2012
Most families now carry record high debt and Canadians work hundreds of hours more per year than most of their European counterparts. Canada has one of the highest ratios of low paying jobs in the OECD and that trend can only get worse. Canadian companies try to increase productivity not by investing in training, technology or better management systems but by driving down wages and salaries and forcing unpaid overtime.

Source:
The Tyee
[ http://thetyee.ca/ ]

---

HealthyWorkplaces --- Innovations and insights for Creating High Performing Workplaces
http://www.healthyworkplaces.info/

---

- Go to the Work-Life Balance Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/work_life_balance.htm

7. Corporate tax breaks are not the answer to hunger in Canada - December 19
(Graham Riches et al. in the Toronto Star)

Corporate tax breaks are not the answer to hunger in Canada
December 19, 2012
http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorialopinion/article/1304824
By Elaine Power, Graham Riches and Valerie Tarasuk
Could a corporate tax break help feed hungry Canadians? Ottawa is now considering a proposal by Food Banks Canada allowing food businesses donating surplus food to food banks to write off up to twice the cost of producing the food. It sounds like a win-win-win proposal. Given that food banks never have enough food to meet the needs of hungry Canadians, why not offer such an incentive? Corporations would win because they get more reward for the food they donate. Food banks would win by having more food available to distribute to hungry Canadians. And food bank users, 38 per cent of whom are children, would win because they would be less hungry. At least that is how it appears.

The first problem is that it gives tacit government approval to a charitable “solution” to hunger. But food banks are not a solution to this problem.
(...) The second problem is that tax breaks undermine government’s fiscal ability to actually address the problem in any serious way.
(...) The Harper government has already cut corporate tax rates from 22.1 per cent in 2007-08 to 15 per cent today.
Why do food corporations need another tax break?

Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

---

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm

8. Two perspectives on income inequality in Canada : TD Economics / Andrew Coyne vs Miles Corak - December 11, 14, 16 and 18

Two perspectives on income inequality in Canada:
TD Economics / Andrew Coyne
vs
Miles Corak ( Economics prof, University of Ottawa)
December 11, 14, 16 and 18

---

ROUND ONE: Special Report from TD Economics

Income and Income Inequality – A Tale of Two Countries (PDF - 864K 7 pages)
http://www.td.com/document/PDF/economics/special/ff1212_income.pdf
December 11, 2012

Highlights:

• The devastating impact of the financial crisis has pushed U.S. median household income to a 16-year low. Meanwhile, in Canada, an economic outperformance over the 2000s and a milder impact from the recession has led to a strong pace of income growth since 1998. As a result, median household income in Canada has been higher than in the U.S. since 2006 and the gap between the two is now at its highest level (in favour of Canada) since the 1980s.

• Income inequality is both persistently lower and rising more slowly in Canada than in the United States. In fact, inequality in Canada has been flat since 1998, as measured by the Gini coefficient.

• The stable (rather than worsening) trend in Canadian income inequality may come as a surprise in light of the heavy global focus on the growing divide between the rich and the poor in recent years. A deeper dive into Canadian income distribution reveals strong income growth at the lower and higher ends of the spectrum, but a comparatively weak performance for middle-income families.

• Assessing shifts in inequality through the income statistics alone doesn’t capture the whole story. For example, the Gini coefficient does not include the role real estate and financial assets have played in driving increasing inequality in household wealth. It also does not consider the concentration of
income that has occurred among the top 1% or top 0.1% of Canadians

Source:
TD Economics
http://www.td.com/economics/analysis/economics-index.jsp

---

From the
Montreal Gazette:

http://www.montrealgazette.com/

Andrew Coyne: there has been no ‘growing gap’ between rich and poor,
despite the thousands of references to that effect you will have seen
http://goo.gl/6Xcjj
By Andrew Coyne
December 14
(...)
In the past two decades (...) Canada has experienced more or less uninterrupted growth. Hence falling unemployment, hence declining poverty, rising incomes and flattening inequality. Why has none of this registered in the public mind? Why have we heard nothing of the record low numbers living on low income?
(...)
One is forced to conclude it is the influence of the American media. Every one of the ailments we imagine ourselves to be suffering is a reality in the United States: Where our incomes are growing, theirs are stagnating; where poverty here is at record lows, there it is at record highs; where inequality in Canada has not grown in recent years, in the United States it has surged. (...) While we (in CAnada) have been largely spared the ravages of recession in the last decade, the Americans have endured two, the last especially severe. The big surprise in that TD study, it would seem, is that Canada is not the United States.

--------------------------------------------------

Counterpoint from
Miles Corak's blog:

Three rules for good pundit behaviour, or if you like:
how to obstruct the debate on inequality in three easy steps

http://milescorak.com/2012/12/16/three-rules-for-good-pundit-behaviour-or-if-you-like-how-to-obstruct-the-debate-on-inequality-in-three-easy-steps/
December 16, 2012
By Miles Corak
Inequality is increasing in Canada. Or is it?
A short report on the topic released by a major Canadian bank [ TD Economics - see above ] includes the bold heading “Income inequality has been unchanged in Canada — say what?”. This apparently contrarian finding has been seized upon by at least one influential pundit [Andrew Coyne] in a way that only serves to obstruct constructive public policy discussion.
(...) But this sort of discussion requires the best of our public commentators, and in this post I offer three rules for good pundit behaviour. Economic statistics can be confusing and they can be used in confusing ways, purposely or not, and so these rules might also be a set of general guideposts for the average reader to help separate fact from fiction, since after all we can’t expect pundits to always follow them.

Rule 1: Look for the underlying trends
Rule 2: Recognize that statistical concepts aren’t truths, they are tools to be used in situations for which they are appropriate. Use them carefully, improper use can be dangerous!
Rule 3: Don’t over-reach your power to explain, rather look for the next set of puzzles.

Source:
Economics for Public Policy (Miles Corak's blog)
http://milescorak.com/
Author Miles Corak is professor of economics at the University of Ottawa, where he has worked since 2007 teaching principles of economics in a way relevant for public policy. He also teaches labour economics, social policy, and statistical research methods.

---

ROUND TWO: Followup TD Observation:

Income Inequality Under Various Income Metrics (PDF - 796K, 3 pages)
http://www.td.com/document/PDF/economics/special/ff1212_income_update.pdf
TD Economics Observation
December 18, 2012
In a recent report (Income and Income Inequality – A Tale of Two Countries), TD Economics reported that the traditional economic benchmark for income inequality, the Gini coefficient, has remained largely unchanged since 1998 in Canada. In light of that finding, we received numerous responses from experts and policymakers asking why we had used pre-tax total household income (which includes government transfers) as opposed to other measures that are available. Given the interest, we thought it would be useful to illustrate that the story does not change if one uses after tax or market income or numbers adjusted for family size.

---

Counterpoint from
Miles Corak's blog:

Has income inequality really been unchanged in Canada? :
a reader’s guide to the recent TD report

http://milescorak.com/2012/12/18/has-income-inequality-really-been-unchanged-in-canada-a-readers-guide-to-the-recent-td-report/
December 18, 2012
To some there would appear to be a debate over whether inequality has increased in Canada. My view is that it has in fact increased, but at the same time its nature has changed.
However, a recent report released by the economic analysis branch of the TD Bank has been interpreted by a columnist at one important national news paper to suggest that inequality has not been changing. Some readers of my December 16th post [see above] attempting to clarify this perspective have asked for my own interpretation of the TD report. This is what I offer here...

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Miles Corak's take on the issue is heartily supported by
Armine Yalnizyan, senior Economist with the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives:

Why The Income Inequality Deniers Are Wrong
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/2012/12/21/why-the-income-inequality-deniers-are-wrong/
By Armine Yalnizyan
December 21, 2012
[An abridged version of this blog post appeared in today's National Post:
http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2012/12/21/armine-yalnizyan-sorry-andrew-coyne-but-income-inequality-is-a-real-problem/ ]
---
You couldn’t have made it through 2012 without running into a story about income inequality. Chances are, it made you think about how you fit into the story. That’s “entirely constructive”, as Bank of Canada Governor Mark Carney called the awakening triggered by the global Occupy movement.

A year later, some people think it’s time you go back to sleep. A new debate is emerging in Canada: is inequality worth discussing at all? On the “no” side are four main arguments, all deeply flawed:
*
Canada is not like the US
* The growing gap is not growing in Canada anymore
* Income inequality is not an issue because people experience income mobility
* Income inequality is not the problem; poverty is.
(...)
The International Monetary Fund has warned that higher inequality is correlated to shorter spells of growth, more market volatility. The Conference Board of Canada cautions that Canada’s levels of inequality mean squandered potential. Just this week TD Bank CEO Ed Clarke acknowledged inequality in Canada has been growing for the last 30 years, raising a challenge for society that demands discussion.
(...)
Income inequality has become as inconvenient a truth as climate change, and every bit as challenging to our future. It, too, has its share of deniers. But the evidence that is accumulating around the world makes clear — burying the issue under a false sense of progress won’t protect us from the massively disruptive consequences of a growing gap. Stay awake. Start talking.

Source:
Progressive Economics Forum
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/relentless/

- Go to the Income and Wealth Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

9. New from Finance Canada (December 17)
--- Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories for 2013–14
--- Backgrounder on Equalization and Territorial Formula Financing Renewal

With transfers growing from record highs, Finance Ministers
positioned to focus on jobs, growth and long-term prosperity
http://www.fin.gc.ca/n12/12-166-eng.asp
December 17, 2012
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, today presented Provincial and Territorial Finance Ministers with details on transfer amounts for 2013-14, as well as on technical improvements to the Equalization and Territorial Formula Financing (TFF) programs in the context of the renewal of these programs’ enabling legislation, which expires on March 31, 2014.

Related Documents:

* Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories for 2013–14
http://www.fin.gc.ca/n12/data/12-166_1-eng.asp

* Backgrounder on Equalization and Territorial Formula Financing Renewal
http://www.fin.gc.ca/n12/data/12-166_2-eng.asp

Source:
Finance Canada

http://www.fin.gc.ca/fin-eng.asp

Also from
Finance Canada:

More links to federal transfers to provinces/territories:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/cap.htm#post
Click to access a number of special reports on transfers, including the following:

* Federal Transfers to Provinces and Territories
http://www.fin.gc.ca/access/fedprov-eng.asp
There are four main transfer programs: the Canada Health Transfer (CHT), the Canada Social Transfer (CST), Equalization and Territorial Formula Financing (TFF). Follow this link for detailed info for all provinces and territories

* History of the Health and Social Transfers
http://www.fin.gc.ca/fedprov/his-eng.asp

* Federal Support for Children
http://www.fin.gc.ca/fedprov/fsc-eng.asp
- incl. a brief description of, and payment information for, the Universal Child Care Plan (2006 and 2007), the Early Learning and Child Care Initiative (2005), the Early Learning and Child Care Framework Agreement (2003), and the Early Childhood Development Agreement (2000)
NOTE: This list formerly included Support for First Nations and Aboriginal Children, but this program was cut by the Harper Government.

---

LEST WE FORGET:

Cuts Coming to the Canada Health Transfer
and the Canada Social Transfer?

[ Email alert from Rob Rainer of Canada Without Poverty ]
February 1, 2011
A rapidly emerging issue of immense public interest is the future of the Canada Health and Canada Social transfers. Critical decisions are coming about these transfers that could greatly shape the health and social security of Canadians in the coming years – and thus the very fabric of Canada. Through these transfers of many billions of dollars, the federal government helps support provinces and territories in the delivery of health care and social security services.

The legislation authorizing these transfers expires March 31, 2014.

In a remarkable open letter on January 25 to federal Finance Minister, Jim Flaherty, former senior Department of Finance officials Scott Clark and Peter Devries lay out the stark implications of this issue. This lengthy open letter offers a detailed analysis of this issue, and it closes with these words and questions (bold lettering added here for emphasis):

The decision you, or any government, will take with respect to the CHT and CST will set the course of the federal government and federal/provincial relations for many years to follow. Is it not possible to engage Canadians in this debate before a final decision is taken? In the past you have supported the analysis and recommendations of the IMF [International Monetary Fund], and quite rightly so. We would strongly recommend that you support the IMF conclusion in its recent report on " the importance of increasing transparency and communication about these challenges (demographic) and their long-run implications, (and) to increase public awareness and contribute to a debate about possible solutions.

Read the
complete open letter:

Pre-Budget 2011 Submission: Confronting the Structural Deficit
http://www.3dpolicy.ca/content/minister-finance-honourable-j-flaherty-pre-budget-2011-submission-confronting-structural-def
To: Minister of Finance The Honourable J. Flaherty
From: Scott Clark and Peter Devries
2011-01-25

------------------

Rob Rainer is with
CANADA WITHOUT POVERTY /
CANADA SANS PAUVRETÉ
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From StatCan's
"The Daily" for December 19, 2012:

Fiscal Arrangements Certificates: Federal Equalization Program, 2013/2014
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/121219/dq121219g-eng.htm
Fiscal Certificates prepared for the administration of the Federal-provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act and Regulations for 2013/2014 are now available. The Fiscal Certificates cover the four fiscal years of data from 2009/2010 to 2012/2013.

The Fiscal Certificates are available free of charge in electronic format upon request.
---
[ Comment by Gilles : If these certificates are free and already in electronic format, why hasn't StatCan already posted them online instead of requiring interested parties to contact StatCan and self-identify to obtain a copy?? Surely StatCan knows that many people refuse on principle to divulge their personal information. Oh, wait --- I think StatCan figured that one out. Transparency and accountability, eh? That's B.S. ]
---

If you still wish to acquire the certificates, obtain more information or enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, contact StatCan (toll-free 1-800-263-1136; infostats@statcan.gc.ca) or Media Relations (613-951-4636; mediahotline@statcan.gc.ca).

---

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
[ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page ]

Canadian transfer payments
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_transfer_payments

---

- Go to the Canada Assistance Plan / Canada Health and Social Transfer / Canada Social Transfer Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/cap.htm

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

10. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Consumer Price Index, November 2012 - December 21
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, October 2012 - December 20
--- Employment Insurance, October 2012 - December 20
--- Health Reports, December 2012 contains two articles:
----- Seniors' use of and unmet needs for home care, 2009

----- Acute care hospital days and mental diagnoses
--- Fiscal Arrangements Certificates: Federal Equalization Program, 2013/2014

What's new from The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

December 21, 2012
Consumer Price Index, November 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/121221/dq121221b-eng.htm
Consumer prices rose 0.8% in the 12 months to November, following a 1.2% gain in October. On a seasonally adjusted monthly basis, the Consumer Price Index decreased 0.2% in November after increasing 0.2% in October.

December 20, 2012
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, October 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/121220/dq121220b-eng.htm
Average weekly earnings of non-farm payroll employees were $909 in October, up 0.9% from the previous month. On a year-over-year basis, earnings increased 2.8%. Average weekly earnings of non-farm payroll employees were $909 in October, up 0.9% from the previous month. On a year-over-year basis, earnings increased 2.8%.

December 19, 2012
Employment Insurance, October 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/121219/dq121219b-eng.htm
Following a small decline in September, the number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits in October edged up 4,600 (+0.9%) to 535,000.

December 19, 2012
Health Reports, December 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/121219/dq121219d-eng.htm
The December 2012 online issue of Health Reports, released today, contains two articles:

The first article, Seniors' use of and unmet needs for home care, 2009:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=82-003-X201200411760&lang=eng
...uses data from the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey - Healthy Aging to provide a profile of community-dwelling seniors receiving home care and describe the types of care they receive from formal and informal sources. Seniors' unmet needs for professional home care are also examined.

The second article, Acute care hospital days and mental diagnoses:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=82-003-X201200411761&lang=eng
...examines hospitalizations with a most responsible or comorbid mental diagnosis using administrative data for acute care hospitals.

- Go to the Health Links (Canada/International) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/health.htm

December 19, 2012
Fiscal Arrangements Certificates: Federal Equalization Program, 2013/2014
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/121219/dq121219g-eng.htm
Fiscal Certificates prepared for the administration of the Federal-provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act and Regulations for 2013/2014 are now available. The Fiscal Certificates cover the four fiscal years of data from 2009/2010 to 2012/2013.



Check past issues of The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/DAILY/daily.cgi?s=last
Select a month and year from the two drop-down menus to access all issues of The Daily for a particular month.


Source:
The Daily

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

11. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
http://www.childcarecanada.org

December 22, 2012

What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

OPEN LETTER: To members of Peel Regional Council regarding closure of regional child care centres
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/12/12/open-letter-members-peel-regional-council-regarding-closure
21 Dec 2012 | Ontario
Open letter states that the "(Ontario) provincial government's shift to a new funding formula significantly improves Peel Region's childcare funding situation" and "with this in mind, we are calling on you to take this opportunity to reverse your decision to shut down all Peel Region's high quality Learn Play Care centres".

OCBCC summary of Ontario’s new child care funding formula and funding framework
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/12/12/ocbcc-summary-ontario%E2%80%99s-new-child-care-funding-formula-and-
21 Dec 2012 | Ontario
Initial response to Ontario's new funding formula for child care outlines positive aspects as well as concerns, and calls on the child care community to monitor developments closely in the new year.

Transitioning to Ontario's new child care funding formula and funding framework: Supporting documents
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/12/12/transitioning-ontarios-new-child-care-funding-formula-and-f
19 Dec 2012 | Ontario
Technical paper and funding guidelines introduce and explain new funding formula for child care in Ontario.

An international perspective on regulated family day care systems
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/12/12/international-perspective-regulated-family-day-care-systems
19 Dec 2012 | International
Article co-authored by Gillian Doherty, Martha Friendly and others compares regulated family day care (FDC) in Australia, Canada, England and Wales, Germany, Ireland, Japan, Norway, New Zealand, Sweden, and the USA.

Revisiting work-life issues in Canada: The 2012 national study on balancing work and caregiving in Canada
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/12/12/revisiting-work-life-issues-canada-2012-national-study-bala
19 Dec 2012 | Canada
Study of 25,000 Canadians finds that one in three respondents can be considered to be in the sandwich generation struggling to balance time each week in work, childcare and eldercare.

2. Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad.

Gender wage gap hurts economic growth
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/12/12/gender-wage-gap-hurts-economic-growth
21 Dec 2012 | Canada

Alta. child-care plan needed
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/12/12/alta-child-care-plan-needed
21 Dec 2012 | Alberta

Region gets $1.3million boost to child-care funding
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/12/12/region-gets-13million-boost-child-care-funding
21 Dec 2012 | Ontario

Peel gets larger piece of child care funding
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/12/12/peel-gets-larger-piece-child-care-funding
21 Dec 2012 | Ontario

U of O law student says city day-care policy unfair
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/12/12/u-o-law-student-says-city-day-care-policy-unfair
19 Dec 2012 | Ontario

MORE child care in the news
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NOTE:
For links to earlier (weekly) issues of this weekly alert going
back to June 2009, check out the CRRU Links Archive on this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/crru_links_archive.htm
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
http://www.childcarecanada.org/res/enews/index.html
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere
http://www.childcarecanada.org/links/index.html

CRRU Publications
http://www.childcarecanada.org/pubs/
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

ISSUE files
http://www.childcarecanada.org/resources/issue-files
- theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

http://www.childcarecanada.org
CRRU is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

12. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.. The Dispatch is distributed by the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. News articles from online newspapers are posted here in a number of general categories, and are tagged with more specific keywords relevant to each article.

Tags
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/tags/

Clicking on a word or expression in the list of tags will call up all relevant news items from past Dispatches under that tag. The list contains a tag for each U.S. state so you can view jurisdiction-specific news, and tags for a huge list of topics, including :
* Basic needs * Canada * Caseloads * Cash assistance * Cellular phones * Census * Charities * Child care * Child hunger * Child poverty * Child support * Child welfare * Child well-being * Chronic homelessness * Cohabitation * Cost of living * Crime * Crimes against the homeless * Debt * Deep poverty * Disability * Early childhood education * Earned income tax credit * Electronic benefit transfers * Eligibility * Food insecurity * Food programs * Foster care* Fuel poverty * Health care costs * Health insurance coverage * Homeless children * Homeless families * Homeless veterans * Housing First * Housing subsidies * Immigrant workers * Income * Income inequality * Jobless benefits * Juvenile justice * Legal aid * Low-income housing * Low-wage work * Medicaid * Microfinance * Minimum wage * Newly poor * No Child Left Behind * Ontario * Paid family leave * Payday lending * Persistent poverty * Poverty measurement * Poverty rate * Prisons * Privatization * Public Housing * Rural poverty * Safety net * SCHIP * Section 8 (Housing) * Seniors * Single parents * SNAP/Food Stamps * Supplemental Security Income * Taxes * Teen pregnancy * Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) * Unemployment rate * Uninsured * Urban poverty * Utilities * Welfare reform * Welfare-to-work * Women Infants and Children (WIC) * Work requirements * Youth employment * many more tags...

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:
(older external links may be broken)

December 20- 21, 2012 : No Poverty Dispatch

December 19, 2012
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/12/19/
Young Adults and Homelessness

December 18, 2012
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/12/18/
Nurse Home Visiting Program – New York City

December 17, 2012
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/12/17/
Homeless Veterans in the US
Extended Jobless Benefits (2 articles)

---

Earlier Poverty Dispatches (back to July 2006):
1. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page: [ http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/ and click on a date in the calendar in the top right-hand corner of the page. Change the month by clicking the link at the bottom of the calendar.
OR
3. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page and click on a category or a tag in the right-hand margin.
4. See http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/povdispatch_archive.htm (more complete listing, but only goes back to December 2011)

---

NOTE : You can subscribe to this email list or RSS feed
by clicking "Subscribe" in the right-hand margin on any page of the Poverty Dispatch website

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)

http://www.irp.wisc.edu

University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://www.wisc.edu/

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

13. [U.S.] The Fiscal Cliff : Update from the Center for Law and Social Policy - December 20

From CLASP
(Center for Law and Social Policy):

[NOTE : Both of the articles below contain a number of links to more information.]

Harsh and Unbalanced
http://www.clasp.org/issues/in_focus?type=work_supports&id=0077
December 20, 2012
By Elizabeth Lower-Basch
In less than two weeks, a combination of expiring programs, automatic spending cuts, and tax increases, popularly called the "fiscal cliff," is scheduled to take effect. This week, Speaker Boehner appears to have abandoned attempts to come to agreement with the President on a comprehensive package to prevent this. Instead, he is expected to bring up for a vote in the House of Representatives two proposals, together which would slash spending, particularly on programs that serve low-income individuals, in order to preserve tax breaks for the wealthy and defense spending. Adopting these proposals would be significantly worse than heading off the "fiscal cliff."

---

What’s at Stake for Low-Income Individuals
and Families in the Fiscal Cliff?
http://www.clasp.org/issues/pages?type=poverty_and_opportunity&id=0075
By Elizabeth Lower-Basch
Confused about the fiscal cliff? No wonder since so much media coverage has focused on whether President Obama or the House Republicans have the upper hand, and not on what difference the policies they support will make in real people's lives, particularly low-income individuals and families.

---

Source:
Center for Law and Social Policy
http://www.clasp.org/
CLASP seeks to improve the lives of low-income people. Work We develop and advocate for federal, state and local policies to strengthen families and create pathways to education and work.

-------------------------------------------------

Related links:

From the
Christian Science Monitor:
http://www.csmonitor.com/

'Fiscal cliff' 101: five basic questions answered
http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Politics/2012/1120/Fiscal-cliff-101-5-basic-questions-answered/
President Obama and congressional leaders are working furiously to stop the United States from going over the “fiscal cliff,” a combination of higher taxes and lower spending set to take effect Jan. 1, 2013. What is the fiscal cliff? Where did it come from? And will it get solved before sending the US into a recession? Here are five steps to understanding the fiscal cliff.

---

From About.com:
http://www.about.com/

What is the Fiscal Cliff?
http://bonds.about.com/od/Issues-in-the-News/a/What-Is-The-Fiscal-Cliff.htm

---

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page

United States fiscal cliff
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_fiscal_cliff

---

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

14. Active Ageing Index 2012 for 27 EU Member States - December 2012
(European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research
)

Active Ageing Index 2012
for 27 EU Member States
(PDF - 732K, 11 pages)
http://www.euro.centre.org/data/1356002554_9393.pdf
Developed by Asghr Zaidi et al.
Vienna, 2012
December Policy Brief
The 2012 Active Ageing Index (AAI) is a newly developed tool that offers national and European policy-makers a way to measure and promote the untapped potential of the older population. In its design, the index follows the conceptual framework of the 2012 European Year for Active Ageing and Solidarity between Generations (EY2012). It makes use of a dashboard of diverse indicators, organised under four distinct domains:
(1) Employment of older workers;
(2) Social activity and participation of older people;
(3) Independent and autonomous living of older persons; and
(4) Capacity and enabling environment for active ageing.

The year 2012 has marked the 10th anniversary of the 2nd World Assembly on Ageing and also the 2nd cycle of review and appraisal of the implementation of the Madrid International Plan of Action on Ageing. It is also the European Year for Active Ageing and Solidarity between Generations. To mark these major occasions, the UN Economic Commission for Europe, the European Commission’s Directorate General on Employment, Social Protection and Inclusion and the European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research have undertaken a research and policy advice project, called: the ‘Active Ageing Index’ project, constructing the Active Ageing Index (AAI), which was launched during the Closing Conference of the EY2012, 10th December 2012, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Related links:

Second World Assembly on Ageing
http://www.globalaging.org/waa2/index.htm

Madrid International Plan of Action on Ageing
http://goo.gl/YVTfH

European Year for Active Ageing and Solidarity between Generations (EY2012)
http://europa.eu/ey2012/

UN Economic Commission for Europe
http://www.unece.org/

European Commission Directorate General
on Employment, Social Protection and Inclusion
http://ec.europa.eu/social/home.jsp?langId=en

European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research
http://www.euro.centre.org/

Active Ageing Index
http://www.euro.centre.org/detail.php?xml_id=2004

---

- Go to the Seniors (Social Research) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/seniors.htm

15. CRINMAIL (Newsletter of the Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):
http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

The latest information on children's rights around the world:
CRINMAIL
http://www.crin.org/email/
CRIN publishes several email lists on children's rights issues in English, French, Spanish and Arabic. We also issue thematic editions on armed conflict, violence against children and strategic litigation. You can subscribe to any of these email lists and unsubscribe at any time.

CRINMAIL - Children's Rights Newsletter (weekly)
Latest issue:

19 December 2012 - CRINMAIL ISSUE 1307
http://www.crin.org/email/crinmail_detail_popup.asp?crinmailID=4514
In this issue:
CRC ELECTION UPDATE: New members elected
Latest news and reports
- Calls to halt execution of juveniles
- School shooting ignites debate on arms control
- Mass rape, amputations and killings abound
- Rebels escalate attacks on schools
- Nine girls killed by landmine
- Status of children's rights in Malaysia
- Taking off the adjectives at birth
- Global review of corporal punishment laws
- Funding opportunity
Children's Rights Wiki: Spotlight on Lebanon
Upcoming events
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Issues * Law
* Advocacy (Challenging breaches - Take action - Campaigns - Toolkits

-----------------------------------------------

CRINMAIL Archive (earlier issues):

Option 1: (WITH table of contents)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/CRINMAIL_archive.htm
- includes a table of contents for each issue, as above, back to 2009-2010:

Option 2: (WITHOUT table of contents)
http://goo.gl/C0JNx
- On the CRINMAIL website --- does *not* include the table of contents for each issue (so you must click on each link to see its contents), but it goes back much further (pre-2006). Follow this link to see hundreds of earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

--------------------------------------------------

NOTE:
The CRINMAIL Children's Rights Newsletter is only ONE of several weekly newsletters produced and distributed by CRIN.
See the complete list of newsletters:
http://www.crin.org/email/

Source:
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):

http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

---

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
http://www.cupe.ca/
Thanks, CUPE!

------------------------

If you wish to receive this weekly newsletter by email, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter online subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly newsletter.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

 

Cheap Spellchecker

Eye halve a spelling chequer
It came with my pea sea
It plainly marques four my revue
Miss steaks eye kin knot sea.

Eye strike a key and type a word
And weight four it two say
Weather eye am wrong oar write
It shows me strait a weigh.

As soon as a mist ache is maid
It nose bee fore two long
And eye can put the error rite
Its rare lea ever wrong.

Eye have run this poem threw it
I am shore your pleased two no
Its letter perfect awl the weigh
My chequer tolled me sew.

Source:
Unknown

********************************************

And, in closing...

********************************************

Balance Act performed by Lara Jacobs Rigolo (video, duration 13:00)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a3jGKvEjDwI
Mesmerizing (sez the guy who can't balance a chequebook...)

---

"Baked on a Buttery, Flakey Crust" (video, duration 2:09)
http://www.collegehumor.com/embed/6858225/baked-on-a-buttery-flakey-crust-x50

---

Build your own Demotivator!
http://diy.despair.com/

---

Christmas Light Display : Amazing Grace (video, duration 1:35)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=mnk0KjWxgMA

---

I cried because I had no shoes... (video, duration 4:10)
http://www.wimp.com/watchingthis/

---

A POLITICALLY-CORRECT WINTER SOLSTICE HOLIDAY WISH
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/XMAS/greeting.htm

---

Regardless of your race, creed or colour, I wish you good times filled with laughter and love with family and friends during this holiday season.

Merry Christmas, and Season's Greetings!

Gilles Seguin