Canadian Social Research Links logo 
Canadian Social Research Newsletter
January 24, 2010

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,203 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

************************************************************************

Haiti Earthquake
(Canadian Red Cross)

Powerful earthquake hits Haiti – Urgent help needed

On January 12, 2010 a 7.0 magnitude earthquake, followed by several powerful aftershocks,
struck off the western coast of Haiti, causing buildings to collapse in Port au Prince and chaos
as people fled the damage. Hundreds of thousands of people are dead or homeless. Haiti needs our help.

The Canadian Red Cross is accepting donations to support Red Cross relief efforts in Haiti.
Please give what you can.
* Donate online (secure site)
* Call toll-free 1-800-418-1111
* Visit a Red Cross office near you to donate in person.
* Other ways to donate (regular mail, planned legacy)

Source:
Canadian Red Cross

************************************************************************

IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. Release of The Fiscal Monitor for November 2009 (Department of Finance Canada) - January 22
2. Government transfer payments to persons (Statistics Canada)

3. Federal Cabinet Shuffle - January 19
4. New Ontario Cabinet Announced - January 18
5. Analysis and critique of New Brunswick's poverty reduction plan (Common Front for Social Justice Inc.) - January 2010
6. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Employment Insurance, November 2009 - January 22
--- The changing cyclical behaviour of labour productivity - January 21
--- Consumer Price Index, December 2009 - January 20
--- Leading indicators, December 2009 - January 19
7. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - January 24

International content

8. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs (Institute for Research on Poverty - U. of Wisconsin-Madison)
9. [United States] Who Are America's Poor Children? The Official Story (National Center for Children in Poverty) - January 2010
10. World Report 2010
(Human Rights Watch) - January 20
11. Australian Policy Online - recent content
12. CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!
Gilles

************************
Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net


E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com


1.  Release of The Fiscal Monitor for November 2009 - January 22
(Department of Finance Canada)

Release of The Fiscal Monitor
January 22, 2010
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, today released The Fiscal Monitor for November 2009.

Highlights:
November 2009: budgetary deficit of $4.4 billion
April to November 2009: budgetary deficit of $36.3 billion

Related document:

* The Fiscal Monitor for November 2009

[ earlier issues of The Fiscal Monitor ]

Source:
Department of Finance Canada

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

2. Government transfer payments to persons
(Statistics Canada)

Looking for information on Canadian government expenditures on welfare? Old Age Security? Canada Pension Plan? Employment Insurance?
Look no further.

Government transfer payments to persons
On this one table, you'll find the latest five years' worth of information on national expenditures (provincial stats available for a small fee) in the area of transfers to persons, which includes (among other programs):
* Family and youth allowances * Child tax benefit or credit * Pensions - First and Second World Wars * War veterans' allowances * Grants to aboriginal persons and organizations * Goods and services tax credit * Employment insurance benefits * Old Age Security Fund payments * Provincial Social assistance, income maintenance * Social assistance, other * Workers compensation benefits * Canada and Quebec Pension Plans.
NOTE: In case you're interested in province-level stats, click the "384-0009" link under 'Source' at the bottom of the table. There you can obtain more specialized CANSIM tables, including provincial tables, for a few dollars each. The "Find information related to this table" link (which is also at the bottom of the StatCan table) contains methodological notes and other related StatCan products, many of which are free of charge.
Source:
Statistics Canada

- Go to the Social Statistics Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm
- Go to the Key Provincial/Territorial Welfare Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare.htm

3. Federal Cabinet Shuffle - January 19

PM announces changes to the Ministry
19 January 2010
Ottawa, Ontario
Prime Minister Stephen Harper today announced changes to the Ministry in preparation for a Speech from the Throne and the implementation of Phase II of Canada’s Economic Action Plan.
* The Canadian Ministry (PDF)
* Biographies
* Cabinet Committee Mandates and Membership
(PDF)

Related links:

From The Toronto Star:

Hébert: No change of course in Tory shuffle
January 20, 2010
A s far as recalibrating a government goes, this week's cabinet shuffle does not justify closing Parliament down for most of the winter. It was a pit stop, not a major tune-up.

Musical chairs in Ottawa
January 20
First, he prorogued Parliament. Now, he's shuffled his cabinet. While Stephen Harper has yet to admit his miscalculation in shutting down Parliament, his actions yesterday suggest a Prime Minister who understands damage control.

PM makes Stockwell Day chief cost-cutter
January 20
Right-wing stalwart Stockwell Day was anointed as the Conservatives' "Dr. No" Tuesday in a cabinet shuffle that sets the stage for a concerted attack on federal spending that could impact services and programs used by Canadians of every stripe.

From The Globe and Mail:

PM taps Day to put a lid on spending
Stephen Harper uses cabinet shuffle to signal a tightening of deficit spending
January 20

Federal cabinet shuffle to focus on economy
January 19
Prime Minister Stephen Harper is moving a few big-name members of his cabinet this morning as part of a shuffle that aims to highlight the Conservatives' focus on the economy, government officials say.

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

4. Ontario Cabinet Shuffle - January 18

New Decade, New Challenges, New Cabinet
McGuinty Government Continues To Drive Forward On Priorities
January 18, 2010
Premier McGuinty today announced major changes to his Cabinet to drive the government's economic, education and green energy agenda. The changes will see 12 ministers in new responsibilities and three new women appointed to Cabinet.
- incl. list of Ministers and portfolios

Meet the Ontario Cabinet

Source:
Office of the Premier
[
Government of Ontario ]

Related links:

From The Toronto Star:

Dalton McGuinty orders a transfusion
Premier promotes four backbenchers, fires three veterans, shifts key portfolios
January 19

Shuffle question marks
The provincial cabinet has a fresher face today, but is it better?
January 19

McGuinty reveals revamped cabinet
Former aboriginal affairs minister Brad Duguid promoted to energy and infrastructure post
January 18

From The Globe and Mail:

McGuinty creates cabinet to convince
January 18, 2010
Although cabinet shuffle changed leadership at nearly
half the province's ministries, Dalton McGuinty is more in charge than ever

Dalton McGuinty shuffles cabinet
Four new faces promoted to cabinet, three veterans dropped Monday

January 18

[ Thanks to Jennefer Laidley of the Income Security Advocacy Centre in Toronto for suggesting some of these links. ]

- Go to the Ontario Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm

5. Analysis and critique of New Brunswick's poverty reduction plan - January 2010
(Common Front for Social Justice Inc.)

New Brunswick:

Recent releases from
The Common Front for Social Justice Inc.:

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Recherchistes francophones:
Sur la version française du site Web du
Front commun pour la justice sociale du Nouveau-Brunswick,
...vous trouverez les liens vers la version française de chacun
des textes ci-dessous ainsi qu'à d'autres textes du Front commun.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Reading between the lines of “Overcoming Poverty Together –
The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan”
(PDF - 373K, 11 pages)
January 2010
Complete report (PDF - 373K, 11 pages)
Summary (PDF - 241K, 5 pages)
The purpose of this document is to express the concerns that the CFSJ has regarding the released document entitled Overcoming Poverty Together – The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan (hereafter called the Plan). Our analysis will address the following issues:
1) Who was left out of the plan?;
2) Limits to employability not considered;
3) Delivery structure and possible consequences;
4) Financial support towards the Plan, and
5) Missing elements.

---

"Overcoming Poverty Together
- NB Economic and Social Inclusion Plan"
Some of its Shortcomings
(PDF - 902K, 16 pages)
Powerpoint presentation
January 2010

---

Front for Social Justice applauds
minimum wage hike, argues more needs to be done

NB Media Co-op
January 8, 2010

---

Comparison of New Brunswick's minimum wage with the Atlantic average (PDF - 32K, 1 page)
January 2010
As of April 1, 2011*, assuming the other Atlantic provinces stay the same, NB workers will make 11¢ per hour more than the average minimum wage of all Atlantic provinces.
[*the PDF file says April 2010 but this is incorrect. The French version of this PDF file has the correct date.]
[ One of the elements of the provincial poverty reduction plan (see below) is to raise the minimum wage to the Atlantic average by September 1st, 2011 and adjust for inflation annually thereafter. The Common Front argues that this is a good thing for full-time workers, but many of New Brunswick's poor households work part-time, thus reducing the impact of the increase on the target population. ]

---

Poverty in 2009 - The real picture
December 2009
- evaluation of nine crucial issues that have a direct impact on people living in poverty

Source:
Common Front for Social Justice Inc. (CFSJ)
The Common Front for Social Justice is fighting to build a more human society based on the respect and dignity of all. We want a New Brunswick without poverty. We want a society which give each and everyone a decent living, in particular by having a minimum wage and social income on which citizens can to live on and not just exist.

---

Related links:

Overcoming Poverty Together:
The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan
(PDF - 100K, 5 pages)
PDF file dated November 17, 2009
By 2015, New Brunswick will have reduced income poverty by 25% and deep income poverty by 50%, and will have made significant progress in achieving sustained economic and social inclusion.
Source:
Government of New Brunswick

---

Poverty levels not improving: advocacy group
January 16, 2010
By Greg Mulock
With a new year underway, a provincial advocacy group says the poor in New Brunswick are possibly worse off than they were at the outset of 2009. "The Common Front for Social Justice analyzed different actions taken in 2009 to reduce poverty," said a news release. "It realized the situation for people living in poverty has not changed. On some level it even deteriorated, especially for recipients on social assistance."
Source:
Telegraph-Journal (New Brunswick)

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the New Brunswick Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nbkmrk.htm

6. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Employment Insurance, November 2009 - January 22
--- The changing cyclical behaviour of labour productivity - January 21
--- Consumer Price Index, December 2009 - January 20
--- Leading indicators, December 2009 - January 19

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

January 22, 2010
Employment Insurance, November 2009
The number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits declined 7,300 to 795,900 in November, with Quebec and British Columbia recording the largest decreases.
- incl. the following tables (at the bottom of the page):
* Employment Insurance: Statistics by province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by age group, sex, province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by census metropolitan areas

See also:
* Tables by subject: Employment insurance, social assistance and other transfers
* Employment Insurance Statistics Maps

Related subjects
o Labour
o Employment insurance, social assistance and other transfers
o Non-wage benefits

Related link from
The Progressive Economics Forum
:

EI: Fewer Recipients, More Claims
By Erin Weir
January 22, 2010
The number of Canadians receiving regular Employment Insurance (EI) benefits declined by 7,300 in November. As always, we do not know whether these workers found jobs or simply ran out of benefits. The Labour Force Survey indicated higher employment and slightly lower unemployment that month, which supports a positive interpretation.Following these declines in recipients and in unemployment, the proportion of officially unemployed workers receiving benefits was 50.6%. The EI program is still allowing about half of unemployed Canadians to fall through the cracks.

---

January 21, 2010
The changing cyclical behaviour of labour productivity
by Philip Cross
As the economy slumped in 2008 and 2009, labour productivity in Canada fell slightly as the combined reductions in employment and the average workweek did not match the drop in output. This marks a departure from recent recessions in Canada and the US, when labour productivity increased during recessions.
Source:
Canadian Economic Observer - January 2010 edition
[ earlier editions of the Canadian Economic Observer ]
[ Canadian Economic Observer main page ]

---

January 20, 2010
Consumer Price Index, December 2009
Consumer prices rose 1.3% in the 12 months to December, following a 1.0% increase in November. On a seasonally adjusted monthly basis, consumer prices fell 0.1% from November to December.
TIP: scroll to the bottom of the page for three CPI tables.
[ Related link : December 2009 issue of The Consumer Price Index (PDF - 527K, 68 pages)

Related subjects:
o Prices and price indexes
o Consumer price indexes

---

January 19, 2010
Leading indicators, December 2009
The composite leading index rose 1.5% in December, its seventh straight increase and matching February 1983 for the largest monthly advance since September 1958. For a second straight month, growth was widespread as none of the 10 components fell. The largest gains continued to originate in household spending and the stock market.
[Scroll to the bottom of the page for a link to a table of leading indicators for each month from July to December 2009.]

Related subjects
o Economic accounts
o Leading indicators

---------------------------------

The Daily Archives
- select a month and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm
- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page : http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm
- Go to the Social Statistics Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm

7. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - January 24

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
:

January 24, 2010

What's new online

This section archives documents that have been featured on the CRRU
homepage. Items are in chronological order by posting date from the most
recent to the least recent. Follow the title link for details.

Overcoming poverty together: The New Brunswick economic and social inclusion plan
20 Jan 10
- New Brunswick poverty reduction plan promises expansion of child care spaces and introduction of an Early Learning and Child Care Act.

Implementation of early learning program and Toronto's child care funding risks and pressures
20 Jan 10
- Staff report to the City of Toronto's Community Development Committee outlines issues surrounding Ontario's new full-day early learning program and offers strategies to address them.

Keep the aspirations flying
20 Jan 10
- Video from Teachers.tv shows how an English primary school transformed their outdoor space from barren concrete to a thriving garden for play and learning.

Children and cities: Planning to grow together
20 Jan 10
- Report from the Vanier Institute of the Family discusses the current and possible roles of children in urban planning.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news

· Fighting poverty with new child care
[CA] 20 Jan 10

· Harper changing way we talk, think about Canada
[CA] 20 Jan 10

· The good mother, and modern politician
[DE] 17 Jan 10

· Sensible changes for kindergarten
[CA-ON] 16 Jan 10

· In Germany, a tradition falls, and women rise
[DE] 16 Jan 10

more CC IN THE NEWS »

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sitesin Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

8. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

January 22:
Report: Poverty in Ohio
December 2009 Unemployment Rate
Haiti Earthquake
State Health Insurance Plan - Wisconsin

January 21:
Educational Opportunity Report - California
Kids Count Report - New Jersey
US Urban and Suburban Poverty Rates

January 20:
US Urban and Suburban Poverty Rates
Financial Crisis and Education in Poor Nations
State Budget and Medicaid - Kentucky
The World’s Poor and Access to Banking

January 19:
Medicaid Reimbursement Rates - California, Utah
Unemployment Benefit System - California
Hybrid Welfare System - Indiana
Charter School Performance - Georgia, Washington DC
Enrollment in Assistance Programs - Idaho

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

9. [United States] Who Are America's Poor Children? The Official Story - January 2010
(National Center for Children in Poverty)

Who Are America's Poor Children?
The Official Story

By Vanessa R. Wight, Michelle Chau, and Yumiko Aratani
January 2010
HTML version
PDF version
(463K, 8 pages)
More than 13 million American children live in families with incomes below the federal poverty level, which is $22,050 a year for a family of four. The number of children living in poverty increased by 21 percent between 2000 and 2008. There are 2.5 million more children living in poverty today than in 2000. Not only are these numbers troubling, the official poverty measure tells only part of the story. Research consistently shows that, on average, families need an income of about twice the federal poverty level to make ends meet. Children living in families with incomes below this level – for 2009, $44,100 for a family of four – are referred to as low income. Forty-one percent of the nation’s children – more than 29 million in 2008 – live in low-income families. Nonetheless, eligibility for many public benefits is based on the official poverty measure. This fact sheet – the first in a series focusing on economic and material hardship – details some of the characteristics of American children who are considered poor by the official standard.
Source:
National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP)
NCCP is the nation’s leading public policy center dedicated to promoting the economic security, health, and well-being of America’s low-income families and children. NCCP uses research to inform policy and practice with the goal of ensuring positive outcomes for the next generation. We promote family-oriented solutions at the state and national levels.

Related NCCP links:

Low-income Children in the United States
National and State Trend Data, 1998-2008
(PDF - 930K, 60 pages)
By Michelle Chau
November 2009
After nearly a decade of decline, the number of children living in low-income families has increased significantly since 2000. This data book provides national and 50-state trend data on the characteristics of low-income children over the past decade: parental education, parental employment, marital status, family structure, race and ethnicity, age distribution, parental nativity, home ownership, residential mobility, type of residential area, and region of residence.

The most current year of data can also be accessed at www.nccp.org—see NCCP’s 50-State Demographic Profiles or build custom tables using NCCP’s 50-State Demographics Wizard. For a discussion of these data and selected policy implications, see NCCP’s fact sheets on low-income children, which are updated annually.

More NCCP resources on the topic of poverty

Ten Important Questions About Child Poverty and Family Economic Hardship

NCCP Fact Sheets

- Go to the International Children, Families and Youth Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chn2.htm
- Go to the Government Social Research Links in Other Countries page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internat.htm

10. World Report 2010 - January 20
(Human Rights Watch)

New from
Human Rights Watch
:

World Report: Abusers Target Human Rights Messengers
Rights-Respecting Governments Should Speak Up to Protect Defenders
January 20, 2010
News Release
Washington, DC - Governments responsible for serious human rights violations have over the past year intensified attacks against human rights defenders and organizations that document abuse, Human Rights Watch said today in issuing its World Report 2010. The 612-page report, the organization's 20th annual review of human rights practices around the globe, summarizes major human rights trends in more than 90 nations and territories worldwide*, reflecting the extensive investigative work carried out in 2009 by Human Rights Watch staff.
-----
* more than 90 nations and territories worldwide, including the U.S. --- but not Canada.
Hey - wassup with THAT?
... "attacks against human rights defenders and organizations that document abuse" sounds like something that's been happening here in Canada, what with the increasing amount of media slagging in the past few years about human rights bodies and even respected individuals, like Louise Arbour, former Supreme Court Justice and UN High Commissioner for Human Rights.

The only Canada coverage in the Human Rights Watch site is the following:
Canada: Human Rights Watch
- incl, links to * News Releases * Reports * Commentaries * Letters

Complete report:
World Report 2010
(PDF - 3.7MB, 624 pages)

Introduction to World Report 2010:
The Abusers’ Reaction: Intensifying Attacks on
Human Rights Defenders, Organizations, and Institutions

By Kenneth Roth, executive director of Human Rights Watch

Country Chapters - links to individual reports for 90 countries , including the U.S. --- but not Canada.

Source:
Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch is one of the world’s leading independent organizations dedicated to defending and protecting human rights. By focusing international attention where human rights are violated, we give voice to the oppressed and hold oppressors accountable for their crimes
.

Related links:

* Canadian Human Rights Commission
***** Links - over 120 links to related resources

* United Nations Association in Canada
***** Canada and Human Rights

* List of Provincial Human Rights Commissions
Newfoundland and Labrador: http://www.justice.gov.nl.ca/hrc/
Prince Edward Island:
http://www.gov.pe.ca/humanrights/index.php3?number=72187&lang=E
Nova Scotia: http://www.gov.ns.ca/humanrights/
New Brunswick: http://www.gnb.ca/hrc-cdp/index-e.asp
Quebec: http://142.213.87.17/en/home.asp
Ontario:
http://www.ohrc.on.ca
Manitoba: http://www.gov.mb.ca/hrc
Saskatchewan: http://www.shrc.gov.sk.ca/
Alberta: http://www.albertahumanrights.ab.ca/
British Columbia: http://www.bchrt.bc.ca/

Google News Search results:
"Canada, human rights"
- 2,495 results

- Go to the Human Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/rights.htm

11. Australian Policy Online - recent content

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia. [ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week
appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page, and the downloads vary depending on the topic you select.

-------------------------------------------------------

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

12. CRINMAIL
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)

Latest issue of CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter):

21 January 2010 - CRINMAIL 1141
* GLOBAL: Human Rights Watch World Report 2010 [publication]
* UGANDA: UN human rights chief urges Uganda to shelve “draconian” law on homosexuality [news]
* EDUCATION FOR ALL: Global Monitoring Report 2010 [publication]
* NEW ZEALAND: Monitoring Places of Detention [publication
* PAKISTAN: Expedite Domestic Violence Legislation [news]
* AFGHANISTAN: 2009 Annual Report on the Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict in Afghanistan [publication]
* CRIN NOTICEBOARD
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

19 January 2010 - CRINMAIL 1140
* HAITI: Special protection measures needed for Haiti’s children, says the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child [news]
* AFRICA: 2nd Civil Society Organisation Forum on the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child [publication]
* MAURITANIA: Fatwa bans female genital mutilation [news]
* CHILD SURVIVAL: Unicef child-death campaign in Africa 'failed' [news]
* CRIN NOTICEBOARD
* RESOURCES: ARC Resource Pack and Voices of Youth online discussion forum
* EMPLOYMENT: UNICEF and Save the Children UK
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

------------------------------------------

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL
- links to 200+ weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm




Disclaimer/Privacy Statement


Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com



**************************

How to Sing the Blues

**************************

 
1. Most Blues begin "woke up this morning."

2. "I got a good woman" is a bad way to begin the Blues, unless you stick something nasty in the next line.

    I got a good woman--
    With the meanest dog in town.

3. Blues are simple. After you have the first line right, repeat it. Then find something that rhymes. Sort of.

    Gotta good woman
    with the meanest dog in town.
    She got teeth like Margaret Thatcher
    And she weighs about 500 pounds.

4.
No one will believe it's the Blues if you wear a suit, unless you happen to be an old black man.

5. Blues cars are Chevys and Cadillacs.
Other acceptable Blues transportation is Greyhound bus or a southbound train.
Walkin' plays a major part in the Blues lifestyle. So does fixin' to die.

6. Teenagers can't sing the Blues.
Adults sing the Blues.
Blues adulthood means old enough to get the electric chair if you shoot a man in Memphis.

7. You can have the Blues in New York City, but not in Brooklyn or Queens. Hard times in Vermont or North Dakota are just a depression. Chicago, St. Louis and Kansas City are still the best places to have the Blues.

8. The following colors do not belong in the Blues:
* violet
* beige
* mauve

9. You can't have the Blues in an office or a shopping mall, the lighting is wrong.

10. Good places for the Blues:
* the highway
* the jail house
* the empty bed

Bad places:

* Ashrams
* Gallery openings
* Weekend in the Hamptons

Source:
http://www.c4vct.com/kym/humor/blues.htm

[HINT: click the link for seven more rules for singin' the blues.]



----------------------------

And, in closing...

----------------------------


Should you stop using Internet Explorer?
The recent revelation of a major security flaw in Internet Explorer makes this a good time to consider the alternatives
23 Jan 2010
http://tinyurl.com/y8b8he3

---

Five alternatives to Internet Explorer
The UK Telegraph's guide to the best alternative web browsers on the market
23 Jan 2010
http://tinyurl.com/y96z7j2

[I've  used Firefox for years. Try it - you'll like it. Gilles]

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Inspired Bicycles - Danny MacAskill April 2009
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z19zFlPah-o
Incredible video, insane bike control, parkour on two wheels, cool music.
Enjoy.