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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
October 24, 2010

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,341 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

************************************************************************

IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. The Fiscal Monitor – August 2010 (Finance Canada) – October 22
2. National housing act bill (C-304) moves big step closer to law (Wellesley Institute Blog) – October 2010
3. Atkinson Foundation e-Bulletin – October 2010
4. Canada’s Finance Minister Highlights Tax Breaks for Canadians (Finance Canada) - October 18
5. 3D Policy, a new economics blog in town (By Andrew Jackson in the Progressive Economics Forum) - October 18
6.  Post-Secondary Education in Canada (By Nick Falvo) - October 16
7.datalibre.ca : the Census long form questionnaire issue
8. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Consumer Price Index, September 2010 - October 22
--- Employment Insurance, August 2010 - October 21
--- Leading indicators, September 2010
- October 21
--- Neighbourhood variation in hospitalization for unintentional injury among children and teenagers - October 20
--- Canadian Social Trends - October 2010 online edition - October 19
9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - October 23

International content

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
11. [U.S.] The 'Culture of Poverty' moves to the suburbs (Various articles, from The Scout Report) - October 7-20
12. [U.S.] And the poor get poorer (Center on Budget and Policy Priorities) - October 21
13.
Australian Policy Online - selected recent content (October 23)
--- A guide for using statistics for evidence based policy, 2010
--- Removing poverty traps in the tax transfer system

14. CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!
Gilles

[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

1. The Fiscal Monitor (August 2010) – October 22
(Finance Canada)

Release of The Fiscal Monitor
News Release

October 22, 2010
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, today released The Fiscal Monitor for August 2010.
Highlights
* August 2010: budgetary deficit of $5.8 billion
* April to August 2010: budgetary deficit of $13.5 billion

Related document:

* The Fiscal Monitor – August 2010

[ earlier editions of The Fiscal Monitor - going back to 1996 ]

Source:
Department of Finance Canada

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

2. National housing act bill (C-304) moves big step closer to law – October 21
(Wellesley Institute Blog)

October 21, 2010
Great news: National housing act bill (C-304) moves big step closer to law
By Michael Shapcott
Great news!
Third reading debate
on Bill C-304 - draft legislation to create a national housing plan for Canada – started on Wednesday evening in Parliament, and three of the four political parties in the Commons have pledged their support. Vancouver East MP Libby Davies, sponsor of the bill, told her fellow MPs: “This bill is very straightforward and clear. It calls on the federal government, in partnership with the provinces, the territories, first nations, municipalities and stakeholders, to develop a strategy that could take us forward and move us into a situation where we have a real plan with objectives, targets, outcomes, and deliverables. That is why so many people have signed on in support of this bill.”
Source:
Wellesley Institute Blog

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

3. Atkinson Foundation e-Bulletin – October 2010

Atkinson Foundation e-Bulletin – October 2010
Featuring news, views and updates from the Atkinson Charitable Foundation and its partners.
IN THIS BULLETIN...
June Callwood Centre champions change…
Full day early learning an economic boost…
Fellowship examines Canadian culture…
Information must be Canada’s bedrock…
Time for bold income security review…

Source:
Atkinson Charitable Foundation
We are a private Canadian foundation established in 1942 by Joseph E. Atkinson, former publisher of The Toronto Star newspaper. Our mission is to "promote social and economic justice in the tradition of our founder," Joseph E. Atkinson. In the categories of health, social welfare, economic justice and education the Foundation has granted more than $55 million since its inception.
The Foundation has a focus on three priority areas in 2010:
* Early Learning and Child Care * Poverty Reduction * The Canadian Index of Wellbeing

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

4. Canada’s Finance Minister Highlights Tax Breaks for Canadians - October 18
(Finance Canada)

Canada’s Finance Minister Highlights Tax Breaks for Canadians
News Release
October 18, 2010
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, today highlighted the tax measures that the Government of Canada has implemented to reduce the tax burden on Canadians. (...)
Key tax breaks for Canadian families, individuals and small businesses include:
* All Canadians—even those who do not earn enough to pay personal income tax—are benefiting from the 2-percentage-point reduction in the Goods and Services Tax rate.
* All taxpayers are benefiting from the reduction in the lowest personal income tax rate to 15 per cent from 16 per cent.
* The Tax-Free Savings Account is improving incentives to save through a flexible, registered general-purpose account that allows Canadians to earn tax-free investment income.
* A reduction of the federal income tax rate applying to qualifying small business income to 11 per cent in 2008 and an increase in the amount of income eligible for this lower rate to $500,000 in 2009.

Source:
Department of Finance Canada

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

5. 3D Policy, a new economics blog in town - October 18
(By Andrew Jackson in the Progressive Economics Forum)

3D Policy
October 18, 2010
Andrew Jackson* says:
"There is a new economics blog in town.
http://www.3dpolicy.ca

It is put together by former Finance Deputy Minister Scott Clark and former Director of Fiscal Policy, Peter Devries. I disagree with their fiscally very cautious line, but this is highly informed commentary on the numbers - with a major piece on the recent Economic and Fiscal Update - so do go visit! It should help keep Finance more honest!"

Source:
Relentlessly Progressive Economics Blog
[ Progressive Economics Forum (PEF) ]
The Progressive Economics Forum aims to promote the development of a progressive economics community in Canada. The PEF brings together over 125 progressive economists, working in universities, the labour movement, and activist research organizations.
[ * Andrew Jackson is National Director, Social and Economic Policy, with the Canadian Labour Congress. ]

- Go to the Non-Governmental Organizations Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ngobkmrk.htm

6. Post-secondary Education in Canada - October 16
(By Nick Falvo)

Two recent items in the media on
post-secondary education in Canada
by Nick Falvo:

The Big Five Proposal: Why We Shouldn’t Pick Winners
October 2010
Just over a year ago, a debate emerged in Canada over the so-called “Big Five” proposal for Canadian universities. While it succeeded in grabbing headlines, I wouldn’t put my money on it ever seeing the light of day. At best, the proposal represents ill-advised and overly-simplistic thinking. At worst, it’s a shameless attempt by five university presidents to bring more prestige to their respective schools, irrespective of the impact on the broader post-secondary education system. Last year, the presidents of the universities of Toronto, McGill, UBC, Alberta and Montréal requested an interview with MacLean’s. Paul Wells summed up the interview as follows: “An hour into our conversation, the five presidents had called for more research money, the ability to concentrate more on graduate education, fewer undergrads, more international students, and the right to charge higher tuition in return for increased financial assistance to the least affluent students.”
Source:
Academic Matters

---

Give Carleton funds to recruit foreign students
October 14, 2010
Letter to the editor (see the link below)
Re: Foreign-student plan stirs Carleton debate
First-year of university program would be privately run
I enjoyed reading Matthew Pearson's very informative article about Navitas, a for-profit company wanting to both recruit and teach international students at Carleton University. However, there is an alternative to allowing a private company such a role in university teaching. To be sure, Carleton University could easily do on its own what Navitas is proposing to do -- but, due largely to insufficient funding from the McGuinty government, Carleton lacks the up-front money needed to recruit on the same scale as Navitas...
Source:
Ottawa Citizen

Related link:

Re: Foreign-student plan stirs Carleton debate
First-year of university program would be privately run
By Matthew Pearson,
October 7, 2010
Ottawa Citizen

Nick Falvo is a doctoral candidate at Carleton University’s School of Public Policy and Administration. He is also vice-president finance of Carleton’s Graduate Students’ Association.

- Go to the Canadian Universities and Colleges Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/univbkmrk.htm

7. datalibre.ca : the Census long form questionnaire issue

#1 Recommended resource for links to
comprehensive information on the Census
long form questionnaire controversy:

datalibre.ca - the most comprehensive online resource on the Census questionnaire issue!
datalibre.ca is a blog that's maintained mostly by Tracey Lauriault.
It's inspired by civicaccess.ca, which believes all levels of Canadian governments should make civic information and data accessible at no cost in open formats to their citizens.

Most recent
datalibre Census postings by Tracey:

New Census Legal Challenge – Fighting for the Equal Right to be Counted…
October 22, 2010
Just over 100 days have passed since the Harper Government launched its assault on Canada’s fundamental data source with a sneak attack on the long form census. The most reliable, comprehensive source of information, relied on as a tool to respond to the needs and priorities of every Canadian — wiped out, against the advice of experts across the country and abroad, on a political whim. Canada’s response to this decision has been unequivocal: Why would the government shut down Canada’s navigation system?
(...) Responding to the overwhelming and very real concerns about the consequences of this catastrophic decision, the Canadian Council on Social Development has launched a legal challenge in the Federal Court defending the equal right of all Canadians to be counted.

---

PublicScience.ca
October 19, 2010
Evidence based planning has taken a hit in Canada and public scientists have been replaced by “media relations” officers as the purveyors of truth, compelling the union that represents public scientists to take action.

PublicScience.ca is a new initiative sponsored by the Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada.
The site aims to highlight science done for the public good – much of it taxpayer-funded and carried out by government scientists – and to “mobilize” scientists and the public to pressure politicians to support it. It features interviews with federal scientists about their work, along with interviews with science policy experts. (CBC)
Part of what inspired the creation of PublicScience.ca was the cancellation of the Long-Form Census

---

Census vs Voluntary Survey response rate estimates
October 18, 2010
Its official!
StatCan expects a 50% response rate from the Voluntary National Household Survey and would have expected a 94% response rate from a mandatory Long-Form Census.

Related link:
StatCan National Household Survey: data quality

----------------------------------------

Australia:

A guide for using statistics for evidence based policy, 2010
22 October 2010
There in an increasing emphasis within Australia on using good statistical information in policy-making. This guide provides an overview of how data can be used to make well informed policy decisions.
Source:
Australian Bureau of Statistics

----------------------------------------

Most recent Google.ca
News Search Results Page
: "Canada census 2011, long form questionnaire."

Related link:

Statistics Canada's Census Home Page

----------------------------------------

- Go to the Census 2011 questionnaire links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/2011_census_questionnaire.htm

8. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Consumer Price Index, September 2010 - October 22
--- Employment Insurance, August 2010 - October 21
--- Leading indicators, September 2010
- October 21
--- Neighbourhood variation in hospitalization for unintentional injury among children and teenagers - October 20
--- Canadian Social Trends - October 2010 online edition
- October 19

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

October 22, 2010
Consumer Price Index, September 2010
Consumer prices rose 1.9% in the 12 months to September, following a 1.7% increase in August. On a seasonally adjusted monthly basis, consumer prices rose 0.3% in September.
- includes links to three tables:
* Consumer Price Index and major components, Canada
* Consumer Price Index by province, and for Whitehorse, Yellowknife and Iqaluit
* Consumer Price Index and major components

Related report:

The Consumer Price Index
This monthly release of the The Consumer Price Index (CPI) for Canada, the provinces, Whitehorse and Yellowknife, provides a descriptive summary of retail price movements, inflation rates and the factors underlying them. The CPI also contains the following tabular information: latest price index movements for the eight major components; price index changes on one and 12-month bases for an extensive number of components and groups; historical monthly information; and price indices reclassified according to categories of goods and services.
Click the link above, then "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

[ earlier editions of this report ]

Guide to the Consumer Price Index (1998)

Related subjects:
* Prices and price indexes
* Consumer price indexes


October 21, 2010
Employment Insurance, August 2010
In August, 671,200 people received regular Employment Insurance benefits, virtually unchanged from July.
- includes three tables:
* Employment Insurance: Statistics by province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by age group, sex, province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by census metropolitan areas

Related link:

Employment Insurance Statistics Maps, August 2010
- change in number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits in the last 12 months, by Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations.
(Intro to maps + link to August 2010 maps)

Related subjects
o Labour
o Employment insurance, social assistance and other transfers
o Non-wage benefits

[ earlier editions of this report ]


October 21, 2010
Leading indicators, September 2010
The composite leading index edged down 0.1% in September, its first decrease since April 2009. Half of the 10 components rose and half decreased. The housing index continued to post the largest declines.

Related subjects:
* Business performance and ownership
* Current conditions
* Economic accounts
* Leading indicators


October 20, 2010
Study: Neighbourhood variation in hospitalization for
unintentional injury among children and teenagers, 2001/2002 to 2004/2005

Children aged 9 and under living in lower-income urban neighbourhoods were more likely than those in higher-income neighbourhoods to be hospitalized for unintentional injuries between 2001/2002 and 2004/2005.

Findings
- includes links to several tables

Link to the article:
HTML
PDF - 484K, 10 pages)

Source:
Health Reports - product main page
Health Reports, published by the Health Analysis Division (HAD) of Statistics Canada, is a peer-reviewed journal of population health and health services research. It is designed for a broad audience that includes health professionals, researchers, policymakers, and through media coverage, the general public. The journal publishes articles of wide interest that contain original and timely analyses of national or provincial/territorial surveys or administrative databases.
- Click the product main page link, then "View" to read the latest issue or "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:

* Children and youth
* Health and well-being (youth)
* Health
* Diseases and health conditions
* Health care services


October 19, 2010
Canadian Social Trends - October 2010 online edition
The October 2010 online issue of Canadian Social Trends, released today, contains two articles.

The first article,
"Child care for First Nations children living off reserve, Métis children, and Inuit children"
[ HTML - PDF (134K, 11 pages) ]

... examines child care arrangements of First Nations living off reserve, Métis and Inuit children. It examines the availability of culturally-relevant activities and language in care as predictors of children's outcomes.

The second article, "Help with activities of daily living for people with a disability"
[ HTML - PDF (130K, 12 pages) ]

... examines how many people with disabilities receive help with activities of daily living, the type of activities with which they get help and the care receiver's relationship to the person or persons providing help. It also explores how these relationships change as the severity of the care receiver's disability increases.

NOTE:
The October 2010 issue of Canadian Social Trends also includes links to the following articles posted since June 2010:
* Sharing their lives: women, marital trends and education (September 9, 2010)
* Family, community, and Aboriginal language among young First Nations children living off reserve in Canada (September 9, 2010)
* Participation in sports and cultural activities among Aboriginal children and youth (July 13, 2010)
* Emigration from Canada to the United States from 2000 to 2006 (July 13, 2010)
* Migration from central to surrounding municipalities in Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver (June 8, 2010)
* Making fathers “count” (June 8, 2010)
* Foreign nationals working temporarily in Canada (June 8, 2010)


The Daily Archives
- select a month and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

---------------------------------

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm

9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - October 23

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
:

October 23, 2010

child care in the news
[This section features interesting and noteworthy
news about ECEC and related issues in Canada and internationally.]

Child care for First Nations children living off reserve, Metis children, and Inuit children
20 Oct 10 - Study for Statistics Canada describes cultural aspects within the care environment for First Nations children. Culturally relevant activities and language spoken in care were examined as predictors of children's outcomes.

The challenge of care: Early childhood education and care in Canada and Quebec
20 Oct 10 - Article from Studies in Political Economy uses Nancy Fraser's universal caregiver model to critique existing child care policies and services in Canada (including Quebec).

"Shorty List" website is sign of what's wrong with BC child care
20 Oct 10 - Article from Liberation Learning Project - a group that shares news and ideas for B.C.'s child care workers - provides a thoughtful commentary on a site that posts anonymous reviews of child care centres.

How does job-protected maternity leave affect mothers' employment and infant health?
20 Oct 10 - Working paper from the National Bureau of Economic Research provides evidence of the labor supply effects of leaves from an analysis of the introduction and expansion of job-protected maternity leave in Canada.

National child care often promised, still missing
13 Oct 10 - Chapter by Martha Friendly for CCPA's new book "Speaking Truth to Power" explains why Canadian women shouldn't be silent about the struggle for child care.

The Perry Preschool Study stands the test of time, but it doesn't stand alone
22 Sep 10 - In this post from the National Institute for Early Education Research's Preschool Today blog, Steve Barnett addresses the validity of some of the criticisms of the Perry Preschool Study.

more CC IN THE NEWS »

What's new online:
[This section archives documents that
have been featured on the CRRU homepage..]

· Paper debunks myths on women as leaders
[AU] 20 Oct 10

· Red-flagged as problem pupils, are boys misunderstood?
20 Oct 10

· Euro MP's back 20-week maternity leave plan
[EU] 20 Oct 10

· Focus on families
[CA] 19 Oct 10

· Speaker of the Assembly announces temporary childcare for the working poor
[US-CA] 19 Oct 10

· The endangered male teacher
[CA] 18 Oct 10

· Three out of 10 B.C kids on a path to failure
[CA-BC] 17 Oct 10

· Tory spending will force liberals to scale back on social programs plans
[CA] 14 Oct 10

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

October 22:
Working Families and Food Assistance
US Teen Birth Rates
State Budget and Human Services - Illinois
Haiti Cholera Outbreak
Unemployment Rate and Jobless Benefits

October 20:
Child Care Subsidies - California
Graduation Rates at Community Colleges - California
High School Graduation Rates for Black Males - Baltimore, MD

October 19:
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
Portland Press Herald Series on Maine Welfare-to-Work
Aging out of Foster Care
School Meal Programs - Washington, DC

October 18:
Poverty and Culture
Poverty Measurement and the Elderly - California
Poverty Rate - Israel

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

11. [U.S.] The 'Culture of Poverty' moves to the suburbs - October 7-20
(Various articles, from The Scout Report)

[U.S.] Poverty in the news:

The 'Culture of Poverty' moves to the suburbs,
reviving old problems and generating new complications

Poverty in the suburbs: Mortgage or food
October 14, 2010
http://www.economist.com/node/17257857?story_id=17257857&fsrc=rss

How Important Is Economic Diversity in Schools?
October 18, 2010
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=130647610

Poorest school districts get least-qualified teachers; affluent districts get the best, survey finds
October 18, 2010
http://www.star-telegram.com/2010/10/18/2556603/poorest-school-districts-get-least.html

A Culture of Poverty
October 20, 2010
http://www.theatlantic.com/personal/archive/2010/10/a-culture-of-poverty/64854/

Reconsidering the 'Culture of Poverty'
October 20, 2010
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=130701401

The Great Recession and Poverty in Metropolitan America
October 7, 2010
http://www.brookings.edu/papers/2010/1007_suburban_poverty_acs_kneebone.aspx

For much of America's history, urban areas contained the lion's share of the country's poor, an image reinforced by popular media depictions in film, television, and evening news reports. Recent news reports from the New York Times and The Economist would seem to indicate that suburban areas have larger numbers of poor people, and many are finding it hard to locate adequate social services, food banks, and other resources. This news drew on two new reports from the Brookings Institution, which found that the number of poor people in the suburbs has increased 37.4% over the past decade. Also, these findings come on the heels of a renewed discussion regarding the so-called "culture of poverty". When it was on the front page of policy discussions forty years ago, many politicians (including the late Daniel Patrick Moynihan) argued that there was in fact a unique set of cultural values and practices held by the poor that made it difficult, if not impossible, to make the transition out of poverty. As policy-makers continue to confront the shifting geography of poverty, all of these issues will require sustained conversation and significant soul-searching. [KMG]

The first link will take users to a news article from [the latest issue of] The Economist which reports on growing suburban poverty trends, with particular attention to the city of Freeport on Long Island. The second link leads to a related piece from National Public Radio which talks about the performance of low-income students in schools with greater economic diversity. The third link leads to a timely story from this Monday's Fort Worth Star-Telegram which talks about a study that shows that less affluent areas (and as a result, school districts) often have the least-qualified teachers. Moving on, visitors will find a thoughtful piece by Ta-Nehisi Coates of The Atlantic where he ruminates on his own experiences with the culture of poverty and related matters. The fifth link leads to an excellent discussion on the culture of poverty with Patricia Cohen of the New York Times and Professor Sudhir Venkatesh of Columbia University. The final link leads to the two aforementioned reports from the Brookings Institution, and visitors with an interest in this type of social transformation will want to give both of them a closer look.
Source:
From The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2010.
http://scout.wisc.edu/

12. [U.S.] And the poor get poorer - October 21
(Center on Budget and Policy Priorities)

Tax Data Show Richest 1 Percent Took
a Hit in 2008, But Income Remained
Highly Concentrated at the Top
Recent Gains of Bottom 90 Percent Wiped Out

October 21, 2010

By Hannah Shaw and Chad Stone
“The average income of the top 1 percent of households fell by 20 percent from 2007 to 2008, after adjusting for inflation, wiping out almost half of the gains this group achieved between 2002 and 2007.
“The average income of the bottom 90 percent of households fell 7 percent from 2007 to 2008, in inflation-adjusted dollars, the largest one-year drop for this group since 1938. The loss in 2008 more than wiped out the increase from 2002 to 2007, leaving the average income for the bottom 90 percent of households at its lowest level since 1996.”

View the full report:
HTML : http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3309
PDF : http://www.cbpp.org/files/10-21-10inc.pdf
(4pp.)

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals.

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

13. Australian Policy Online - selected recent content (October 23)
--- A guide for using statistics for evidence based policy, 2010
--- Removing poverty traps in the tax transfer system

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia.
[ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week (see below)
appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page.

---

Week ending October 23, 2010
Most viewed this week on APO:

1. Communications Policy and Research Forum 2009
2. Electronic information security
3. A guide for using statistics for evidence based policy, 2010
4. Arts and culture in Australia: a statistical overview, 2010
5. Snapshot 2010: Children and young people in Queensland

[You'll find links to the above studies on the APO home page.]

-------------------------------------------------------

New Research : Social Policy
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social Inclusion * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

Week ending October 23, 2010
Most viewed this week in the Social Policy area:

1. A guide for using statistics for evidence based policy, 2010
2. Snapshot 2010: Children and young people in Queensland
3. Removing poverty traps in the tax transfer system
4. Water management partnerships: Report on performance 2009
5. Teens and social media

[You'll find links to the above studies on the APO Social Policy page.]

--------------

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

14. CRINMAIL
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
:

Latest issue of CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter):

20 October 2010, CRINMAIL issue 1197
In this issue:
Ending the inhuman sentencing of children
Latest News and Report
--- The future for Europe's children
--- Ending corporal punishment: Mozambique
--- Children ordained as monks: Sri Lanka
--- Children's rights violated: Austria
--- Recent Events
--- Upcoming Events
- Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Laws * Issues
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

------------------------------------------

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL
- links to hundreds of weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.
NOTE: see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm for the table of contents for, and links to, several months' worth of issues of CRINMAIL.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

 


 

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------------------------

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The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
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Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

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Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com


***********************************

Two New Elements
for the Periodic Chart

***********************************


Element: WOMAN

Symbol: Wo

Atomic Weight: 120 (more or less, usually more)

Physical Properties: Generally round in form. Boils at nothing and may freeze anytime. Melts whenever treated properly. Very bitter if not used well.

Chemical Properties: Very active. Highly unstable. Possesses strong affinity to gold, silver, platinum, and precious stones. Able to absorb great amounts of exotic food. Turns slightly green when placed next to a better specimen. Ages rapidly.

Usage: Highly ornamental. An extremely good catalyst for dispersion of wealth. Probably the most powerful income reducing agent known.

Caution: Highly explosive in inexperienced hands.


*********************


Element: MAN

Symbol: XY

Atomic Weight: 180+/-100

Physical Properties: Solid at room temperature but gets bent out of shape. Fairly dense and sometimes flaky. Difficult to find a pure sample. Due to rust, aging samples are unable to conduct electricity as easily as young fresh samples.

Chemical Properties: Attempts to bond with Wo any chance it can get. Also, tends to form strong bonds with itself. Becomes explosive when mixed with Kd (element Kid) for prolonged period of time. Pretty basic. Neutralize by saturating with alcohol.

Usage: None really, except methane production. Good samples are able to produce large quantities on command.

Caution: In the absence of Wo, this element rapidly decomposes and begins to smell.

Source:
http://www.c4vct.com/kym/humor/index.htm


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<>How good are YOUR
powers of observation?


Twenty-five questions about things we* see every day.
(*...although it helps to be American for a few questions - you'll see...)

1. Click the link below (requires Flash)
http://www.oldjoeblack.0nyx.com/thinktst.htm

2. Click "sound" in the bottom right-hand corner of the little screen  to disable the stupid soundtrack.
(Or else I promise you'll be hitting your computer's Mute button within the first 30 seconds!)

3. Complete the questionnaire.

I scored 16.
So beat me.


-----------------------

And, in closing...

-----------------------


ROFL!
Kitty lovers must watch this video:

An Engineer's Guide to Cats
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHXBL6bzAR4
Post-modern cardboard deconstruction, cat yodeling and much more...
[No humans were harmed in the making of this film clip.]

-------

Tilt-Shift Concert Video

If you enjoy seeing tilt-shift photography as much as I do
[ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tilt-shift_photography ]
...you'll be mesmerized as I was watching the video below of an open-air concert event. It's not about the concert itself, but rather the thousands of people arriving, setting up tents, milling about, then the evening concert crowd, and then the dénouement. The weekend event was shot in tilt-shift style and all compressed into
four minutes.
Trippy.


Tilt-shift Concert Weekend
(video,  4:09)
Take one open-air concert weekend.
Record a tilt-shift  video of the crowd of thousands, arriving, enjoying and leaving.
Instant hit!


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Oddee.com
http://oddee.com/
- A Blog on Oddities: the odd, bizarre and strange things of our world