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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
July 25, 2010

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,305 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

************************************************************************

IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. HANDS OFF THE CENSUS LONG FORM QUESTIONNAIRE: Act III, scene 1
--- Census Watch - List of organizations AGAINST and SUPPORTING Stephen Harper
---
Uses of Census Long-form data – Question Justification - July 19
--- StatsCan head quits over census dispute
- July 21
--- Full text of Munir Sheikh's resignation letter
--- Statistics Shuffle (video : the Census questionnaire debate) - July 19
---
Building a Knowledge Infrastructure to Support Place-Based Policy - March 2010
--- John Campey and the Data Hounds say Count Me In!
--- More media coverage...
2.  New/Recent from the Caledon Institute of Social Policy:
--- Reconstructing Social Assistance in New Brunswick: Vision and Action - July 2010
--- Breaking down the welfare wall in New Brunswick - March 2010

3. Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2007 (Federal-Provincial-Territorial Directors of Income Support) - Posted July 15

4. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---Consumer Price Index, June 2010 - July 23
--- Employment Insurance, May 2010 - July 22
--- Study: Labour market activity among seniors, 1981 to 2006 - July 21
--- Study: Health-promoting factors and good health among Canadians in mid- to late life, 2009 - July 21
--- Police-reported crime statistics, 2009 - July 20
--- Mortality, Summary List of Causes, 2006 - July 19

5. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit  - July 25

International content

6. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
7. [United Kingdom] Allocating social housing: opportunities and challenges (Chartered Institute of Housing) - July 2010
8. Hong Kong passes its first-ever minimum wage law (Globe and Mail) - July 17
9. Australian Policy Online - recent content
10. CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter)


Have a great week!
Gilles

[ gilseg@rogers.com ]


Daily media scan
for social researchers
450+ links as at July 23/10!!
Ontario / Canada / International

By Jennefer Laidley
[ Income Security Advocacy Centre - Toronto ]

1. HANDS OFF THE CENSUS LONG FORM QUESTIONNAIRE: Act III, scene 1
--- Census Watch - List of organizations AGAINST and SUPPORTING Stephen Harper
---
Uses of Census Long-form data – Question Justification - July 19
--- StatsCan head quits over census dispute
- July 21
--- Full text of Munir Sheikh's resignation letter
--- Statistics Shuffle (video : the Census questionnaire debate) - July 19
---
Building a Knowledge Infrastructure to Support Place-Based Policy - March 2010
--- John Campey and the Data Hounds say Count Me In!
--- More media coverage...

-----------------------------
How low can you go??
Having unsuccessfully tried the Hogan's Heroes defence ,
Stephen Harper and Tony Clement decide to try the
What's-the-matter-Lassie-is-Timmy-stuck-in-the-abandoned-mine

diversion.
<Seriously, well done!>

-----------------------------

NOTE: The 2011 Census questionnaire section of the Statistical links page was becoming so large that it made sense to create a special page for links to resources on this issue:
- Go to the Census 2011 questionnaire links links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/2011_census_questionnaire.htm

(145+ links as at July 25/10)
NOTE: the link above includes all of the content that's above the next red horizontal bar below.

---


Census Watch

List of Organizations AGAINST and SUPPORTING the Government’s Position on the cancellation of the Long Form of the 2011 Census.

As at July 24, there are 164 organizations against the Harper
government's position and 4 in support of the government's position.

Source:
datalibre.ca
datalibre.ca is a blog, inspired by civicaccess.ca, which believes all levels of Canadian governments should make civic information and data accessible at no cost in open formats to their citizens.

-------------
See also:

Census 2011 questionnaire links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/2011_census_questionnaire.htm

---


Uses of Census Long-form data – Question Justification

July 19, 2010
By Tracey Lauriault
As part of her PhD dissertation research, Tracey Lauriault has been investigating the Census of Canada right back to 1871. This post to the datalibre.ca blog is a summary list of 36 questions on the long form [ See 2006 Census questionnaires and guides ] and the rationale for including each one in the Census.
Clear rebuttals to Tony Clement's speaking points!
Two examples:
Why does government need to know the number of bedrooms in your home?
Because It helps to evaluate overcrowding, dwelling size, housing condition and quality of life.
Why does government need to know how you get to work each day?
To help plan urban growth and transportation networks, environmental impact and energy consumption with transportation

Source:
datalibre.ca

---

Stats crash at the corner of ideology and reason
Munir Sheikh had no choice but to resign as head of Statistics Canada
By Jeffrey Simpson
July 23, 2010
(...) The Statistics Canada fight is not the usual clash of competing political visions, of left against right, of Conservatives against progressives. Rather, this is a fight about rational decision-making that requires the best fact-based evidence available against a reliance on ideological nostrums that scorn facts and reason when they stand in the way of those nostrums.
Source:
Globe and Mail

---


My two cents' worth (by Gilles):
July 23/25, 2010

Notwithstanding the resignation on principle of the respected head of Statistics Canada on July 21 (Bravo, Mr. Sheikh!), Industry Minister Tony Clement won't back down on "his" Census 2011 long-form decision (CBC, July 22). According to the CBC article, Minister Clement doesn't personally consider long-form questionnaires intrusive, but he says he wants to be respectful of Canadians who *do* have a problem disclosing their personal information to the government. He said he's heard from "Canadians who are concerned about other questions, like whether someone in the household has a mental or physical incapacity, they're concerned about questions about the characteristics of their commute to work."
[Never mind the fact that the information, stripped of all personal identifiers, would be used by organizations planning the delivery of home care services for aged people and those living at home with a disability and by city transit planners to improve the public transit service in the neighbourhood. Just to use the two same examples from Minister Clement's statement...]

C'mon, really?
The government's own privacy watchdog agency has received a mere handful of complaints over the years from people fundamentally opposed to divulging any personal information to government. Minister Clement would diminish the value of the Census to appease a handful of people?
Really?
Only Statistics Canada employees are allowed to see and work with information collected via the long form questionnaire. Those employees must take an oath not to share this information, under penalty of a fine and/or imprisonment. As one media analyst observed, StatCan is interested in information about you not as an individual but as part of a sample for use in planning community and social services, health services, education services, and so much more.

Here's a face-saving solution* for Mr. Harper:

Minister Clement is in England on ministerial business, right? (see the CBC article above)
He's the person who ended up with egg on his face when Munir Sheikh said categorically that a voluntary survey cannot become a substitute for a mandatory census. In the absence of the Minister responsible, Mr. Harper could simply respond to this twist in the story by declaring the questionnaire switch null and void because the options presented by StatCan were in fact not all viable options, or some such crap.

Minister Clement has stated that "[T]here's not a micron of difference of opinion between myself and the prime minister on this.,"
Of course not - right after the prime minister took him aside and read him the riot act.

------------------------------

* JULY 25 UPDATE:
Having unsuccessfully tried the Hogan's Heroes defence ,
Stephen Harper and Tony Clement decide to resort to the
What's-the-matter-Lassie-is-Timmy-stuck-in-the-abandoned-mine

diversion.
<Seriously, well done!>

--------------------------------------------------------------------

When Smart Parties Make Stupid Decisions
By Paul Saurette Associate Professor of Political Studies, University of Ottawa
July 23, 2010
The Harper government's decision to make the long-form census voluntary is terrible policy, but there is method in their madness.
(...) One of the core beliefs of many conservative intellectuals and activists is that decades of Liberal dominance in Ottawa has created an octopus-like configuration of arms-length organizations with mandates to mine statistical data (much of it collected by StatsCan) to discover inequalities and other structural patterns, and then to lobby the government and Canadian society to reduce these inequalities through social programs. This drives many conservatives up the wall for many reasons...
(...) Many argue that changing the census policy is simply an example of the government acting the bully – arbitrarily enforcing bad policy because they are too short-sighted and stubborn to appreciate the consequences of this policy. Nothing could be farther from the truth. Rather than underestimating the importance and impact of this policy, the government understands precisely the central role this change has in their long-term goal of cultivating a very different political culture in Canada.
Source:
The Mark - "The people and ideas behind the headlines"
COMMENT: This is one Hell of a scary analysis.

--------------------------------------------------------------------

The 2006 questionnaires:

* The short census questionnaire (PDF - 5K, 3 pages)
*
The long census questionnaire (PDF - 1MB, 40 pages)
Source:
2006 Census questionnaires and guides
[ Census of Canada ]
[ Statistics Canada ]

--------------------------------------------------------------------

StatsCan head quits over census dispute
July 21, 2010
Munir Sheikh, the head of Statistics Canada, resigned Wednesday over the federal government's decision to scrap the mandatory long-form census. "I want to take this opportunity to comment on a technical statistical issue which has become the subject of media discussion. This relates to the question of whether a voluntary survey can become a substitute for a mandatory census," Sheikh said in a release. "It cannot," he said. "Under the circumstances, I have tendered my resignation to the prime minister."
Source:
CBC News

-------------

Thank you Munir Sheikh
July 22, 2010
By Tracey Lauriault
Our Chief Statistician Resigned Yesterday. A first for Canada.
Full text of Munir Sheikh's resignation letter, which was posted briefly on the Statistics Canada website until Steve made them take it down.
Source:
datalibre.ca

-------------

Thanks for that, Mr. Sheikh.
You are a man of integrity, and a true public servant.

Related link:

Statistics Shuffle (video)
["SYCOPHANCY" : See "Fraser Institute"]
July 19, 2010
Major changes to census collection in our country has [sic] many groups concerned, including here in Alberta. Instead of a mandatory long-form census the federal government will now supply a shorter, voluntary form. The feds say they're responding to complaints that the census infringes on privacy rights, critics say the information collected is vital for health care, our economy and for long term municipal planning. How critical is census information? Will the quality and usability of the information suffer? And how will you be impacted? Joining us for this conversation are Niels Veldhuis, director of fiscal studies at the Fraser Institute and Derek Cook, a research and social planner with the city of Calgary.
Source:
Alberta Prime Time
[ CTV Globemedia ]
NOTE: My reference to The Fraser's servile flattery is deserved, IMHO.
At last count, it was Stephen Harper and the Fraser Institute vs. the rest of the frikkin' country.
[Where's, oh where, is Marge Princess Warrior when we need her??]

--------------------------------------------------------------------

Also from Derek Cook
of the City of Calgary:

Donec Prohibiti, Procidite*:
Building a Knowledge Infrastructure to Support Place-Based Policy
Derek Cook
March 2010
The author of this article in the March 2010 issue of the Policy Research Initiative's Horizons magazine contends that the Harper government's decision to replace the long form Census questionnaire is completely at odds with the recent direction of Statscan and the data user community. The article discusses a developing partnership with Statscan over recent years that is incongruent with the new direction set down by the ruling Conservative party.
The article speaks about some recent work of the Community Social Data Strategy and the Quality of Life Reporting System on the joint development of the Municipal and Community Data Access Initiative. "Through these initiatives, communities work collaboratively with Statistics Canada to increase access to information and more effectively engage with senior orders of government."
[* Donec prohibiti, procidite = "proceed until apprehended"]

Source:
Sustainable Places
Horizons, March 2010 <=== click for links to 15 more articles on place-based sustainable development
(Volume 10 Number 4)
[ Sustainable Development Research and Analysis ]
[ Policy Research Initiative
The Policy Research Initiative (PRI) is a policy research organization for the whole of the federal government specialized in early stage work on issues involving several federal departments. The PRI bridges the span between the policy research community inside and outside of government and the policy development community within government on issues... ]

--------------------------------------------------------------------

Creating Harper Hysteria (note the comment about a “lame protest song”):
http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2010/07/21/kevin-libin-census-move-provokes-harper-hysteria/

The not-so-lame-at-all protest song:

John Campey
and the Data Hounds
say Count Me In!
(YouTube video)

--------------------------------------------------------------------

Latest Census-related news from the
Canadian Council on Social Development (CCSD):
[Click the link above to access the content below.]
*
Ottawa city council voted to petition the federal government to keep the long census form mandatory [July 21, 2010]
*
Read the growing list of organizations opposed to the census changes [July 21, 2010]
*
Surprising coalition of leaders seek a meeting with Industry Minister, Tony Clement, regarding the Census - read the letter [July 19, 2010]
*
Keeping Canadians in the Dark - Harper's decision to scrap the Long Form Census [July 13, 2010]
*
Several publications lash out at Harper's census decision, including:
---
Family History for Beginners
--- Toronto Star: Tories eliminate compulsory long census form
--- Macleans: Alarm on cuts to detailed census questionnaire spreads to business groups
--- The Montreal Gazette: Census overhaul rethought Historians, genealogists raised outcry
--- Social Policy in Ontario: Wrong move on census
--- Datalibre.ca: 2011 Census severely slashed
--- MaCleans: Former StatsCan head slams census decision by Tories
--- Don't count on long census data: Tories scrub mandatory form
--- Languages watchdog to probe census change
*
Sign the Declaration of the Voices-Voix Coalition [July 12, 2010]
*
Changes to the 2011 Census questionnaire - Letter to the Minister of Industry [July 5, 2010]
*
Government tries to undermining free expression & human rights - Contribute Your Viewpoint [June 17, 2010]
Source:
Canadian Council on Social Development
The Canadian Council on Social Development (CCSD) is a non-governmental, not-for-profit organization, which was founded in 1920. Our mission is to develop and promote progressive social policies inspired by social justice, equality and the empowerment of individuals and communities.

--------------------------------------------------------------------

From the
Caledon Institute of Social Policy:

Information Blackout (PDF - 30K, 1 page)
Letter to the editor in the Globe and Mail on July 9, 2010
By Ken Battle, Sherri Torjman and Michael Mendelson
(...) In 2011, the federal government will not be mounting the Participation and Activity Limitation Survey, the major source of national information on persons with disabilities.
(...) Social Security Statistics: Canada and Provinces is another treasure trove that has quietly bit the dust: It has not been updated since 2002-03. Data on program beneficiaries and expenditures is essential for policy planning and cost estimates.
Cuts to national sources of information are a form of social policy by stealth.
They are made quietly under the radar screen but their impact can be irreparable.

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy

NOTE: For more detailed information about Social Security Statistics: Canada and Provinces, see
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/personal.htm (almost halfway down the page)

----------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Latest media coverage of the Census questionnaire issue:

July 22, 2010

From:
Jennefer Laidley
Interim Research and Policy Analyst
Income Security Advocacy Centre (ISAC)

ISAC website:
www.incomesecurity.org

ISAC's Social Assistance Review website:
www.sareview.ca

-------------------------------------------------------------------
-------------------------------------------------------------------

You may wish to vote on the Census question.
T here are currently a couple of polls, one on the Globe site and one on the CBC:

1) http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/glob e-online-poll-census/article1648059/
2) http://www.cbc.ca/news/pointofview/2010/ 07/census-is-it-an-invasion-of-privacy.html

-------------------------------------------------------------------
-------------------------------------------------------------------

The Census:

Perhaps the biggest news is the resignation of the Chief Statistician, Munir Sheikh:

CBC:
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/story/2010/07/21/statistics-canada-quits.html

Globe:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/statistics-canada-chief-falls-on-sword-over-census/article1647348/

Star:
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/census/article/838401--statscan-chief-quits-over-census-furor

Post:
http://www.nationalpost.com/StatsCan+boss+resigns+over+changes+long+form+census/3305442/story.html

On the implications:

Spector:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/spector-vision/the-inconvenient-truth-in-mr-sheikhs-resignation/article1648067/

Ibbitson:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/john-ibbitson/long-or-short-tories-must-retreat-on-the-census/article1648011/

GREAT column from Travers:
http://www.thestar.com/printarticle/838589

Globe editorial:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/opinions/editorials/federal-statistical-folly-in-full-view/article1647903/

The Opposition parties are calling for a reversal of the decision:

CBC:
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/story/2010/07/22/statscan-census-tories-.html

Globe:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/ottawa-notebook/opposition-vents-spleen-over-tory-census-bungling/article1648350/

Post:
http://www.nationalpost.com/Tories+grilled+over+census+changes/3309773/story.html

But there has been all kinds of other coverage of this issue over the last two days – far too much for me to include here (I can’t keep up!). But here are a few juicy ones:

The history of Canada ’s 345-year-old Census:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/a-history-of-counting-canadians/article1647613/

Ten ways the Census affects regular Canadians:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/ten-ways-the-census-could-affect-you/article1646825/

Tony Clement gives his reasoning:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/ottawa-notebook/tony-clement-clears-the-air-on-census/article1647055/

Carol Goar on the alienation of voters:
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/838087--goar-busy-tony-clement-is-alienating-voters

Decision gets a drubbing in Quebec :
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/survey-says-census-plans-crash-and-burn-in-quebec/article1647660/

Provinces not pleased:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/provinces-rally-against-ottawa-as-anger-over-census-mounts/article1646827/

Neither is Toronto Planning:
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/toronto/story/2010/07/22/toronto-long-census545.html

Creating Harper Hysteria (note the comment about a “lame protest song”):
http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2010/07/21/kevin-libin-census-move-provokes-harper-hysteria/

Here’s that “lame protest song”, by the way, which has been featured in most major media for the last couple of days:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HThxOTtWNR0&feature=related

----------------------

- Go to the Census 2011 questionnaire links links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/2011_census_questionnaire.htm

2. New/Recent from the Caledon Institute of Social Policy:
--- Reconstructing Social Assistance in New Brunswick: Vision and Action - July 2010
--- Breaking down the welfare wall in New Brunswick - March 2010

New from the
Caledon Institute of Social Policy:

Reconstructing Social Assistance in New Brunswick: Vision and Action (PDF - 77K, 19 pages)
By Ken Battle, Michael Mendelson, Sherri Torjman
July 2010
The Government of New Brunswick has launched a comprehensive reform of its social assistance system as a key element of its poverty reduction strategy. This report contains two papers. The first is a vision paper written for New Brunswick by the Caledon Institute that sets out a philosophy and key elements of reform. The second is an account of New Brunswick's plans and actions to implement the vision for reform.

-------

Breaking down the welfare wall in New Brunswick (PDF - 34K, 2 pages)
March 2010
By Ken Battle, Sherri Torjman and Michael Mendelson
[ Version française : Briser le mur de l'aide sociale (PDF)]
This op ed was published as a Globe and Mail online commentary. It points out that one of the most promising developments in Canadian social policy is the rise of provincial poverty reduction plans. New Brunswick recently announced a comprehensive poverty reduction strategy, which includes fundamental reform of its social assistance system. The province is taking some important steps in this ambitious reform including the creation of a provincial working income supplement. New Brunswick will also extend the length of coverage under its health card for up to three years to recipients who leave welfare for work or training. It will launch a prescription drug program, plus vision and dental care for all low-income children. The op ed highlights other needed reforms, such as a boost to the New Brunswick Child Tax Benefit.

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
Established in 1992, the Caledon Institute of Social Policy is a social policy think tank. - a private, nonprofit organization with charitable status. It is supported primarily by the Maytree Foundation, located in Toronto.

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the New Brunswick Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nbkmrk.htm

3. Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2007 - Posted July 15
(
Federal-Provincial-Territorial Directors of Income Support)

Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2007
Posted online July 15, 2010
Prepared by:
Federal-Provincial-Territorial Directors of Income Support
"
In recognition of the growing public demand for comprehensive information on provincial and territorial social assistance programs and caseloads, the Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2007 is the fourth annual joint publication by federal, provincial and territorial governments. The report provides a general overview of social assistance in Canada, as well as a description of income support-related/social assistance programs in each jurisdiction. This report does not include social assistance rates as this information is currently available to the public on most provincial and territorial government Web sites."
(Excerpt from Chapter 1 - Summary)

NOTE: Chapter Two of the report is a six-page descriptive overview of social assistance in Canada in 2006-2007, comprising a (very) brief history of federal social assistance since 1966 and general information about welfare eligibility and benefits. Other chapters of the report provide, for each province and territory, information on eligibility (including asset and income exemption levels) and benefits, as well as an impressive number of statistical tables, graphs and charts providing numbers of cases and beneficiaries (time series statistics going back as far as the mid-1990s, depending on the jurisdiction), profile information (age/education/sex of household head, cases by reason for assistance) and even (for most jurisdictions) the percentage of households reporting income.

Complete report
in one PDF file
- (751K, 129 pages)

Links to the three earlier editions of this report:
* Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2006
*
Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2005

*
Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2004

Source:
Social Policy

[ Human Resources and Skills Development Canada ]

< Begin social researcher's lament. >

It's great to see the 2007 edition of this report online, but the numbers in this report *are* over three years old --- none of the welfare ripple effects of the economic disaster of 2008 and 2009 are evident in the (March 2007) stats in this report. This really isn't timely enough to help in the policy formulation process, nor is it timely enough to ensure accountability with respect to spending by federal, provincial and territorial governments on Canada's social assistance programs.

So why are timely welfare statistics important?
To tell us, among other things, how many new welfare cases are "EI exhaustees" (households whose Employment Insurance benefit period has expired) and how many are there because they didn't qualify for EI in the first place. Welfare reporting must be comprehensive AND reasonably current.
Perhaps it's time to farm out the production of welfare statistics and related information to an objective, non-politicized third party...

< /End social researcher's lament. >

- Go to the Social Statistics Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm
- Go to the Key Provincial/Territorial Welfare Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare.htm

4. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---Consumer Price Index, June 2010 - July 23
--- Employment Insurance, May 2010 - July 22
---
Study: Labour market activity among seniors, 1981 to 2006 - July 21
--- Study: Health-promoting factors and good health among Canadians in mid- to late life, 2009 - July 21
--- Police-reported crime statistics, 2009 - July 20
--- Mortality, Summary List of Causes, 2006 - July 19

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

July 23, 2010
Consumer Price Index, June 2010
Consumer prices rose 1.0% in the 12 months to June, following a 1.4% increase in May. On a seasonally adjusted monthly basis, consumer prices fell 0.2% in June, the same rate of decrease as May.
- includes links to three tables:
* Consumer Price Index and major components, Canada
* Consumer Price Index by province, and for Whitehorse, Yellowknife and Iqaluit
* Consumer Price Index and major components

Related reports:

The Consumer Price Index, June 2010
PDF version (522 K, 67 pages)
HTML version - Table of contents with links to each of the following sections of the report:
1. Highlights 2. Briefing notes 3. Analysis 4. Tables 5. Charts 6. Data quality, concepts and methodology 7. Appendices 8. User information 9. Related products

[ earlier editions of this report ]

Guide to the Consumer Price Index (1998)

Related subjects:
* Prices and price indexes
* Consumer price indexes

---

July 22, 2010
Employment Insurance, May 2010
The number of regular Employment Insurance beneficiaries increased for the first time in eight months, rising by 8,600 to 680,100 in May.
- includes three tables:
* Employment Insurance: Statistics by province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by age group, sex, province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by census metropolitan areas

Employment Insurance Statistics Maps, May 2010
- set of maps presenting the number of regular Employment Insurance beneficiaries. These maps complete the analysis published simultaneously in The Daily. The maps show the percentage change in number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits in the last 12 months, by Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) and Census Agglomerations (CAs).

Related subjects
o Labour
o Employment insurance, social assistance and other transfers
o Non-wage benefits

[ earlier editions of this report ]

Related link:

More Unemployment = More EI
Posted by Erin Weir
July 22, 2010
For the first time in eight months, the number of Employment Insurance (EI) recipients increased in May. We already knew from the Labour Force Survey that unemployment had increased by just over 8,000 in May. It is good news that EI expanded by the same amount because it implies that those who became unemployed that month received benefits. However, it is worth emphasizing that this EI expansion reflects worsening unemployment in May as opposed to a policy decision to improve the program. Unfortunately, EI has dropped off the Canadian political agenda.
Source:
Relentlessly Progressive Economics Blog
[ The Progressive Economics Forum ]

---

July 21, 2010
Study: Labour market activity among seniors, 1981 to 2006
Between 1996 and 2006, the employment rate for seniors age 65 and older increased from 12% to 15% for men, and from 4% to 6% for women. These increases followed declines during the 1980s and 1990s.

Related article:

Labour market activity among seniors
HTML version
PDF version
(175K, 14 pages)

Related subjects:

* Labour
* Work transitions and life stages
* Seniors
* Work and retirement

---

July 21, 2010
Study: Health-promoting factors and good health among Canadians in mid- to late life, 2009
A sizeable proportion of people aged 45 or older reported that they were in good health in 2009, based on their self-perceived general and mental health, as well as on measures of functional ability and independence in their daily life.
Summary of key findings

Full text of article:
HTML version
PDF version
(969K, 10 pages)

Related subjects:

* Health
* Lifestyle and social conditions
* Population and demography
* Population aging
* Seniors
* Health and disability among seniors

---

July 20, 2010
Police-reported crime statistics, 2009
Police-reported crime in Canada continues to decline. Both the volume and severity of police-reported crime fell in 2009, continuing the downward trend seen over the past decade.

----------------------------------
And yet:
http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/canada/prison-construction-costs-to-jump-87099482.html
The increase in prison construction costs make sense to me now.
NOT.
----------

Related subjects:

* Crime and justice
* Crimes and offences

More Police-reported crime statistics
from the Summer 2010 issue of Juristat

---

July 19, 2010
Mortality, Summary List of Causes, 2006
1. Introduction
2. Highlights
3. Tables
4. Data quality, concepts and methodology
5. Appendices
6. User information
7. Related products
8. PDF version (1MB, 124 pages)

[ earlier editions of this report ]

---

The Daily Archives
- select a month and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

---------------------------------

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

5. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - July 25

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
:

July 25, 2010

What's new online:

[This section archives documents that
have been featured on the CRRU homepage..]

The nanny business 21 Jul 10 - Global News' Currents documentary series investigates the Live-in Caregiver program; finds cheating, abuse and mistreatment, as well as brave nannies, advocates and parents trying to force change.

Who cares? Assessing generosity and gender equality in parental leave policy designs in 21 countries
21 Jul 10
- Study examines parental leave in 21 high-income countries; finds Canada ranks 6th in generosity of leave, but 15th in the gender equality of the policy design.

A global perspective on happiness and fertility
21 Jul 10
- Working paper from the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research investigates the fertility-happiness association across 86 countries; compares results by welfare regime type.

Pascal's wager: From science to policy on early childhood development
21 Jul 10
- Commentary article from the Canadian Journal of Public Health discusses the potential of the Early Learning Advisor's report to lead to a comprehensive ECEC policy in Ontario.

Three approaches from Europe: Waldorf, Montessori, and Reggio Emilia
21 Jul 10
- Article from Early Childhood Research and Practice provides a comparative introduction to Waldorf, Montessori, and Reggio and highlights areas of similarity and contrast.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news:

[This section features interesting and noteworthy news
about ECEC and related issues in Canada and internationally.]

· Purchase of six additional childcare centres advances Edleun's growth strategy
[CA-AB] 21 Jul 10

· NZ parental leave 'middling'
[NZ] 20 Jul 10

· Letter to the editor re: Stony Day Care closure
[CA-AB] 20 Jul 10

· Raise the bar for day cares in Alberta
[CA-AB] 17 Jul 10

· Province does little to ease parents' child care dilemmas
[CA-AB] 17 Jul 10

· Upper Canada board, CUPE reach deal
[CA-ON] 17 Jul 10

· Parental happiness and the welfare state
[US] 6 Jul 10

more CC IN THE NEWS »

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Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

6. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

July 19:
Long-Term Unemployment in the US
HIV Infection Rates in High-Poverty U.S. Cities

July 20:
Low-Income Neighborhoods and Farmers Markets – Minneapolis, MN
Unemployment Rates Fall

July 21:
State Cuts to Home Care Programs
Food Stamps Benefits and Reductions in Other Aid-Indiana
Extension of Jobless Benefits
Social Welfare System – Germany
Mortgage Program For Unemployed Borrowers

July 22:
Aging Youth in Foster Care - Michigan
Rising Cost of Energy Bills – United Kingdom
Changes to Food Stamp Policy – Indiana
Economy Weakened
Increasing Homelessness – Australia
War on Poverty

July 23:
Bilingual Education Helps Children Progress - Vietnam
Minimum Wage Hike Causes Jobless Teens
Unemployment Rates on the Rise
Enrollment Encouraged in Low-Cost Health Care - Indiana

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

7. [United Kingdom] Allocating social housing: opportunities and challenges - July 2010
(Chartered Institute of Housing)

Allocating social housing:
opportunities and challenges
(PDF - 396K, 43 pages)
By John Thornhill
July 2010
Contents:
1. Summary of the challenges and options
2. What is social housing and what is it for?
3. What are the challenges to the way in which social housing is allocated?
4. How does social housing work in other countries? (Scandinavia, the U.S. and Germany only)
5. Options: rethinking allocations in a wider context
6. Aspirations for approaches to allocations
-------------------------------
(Excerpt from the Conclusion):
The election of a new coalition government in the UK ushers in an era of change and reform which will be significant for the housing sector. Many changes which will impact on the policies, priorities and structural landscape of allocations and access to housing can be expected.
Source:
Chartered Institute of Housing
The Chartered Institute of Housing (CIH) is the professional body for people involved in housing and
communities. We are a registered charity and not-for-profit organisation. We have a diverse and growing
membership of over 22,000 people – both in the public and private sectors – living and working in over 20
countries on five continents across the world. We exist to maximise the contribution that housing professionals
make to the wellbeing of communities.

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm
- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

8. Hong Kong passes its first-ever minimum wage law - July 17
(Globe and Mail)

Hong Kong passes first-ever minimum wage law
Rate could be at least $3 (U.S.) an hour in rare departure from financial hub’s free-market philosophy
July 17, 2010
Hong Kong passed its first-ever minimum-wage law Saturday, a rare departure from the wealthy Chinese financial hub's free-market philosophy. The move was hailed by union workers as a victory for the territory's underpaid working class.
No rate has yet been set, but it appears employers will be required to pay at least $3 (U.S.) an hour — well short of the rates in the West and low for one of the most expensive cities in the world. Thousands of foreign live-in domestic workers also will be excluded from the deal. But legislator and union organizer Lee Cheuk-yan said it was symbolic, showing that the city was saying “goodbye to shameful wages and embraced social justice for workers."

Source:
The Globe and Mail

- Go to the Government Social Research Links in Other Countries page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internat.htm

9. Australian Policy Online - recent content

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia.
[ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week
appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page.

-------------------------------------------------------

Week ending July 25, 2010
Most viewed this week on APO:

1. Tactics in a not-so-knife-edge election
2. Getting perspective on youth mental health
3. Commonwealth Indigenous budget bulletin - July 2010
4. Interventions early in school as a means to improve higher education outcomes for disadvantaged (particularly low SES) students
5. Climate change, food insecurity and chronic diseases

[You'll find these links on the APO home page.]

-------------------------------------------------------

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social Inclusion * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

Week ending July 25, 2010
Most viewed this week:

1. Getting perspective on youth mental health
2. Interventions early in school as a means to improve higher education outcomes for disadvantaged (particularly low SES) students
3. Mental health of young people, 2007
4. Marginalized youth, surveillance and public space
5. Sustaining families in challenging times

[You'll find these links on the APO Social Policy page.]

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

10. CRINMAIL
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
:

Latest issue of CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter):

21 July 2010, CRINMAIL issue 1184
* In this issue:
Editorial: Toolkit to support child care professionals
* Latest news and reports:
- CRC elections: getting strategic
- Ukraine: call to halt return to 'Soviet style' institutions
- Vatican: children's rights report 13 years overdue
- Corporal punishment: progress in Brazil, Bangladesh
- International AIDS conference
- Violence: Kazakhstan, Iraqi Kurdistan
- Latin America: Inter-American Commission, World Bank
- Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Laws * Issues * Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

------------------------------------------

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL
- links to hundreds of weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.
NOTE: see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm for the table of contents for, and links to, several months' worth of issues of CRINMAIL.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


 


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com



***************************

The Human Condition

***************************


The following observations of the human condition have been gleaned from
years of experience and research.  Shared with you for some additional
insight and enlightenment.


1. Part of a best friend's job should be to immediately clear your computer's cache if you die suddenly.
 
2.  Nothing sucks more than that moment during an argument when you realize you're wrong.
 
3. GoogleMaps really needs to start their directions on #5 --- I'm pretty sure I know how to get out of my neighborhood.
 
4. Bad decisions make good stories.
 
5. Can we all just agree to ignore whatever comes after Blue Ray? 
I don't want to have to restart my video collection...again.
 
6. I'm always slightly terrified when I exit out of Word and it asks me if I want to save any changes to my ten-page research paper that I swear I did not modify in any way.
 
5.  I hate when I just miss a call by the last ring (Hello?  Hello? Damn it!),
but when I immediately call back, it rings nine times and goes to voice mail. 
What did you do after I didn't answer?  Drop the phone and run away?

7.  We'd rather try to carry 10 plastic grocery bags in each hand than take 2 trips to bring groceries in from the car.

8.  I love the sense of camaraderie when an entire line of cars team up to prevent an A-hole from cutting in at the front. 
Stay strong, brothers and sisters!

9. Is it just me or do high school kids get dumber & dumber every year?

10. There's no worse feeling than that millisecond you're sure you are going to die after leaning your chair back a little too far.
 
11. As a driver, I hate pedestrians, and as a pedestrian, I hate drivers, but no matter what the mode of transportation, I always hate cyclists.
 
Source:
Email



----------------------------

And, in closing...

-----------------------


Should we give money to panhandlers?
http://www.homelesshub.ca/researchmatters/post/2010/07/22/Should-we-give-money-to-panhandlers.aspx
by Stephen Gaetz
July 22, 2010
The Government of Alberta has announced its intention to put forward a plan that encourages people to refrain from giving money to panhandlers, and instead to give those resources to agencies serving people who are homeless.
Source:
The Homeless Hub

http://www.homelesshub.ca/
[Gilles' comment: That's tokenism --- like Ottawa's millionaire mayor  Larry O'Brien converting a few obsolete parking meters into - get this - "Kindness Meters. " According to anecdotal reports, any money that's ever been collected from the meters is routinely  deposited into the City's general revenue account vs being earmarked for services for street people.]


Related link:
Reasons the Ottawa Kindness Meters were a Bad Idea

http://www.knitnut.net/2007/12/kindness-meters/
Source:
ZOOM
[ http://www.knitnut.net ]

-------------------------
-------------------------

Canonical list of Blonde jokes
http://www.yotta.com/rechumor/blond.txt
Sample:
Q: Why don't blondes have elevator jobs?
A: It takes them too long to learn the route.

-------------------------

Canonical list of  lawyer jokes
http://www.awpi.com/Combs/Humor/lawyers.html
Sample:
Q: Why won't sharks attack lawyers?
A: Professional courtesy.

-------------------------

Canonical list of  elephant jokes jokes
http://www.lanet.lv/users/judrups/Humor/canoneleph.html
Sample:
Getting anything done around here is like mating elephants.
It's done on a very high level.
There's a lot of stomping and screaming involved.
And it takes two years to get any results.

-------------------------

Canonical list of  redneck jokes
http://terhune.net/jokes/se10056.html
Sample:
You're probably a redneck if your dog and your wallet are both on chains.