Canadian Social Research Newsletter
September 25, 2011

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail alert for this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,471 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content


1.
Accountability begins at home, Mr. Harper (Ottawa Citizen) - September 23
2. Ontario minimum wage update
- September 23
3. SPENT (online "game") : Could YOU make it through the month on $1,000? (MarketWatch - Wall Street Journal) - September 23
4. 2011 Profile of Hunger in the Greater Toronto Area (Daily Bread Food Bank - Toronto) - September 2011
5. 2012 Federal Budget Submission: We need action on poverty (Canada Without Poverty) - September 22
6. Income Support for Persons With Disabilities [in Ontario, B.C and Alberta] (University of Calgary) - September 2011
7. Why even conservatives are worried about rising inequality (By Armine Yalnizyan in Progressive Economics Forum) - September 21
8. What’s Wrong With Harper’s Omnibus Crime Bill (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - September 20
9. The Ontario NDP Platform : Six Concerns (Nick Falvo in Progressive Economics Forum) - September 20
10. Taxing the rich may be fair, but it won’t fill the coffers (By Stephen Gordon in the Globe and Mail, September 19) + Rebuttal by Andrew Jackson in Progressive Economics Forum - September 22
11. Ontario Vote Compass (CBC News) - September 19
12. Schedule of upcoming provincial government elections in Canada
13. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- The financial well-being of the self-employed, 2009
---
Gambling 2011 - September 2011
--- Employment Insurance, July 2011 - September 22
--- Consumer Price Index, August 2011 - September 21
--- Leading Indicators, August 2011 - September 20
--- Study: Layoffs during the last three recessions, 1981 to 2010 - September 20
--- A Profile of Minority-language Students in Canada: Results from the Programme for International Student Assessment, 2009 - September 19
--- Trends in Registered Apprenticeship Training in Canada, 1991 to 2009 - September 19

14. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

15. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
16. American Income Equality Off the Rails- October 2010 (Malcom Gladwell on FORA.TV) + September 19 (2011) article ranking income inequality in the U.S. and other countries (The Atlantic)
17. The Best and Worst Places in the World for Women (Newsweek / The Daily Beast) - September 20
18. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

[ Go to Canadian Social Research Links Home Page ]



1. Accountability begins at home, Mr. Harper - September 23
(MarketWatch - Wall Street Journal)

Accountability begins at home
Editorial
September 23, 2011
Prime Minister Stephen Harper's use of the words "if it matters, measure it" at the United Nations this week has, understandably, raised some eyebrows at home. The comments, part of a speech on maternal health, came just as an essay by the former head of Statistics Canada criticizing the Conservative government's decision to cancel the mandatory long-form census was made public. Munir Sheikh, who resigned over the government's handling of the issue last year, had this to say in his essay: "No country can be among the league of civilized societies without intelligent policy development. And, intelligent policy development is not possible without good data."
Source:
Ottawa Citizen

Related links:

Ex-chief statistician picks apart cancellation of long census
By Heather Scoffield
September 20, 2011
OTTAWA—The federal government cancelled the long-form census with little heed to the consequences of its decision, according to a new first-hand account of the drama that unfolded a year ago. An essay by former chief statistician Munir Sheikh says the census decision has shaken Statistics Canada’s neutrality and independence, and put at risk the government’s own work in many areas.
Source:
Toronto Star

THE ESSAY:

Good Data and Intelligent Government:
New Directions for Intelligent Government in Canada
(full screen)
By Munir A. Sheikh
Excerpt from
the Concluding Remarks:
The census issue has put a pointer on the fact that the good outcomes cannot be taken for granted. This paper has provided a list of issues that should be dealt with, with some focused on the government and others at Statistics Canada.
[ NOTE: The essay also appears in the above Toronto Star article. Click "View in full screen".]

---

- Go to the Census 2011 questionnaire links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/2011_census_questionnaire.htm

2. Ontario minimum wage update - September 23

On September 23, 2011, a regular Canadian Social Research Links visitor notified me to say that I han't posted the latest information on the minimum wage in Ontario, dating back to February 2011. Below, you'll find a link to the Ontario Ministry of Labour news release dated Feb. 11 announcing a freeze for 2011 of Ontario's minimum wage levels. I've also updated the Minimum wage section of the Ontario Govenrment Links page of this website to include news releases for each of the annual increases for 2008 to 2010.

2011 Minimum Wage Rate Set - Highest of Canadian Provinces
McGuinty Government Striking the Right Balance
News Release
February 11, 2011
After seven consecutive increases, the Ontario minimum wage rate will remain at $10.25 per hour in 2011, the highest provincial minimum wage in Canada. The Ontario minimum wage has increased by 50 percent with annual increases in the last seven years. These increases outpaced inflation in part to make up for a nine year minimum wage freeze between 1995 and 2004.
Source:
News Releases
[ Ontario Ministry of Labour  ]

---

- Go to the Ontario Government Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm

3. SPENT (online "game") : Could YOU make it through the month on $1,000? - September 23
(MarketWatch - Wall Street Journal)

NOTE : Although this article and "game" are from the Wall Street Journal - which in itself is as shocking as the Conference Board of Canada decrying worsening income inequality in Canada - the concept is simple yet effective, and it applies to the U.S. as well as Canada and other countries.

Poverty isn’t just a game
Online game shows how tough it is without good options
September 23, 2011
NEW YORK— You’ve lost your job. You’ve lost your house. You’re down to your last $1,000. Can you make it through the month?
Jenny Nicholson is tired of hearing how the poor are poor because they make poor choices. Let’s see what kind of choices you make when it’s your turn to be flattened by the economy. That’s the idea behind Spent, an online game Nicholson created to challenge popular misconceptions about poverty. [Play it by clicking the link below.] So far, it’s been played more than a million times by people in 196 countries. And Nicholson is challenging every member of Congress to play it, too.
Source:
MarketWatch
[ Wall Street Journal ]

THE GAME:

SPENT - an interactive game that takes challenges participants to survive a typical month on $1,000 --- it's all about the choices you must make every day when you're living on the margin. The game took me about 10 minutes to finish, and I made it to day 30 before I ran out of money. I was reminded of an observation made by a presenter at a poverty conference a few years ago : "The money usually runs out before the month does."

---

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

4. 2011 Profile of Hunger in the Greater Toronto Area - September 2011
(Daily Bread Food Bank - Toronto)

Daily Bread food report says rents trump hunger
Study suggest 72% of clients' monthly income spent on housing

September 22, 2011
The majority of people relying on Toronto's Daily Bread Food Bank to feed themselves and their families are facing such high rental rates that they often have little money left over for food. So says a new report from the non-profit charitable organization, which has urged the provincial government to help fight hunger in the Greater Toronto Area. The Daily Bread Food Bank has released a report that says over 70 per cent of its clients can't afford food because their income is going towards housing.
Source:
CBC News

The Daily Bread Food Bank report:

Who's Hungry : Fighting Hunger
2011 Profile of Hunger in the Greater Toronto Area
(PDF - 1.6MB, 15 pages)
September 21, 2011
Unlike food, paying the rent every month is non-negotiable. The cost of housing is a key reason people go hungry and have to come to a food bank, regardless of any other circumstances...

Key findings in the 2011 report

Toronto Hunger Statistics, 2005 to 2011

Source:
Daily Bread Food Bank
The Daily Bread Food Bank is a non-profit, charitable organization that is fighting to end hunger in our communities. As Canada’s largest food bank, Daily Bread serves people through neighbourhood food banks and meal programs in approximately 170 member agencies

Related link:

From the
Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB)

OAFB's 2011 Election Ontario Priorities
The 2011 Ontario Provincial Election takes place on October 6th, 2011!
We need the Ontario government to address the root causes of hunger, and implement long-term sustainable solutions that will end hunger in our province and make food banks unnecessary!
Our top three issues and recommendations
to this year's provincial party candidates
:
We respectfully request your party to take action on the following three issues to help make fighting hunger in Ontario a priority:
Issue #1 – Food Bank Donation Tax Credit for Farmers
Issue #2 – Housing Benefit for Low-Income Tenants
Issue #3 – Access to Affordable, Nutritious Food

Source:
Ontario Association of Food Banks
The Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB) is a network of over 100 food banks from Windsor to Ottawa, and Thunder Bay to Niagara Falls. Since 1992, we have been committed to reducing hunger across the province

---

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

5. 2012 Federal Budget Submission: We need action on poverty - September 22
(Canada Without Poverty)

From Canada Without Poverty:

Federal budget submission: We need action on poverty
September 22, 2011
[ Version française (fichier PDF - 140K, 3 pages) ]

Canada Without Poverty today publicly released its 2012 Pre-budget Submission to the House of Commons Finance Committee, for comment and discussion in advance of hopeful opportunity to have discussion with the Committee this fall. The release is also in advance of two major events of Canada Without Poverty at the end of September, in part to increase public discussion on economic and social rights such as the right to food, housing and social security.

Complete submission (PDF - 442K, 5 pages)
Two-part recommendation for the federal government:
(1) to set targets and timelines for poverty reduction and elimination, and
(2) to study all fiscal mechanisms, federal as well as intergovernmental, available to help reach these targets and lay out options for the committee’s consideration and consultation.

Source:
Canada Without Poverty
Canada Without Poverty is a federally incorporated, non-partisan, not-for-profit and charitable organization dedicated to the elimination of poverty in Canada.

---

- Go to the 2012 Canadian Government Budgets Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets_2012.htm

6. Income Support for Persons With Disabilities [in Ontario, B.C and Alberta] - September 2011
(University of Calgary)

Income Support for Persons With Disabilities [in Ontario, B.C and Alberta] - (PDF - 1.5MB, 21 pages)
By
Ronald Kneebone and Oksana Grynishak
This paper examines the criteria disabled persons in Ontario, B.C and Alberta must meet in order to receive income-support. The authors also trace variations of monthly payment levels in relation to political exigencies and inflationary pressures affecting the cost of living. By crunching these numbers, the authors reveal whether disability funding in these three provinces is enough to cover the basic needs of the people who receive support.
Source:
School of Public Policy
[ University of Calgary ]

University of Calgary: Alberta, Ontario barely meeting needs of people with disabilities - BC failing
New study compares support for disabled across three provinces
Sept. 21, 2011
Calgary, Alberta
Most people will agree that a fundamental role of government is to provide a safety net for people who are disabled and have no source of income. However, in a groundbreaking comparative study released today by The School of Public Policy, Prof. Ron Kneebone reveals a disparity between the support provided by BC, Alberta and Ontario to disabled residents, and argues that BC is failing to provide for basic needs.
Source:
MarketWatch

---

- Go to the Alberta Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/abkmrk.htm

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

- Go to the Disability Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/disbkmrk.htm

7. Why even conservatives are worried about rising inequality - September 21
(By Armine Yalnizyan in Progressive Economics Forum)

Why even conservatives are worried about rising inequality *
By Armine Yalnizyan
September 21, 2011
Work hard and you’ll get ahead. That’s been the mantra of folks who prefer their governments small and their success big.
But as two recent Conference Board of Canada reports

show, that mantra is being cast into doubt. According to the voice of Canada’s business establishment: “High inequality can diminish economic growth if it means that the country is not fully using the skills and capabilities of all its citizens or if it undermines social cohesion, leading to increased social tensions. High inequality [also] raises a moral question about fairness and social justice.”

[ * Author's note: This essay was commissioned by the National Post. It was published in today’s edition under the headline “A Problem for Everyone“. In the print edition, the overline - a large font summary of what you are about to read written by the editors – reads: “Income inequality isn’t just unfair — it threatens the whole foundation on which our capitalist economy is based.” Those are not my words. They are the words of the National Post. ]

Source:
Progressive Economics Forum

---

- Go to the Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

8. What’s Wrong With Harper’s Omnibus Crime Bill - September 20
(Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

What’s Wrong With Harper’s Omnibus Crime Bill
September 20, 2011
By Paula Mallea
Prime Minister Harper will be launching his tough-on-crime agenda today. Our criminal justice system is by no means perfect, but the omnibus crime bill will send us back to a 19th century punishment model. Here are some reasons why Canadians need to speak out against this legislation. The former U.S. drug czar (Asa Hutchinson) has encouraged Canada not to make the same mistakes the U.S. made. The two mistakes he cited were mandatory minimum sentences, and insufficient attention to rehabilitative programs. (...) [Up] to 80-90% of offenders in some institutions are addicts (mostly to alcohol), and up to 40% have mental illnesses. A huge proportion are Aborignal people. Many offenders are homeless, illiterate, victims of sexual abuse, and so on...
-----------
[Author Paula Mallea practised criminal law for 15 years in Toronto, Kingston, and Manitoba.
She is a Research Associate with the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives]
Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

Related link:

A crime debate without facts or arguments
By Dan Gardner
September 23, 2011
I suppose I could write a substantive and serious column about the government's omnibus crime bill. First, I'd explain the many proposals. Then I'd say they are a terrible mistake. They will not reduce crime, but they will waste billions of dollars, spawn injustices, and damage communities. Or so I would argue. If I did that, I would cite evidence. Lots of it. There's a small mountain of criminological research to support my case, along with much fine writing by jurists and political scientists. There's also practical experience, here and elsewhere - especially the United States, where even rock-ribbed Republicans are having second thoughts about the policies Stephen Harper is importing to this country. I could do that. It would be easy. I've done it before. Dozens of times. I've been writing about criminal justice policy ever since I became a journalist in 1997. But there's no point. Not with this government, anyway. Not with this prime minister.
...this government is cynical, contemptuous, and intellectually bankrupt.
Source:
Ottawa Citizen

---

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

9. The Ontario NDP Platform : Six Concerns - September 20
(Nick Falvo in Progressive Economics Forum)

The Ontario NDP Platform : Six Concerns
Posted by Nick Falvo
September 20, 2011
Pollsters tell us that Ontario’s New Democrats may double their seat total in next month’s provincial election. It’s also entirely conceivable that they could be part of a coalition government at Queen’s Park. But what’s actually in the party’s election platform?
I have six concerns about the platform.
1. Scale.
2. Taxing The Rich.
3. Priorities.
4. Environment.
5. Poverty. [See the comments section for a correction]
6. Post-Secondary Education. As I’ve blogged about before, tuition rates in Ontario are the highest in Canada. Ontario’s NDP is proposing to freeze them at these levels. It also proposes to eliminate the interest on the provincial portion of student loans, which, for a student with a $25,000 student loan, would amount to an annual savings of $60. In my mind, this pales in comparison with the undergraduate tuition grant being proposed in the current election campaign by the governing Liberals, which would be worth $1,600 per year for a full-time undergraduate university student.

Source:
Progressive Economics Forum

- Go to the Political Parties and Elections Links in Canada (Provinces and Territories) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_prov_terr.htm

10. Taxing the rich may be fair, but it won’t fill the coffers (By Stephen Gordon in the Globe and Mail, September 19)
+ Rebuttal by Andrew Jackson in
Progressive Economics Forum - September 22

Taxing the rich may be fair, but it won’t fill the coffers
By Stephen Gordon
September 19, 2011
President Obama’s proposal to increase taxes on those earning more than $1-million may help him persuade U.S. voters that his government is trying to do something to attenuate the increasing trend to which incomes have been concentrated among a very small group of high earners. But as the article notes, this measure is not expected to be an important source of government revenues.

[ 165 comments ]

Source:
Globe and Mail

Counterpoint:

Taxing the Rich
By Andrew Jackson
September 22
Over at the Globe and Mail Economy Lab our friend Stephen Gordon argues that there are only limited revenues to be gained by taxing the rich. He plays around with some back of the envelope calculations based on CRA data on the incomes of those making more than $500,000 – accurately enough, I think - and concludes that each percentage point increase in the marginal tax rate of this very affluent group would yield only $400 Million per year in increased annual revenues. Thus “a tax on millionaires’ is unlikely to generate much new revenue.” (Those of you out there inclined to pile on Stephen should note that he does not oppose higher taxation of the very affluent on equity grounds.) The problem with Stephen’s approach is that he does not include the option of raising the taxable incomes of the very affluent by ending or limiting preferential treatment of the property income which goes to the very top of the income distribution. This is actually much more important than the marginal tax rate issue, as has been recently highlighted by Warren Buffett who points out that he pays much less tax than his secretary since his income is in the form of capital gains (taxed at 15% in the US) rather than wages.
Source:
Progressive Economics Forum

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- Go to the Non-Governmental Organizations Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ngobkmrk.htm

11. Ontario Vote Compass - September 19
(CBC News)

Vote Compass returns for Ontario election
Online tool generated more than a million responses during federal election

September 19, 2011
The Vote Compass online tool allows voters to see how their views compare with the platforms of each of Ontario's four major political parties. This is an enhanced version of Vote Compass, CBC’s online election issues survey that proved popular with voters during the federal election.
Returning to CBC.ca today, Vote Compass uses an online questionnaire to compare a user’s political views to the platforms of the major political parties.

[ Comments (198) ]

Vote Compass FAQs

VOTE COMPASS --- Try it yourself.

Source:
CBC News

Related links from CBC News:

* Ontario Votes 2011 - full election coverage

* LIVE BLOG: Election campaign

* MAP: Ontario ridings to watch

* Election promise calculator

---

- Go to the Political Parties and Elections Links in Canada (Provinces and Territories) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_prov_terr.htm

12. Schedule of upcoming provincial government elections in Canada

Schedule of upcoming provincial/territorial
government elections in Canada

September 22, 2011

By Gilles:
Because Ontario is my home province, I tend to focus on it more than on other provinces and territories.
However, it's not Only Ontario that's in the middle of a provincial government election campaign --- no less than *seven* Canadian jurisdictions are holding elections from early October until November 7.

Here's the complete calendar of provincial election dates for all jurisdictions except New Brunswick and Alberta, where a date for the next provincial election has not yet been set.

Newfoundland and Labrador--- October 11, 2011
Prince Edward Island --- October 3, 2011
Nova Scotia --- 2013
New Brunswick
Québec --- 2013
Ontario --- October 6, 2011
Manitoba --- October 4, 2011
Saskatchewan --- November 7, 2011
Alberta
British Columbia --- May 14, 2013
Yukon --- Oct. 11, 2011
Northwest Territories ---October 3, 2011
Nunavut --- 2012

To access all online election resources for each jurisdiction, go to the Political Parties and Elections Links in Canada (Provinces and Territories) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_prov_terr.htm

13. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- The financial well-being of the self-employed, 2009
---
Gambling 2011 - September 2011
--- Employment Insurance, July 2011 - September 22
--- Consumer Price Index, August 2011 - September 21
--- Leading Indictaors, August 2011 - September 20
--- Study: Layoffs during the last three recessions, 1981 to 2010 - September 20
--- A Profile of Minority-language Students in Canada: Results from the Programme for International Student Assessment, 2009
- September 19
--- Trends in Registered Apprenticeship Training in Canada, 1991 to 2009
- September 19

What's new from
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]:

The September 2011 issue of Perspectives on Labour and Income features the two following articles:

The financial well-being of the self-employed
Highlights
Full article:
* HTML
* PDF
(169K, 15 pages)
Abstract:
About 1 in 6 Canadian workers is self-employed. Does taking on the responsibility of a business result in greater earning potential? More wealth? Affect spending patterns? This paper uses a variety of data sources to examine how the self-employed differ from paid employees in income level and dispersion, wealth, retirement preparation and spending.

Related subjects:

* Economic accounts
* Income and expenditure accounts
* Families, households and housing
* Household characteristics
* Income, pensions, spending and wealth
* Household spending and savings
* Household assets, debts and wealth
* Household, family and personal income
* Low income and inequality
* Labour

----------------------

Gambling 2011
Full article:
* HTML
* PDF
(124K, 7 pages)
Abstract:
This product presents the latest facts and figures on gambling in Canada.

September 23, 2011
Study: Financial well-being of the self-employed, 2009
Self-employed households in Canada had more than twice the 'wealth,' or household net worth, of paid workers in 2009, and were also more knowledgeable about finances. Accumulated wealth is an important aspect of the financial situation of the self-employed, notably because their incomes fluctuate more and they are less likely to have pensions or health insurance.

Source:
Perspectives on Labour and Income - product main page*
This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of labour and income data. Topics include youth in the labour market, pensions and retirement, work arrangements, education and training, and trends in family income.
[ * On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

---

September 22, 2011
Employment Insurance, July 2011
The number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits decreased by 24,800 (-4.4%) in July to 535,700, the largest of 10 consecutive monthly declines.
- includes three tables:
* Employment Insurance: Statistics by province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by age group, sex, province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by census metropolitan areas

Related link:

Employment Insurance Statistics Maps, July 2011
- change in number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits in the last 12 months, by Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations.
- incl. Intro to maps + link to July 2011 maps [in the left margin]

Source:
Employment Insurance Statistics Maps - Product main page*
Set of maps presenting Employment Insurance Statistics. The maps show the percentage change in the number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits in the last 12 months, by Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) and Census Agglomerations (CAs), using 2001 Census geography. Data are also shown in a tabular format.
---
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue
of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:
* Labour
* Employment insurance, social assistance and other transfers
* Non-wage benefits

[ earlier editions of this report ]

---

September 21, 2011
Consumer Price Index, August 2011
The Consumer Price Index rose 3.1% in the 12 months to August, mainly as a result of higher prices for gasoline and food purchased from stores. This follows increases of 2.7% in July and 3.1% in June. On a seasonally adjusted monthly basis, consumer prices rose 0.3% in August.

- includes links to three tables:
* Consumer Price Index and major components, Canada
* Consumer Price Index by province, and for Whitehorse, Yellowknife and Iqaluit
* Consumer Price Index and major components

Source:
The Consumer Price Index - product main page*
This monthly release of the The Consumer Price Index (CPI) for Canada, the provinces, Whitehorse and Yellowknife, provides a descriptive summary of retail price movements, inflation rates and the factors underlying them. The CPI also contains the following tabular information: latest price index movements for the eight major components; price index changes on one and 12-month bases for an extensive number of components and groups; historical monthly information; and price indices reclassified according to categories of goods and services.
* On the product main page, click View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

[ earlier editions of this report ]

Guide to the Consumer Price Index (1998)

Related subjects:
* Prices and price indexes
* Consumer price indexes

---

September 20, 2011
Leading indicators, August 2011
The composite leading index was little changed in August for the third month in a row. Of the 10 components, 6 continued to expand in August, the same number as in July. The weakness in the index was concentrated in the housing index and the stock market, both of which fell more than the month before.
* This release will be reprinted in the October 2011 issue of The Canadian Economic Observer (Click "View" for the latest issue)

Related subjects:

* Business performance and ownership
* Current conditions
* Economic accounts
* Leading indicators

---

September 20, 2011
Study: Layoffs during the last three recessions, 1981 to 2010

Canadian workers were less likely to be laid off during the last economic recession than their counterparts during the two recessions in the early 1980s and 1990s. They were also more likely to find a job in the short term.
On a monthly basis, 2.0% of employees were laid off temporarily or permanently between October 2008 and December 2010. This compares with 2.9% during the early 1980s and 2.7% in the early 1990s.

Related subjects:

* Labour
* Employment and unemployment
* Labour mobility, turnover and work absences
* Wages, salaries and other earnings

September 19, 2011
Education Matters: Insights on Education,
Learning and Training in Canada, September 2011

The September 2011 issue of Education Matters: Insights on Education, Learning and Training in Canada contains two articles:

A Profile of Minority-language Students in Canada: Results from the Programme for International Student Assessment, 2009 summarizes the results of the Programme for International Student Assessment 2009 for students in minority-language school systems in the seven provinces that reported data for both their English- and French-language school systems. The minority-language student population consists of Anglophone students in Quebec and Francophone students outside of Quebec.

Trends in Registered Apprenticeship Training in Canada, 1991 to 2009 examines trends in registered apprenticeship training in Canada over the 1991 to 2009 period, using information from the Registered Apprenticeship Information System.

Source:
Education Matters - Product main page*
This free online periodical provides summary information on issues and gives access to education indicators and Canadian education analysis. It presents information, statistics and analysis in a non-technical, highly readable format for teachers, students, parents, education associations, researchers and policy makers [ This free online periodical provides summary information on issues and gives access to education indicators and Canadian education analysis. It presents information, statistics and analysis in a non-technical, highly readable format for teachers, students, parents, education associations, researchers and policy makers.

[ * On the product main page,click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

----------------------------

The Daily Archives
- select a month and year from the drop-down menus and click on a date for that day's Daily

-----------------------------

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

14. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
:

September 24, 2011

What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

Early childhood education and care in the fall 2011 provincial/territorial elections
21 Sep 2011
New ISSUE File from CRRU collects information about how ECEC is being addressed in elections in Newfoundland and Labrador, PEI, Ontario, Manitoba, Northwest Territories, and the Yukon Territory.

City of Toronto core services review: Executive committee recommendations
21 Sep 2011
Recommendations by the City of Toronto Executive Committee includes "call on the provincial and federal government to work together with City staff to develop a strategy to expand the number of child care spaces in Toronto". Child care cuts considered by Executive Committee have been referred back to City Manager for "inclusion in broader service, and organizational studies".

How Canada performs: Income inequality
21 Sep 2011
Two reports from the Conference Board of Canada draw attention to the growing income gap in Canada and internationally. "Unlike most other countries, income inequality has continued to rise in Canada since the mid-1990s, with Canada outpacing the United States."

Income inequality is a problem for everyone
21 Sep 2011
Op-ed on income inequality in the National Post by Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives' Armine Yalnizyan.

Letter to members of the City of Toronto Executive Committee regarding proposed child care cuts
19 Sep 2011
Letter from CRRU's Executive Director Martha Friendly to the City of Toronto Executive Committee suggests that cutting 2,000 child care subsidies "would be wasteful, not an efficiency"; contends that "a cut by attrition is still a cut".

MORE research, policy & practice

2. Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad.

Montreal daycare firebombed twice in one day
21 Sep 2011 Quebec

Briefing session looks at early childhood education
21 Sep 2011

British Columbia
'Think like a Beaver': Bridging the generational economic divide
21 Sep 2011 Canada

A conversation about Canada working for all generations
21 Sep 2011 Canada

Libraries, child care cuts taken off table by executive committee
21 Sep 2011 Ontario

MORE child care in the news

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Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

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- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

15. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

September 23:
Census: American Community Survey
Young Adults and Health Insurance Coverage

September 22:
Census: American Community Survey

September 21:
States and Health Insurance Programs
UN Millennium Development Goals

September 20:
Census Poverty Data
State Medicaid Programs - Alabama, Kentucky, Utah
Restaurant Meal Program

September 19:
Welfare Reform - Kansas
Recession and Cases of Child Abuse
Unemployment and Foreclosure

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Poverty Dispatch Archive

Past Poverty Dispatches (June 2006 to June 2009 only, offers links but no content)
The IRP Poverty Dispatch Archive hasn't been updated since June 2009.

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To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu subject=subscribe

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Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

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- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

16. American Income Equality Off the Rails- October 2010 (Malcom Gladwell on FORA.TV)
+ September 19 (2011) article ranking income inequality in the U.S. and other countries (The Atlantic)

 


Malcolm Gladwell
is a Canadian journalist, bestselling author, and speaker, currently writing for the New Yorker magazine.
This video presentation is from the 2010 New Yorker Festival.

Related link:

U.S. Ranks Near Bottom on Income Inequality
September 19, 2011
- includes the full list of indicators ("data points") considered and sources
Perhaps the most politically contentious aspect of President Barack Obama's new proposed legislation, aimed to revive the still-struggling U.S. economy, is $1.5 trillion in tax increases, much of it aimed at wealthy Americans. The White House is calling this "the Buffett rule." Named for super-investor Warren Buffett's complaint that he pays a lower tax rate than some of his most menial wage employees, the legislation would be designed to ensure that anyone making more than $1 million per year will pay at least the same rate as middle-income taxpayers.
Source:
The Atlantic

- Go to the Inequality Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

17. The Best and Worst Places in the World for Women - September 20
(Newsweek / The Daily Beast)

The Best and Worst Places for Women
September 18, 2011
Newsweek/The Daily Beast analyzed dozens of data points for 165 countries to determine which countries offer women the most expansive rights and the best quality of life.

The 10 Best Countries for Women
[Click "Next" in the top right-hand corner of the page to view all ten countries.]
1. Iceland - Overall score: 100%
2. Sweden - Overall score: 99.2 %
3. Canada - Overall score: 96.6 % ("We're Number Three, we're number three!")
4. Denmark - Overall score: 95.3 %
5. Finland - Overall score: 92.8 %
6. Switzerland - Overall score: 91.9 %
7. Norway - Overall score: 91.3 %
8. United States of America - Overall score: 89.8%
9. Australia - Overall score: 88.2%
10. Netherlands - Overall score: 87%

The 10 Worst Countries for Women
[Click "Next" in the top right-hand corner of the page to view all ten countries.]

156. Sudan - Overall score: 26.1%
157. Ethiopia - Overall score: 23.7%
158. Pakistan - Overall score: 21.4%
159. Niger - Overall score: 21.2%
160. Solomon Islands - Overall score: 20.8%
161. Mali - Overall score: 17.6%
162. Democratic Republic of the Congo - Overall score: 13.6%
163. Yemen - Overall score: 12.1%
164. Afghanistan - Overall score: 2%
165. Chad - Overall score: 0.0%

Complete list of 165 countries
[Click the far left icon at the bottom of the list to view it in full screen.]

The Best Place to be a Woman (video, duration 3:35)

Source:
The Daily Beast

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- Go to the Links to International Sites about Women's Social Issues page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/womeninternat.htm

18. CRINMAIL
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
:

CRINMAIL - children's rights newsletter

21 September 2011 - CRINMAIL Issue 1243
In this issue:
Children's Rights Wiki - New advocacy tool
Latest news and reports
- Inhuman sentencing: Iran
- State violence: Syria, Libya, Yemen
- The gender agenda: Netherlands, Australia
- Forced labour & child slavery: Uzbekistan, UN
- Infant mortality: Somalia
- UN News
Upcoming events
Employment
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Issues * Law
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

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See http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm
for the table of contents for, and links to, a large collection of issues of CRINMAIL.
NOTE : The CRIN "Links to Issues of CRINMAIL" (next link below) doesn't include the table of contents for each issue.

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL (from CRIN)
- links to earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL (incl. subscription info)

[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

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- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

 

Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

 

Factoids

Around 100 people choke to death on ballpoint pens each year.

The average human spends a total of three years on the toilet.

Donald Duck was once banned in Finland because he doesn’t wear trousers.

There are 6,000 dog restaurants in South Korea.

The average human body makes enough heat in 30 minutes to boil two pints of water.

Spiders were once thought to be a cure for malaria – provided they were eaten alive.

In Ancient Greece, boxing matches ended only when one fighter was unconscious or dead.

The average person travels four miles a year while making beds.

Rhubarb is poisonous if eaten in large doses.

The longest case of hiccups lasted 69 years.

During the reign of Henry VIII an estimated 72,000 people lost their heads.

Fourteen years before the Titanic sank with the loss of 1,500 lives a novel called Futility told the story of a liner named Titan that hit an iceberg and went down.

The acid in a person's stomach is so powerful that it can dissolve a razor blade in less than a week.

There are 700 species of bacteria in the human mouth.

When blonde hair became fashionable in Ancient Rome thousands of Nordic blondes were captured or slain so their hair could be used as wigs.

Parts of blowfish, a delicacy in Japan, contain a poison 500 times as strong as cyanide.

Source:

http://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/view/211875/

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And, in closing...

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Queen : We Will Rock You (video, duration 2:15)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-tJYN-eG1zk&NR=1

We are Walmart (video, duration 1:05)
http://videosift.com/video/We-are-Walmart
Pathetic.

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Queen : Somebody To Love (video, duration 2:11)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wVR38mm4Hzg

Marc Martel : Somebody To Love (video, duration 2:11)
http://videosift.com/video/Guy-Sounds-Just-Like-Freddie-Mercury

The story behind the video and Marc Martel (Canajun, eh).
"...eerily Mercuryesque"
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2011/09/23/marc-martel-freddie-mercury-impression_n_978271.html

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Google Gravity
http://mrdoob.com/projects/chromeexperiments/google_gravity/

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The Giving Pledge
http://givingpledge.org/

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