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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
October 25, 2009

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,121 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian content

1.  [Ontario] Why don't we want the poor to own anything? (John Stapleton for the Metcalf Foundation) - October 21
2. Government of Ontario 2009 Fall Economic Statement - October 22
3. Retirement Lost (The Globe and Mail) - seven-part series (October 16 - 23)
4. What's New from Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) in September 2009:
----- Proposed measure to extend Employment Insurance (EI) regular benefits for long-tenured workers
-----
New Horizons for Seniors Program — Call for Proposals for Capital Assistance Funding
5. [Ontario] Hard Hit : Impact of the Economic Downturn on Nonprofit Community Services in Ontario (Social Planning Network of Ontario) - October 21
6. [Ontario] The Impact of the Economic Downturn for Ontario's Food Banks (Ontario Association of Food Banks - OAFB) - October 2009
7. New from CARP (formerly the Canadian Association of Retired Persons):
----- Time for a Universal Pension Plan - September 2009
----- Submission to the Standing Committee on Finance Pre-budget consultations - August 14
8. 173 Million Stand Up Against Poverty (Stand Against Poverty) - October 20
9. [New Brunswick] Cut the roots of poverty with a living wage [and a guaranteed annual income!] (Telegraph-Journal) - October 21
10. Recent releases from Mapleleafweb:
--- Federal Fiscal Policy in Canada: History, Operation, and Trends in the Global Recession
- October 13
--- Employment Insurance in Canada: History, Structure and Issues - September 22
11. [Ontario] Social Assistance, Pension and Tax Credit Rates, July to September 2009 (Ministry of Community & Social Services)
12. Ontario :
Human Rights Legal Support Centre
13.
This Week in (mostly) Ontario Social Policy News (30+ links)
14. November 24 is the 20th Anniversary of Parliament’s Pledge to Eradicate Child Poverty by 2000 (Campaign 2000 /Canada Without Poverty) - October 19
15. British Columbia law to deny welfare to "people with outstanding warrants"; wording too loose says NDP (The Tyee) - October 19
16.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Perspectives on Labour and Income - October 2009 issue - October 23
---Changes in parental work time and earnings (October 2009)
---Work–life balance of older workers (October 2009)
--- University tuition fees, 2009/2010 - October 20
--- Leading indicators, September 2009 - October 20
17. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - October 25

International content

18. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs (Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)
19. Australian Policy Online - recent content
20. CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter) - October 2009

Have a great week!
Gilles

************************
Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net


E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com

1. Why don't we want the poor to own anything? October 21
(John Stapleton for the Metcalf Foundation)

Ontario:

Report: Why don't we want the poor to own anything?
Metcalf Innovation Fellow John Stapleton launched a new report on October 21, 2009

News Release
October 21, 2009
Overly strict welfare eligibility rules are forcing Ontario’s newly unemployed to divest themselves of all their assets, crippling their chances for an economic recovery. Why Don’t We Want the Poor to Own Anything?, by John Stapleton, Metcalf Foundation Fellow and a leading social policy expert, reveals weaknesses in Ontario’s asset limits for those seeking social assistance, disability support, subsidized housing and legal aid.
Source:
Metcalf Foundation

Complete report:
Why don't we want the poor to own anything?
Our relentless social policy journey toward destitution for the 900,000 poorest people in Ontario
(PDF - 983K, 30 pages)
By John Stapleton
(...) 475,000 families receive social assistance in Ontario. They have stripped themselves of their liquid assets. They must wait until they no longer require legal aid, and leave public housing, before they can resume saving for anything, let alone save for retirement. In a society that promotes saving and cherishes self-reliance, there is no good rationale for public policy that almost guarantees people will grow old in poverty.

Related links:

Open Policy - John Stapleton's website

The welfare asset trap
October 21 2009
It is well known that when the Conservatives came to power in 1995 Mike Harris gutted welfare rates – leaving needy Ontarians living far below the poverty line. Less well known is that changes were also made to force Ontarians to divest themselves of almost every cent of savings, including cashable RRSPs, before they could qualify for a welfare cheque. In a report to be released Oct. 21, Metcalf Foundation fellow John Stapleton presents a compelling case for allowing welfare recipients to keep some savings. (...) Asset-stripping is just one of the failings of our outdated and mean-spirited social assistance system. The government's promised social assistance review – still waiting to be launched – will find many other hurdles in the path of those in need of a helping hand.
Source:
The Toronto Star

- Go to the Asset-Based Social Policies Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/assets.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

2. Government of Ontario 2009 Fall Economic Statement - October 22

Ontario 2009 Fall Economic Statement

Global Economic Recession Causes Increase in Deficit
News Release
October 22, 2009
The McGuinty government outlined today in the 2009 Fall Economic Statement how it is helping Ontario individuals, families and businesses through the global recession and positioning the province for future job creation and economic growth.

Economic Outlook and Fiscal Review 2009
Using the most recent information available at October 15, 2009, the 2009 Ontario Economic Outlook and Fiscal Review updates the economic assumptions from the 2009 Ontario Budget. The impact of these changes is applied to the government’s revenue and expenditure projections, which revise the anticipated financial results for the current fiscal year.


Ontario Economic Outlook and Fiscal Review 2009
* PDF version
(1.7MB, 94 pages)
* HTML version - Table of Contents:
Foreword
Chapter I: Confronting the Challenge
Chapter II: Ontario's Economic Performance and Outlook
Chapter III: Fiscal Outlook
Chapter IV: Borrowing and Debt Management
Chapter V: Creating a More Competitive and Modern Tax System
Chapter VI: How to Participate in the 2010 Pre-Budget Consultations
Economic Data Tables
- also includes links to backgrounders on transparency in taxation and other related topics

Related links:

Ontario deficit could reach $24.7B: Duncan
Provincial economy expected to shrink 3.5%
October 22, 2009
Ontario's deficit is expected to reach $24.7 billion in the current fiscal year, provincial Finance Minister Dwight Duncan announced Thursday. And the province's economic output is expected to show a decline of 3.5 per cent for 2009, Duncan said in the Ontario Economic Outlook and Fiscal Review, which he released at Queen's Park. Declining corporate tax revenues and increasing demand for public services have dragged down the government's bottom line, Duncan said. Corporate tax revenues dropped by an "unprecedented" 48.1 per cent in 2008-09, or by more than $6 billion, the report says.
Source:
CBC

Deficit slaps $1,891 for each Ontarian
Pummelled by the recession, bruised by stimulus measures, Ontario runs a record $24.7B deficit
By Robert Benzie and Rob Ferguson
October 23, 2009
Every Ontario man, woman and child owes an additional $1,891 thanks to a record provincial deficit of $24.7 billion, greater even than the impact of Ottawa's massive shortfall on each Canadian.Finance Minister Dwight Duncan delivered the revised deficit projection for this fiscal year in the fall economic statement Thursday, saying Ontarians must wait until the March budget to learn what sacrifices will have to be made as the Liberals cobble together a restraint plan to eliminate the record shortfall. Duncan admitted he and Premier Dalton McGuinty have no idea yet how the government will tackle the problem.
Source:
Toronto Star

Ontario government gives housing dollars with one hand, takes away more with the other
October 24, 2009
By Michael Shapcott
The Ontario government is helping households across the province cope with deep and persistent housing insecurity and homelessness by making a big 7% ($52.1 million) cut to spending at the Ontario Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing, according to the province's fall economic account. Over the past four years, MAH has seen its annual operating funding cut by $222.4 million (that's almost a quarter of a billion dollars) - adding up to a painfully deep 24% cut since fiscal 2005. Over the past four years, the cumulative spending cuts at MAH add up to $657.1 million. This is enough to finance the construction of more than 4,380 new affordable homes.
Source:
Wellesley Institute Blog
[ Wellesley Institute ]

- Go to the 2009 Canadian Government Budgets Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets.htm
- Go to the Ontario Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm

3. Retirement Lost (seven-part series - October 16-23)
(The Globe and Mail)

From The Globe and Mail:

Retirement Lost (seven-part series)
Canada's retirement dreams are under seige, weakened by underfunding and hobbled by the global recession.
It's a national crisis with no easy answers.
[NOTE :

* Part one: The crisis
--- Retirement dreams under siege

By Jacquie McNish
October 16, 2009
- incl. links to: * Article * Video * Photos * Pension scenarios * Comments (198)
What you need to know:
--- 84% of public service workers have pensions.
--- 78% of these plans are gold plated defined benefit pensions
--- 25% of private sector workers have a pension plan
--- 16% of these plans are gold plated defined benefit pensions
--- 11 million workers, or 60 per cent, of Canada’s workers have no pension at all
--- 8 million or 45 per cent, have no pensions or registered retirement savings plans (RRSPs)

* Part Two: Manufacturing's wreckage
--- Bankrupt companies, pension promises destroyed
By Greg Keenan
October 18, 2009
- incl. links to : * Article * Video * Photos * The history of pensions (recommended by Gilles!) * Comments (124)
What you need to know:
--- 17.6 million: Number of people in the Canadian work force.
--- 11 million: Number of Canadian workers without pension plans.
--- 4 million: Number of those workers with registered retirement savings plans.
--- 10,000: Number of pension plans in Canada.
---- 4.5 million: Workers with pension plans who have defined benefit plans that guarantee the pension income of retirees until they die.
--- 55 per cent: Amount of those plans held by public sector employees.
--- $25,000: Average pension per year.

* Part three: Death of the traditional plan
--- Hybrid pension plans: a hard sell
By Janet McFarland
October 19, 2009
- incl. links to : * Article * Video * Photos * The history of pensions * Comments (36)
As companies weigh alternatives for the future, a crucial choice comes down to a pair of innocuously simple-looking bits of shorthand: Will the future be DB (Defined Benefit) or DC (Defined Contribution)? Traditional pension plans are DB, defined benefit. A retiree covered by the plan is guaranteed a given level of income. If the plan falls short, the employer is on the hook. The new model, increasingly favoured by employers, is DC, defined contribution. In this approach, the employer’s responsibility is limited to making a certain (“defined”) contribution to the employees’ pension plan. Contributions made by both the employer and employee go into an individual account for the employee, who makes his or her own investment choices. If the plan falls short, the employee is on the hook.

* Part four: Conflicts of interest
--- Financial planning: Whom should you trust?
By Rob Carrick
October 20, 2009
- incl. links to : * Article * Video * Photos * The history of pensions * Comments (78)
As pensions become unreliable, more Canadians are being forced to plan for retirement themselves. But whom do you turn to for help? The experience of one couple who relied on a financial adviser is a cautionary tale.

* Part five: Underfunded dreams
--- No pension safety net for self-employed
By Andrew Willis
October 21, 2009
- incl. links to : * Article * Video * Photos * The history of pensions * Comments (59)
Meet the next generation of retirees: middle-class workers without pensions who are left to their own devices and facing an uncertain financial future. As formal pension plans become increasingly less common, many Canadians face a savings burden that many are unwilling – or unable – to shoulder.

* Part six: Steps to financial freedom
--- Freedom 55? Couple couldn’t wait that long for retirement
By John Heinzl
October 22, 2009
- incl. links to : * Article * Video * Photos * The history of pensions * Comments (84)
In a society that encourages consumers to borrow and spend, in which the pressure to upgrade homes, cars and gadgets never stops, living within one’s means and staying out of debt is a challenge. But for people who make a middle-class salary, the “boring” approach may be the surest route to building wealth and achieving financial security, say those who have done it.

* Part seven: Reforming a broken system
--- Canada's gathering pension storm
By Konrad Yakabuski
October 23, 2009
- incl. links to : * Article * Video * Photos * The history of pensions * Comments (36)
Italy may be one of the worst off, but all developed countries, along with China, will experience unprecedented economic and social pressure in coming decades as their populations grey. Few, if any, have prepared for the demographic tsunami that will hit them as the baby boom generation heads into its golden years. By comparison, Canadians have some reason to feel fiscally smug, with a public pension system considered one of the world’s most financially sustainable. There’s only one catch: That system pays among the least generous government-sponsored benefits in the developed world.

Source:
The Globe and Mail

- Go to the Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/hrsdc.htm
- Go to the Seniors (Social Research) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/seniors.htm

4. What's New from Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) in September 2009:
----- Proposed measure to extend Employment Insurance (EI) regular benefits for long-tenured workers
-----
New Horizons for Seniors Program — Call for Proposals for Capital Assistance Funding

What's New from Human Resources and
Skills Development Canada in September 2009:

* Proposed measure to extend Employment Insurance (EI) regular benefits for long-tenured workers – Fact Sheet

* New Horizons for Seniors Program — The call for proposals for Capital Assistance Funding is now open for all of Canada except Quebec until November 6, 2009.

Source:
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page : http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm
- Go to the Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/hrsdc.htm
- Go to the Seniors (Social Research) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/seniors.htm

5. [Ontario] Hard Hit: Impact of the Economic Downturn on Nonprofit Community Services in Ontario - October 21
(Social Planning Network of Ontario)

Crisis Coming for Ontario Communities
Media
Release
October 21, 2009
Hard Hit, a new research report from the Social Planning Network of Ontario (SPNO) documents the one-two punch affecting Ontario's nonprofit community services -- an increasing demand for services and lost revenue from funding cuts driven by the economic downturn. The survey of more than 400 Ontario agencies found that 60% had experienced mostly increases in service demand since September 2008. Three-quarters of these agencies attributed the increase in demand, at least in part, to the recession. Half of the organizations surveyed also experienced a cut in at least one funding source during 2009 and 65% anticipate they will have further funding cuts in 2010. This combination of increased demands and cuts in resources spells an impending crisis in communities across Ontario.

Complete report:

Hard Hit: Impact of the Economic Downturn
on Nonprofit Community Services in Ontario
(PDF - 2.7MB, 35 pages)
October 2009
The purpose of this study was to identify the impact of the current global economic recession on nonprofit community social service agencies in Ontario, and ultimately, to assess the capacity of the sector to respond to current and emerging community needs. This survey is intended to be the first stage of an ongoing research and assessment process that will allow the SPNO to monitor the ongoing impact of the recession on agencies in Ontario.
Source:
Social Planning Network of Ontario

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

6. The Impact of the Economic Downturn for Ontario's Food Banks - October 2009
(Ontario Association of Food Banks - OAFB)

In the Midst of the Storm:
The Impact of the Economic Downturn for Ontario's Food Banks
(PDF - 2.9MB, 16 pages)
October 2009
(...) There can be no doubt that Ontario’s food banks are struggling to respond to the collateral damage caused by the global economic downturn. The challenge of hunger was already staggering before we were hit by the Great Recession: hundreds of thousands of our neighbours were turning to food banks. We are now faced with an even greater challenge: tens of thousands more Ontarians are turning to us for support, and many food banks are faced with a decline in donations.

Source:
Ontario Association of Food Banks (OAFB)
OAFB is a network of food banks in 100 communities across Ontario.

-----------------------------------
More OAFB reports:

OAFB Research Studies
OAFB releases a number of key research studies throughout the year, including their annual Ontario Hunger Report.

OAFB Government Submissions
OAFB provides the provincial government with thoughtful research and policy solutions on a regular basis related to issues important to food banks and those they serve across the province.
-----------------------------------

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm
- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm

7. New from CARP (formerly the Canadian Association of Retired Persons):
----- Time for a Universal Pension Plan - September 2009
----- Submission to the Standing Committee on Finance Pre-budget consultations - August 14

CARP* calls on government to honour Canada’s
pension promise and releases Universal Pension Plan
October 21, 2009
HALIFAX, Nova Scotia: Canada is not honouring its promise to keep Canadians out of poverty in retirement says CARP which calls for immediate pension reform to help Canadians now at risk as well as to prevent such insecurity for future generations. At a public meeting organized by CARP’s Halifax Chapter on retirement security, CARP released its position papers calling for comprehensive pension reform
[* CARP was formerly known as the Canadian Association of Retired Persons.]

Time for a Universal Pension Plan (PDF - 111K, 11 pages)
September 2009
- CARP Position Paper on its proposal for a Universal Pension Plan

Submission to the Standing Committee on Finance
Pre-budget consultations
(PDF - 43K, 5 pages)
August 14, 2009
CARP’s pre-budget submission to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance

Source:
CARP
A New Vision of Aging for Canada: A society in which
everyone can live active, independent, purposeful lives as they age.

Related links:

CARP (Canada)
CARP (originally the Canadian Association of Retired Persons, now billed as Canada's Association for the Fifty-Plus) is a Canadian organization advocating for the rights of those fifty years of age or older.
Source:
Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

---

An earlier kick at the can:

CARP poll find members overwhelmingly support a new Universal Pension Plan
April 21, 2009
By Jonathan_Chevreau
The over-50 lobby group known as CARP today told the government it should consider establishing a Universal Pension Plan modelled on the CPP, with mandatory enrolment, a payroll deduction mechanism and a performance-oriented mandate that is independent from government or any single employer.
Source:
The National Post

- Go to the Seniors (Social Research) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/seniors.htm

8. 173 Million Stand Up Against Poverty - October 20
(Stand Against Poverty)

Guinness World Book of Records shattered by
citizens across the globe demanding that their leaders end poverty

More than 173 Million People Gather at “Stand Up, Take Action,
End Poverty Now!” events, setting new world record for largest mobilization in history
By Sebastian
October 20, 2009
A Guinness World Record shattered this weekend when 173,045,325 citizens gathered at over 3,000 events in more than 120 countries, demanding that their governments eradicate extreme poverty and achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). “Stand Up, Take Action, End Poverty Now!”, now in its fourth year, has been certified by Guinness World Records as the largest mobilization of human beings in recorded history, an increase of about 57 million people over last year.
Source:
Stand Up Blog
[ Stand Against Poverty ]

Related links:

Make Poverty History - Canada

United Nations

U.N. Millennium Development Goals

U.N. End Poverty 2015 Millennium Campaign

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the United Nations Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/un.htm

9. [New Brunswick] Cut the roots of poverty with a living wage [and a guaranteed annual income!] - October 21
(Telegraph-Journal)

New Brunswick:

Cut the roots of poverty with a living wage
October 21, 2009
By Janice Harvey
Finally, poverty reduction is a legitimate public debate. Shawn Graham's government has embarked on a poverty reduction strategy, the preliminary results of which will be revealed sometime next month. PC Leader David Alward has recently announced the Conservatives will eliminate the so-called economic unit policy, increase the amount people can earn before being penalized on their welfare payments and adjust the way prescription drug coverage is handled.
(...) At a legislated minimum wage of $8.25 an hour, an individual can work the legislated work week of 40 hours and still fall below the poverty line. This should not be the case. This amounts to legislated poverty.
(...) Second, we have to consider those who cannot work, whether temporarily or permanently. Green parties from their inception have advocated for an annual guaranteed livable income. It's an idea whose time has come.
(...) A guaranteed annual income, sometimes called a negative income tax, replaces all the piecemeal, ineffective measures now administered by provincial agencies including welfare payments, various supplements, prescription drug coverage and many others. It treats people with dignity and provides a basic level of well-being across the community without discrimination. A living minimum wage and a guaranteed livable income for households are essential (but not the only) elements of a structurally fair economy. To not address them is to perpetuate the current structural injustice while trying to paper over its worst abuses.
Source:
Telegraph-Journal

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the New Brunswick Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nbkmrk.htm

10. Recent releases from Mapleleafweb:
--- Federal Fiscal Policy in Canada: History, Operation, and Trends in the Global Recession
- October 13
---
Employment Insurance in Canada: History, Structure and Issues - September 22

Federal Fiscal Policy in Canada: History, Operation, and Trends in the Global Recession
October 13, 2009
By Jay Makarenko
With the global economic recession of 2008-09, and the various attempts by the Canadian government and its counterparts around the world to address their economic difficulties, the issue of fiscal policy has come to the fore, earning significant public attention. This article provides an introduction to Canadian fiscal policy at the federal level of government. Topics include an overview of fiscal policy as a concept, the operation of Canadian federal fiscal policy, a brief historical review of fiscal policy in Canada, and a discussion of trends in federal policy stemming from the global economic recession.
Table of Contents:
* An Introduction to Fiscal Policy
- What is government fiscal policy in Canada?
* Operation of Federal Fiscal Policy in Canada - Key processes and actors in federal fiscal policy in Canada
* History of Federal Fiscal Policy in Canada - Summary of federal fiscal policy from early-1900s to 2007
* Canadian Fiscal Policy and the 2008-09 Global Recession - Trends in contemporary federal fiscal policy in Canada and the World
* Sources and Links to More Information - List of article sources and links to more on this topic

---

Employment Insurance in Canada: History, Structure and Issues
By Jay Makarenko
September 22, 2009
Employment insurance in Canada is a legacy of the Great Depression, and remains a pillar of the nation’s modern social programs. Since its creation in 1940, the program has undergone many significant evolutions, both philosophically and structurally. Moreover, debate over the program has remained constant throughout its existence, and is still present in contemporary political discourse. This feature provides an introduction to the history, administration, and issues relating to Employment Insurance in Canada.
---
Table of Contents:
* History of Employment Insurance in Canada
- Historical overview of public employment insurance
* Administration of the Employment Insurance Program - Laws, bureaucracies, processes, and finances of employment insurance
* Issues Concerning Employment Insurance in Canada - Debates on the philosophy and structure of employment insurance
* Sources and Links to More Information - List of article sources and links to more on this topic

Source:
Mapleleafweb
Maple Leaf Web is a non-profit, non-partisan Canadian political education web-site that aims to provide educators, students and the attentive public with a credible source for political education and information. Located at the University of Lethbridge, in Lethbridge, Alberta (Canada), Maple Leaf Web publishes original articles and features on Canadian political events and institutions and provides important links to a wide range of external resources.

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page : http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm

11. [Ontario] Social Assistance, Pension and Tax Credit Rates, July to September 2009
(Ministry of Community & Social Services)

Ontario:

Social Assistance, Pension and Tax Credit Rates, July to September 2009 (PDF - 160K, 2 pages)
Recommended reading/saving/printing!
All in two pages, (just about) everything you ever
wanted to know about federal and provincial social program benefit levels in Ontario.
[This is mostly amounts - you'll have to find the corresponding program information elsewhere...]

This factsheet contains current rate information (benefit levels)
for the following federal and Ontario programs:

* Federal Income Security programs
----- Old Age Security, Guaranteed Income Supplement, the Allowance (formerly Spouse's Allowance)
----- Canada Pension Plan
----- Goods and Services Tax Credit
----- Medical Expense Tax Credit
----- War Veterans Allowance
----- Employment Insurance
----- Canada Child Tax Benefit (inc. the National Child Benefit Supplement and Child Disability Benefit)
* Ontario Works - Social Assistance rates (eff. August 2009) + earnings exemptions and incentives
* Ontario Disability Support Program - Social Assistance rates (eff. July 2009)
* Ontario Guaranteed Annual Income System (provincial top-up for Ontario seniors receiving the Guaranteed Income Supplement under the federal Old Age Security program)
* Ontario Child Benefit
* Ontario Child Care Supplement for Working Families
* Ontario Sales and Property Tax Credits

Source:
Tip Sheet List - (check this link for more recent updates)
[ Community Advocacy & Legal Centre - a non-profit community legal clinic
serving low income residents of Hastings, Prince Edward and Lennox & Addington counties.]

Prepared by the
Statistics and Analysis Unit, Social Policy Development Division
[ Ministry of Community & Social Services ]

--------------------------------------------------------

Some gratuitous advice from the
Canadian Social Research Links Guy:

1. To students and researchers:
Print this two-page pamphlet and keep it with your social research reference documents.
You'll thank me the next time you need to know the current OAS rate or the shelter allowance under ODSP or OW.

2. To other welfare departments in other provinces:
Please consider producing and making available online a short factsheet like this one for the programs in your jurisdiction.
It's an invaluable social research aid.

3. To the nice folks at the Ontario
Ministry of Community and Social Services:

This is such an excellent social research reference that it deserves to be on the MCSS home page, or at least the OW & ODSP home pages.
I can't find it anywhere on the MCSS website.
(Please correct me if I'm wrong.)
Please consider uploading this factsheet to your own website.

4. To the nice folks at the
Community Advocacy & Legal Centre:

Thanks for posting this to your site!
[BTW - If the MCSS Police come breaking down your door because you posted an
Ontario govt file that says "INTERNAL: FOR PLANNING PURPOSES ONLY"to the Web, you don't know me and I don't know you, OK?]

- Go to the Ontario Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Guide to Welfare in Ontario page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onwelf.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm

12. Ontario:
Human Rights Legal Support Centre

Ontario:

Human Rights Legal Support Centre
The Human Rights Legal Support Centre offers human rights legal services to individuals throughout Ontario who believe they have experienced discrimination. The Centre’s services range from legal assistance in filing an application at the Tribunal to legal representation on human rights applications.
- incl. links to : * About Us * Getting Legal Help From the Centre * Calling the Centre * Ontario Human Rights System * Resources * Ontario’s new human rights system * A guide to human rights applications * Housing and Human Rights * Temporary and Casual Workers * Pregnancy * Policies (Accommodation Policy - Complaints Policy - Draft Eligibility Criteria)

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

13. This Week in (mostly) Ontario Social Policy News (30+ links)

Ontario
- Selected media links to this past week's social policy news:

Walkom: Expect provincial spending cuts to make matters worse Image
http://www.thestar.com/news/ontario/article/715615--walkom-expect-provincial-spending-cuts-to-make-matters-worse

Adam Radwanski says McGuinty’s government will die the death of a thousand cuts:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/mcguinty-faces-death-by-a-thousand-cuts/article1334802/

A comparison of provinces’ deficits:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/how-the-provinces-compare/article1334276/

In Manitoba , the poor sell their meds to get by:
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2009/10/21/man-prescriptions-cbc-investigation.html

Rising dollar could garner action:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/crash-and-recovery/bank-of-canada-talks-tough-on-rising-dollar/article1334608/
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/bank-of-canada-sees-96-cent-dollar/article1333735/

Jack Layton pushes for pension insurance:
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/story/2009/10/22/layton-pensions.html

Canada’s sub-prime mortgage bomb:
http://rabble.ca/news/2009/10/canadas-sub-prime-mortgage-time-bomb

Tax fairness, not the HST:
http://rabble.ca/news/2009/10/canada-needs-tax-fairness-not-hst

Meanwhile, back at the ranch, the federal deficit is ballooning:
http://www.cbc.ca/money/story/2009/10/23/federal-deficit.html

From Finance – the Fiscal Update and Economic Outlook:
http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/budget/fallstatement/2009/

Note the information about the pre-budget consultations:
http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/consultations/prebud/

Coverage:

Deficit is huge – difficult choices ahead:
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/714276--ontario-deficit-billions-more-than-expected

Nearly two thousand dollars for each person:
http://www.thestar.com/news/ontario/article/714791--deficit-slaps-1-891-for-each-ontarian

Ontario falls deep into the red:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/ontario-falls-deep-into-the-red/article1334227/

No exit plan:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/ontario-deficit-hits-24-billion-but-no-exit-plan/article1335097/

Fiscal report:
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/toronto/story/2009/10/22/toronto-fiscal-report-091022.html

Eliminate the weak program and properly fund the strong program, and don’t sell assets:
http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorials/article/714677--deficit-numbers-in-perspective

Consultation OK, says OPSEU, but not at expense of people and programs:
http://www.cnw.ca/en/releases/archive/October2009/22/c9771.html

In the meantime, Second Career gets capped because of too much demand:
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/toronto/story/2009/10/22/ottawa-ontario-second-career.html

Don’t relax stimulus spending, say professors:
http://www.cnw.ca/en/releases/archive/October2009/22/c9741.html

Criminal lawyers boost legal aid boycott:
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/toronto/story/2009/10/21/ont-legalaid-boycott.html

Restraint looms in Ontario:
http://www.thestar.com/news/ontario/article/714053--as-ontario-s-deficit-soars-restraint-looms

And big deficit news expected in Ontario:
h
ttp://www.cbc.ca/canada/toronto/story/2009/10/21/ont-economic-update.html

But Thomas Walkom says the deficit is a non-issue:
http://www.thestar.com/news/insight/article/710956--how-to-spend-your-way-out-of-a-deficit

The Conference Board of Canada says we’re moving into recovery:
http://www.cnw.ca/en/releases/archive/October2009/22/c9486.html

And Stephen Harper is looking at signs of recovery:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/crash-and-recovery/stephen-harper-sees-budding-recovery/article1332815/

Self employed have no pension safety net:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/retirement/no-pension-safety-net-for-self-employed/article1322009/

Tim Hudak and the PCs on the debt and deficit:
http://www.cnw.ca/en/releases/archive/October2009/21/c9189.html

An astonishing 1/3 of all people who are homeless in Toronto are immigrants:
http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/article/712762--one-third-of-homeless-in-city-are-immigrants

Self-employed EI benefits a “tricky task”:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/bringing-ei-to-self-employed-tricky-task/article1321305/

TD report on looming huge deficits:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/ottawa-provinces-set-for-huge-deficits-td/article1330747/

Ignatieff releases the Pink Book – includes commitment to a federal Poverty Reduction Strategy:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/blogs/bureau-blog/changing-his-tune/article1332711/
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/713660--ignatieff-commits-to-women-s-issues

-------

Thanks to Jennefer Laidley of the
Income Security Advocacy Centre
(ISAC) in Toronto for these link suggestions.

-------

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

14. November 24: Twentieth Anniversary of Parliament’s Pledge to Eradicate Child Poverty by 2000 - October 19
(Campaign 2000 / Canada Without Poverty)

20th Year Since Parliament’s Pledge to Eradicate Child Poverty by 2000
October 19, 2009
November 24, 2009 marks the 20th year since Parliament’s pledge in 1989 to eliminate child poverty in Canada by 2000. Instead, in 2000 18.1% of children and youth (under 18) lived in low income. While this rate of child and youth poverty fell steeply to 11.9% by 2007 (latest year of data available, using the Market Basket Measure of low income), it is nonetheless shockingly high and completely unacceptable – particularly given Canada’s status as one of the world’s wealthiest nations. Indeed, in September 2009,
even the Conference Board of Canada could only give Canada a “C” grade for its progress in child poverty.
Source:
Canada Without Poverty

Campaign 2000 is leading the commemoration of November 24, 2009.
For more information, contact Campaign 2000 by telephone (416-595-9230 ext. 244) or by email ( contactus@campaign2000.ca ).

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

15. British Columbia law to deny welfare to "people with outstanding warrants"; wording too loose says NDP - October 19
(The Tyee)

BC law to deny welfare to some; wording too loose says NDP
By Andrew MacLeod
October 19, 2009
British Columbia housing and social development minister Rich Coleman today introduced legislation that he says will prevent people with outstanding warrants for serious crimes from receiving welfare. But New Democratic Party critic Shane Simpson says the legislation will also affect people who have committed only minor crimes. “The minister has issued a press release that says one thing and a piece of legislation that says something very different,” said Simpson. “They have a blank cheque on who they can capture with this and that's inappropriate.”
Source:
The Tyee

The proposed legislation:

Bill 14 — 2009
Housing and Social Development
Statutes Amendment Act, 2009

First Reading copy
October 19, 2009

The news release from the
Ministry responsible for welfare:

Outstanding warrants to be ineligible for social assistance
News Release
October 19, 2009
VICTORIA – The provincial government will restrict access to income assistance and disability assistance for people with outstanding indictable arrest warrants in B.C. and other provinces, as well as arrest warrants under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (Canada). Indictable offences are the most serious types of offences and include a wide range of crimes such as assault, breaking and entering, drug trafficking, murder, assault with a weapon, and assault causing bodily harm.
Source:
Ministry of Housing and Social Development

Related links:

Welfare rules won't apply to other benefits;
People who get low-income tax credits will not have to submit to criminal record check
s
By Justine Hunter
October 20, 2009
While British Columbia seeks to deny welfare benefits to people who are wanted by police, it does not apply the same standards to people collecting provincial tax credits. The province does, however, deny inmates of federal prisons from receiving low-income tax credits, and is currently seeking to expand that exclusion to include prisoners in provincial jails. The province offers numerous tax credits to low-income earners, including sales tax and climate-action rebates. A government official said yesterday there are no plans to require a criminal background check to screen for outstanding warrants in those cases.

Bill urges criminal checks for welfare seekers
First-of-its-kind law to weed out those with warrants
for serious crimes based on a principle of ‘punishment,' civil liberties group says
By Justine Hunter
October 19, 2009
British Columbians seeking welfare and disability benefits will be denied assistance unless they agree to a criminal background check, under proposed new legislation tabled yesterday. Housing and Social Development Minister Rich Coleman told reporters that the law, expected to be in effect early in 2010, is meant to ensure the province is not paying benefits to people who are wanted by police in other jurisdictions for serious crimes.

Source:
Globe and Mail

- Go to the BC Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk.htm

16. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Perspectives on Labour and Income - October 2009 issue - October 23
***** Changes in parental work time and earnings (October 2009)
*****Work–life balance of older workers (October 2009)
--- University tuition fees, 2009/2010 - October 20
--- Leading indicators, September 2009 - October 20

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

October 23, 2009
Perspectives on Labour and Income - October 2009 issue
The October issue of Perspectives includes the two articles below.

Changes in parental work time and earnings
October 2009
Highlights
Full article:
* HTML
* PDF
(218K, 12 pages)
Abstract:
Between 1980 and 2005, family work time increased for most families with children, especially for families located at the bottom and in the middle of the earnings distribution. However, this increase occurred against a backdrop of a stronger increase in earnings for families at the top of the earnings distribution. This study finds that high earnings families earned more in 2005 than in 1980 for a given amount of family work time, likely because of higher wages.

Work–life balance of older workers
October 2009
Highlights
Full article:
HTML
PDF
(209K, 12 pages)
Abstract:
Although it has received some attention in the Canadian literature, the issue of work–life balance of older workers remains largely understudied. This article addresses that gap using data from the 2005 General Social Survey. Overall, 14% of Canadian workers age 55 and over reported being dissatisfied with their work–life balance in 2005. The sources of conflict most frequently cited were too much time on the job and too little time for the family. Work–life balance dissatisfaction was associated with having a disability, providing elder care, working long hours, occupying a managerial position and being a woman. At the same time, having an employed partner, being self-employed and enjoying one’s job reduced the probability of work–life conflict. When the self-selection of older individuals out of employment was taken into account, the risk of work–life conflict did not vary with age.

Related subjects
o Labour
o Hours of work and work arrangements
o Wages, salaries and other earnings

October 20, 2009
University tuition fees, 2009/2010
Canadian full-time students in undergraduate programs faced the same increase in tuition fees (+3.6%) for the 2009/2010 academic year as they did a year earlier.

October 20, 2009
Leading indicators, September 2009
The composite leading index rose by 1.1% in September, its fourth straight gain, while August was revised up from 1.1% to 1.2%. In September, 7 of the 10 components advanced, led again by the stock market and the housing index, while 2 components declined, the same as the month before.
[ Table: Leading Indicators, April - September 2009 ]

---

Check The Daily Archives
- select a month and click on a date for that day's Daily

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

17. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - October 25

What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

October 25, 2009

Childcare markets in England and The Netherlands
21 Oct 09
- Presentation by Eva Lloyd, ICMEC University of South London, on new research examining the impact of childcare market developments in England and The Netherlands.

More spaces for child care and early learning - a Liberal commitment
21 Oct 09
- Press release from Liberal leader Michael Ignatieff announcing that a national child-care program will be among the top priorities in the next election platform

Long-term effects of cash for childcare on mothers' labour supply
21 Oct 09
- Article published in the journal Labour further exploring the relationship of a cash benefit for young children and mother’s labour supply in Norway.

Working better: Fathers, family and work- contemporary perspectives
21 Oct 09
- Report from the Equality and Human Rights Commission on fathers’ struggle to balance work and family.

Early childhood education and care in Canada 2008
16 Sep 09
- New report from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit looks at the current state of ECEC spaces, finances and policy developments.

30 quick facts about Canadian ECEC: Trends & Analysis 2008
16 Sep 09
- Companion document to ECEC in Canada 2008 highlights important facts about Canadian child care.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news

· Ignatieff commits to women's issues
[CA] 21 Oct 09

· Michael Ignatieff makes daycare a key campaign plank
[CA] 21 Oct 09

· Celebrating child care workers and early childhood educators
[CA] 20 Oct 09

· Region wants lead role on early learning
[CA-ON] 20 Oct 09

· Pros, cons of all-day kindergarten considered
[CA-BC] 15 Oct 09

· Funding cuts could hurt family pocketbooks
[CA-ON] 14 Oct 09

more CC IN THE NEWS »

---

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

18. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest content from the Poverty Dispatch:

October 23:
Welfare-to-Work Program and Work Requirements - North Carolina
Pre-Kindergarten and Low-income Students
Report: Child Abuse and Neglect in the US
2009 Commitment to Development Index
September 2009 Unemployment Rate

October 22:
Poverty Rates in US Cities
Youth Poverty and Unemployment - Detroit, MI
Fuel Poverty - United Kingdom

October 21:
Privatization of Social Services - Indiana
Editorials and Opinions: Privatization of Social Services - Indiana
High School Graduation Rates - Louisiana
Alternative Measures of Poverty in the US

October 20:
Extension of Unemployment Benefits - South Carolina
School Voucher Program - Washington, DC
Alternative Measures of Poverty in the US
Child Poverty - Colorado
High-poverty Schools and Teacher Quality - Nashville, TN

October 19:
Legal Aid in Civil Cases - California
Home Foreclosures and Homelessness
States and Health Insurance Coverage

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

19. Australian Policy Online - recent content

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia. [ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week
appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page, and the downloads vary depending on the topic you select.

---

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

20. CRINMAIL - October 2009
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)

Latest issues of CRINMAIL:

22 October 2009 - CRINMAIL 1119
* DISCRIMINATION: Global report on status offences [publication]
* AFRICA: State party reports to the African Committee on the Rights and Welfare of the Child [news]
* CHINA: Children Among "Missing" Xinjiang Detainees [news]
* INTER-AMERICAN COMMISSION: Session 137 [news]
* UNICEF: Children in Immigrant Families in Eight Affluent Countries: Their family, national and international context [publication]
* ASEAN: Worrying attempts to control civil society [news]
* EMPLOYMENT: Save the Children Sweden
**NEWS IN BRIEF**
**QUIZ**

20 October 2009 - CRINMAIL 1118
* UNITED KINGDOM: Row breaks out over Children's Commissioner [news]
* GLOBAL Preparation for independent living [publication]
* CZECH REPUBLIC: Minister to propose introduction of children's Ombudsperson [news]
* UAE: Verdict from UN expert on exploitation [news]
* CARIBBEAN: Commonwealth judges call for child rights commitment [news]
* INTERNET: Online protection guidelines [publication]
* UNITED STATES: Call for information on CRC

---

Earlier issues of CRINMAIL
- links to 200+ earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm




Disclaimer/Privacy Statement


Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com



******************************************

Mondegreens

******************************************

A dozen of my favourite mondegreens:
(a.k.a. misunderstood song lyrics)

*

Baking carrot biscuits.
Actual lyric:
Taking care of business.
(Bachman-Turner Overdrive)

*

Big girl, small fry
Actual lyric:
Big Girls Don't Cry
(The Four Seasons)

*

Big ole Jed had a light on.
Actual lyric:
Big old jet airliner.
(Steve Miller Band)

*

Donuts make my brown eyes blue.
Actual lyric:
Don't it make my brown eyes blue.
(Crystal Gale)

*

Every time you go away you take a piece of meat with you.
Actual lyric:
Every time you go away you take a piece of me with you.

*

I'll never leave your pizza burning.
Actual lyric:
I'll never be your beast of burden.
(Rolling Stones)

*

In-a-gadda-da-vita . . .
Actual lyric:
In the garden of Eden, honey.
(Iron Butterfly)
The band, themselves, while drunk in 1968, botched the lyrics, and decided to keep them this way.

*

I was so mad!
Actual lyric:
I'm a soul man
(Blues Brothers)

*

Maerzee dotes and dozee dotes and little lamsee divey a kiddle ee iveetoo, wouldn't you?
Actual lyric:
Mares eat oats and does eat oats and little lambs eat ivy,
A kid'll eat ivy too, wouldn't you?
(Children's Song)

*

Michelle, Ma Belle, Sunday Monkey Play No Piano Song, No Piano Song.
Actual lyric:
Michelle, ma belle.
Sont des mots qui vont tres bien ensemble,
Tres bien ensemble.
(The Beatles)


*

Life in the Vaseline
Actual lyric:
Life in the Fast Lane
(Eagles)

*

'Scuse me while I kiss this guy
Actual lyric:
'Scuse me while I kiss the sky
(Jimi Hendrix)

*

Source:
I can't remember.
Do a Google.ca search for mondegreen
if you want more...


----------------------------

And, in closing...

----------------------------


Local TV Matters
Campaign by Canadian TV Broadcasters to Preserve Local Content

The outcome of important public hearings set to be held in Ottawa this December will impact you, your TV service and how much you pay for cable.
You demand local TV, and local choice, and we want to continue to deliver it for you.
It’s time to stop cable and satellite companies from charging you more for the local TV you’re already paying for.
[ Local TV Matters --- Get the Facts ]

---

Windows 7 Review: XP vs Vista vs 7 in 80+ Benchmarks
- from MaximumPC

---

Poison Ivy 101
If you've ever caught poison ivy as I did two months ago,
you'll like this tip that I found useful to help me locate the poison ivy so I could take necessary action.

Here's the trick : Wait until the fall.
Poison ivy turns the same colour as sumac (deep wine red) for a few weeks in early fall (that's early October here in eastern Ontario). 

http://tinyurl.com/yztbubk
If you find poison ivy around your home, cottage or playground, DON'T BURN IT --- the oil from the plant can get wreak havoc on your lungs.

[End of Gilles' Public Service Announcement]