Canadian Social Research Newsletter
February 26, 2012

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

This week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,534 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. How RRSP payments can help seniors with benefits (Globe and Mail) - February 24
2. Minister Menzies Highlights Pooled Registered Pension Plans' Strengths for Small and Medium-Sized Business (Finance Canada) - February 24
3. Healing and education needed: Truth and Reconciliation report (Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada) - February 24
4. Is the federal Old Age Security Minister playing divide-and-conquer with youth and seniors?? - February 24
5. The Data Room : Interactives, videos and graphics (Globe and Mail) - February 23
6. New Brunswick at a Crossroads : Progressive Income Tax, a Clear Choice (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - Nova Scotia Office) - February 22
7. British Columbia Budget 2012 - February 21
8. Cuts to Ontario’s justice system necessary to stave off rising debt: Drummond report (Law Times) - February 20
9. More on the Drummond Report
--- Harvard International Review interview with Don Drummond - February 17
---- Response to the above interview by Erin Weir of the Progressive Economics Forum - February 20 - February 20
--- Selling the Drummond Report (video debate : three suits vs Armine Yalnizyan) - February 20
10. Ontario : The Special Diet Allowance (A new Canadian Social Research Links page) - February 21
11. What’s Next? Poverty forum on Parliament Hill (Dignity for All Campaign) - February 14
12. Targeting lower-income seniors (Ish Theilheimer in Straight Goods) - January 31
13. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report - February 26
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, December 2011
- February 23
--- Victim services in Canada, 2009/2010 - February 23
14. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

15. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
16. How to Remove Your Google Search History Before Google's New Privacy Policy Takes Effect (Electronic Frontier Foundation) - February 21
17. The Joy of Stats (Hans Rosling)
18. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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Go to the home page of the
Canadian Social Research Links website:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/index.htm


1. How RRSP payments can help seniors with benefits - February 24
(Globe and Mail)

How RRSP payments can help seniors with benefits
http://goo.gl/NxxTu
February 24, 2012
By Preet Banerjee
There’s been a lot of talk about changes to the Old Age Security program lately, but the Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) deserves a lot more attention. For low-income seniors, it could amount to almost $9,000 a year, but a general lack of knowledge in financial planning is leading some people to effectively turn it down.
Tax Free Savings Account might be a better savings vehicle for low-income seniors. Well, it’s a bit more complicated than just that. It’s true that an RRSP or RRIF withdrawal made if you are eligible for GIS could effectively be taxed at around 70 per cent since you have to pay your marginal tax rate on the withdrawal and it can reduce your GIS payment by 50 cents per dollar. It’s also true that had that withdrawal come from a TFSA, the effective tax rate is zero, since the withdrawal does not affect income-tested benefits. “But there’s sort of an alternate universe that exists for lower-income seniors between 65 and 71”, says social policy consultant John Stapleton. (...) while the TFSA can be a better savings vehicle for many lower-income Canadians, you can’t just assume that will always be the case. You need to plan it out.
Source:
Globe and Mail
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

---

- Go to the Asset-Based Social Policies Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/assets.htm

- Go to the Pension Reforms Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/pensions.htm

- Go to the Seniors (Social Research) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/seniors.htm

2. Minister Menzies Highlights Pooled Registered Pension Plans' Strengths for Small and Medium-Sized Business - February 24
(Finance Canada)

Minister Menzies Highlights Pooled Registered Pension Plans'
Strengths for Small and Medium-Sized Business

http://www.fin.gc.ca/n12/12-019-eng.asp
February 24, 2012
The Honourable Ted Menzies, Minister of State (Finance), today spoke to the Charlottetown Chamber of Commerce about how the introduction of Pooled Registered Pension Plans (PRPPs) will help small and medium-sized businesses compete for the skilled workers they need to expand and grow.
(...)
With PRPPs, participation in privately administered and well-regulated workplace pensions will be encouraged by automatic enrolment of employees. Automatic enrolment will encourage Canadians to begin a program of regular savings for their retirement.

Source:
Finance Canada
http://www.fin.gc.ca/fin-eng.asp

Whoa.
Did you get that zinger in the second sentence above?
"With PRPPs, participation ... will be encouraged by automatic enrolment of employees."
Automatic enrolment isn't encouragement --- it's coercion or, at best, a negative option.
But then, this *is* the Harper Government™ we're talking about here...

Related link:

Pooled Registered Pension Plans (PRPPs):
News Coverage, Opinion & Commentary

http://goo.gl/gcQKY
- links to 60+ related resources, including some negative critiques.
Source:
Ampersand Advisory Group
http://www.ampersandadvisory.com/
(Vancouver pension consulting firm)

---

- Go to the Pooled Registered Pension Plans Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/prpp.htm

- Go to the Asset-Based Social Policies Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/assets.htm

3. Healing and education needed: Truth and Reconciliation report - February 24

Healing and education needed: Truth and Reconciliation report
http://www.lfpress.com/news/canada/2012/02/24/19422941.html
By Kristy Kirkup
February 24, 2012
OTTAWA - The ability to heal the wounded relationship between government and aboriginal Canadians will be hindered until First Nations receive appropriate recognition, according to an interim report released by a commission looking at Canada’s history of residential schools. In its report released Friday, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission said governments have historically taken a “social welfare approach” to its relationship with First Nations and without proper recognition, Canada runs the risk of continuing its “assimilationist” policies. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission is mandated to learn about Canada’s residential school program and it will inform Canadians about what happened in those schools.
Source:
London Free Press

http://www.lfpress.com

---

From the
Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada:

Truth and Reconciliation Commission
releases interim report and historical publication
(PDF - 72K, 2 pages)
http://goo.gl/IXdzx
February 24, 2012
[Backgrounder]
The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) released today its Interim Report. Additionally, the TRC also launched a new historical publication entitled They Came for the Children: Canada, Aboriginal Peoples, and Residential Schools.

The interim report:

Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada:
Interim Report
(PDF - 2.9MB, 39 pages)
http://goo.gl/2dcjp
February 2012
This interim report covers the activities of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada since the appointment of the current three Commissioners on July 1, 2009. The report summarizes:
* the activities of the Commissioners
* the messages presented to the Commission at hearings and National Events
* the activities of the Commission with relation to its mandate
* the Commission’s interim findings
* the Commission’s recommendations

The new
historical publication:

They Came for the Children:
Canada, Aboriginal Peoples, and Residential Schools
(PDF - 3.8MB, 124 pages)
http://goo.gl/SdBhD
February 2012
The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada is publishing this history as a part of its mandate to educate the Canadian public about residential schools and their place in Canadian history. The Commission was established by the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. The agreement was reached in response to numerous class-action lawsuits that former students of residential schools had brought against the federal government and the churches that operated those schools in Canada for well over 100 years. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission has been mandated to inform all Canadians about what happened in the schools and to guide a process of national reconciliation.

Source:
Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada

http://www.trc.ca/
The Commission was established by the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. The agreement was reached in response to numerous class-action lawsuits that former students of residential schools had brought against the federal government and the churches that operated those schools in Canada for well over 100 years. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission has been mandated to inform all Canadians about what happened in the schools and to guide a process of national reconciliation.

Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement:
http://www.residentialschoolsettlement.ca/english_index.html
Version française : http://www.residentialschoolsettlement.ca/French/index_french.html
Inuktitut version : http://www.residentialschoolsettlement.ca/Inuktitut/Inuktitut.html (requires Inuktitut font.)

---

- Go to the First Nations Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/1stbkmrk.htm

4. Is the federal Old Age Security Minister playing divide-and-conquer with youth and seniors?? - February 24

Proposed Old Age Security reforms
(moving age of eligibility from 65 to 67):

On February 21, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Minister Diane Finley gave a speech at Toronto’s swanky Canadian Club --- including a photo-op-ready table of high school students --- about the looming Old Age Security crisis. According to the Star, "[S]he painted a picture of a country awash in grey, gasping seniors, more over 65s than under 14s by 2030, with a shrinking tax base, declining birth rate and skilled-worker shortage." We cannot be backed into a choice between the country’s financial security and the commitment to aging Canadians, she said.

Where I (Gilles) come from, that's called the Divide-And-Conquer Strategy [ or Divide-And-Rule --- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Divide_and_rule ], best summed up in the old saw, "As the watering hole shrinks, the animals start eyeing one another."

Below, you'll find links to two articles about this event. The first deals with the GAG ORDER imposed upon the students (BOOOOOOOOO!), and the second labels as "cynical" the Tory strategy pitting the young and old generations against one another in this manufactured crisis.

---

Diane Finley sells old-age pension changes to the young
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1134754
February 24, 2012
By Tim Harper
(...) Both initiatives (raising the eligibility age for Old Age Security and the recent Internet surveillance bill) show a government obsessed with choreography and stage management, suddenly and curiously gone tone deaf, back on its heels against an opposition offensive. The NDP did dispatch Beaches—East York MP Matthew Kellway for a reality check. (...) A less partisan view surely would be forthcoming from the students arrayed at the luncheon, the ones targeted again and again by Finley, the ones she told to pay attention because this policy is aimed at their generation. (...) But, alas, we will never know. The students from Jean Vanier Catholic Secondary School of Scarborough, used so expertly by a minister with a message, were barred from talking to the media. We don’t know about their retirement plans, but they have already been taught a lesson on message control.
Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

---

The Tories Cynical Strategy On Pensions
http://blogs.ottawacitizen.com/2012/02/24/58095/
February 24, 2012
By Ken Gray
Human Resources Minister Diane Finley has taken a most cynical tact in trying to convince Canadians they should take their Old Age Security payments at age 67 rather than the age for which they paid for them at age 65. Despite the fact that many economists and Parliament’s budget officer feel the OAS is sustainable as it is, the Harper administration, following its small-government ideology, is determined to sell the measure. However rather than address the issue with seniors, Finley is targeting young Canadian voters.
(...)
The OAS, the Canada Pension Plan, medicare (for which federal transfer funds to the provinces have now been capped with no debate undertaken by the Conservative government) and other parts of the meagre safety net are some of the most civilized measures enacted in history. Now it looks as if the federal government is prepared to carry out its small government agenda (despite spending billions on crime legislation and F-35s — a little consistency is lacking here) on the backs of the elderly and the sick.

Source:
The Bulldog (Ken Gray's blog)

http://blogs.ottawacitizen.com/author/kengray20/

Ottawa Citizen
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/

---

- Go to the Pension Reforms Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/pensions.htm

5. The Data Room : Interactives, videos and graphics - February 23
(Globe and Mail)

From the
Globe and Mail Economy Lab:

The Data Room : Interactives, videos and graphics
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/economy/economy-lab/data-room/
The Data Room is The Globe and Mail's new resource for digging into the raw data on the economy.

Selected graphs from
the Data Room:

Poverty and income groups in Canada
http://goo.gl/OWIpa
February 23, 2012
- percentage of individuals 65+ and 25-54 with equivalent family income less than LICO (low income cut off)

---

Old Age Security expenditures as a percentage of Gross Domestic Product
http://goo.gl/1mC7h
February 8, 2012
- total of the Old Age Pension, the Guaranteed Income Supplement and The Allowance (as % of GDP)

---

OAS expenditures: 1966-2060
http://goo.gl/ksENL
February 8, 2012
- historical (to 2009) and projected. Total includes expenditures realting to OAS, GIS and The Allowance and administrative expenses. Dollars are in projected nominal values.

---

OAS and GIS beneficiaries: 1966-2060
http://goo.gl/SJnmb
February 8, 2012
- Old Age Security and Guaranteed Income Supplement Beneficiaries Historical (to 2009) and projected

---

Duration of unemployment in Canada, 2007-2011
http://goo.gl/XFZmi
February 8, 2012
- age 15 and higher, in thousands

---

- Population of Canada projected to 2060
http://goo.gl/M4s9j
January 30, 2012
- by age group (0-19 --- 20-64 --- 65 and over - reaching age 65)

---

Job vacancies by province
http://goo.gl/vdggb
January 24, 2012
- three-month average ending September, 2011

---

Also includes infographics on the following:
[ Go to http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/economy/economy-lab/data-room/ to access the links below. ]
* manufacturing by province (2006-2011)
* export value by province (Dec. 2011)
* Canada, Imports and Exports (2000-2011)
* Dropping out - Americans leaving the labour force (2001-2011)

Source:
Globe and Mail
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

---

- Go to the Social Statistics Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm

6. New Brunswick at a Crossroads : Progressive Income Tax, a Clear Choice - February 22
(Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - Nova Scotia Office)

New Brunswick needs to change direction
http://goo.gl/eb9Ws
News Release
February 22, 2012
A new study from UNB-SJ economist Roderick Hill and CCPA-NS researcher Jason Edwards outlines why New Brunswick should move toward a more progressive tax structure. The report, titled New Brunswick at a Crossroads: Progressive Income Tax, a Clear Choice, estimates that the province could generate another $260 million of annual revenue by reversing the Graham tax cuts and adding a new upper-income bracket. Proposed by The Common Front for Social Justice, these changes would improve the progressivity of the province's tax system, allowing the wealthiest citizens to pay their fair share.

The report:

New Brunswick at a Crossroads:
Progressive Income Tax, a Clear Choice
(PDF - 820K, 12 pages)
http://goo.gl/3WruF
By Jason Edwards and Roderick Hill
February 2012
---------------------------
Version française:
Le Nouveau-Brunswick est à une croisée des chemins:
L’impôt progressif, un choix clair
(PDF - 736K, 12 pages)
http://goo.gl/WJh0N
Février 2012

Related link:

An additional quarter billion dollars could go a long way in New Brunswick
http://goo.gl/BC2Il
News Release
February 20, 2012
----------------------
Version française de ce communiqué:
Un quart de milliard de dollars de plus donnerait
un bon coup de pouce à l'économie du Nouveau-Brunswick
http://goo.gl/9xX4G

Source:
CCPA Nova Scotia Office
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/nova-scotia
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

Common Front for Social Justice (CFSJ)
http://www.frontnb.ca/en/Home_en.htm
The Common Front for Social Justice (CFSJ) is a non-profit organization whose mandate is to lobby for more justice, better social policy and a greater solidarity within society, especially with those living in poverty.

Front commun pour la justice sociale (FCJS)
http://www.frontnb.ca/fr/home_fr.htm

---

- Go to the New Brunswick Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nbkmrk.htm

7. British Columbia Budget 2012 - February 21

From the
BC Ministry of Finance:

British Columbia Budget 2012
http://www.bcbudget.gov.bc.ca/2012/default.htm
February 21, 2011
- includes links to all news releases, backgrounders, budget highlights, Ministry Services Plans, and much more...

---

Budget 2012 News Release (PDF - 148K, 3 pages)
http://www.bcbudget.gov.bc.ca/2012/newsrelease/2012_News_Release.pdf
February 21, 2012
VICTORIA — Budget 2012 lays a firm foundation for the future, putting British Columbia on the right path to eliminate the deficit, protect public services, and build a more competitive economy that attracts jobs and investment, Finance Minister Kevin Falcon announced today. Budget 2012 shows the deficit forecast for 2011-12 improved by $594 million over second Quarterly Report projections to $2.5 billion. The Province forecasts a deficit of $968 million in 2012-13, and surpluses of $154 million in 2013-14 and $250 million in 2014-5. Over the next three years, government will contain spending growth to an annual average of two per cent while continuing to protect health and education funding

Budget and Fiscal Plan (PDF - 2.9MB, 162 pages)
http://www.bcbudget.gov.bc.ca/2012/bfp/2012_Budget_Fiscal_Plan.pdf
- main budget document, lays out the Province’s three-year fiscal plan, including economic outlook, revenues, spending, tax measures, and forecasting risks and assumptions.

Budget Highlights (PDF - 624K, 4 pages)
http://www.bcbudget.gov.bc.ca/2012/highlights/2012_Highlights.pdf
- reader-friendly, plain-language overview of Budget 2012

Budget Speech (PDF - 240K, 17 pages)
http://www.bcbudget.gov.bc.ca/2012/speech/2012_Budget_Speech.pdf
- the Finance Minister's address to the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia.

Budget Backgrounders (small PDF files):

••• Fiscal Plan 2012/13 – 2014/15
http://www.bcbudget.gov.bc.ca/2012/backgrounders/2012_Backgrounder_1.pdf

••• Budget 2012 - Tax savings for B.C families
http://www.bcbudget.gov.bc.ca/2012/backgrounders/2012_Backgrounder_2.pdf

••• Budget 2012 supports B.C Jobs Plan
http://www.bcbudget.gov.bc.ca/2012/backgrounders/2012_Backgrounder_3.pdf

First-Time New Home Buyers' Bonus Fact Sheet: (small PDF file)
http://www.bcbudget.gov.bc.ca/2012/homebuyers/2012_First_Time_Home_Buyers_Fact_Sheet.pdf

Source:
BC Ministry of Finance

http://www.gov.bc.ca/fin/

----------------------------------------

From the Budget 2012 Ministry Service Plans page:
http://www.bcbudget.gov.bc.ca/2012/serviceplans.htm
[Click the link above to access plans for all BC Ministries]

Selected Ministry Plans:

* Ministry of Social Development 2012/13– 2014/15 Service Plan (PDF - 1MB, 24 pages)
(Ministry responsible for welfare)
http://www.bcbudget.gov.bc.ca/2012/sp/pdf/ministry/msd.pdf
February 2012

* Ministry of Children and Family Development (PDF - 236K, 24 pages)
http://www.bcbudget.gov.bc.ca/2012/sp/pdf/ministry/cfd.pdf
February 2011

----------------------------------------

Analysis and media coverage

The false economy of BC Budget 2012:
deficit exaggerated to avoid spending on real problems

http://www.policynote.ca/bc-budget/
February 21st, 2012
By Iglika Ivanova
Today’s BC budget was simply titled Budget 2012. It broke with the tradition of ambitious-sounding titles we’ve seen in the last decade (such as 2010’s Building a Prosperous British Columbia budget), but that’s about all the change you’ll notice from the previous administration’s budgets. Despite the fact that this was hailed as the first budget released by Premier Clark, her opportunity to bring change and show what her family first agenda means in practice, there were no bold policy changes announced here.
Source:
Policy Note blog
http://www.policynote.ca/
CCPA BC Office
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/offices/bc
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

---

Liberal Credibility - Budget 2012
http://www.strategicthoughts.com/record2012/budget2012.html
February 21, 2012
When Finance Minister Kevin Falcon stood in the legislature February 21st to present his budget for 2012-13 and forecasts for two further years, he knew British Columbians won't see audited results until July 2013, two months after the election. Budgets are as much political statements as lists of figures...
Source:
David Schreck : Strategic Thoughts

http://www.strategicthoughts.com/

---

B.C. budget 2012 : 'No one is immune,' says Finance Minister Falcon in introducing tight budget
http://goo.gl/5GP9n
By Cassidy Olivier
February 21, 2012
Determined to balance the books before the next election, B.C. Finance Minister Kevin Falcon introduced a “disciplined” budget on Tuesday that will put a lock on spending, tax small businesses and sell off government assets.
Source:
The Province (Vancouver)

http://www.theprovince.com/

---

Federal and Provincial Budgets
http://www.td.com/economics/gov_finances.jsp
- links to analysis by TD Economics of each federal, provincial and territorial budget after it is tabled.
[The 2012 BC Budget analysis will be posted at this link when completed.]
Source:
2011 Federal, Provincial and Territorial Budgets

http://www.td.com/economics/gov_finances.jsp
TD Economics

http://www.td.com/economics/

---

- Go to the BC Government Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk.htm

- Go to the 2012 Canadian Government Budgets Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets_2012.htm

8. Cuts to Ontario’s justice system necessary to stave off rising debt: Drummond report - February 20
(Law Times)

Cuts to Ontario’s justice system necessary to stave off rising debt: Drummond report
http://goo.gl/gyQyP
February 20, 2012
By Kendyl Sebesta
Putting the federal government in charge of incarceration for sentences that are longer than six months, upgrading or replacing 117 deteriorating courthouses, and diverting less complex cases away from the province’s courts are just some of the changes cash-strapped Ontario will have to make if it hopes to avoid doubling its deficit by 2017-18, economist Don Drummond warned last week.

In his report [ http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/reformcommission/index.html ], Drummond warns if all 10 of his recommendations are not implemented, the province's justice system will suffer. He points to deteriorating courthouses and facilities that he says will cost the province more in the long run if they are not updated or replaced. He also adds more cases and more family court matters are adding to delays in the justice system that will waste time and resources and add to the province's growing deficit. Lastly, he points out the province will spend at least $22 million per year in additional funding for more jails because of the federal omnibus crime bill’s plans to jail more offenders. He adds that figure is likely to climb in the upcoming years.

Hearings for the crime bill are currently underway in the Senate and combine nine previous bills that were never passed by Parliament. They would boost police and prosecutorial powers targeting drug traffickers, child sex predators, and dangerous young offenders if passed.

Source:
Law Times
http://www.lawtimesnews.com/

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

- Go to the Ontario Drummond Report (2012) links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/drummond_report_2012.htm

9. More on the Drummond Report
--- Harvard International Review interview with Don Drummond - February 17
---- Response to the above interview by Erin Weir of the Progressive Economics Forum - February 20 - February 20
--- Selling the Drummond Report (video debate : three suits vs Armine Yalnizyan) - February 20

 

 



<=================================

"Demolition Don"
by Dizzy Minott at the Lula Lounge

---
With commentary by Linda McQuaid

Source:
OperationMaple.com ("Take Canada Back!")
http://www.operationmaple.com/

<=================================

---------------------------------------------------------------

Northern Juggernaut?
A Look Inside the Canadian Economy with Don Drummond
(interview)
http://hir.harvard.edu/northern-juggernaut-a-look-inside-the-canadian-economy-with-don-drummond
By Winston Gee
February 17, 2012
Source:
Harvard International Review
http://hir.harvard.edu/

Below, Erin Weir of the Progressive Economics Forum
responds to the Harvard International Review interview with Don Drummond:

Drummond Misdiagnoses Ontario’s Economy
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/2012/02/20/drummond-misdiagnoses-economy/
By Erin Weir
February 20, 2012
Source:
Relentlessly Progressive Economics Blog
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/relentless/

[ Progressive Economics Forum (PEF)
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/
The Progressive Economics Forum aims to promote the development of a progressive economics community in Canada. The PEF brings together over 125 progressive economists, working in universities, the labour movement, and activist research organizations. ]

More Progressive Economics Forum postings about
Don Drummond's work including his latest report
:
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/category/don-drummond/

---------------------------------------------------------------

From
The Agenda with Steve Paikin (TVOntario):

Selling the Drummond Report (video, duration 40 minutes)
http://ww3.tvo.org/video/172883/selling-drummond-report
February 20, 2012
Economist Don Drummond says changes have to be made.
Ontario politicians say changes are politically unpalatable.
The Agenda examines the divide on Drummond.

Guests:
* Michael Decter - Health Care Analyst
* John Duffy - Principal, StrategyCorp
* Eric Lascelles - Chief Economist, RBC Global Asset Management
* Armine Yalnizyan - Senior Economist, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
* Rocco Rossi - Businessperson and Former Ontario PC Candidate, Eglinton - Lawrence

COMMENT: What, only THREE suits ganging up on Armine??
What is this, TVOntario or Faux News North?
A little balance would be nice...

Source:
The Agenda

http://theagenda.tvo.org/
TVOntario
http://ww3.tvo.org/home

---

- Go to the Ontario Drummond Report (2012) links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/drummond_report_2012.htm

10. Ontario : The Special Diet Allowance - February 21
(A new Canadian Social Research Links page)

The Ontario Special Diet Allowance
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/on_special_diet.htm
A new Canadian Social Research Links page
- 45 links to information about the Ontario Special Diet Allowance that's available under Ontario's two social assistance programs
- includes several Ontario Auditor General's reports pointing to potential abuses of the allowance and what the Ontario is doing - or proposing to do - about it. The Commission of Review of Social Assistance in Ontario is asking for feedback on its second discussion paper, including the Special Diet Allowance, by March 16.

Related link:

The Special Diet : Mary Kelly (video interview, duration 25 min.)
http://ww3.tvo.org/video/163770/web-exclusive-special-diet
Steve Paikin
January 27, 2011
Ontario Disability Support Program recipient Mary Kelly and others like her may be on deathwatch after the upcoming Ontario budget. She makes a compelling case, based on her personal situation, why the Ontario government shouldn't cut the Special Diet under the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) and Ontario Works (OW) in its upcoming provincial budget or its social assistance review.

Source:
TVOntario

http://ww3.tvo.org/home

---

- Go to the Ontario Social Assistance Review Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/on_sa_review.htm

11. What’s Next? Poverty forum on Parliament Hill - February 14
(Dignity for All Campaign)

 


Video streaming by Ustream

“What’s Next?” poverty forum on Parliament Hill (February 14, 2012)


“What’s Next?” poverty forum on Parliament Hill

On February 14th, the Dignity for All campaign for a poverty-free Canada hosted “What’s Next? How do we Address Poverty in Canada?” on Parliament Hill. Over 130 people – including a significant number of parliamentarians, advocacy groups, and members of the public – attended the public forum, with many more from across the country watching online via our live feed.

John Ibbitson from the Globe and Mail moderated a panel discussion and Q & A with representatives from all parties. Participants expressed a strong desire to continue the non-partisan dialogue established at the event and to work together to identify and implement concrete, achievable measures for ending poverty with broad appeal and support.

Panelists included:

Jean Crowder, NDP
Senator Jane Cordy, Liberal
Leilani Farha, Dignity for All
Jean-François Fortin, Bloc Québécois
Elizabeth May, Green Party
Senator Don Meredith, Conservative
Harriet McLachlan, Canada Without Poverty

---

- Go to the National/Federal and International Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty2.htm

12. Targeting lower-income seniors - January 31
(Ish Theilheimer in Straight Goods)

Targeting lower-income seniors
http://www.carp.ca/2012/02/09/targeting-lower-income-seniors/
By Ish Theilheimer

On May 2 last year, nearly four in ten Canadian voters went Conservative — giving Stephen Harper a majority government and a mandate, as he sees it, to reshape Canada. Some voters believed they’d get good management, some wanted to get rid of the gun law, some wanted law and order. Most voters probably did not vote to make retirement a far-away, insecure dream for themselves, but that may be what they chose.

Source:
CARP
http://www.carp.ca/
Originally published by
Straight Goods
[ http://www.straightgoods.ca/ ]
on January 31, 2012

---

- Go to the Pension Reforms Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/pensions.htm

13. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report - February 26
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, December 2011
February 23
---
Victim services in Canada, 2009/2010 - February 23

What's new from The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

NOTE:
[By Gilles
]
WOW!I just found this blockbuster statistical report entitled Women in Canada, (the link immediately below) with over 200 tables and charts, on February 26 while preparing this week's newsletter. I'll be adding links to sections of this report on a number of Canadian Social Research Links pages over the next week, but I wanted to highlight this excellent statistical resource on a wide range of women's issues.

February 26, 2012
Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/89-503-x/89-503-x2010001-eng.htm
This is the sixth edition of Women in Canada – representing the 25th anniversary of this publication. (...) As noted in the original 1985 report, "Women in Canada is intended to aid the continuing discussion and evaluation of the changing roles and social characteristics of Canadian women as well as contribute to the development of policies concerning the status of women in Canada."

General contents of this publication:

(Click the link above, then select a chapter in the left-hand margin of that page.
Each section appears in HTML format, and a link to the corresponding PDF file appears at the top of each section.)

* Female population
* Families, Living Arrangements and Unpaid Work
* Women and Health
* Women and Education
* Paid work
* Economic Well-being
* Women and the Criminal Justice System
* First Nations, Métis and Inuit Women
* Immigrant Women
* Visible Minority Women
* Senior Women
* Women with activity limitations
* Tables and charts <========== links to 200+ tables and charts!
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/89-503-x/2010001/tbl-c-g-eng.htm
* More information
* Other issues in this series

Source:
Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report - Product main page*
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=89-503-X&lang=eng
Understanding the role of women in Canadian society and how it has changed over time is dependent on having information that can begin to shed light on the diverse circumstances and experiences of women. Women in Canada provides an unparalleled compilation of data related to women's family status, education, employment, economic well-being, unpaid work, health, and more.
---
[ * On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue
of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

Related subjects:

* Population and demography
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=3867&lang=eng&more=0

* Society and community
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=75&lang=eng&more=0

* Women and gender
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=75&id=78&lang=eng&more=0

---

- Go to the Social Statistics Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm

- Go to the Canadian Government Sites about Women's Social Issues page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/women.htm

 

February 23, 2012
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, December 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120223/dq120223a-eng.htm
In December, average weekly earnings of non-farm payroll employees were $888.26, up 0.7% from the previous month. On a year-over-year basis, earnings rose 2.4%.

 

February 23, 2012
Victim services in Canada, 2009/2010

By Christopher Munch
Drawing on results from the fourth cycle of the Victim Services Survey, this article presents a profile of victim services, including the types of victim service providers and the services offered.

Highlights:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2012001/article/11626/hl-fs-eng.htm

Full article in HTML:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2012001/article/11626-eng.htm

Full article in PDF(819K):
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2012001/article/11614-eng.pdf

Related link:

Victim Services Survey, 2009/2010
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120223/dq120223e-eng.htm
In 2009/2010, 911 programs or organizations provided a wide range of services to victims of crime in Canada. In addition, there were nine provincial criminal injuries compensation programs in operation that year, four of which were administered in conjunction with other service providers.

Source:
Juristat - product main page*

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=85-002-X&lang=eng
This periodical is intended for those with an interest in Canada's justice system as well as those who plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects. It provides analysis and detailed statistics on a variety of justice-related topics and issues. Five issues of Juristat are produced each year. Each issue contains several articles on variety of topics, including crime, homicide, the court system, and correctional services.
---
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest
issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:

* Crime and justice
http://goo.gl/0apmd

* Victims and victimization
http://goo.gl/o1YVe

* Society and community
http://goo.gl/eP65E

 

The Daily Archives
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/DAILY/daily.cgi?s=last
- select a month and year from the drop-down menus and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

14. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
http://www.childcarecanada.org

February 25, 2012

What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

Information about the current state of child care in Toronto
http://goo.gl/jKwBT
22 Feb 2012 | Ontario
Fact sheet, brochure and community presentation from the City of Toronto provide detailed information on the impacts of full-day kindergarten on the child care sector and strategies needed to stabilize it.

Family Day on the treadmill: Alberta families at risk of too much stress
http://goo.gl/qpQuc
21 Feb 2012 | Alberta
Report suggests Albertans need more than family day to catch up on family time; argues that "high working hours, low vacation entitlement, and lack of childcare is not a recipe for a healthy productive workforce or community."

Learning together: A study of six B.A. completion cohort programs in early care and education: Year 4
http://goo.gl/lmd3K
21 Feb 2012 | United States
Report describes experiences and views of ECE practitioners from an early education B.A. cohort; findings indicate "almost all graduates were of the opinion that their B.A. degrees would have a positive impact on their future."

State early care and education public policy developments: Fiscal year 2012
http://goo.gl/zLaci
21 Feb 2012 | United States
Report highlights approved policy and funding changes that impact early childhood education by state.

Efficiency and evidence-based practice in early childhood education and care:
CRRU’s analysis of the ECEC recommendations in the Drummond report

http://goo.gl/rHrF4
17 Feb 2012 | Ontario
CRRU's response to the Drummond report (Commission on the Reform of Ontario's Public Services)"responds to the FDK recommendations and to the virtual omission of child care from the perspective of efficiency and evidence-based practice, two of the Commission's declared approaches."

MORE research, policy & practice
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice

2. Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad.

Childcare allowance 'fails to address regional differences'
http://goo.gl/pM1Aa
22 Feb 2012 | Europe

Albertans work hard for a living
http://goo.gl/x8PLK
21 Feb 2012 | Alberta

Putting the sex into government budgets
http://goo.gl/hf4KD
21 Feb 2012 | Canada

How looming Ontario cuts will spark a ‘she-cession’
http://goo.gl/xYKvx
21 Feb 2012 | Ontario

Questioning “The Prophet Drummond”
http://goo.gl/XSPtH
21 Feb 2012 | Ontario

MORE child care in the news
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

------

NOTE: For links to earlier (weekly) issues of this weekly alert going back to June 2009,
check out the CRRU Links Archive on this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/crru_links_archive.htm

------

Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
http://www.childcarecanada.org/res/enews/index.html
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere
http://www.childcarecanada.org/links/index.html

CRRU Publications
http://www.childcarecanada.org/pubs/
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

ISSUE files
http://www.childcarecanada.org/resources/issue-files
- theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
http://www.childcarecanada.org
CRRU is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

15. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.. The Dispatch is distributed by the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. News articles from online newspapers are posted here in a number of general categories, and are tagged with more specific keywords relevant to each article.

Tags
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/tags/
Clicking on a word or expression in the list of tags will call up all relevant news items from past Dispatches under that tag. The list contains a tag for each U.S. state so you can view jurisdiction-specific news, and tags for a huge list of topics, including :
* Basic needs * Canada * Caseloads * Cash assistance * Cellular phones * Census * Charities * Child care * Child hunger * Child poverty * Child support * Child welfare * Child well-being * Chronic homelessness * Cohabitation * Cost of living * Crime * Crimes against the homeless * Debt * Deep poverty * Disability * Early childhood education * Earned income tax credit * Electronic benefit transfers * Eligibility * Food insecurity * Food programs * Foster care* Fuel poverty * Health care costs * Health insurance coverage * Homeless children * Homeless families * Homeless veterans * Housing First * Housing subsidies * Immigrant workers * Income * Income inequality * Jobless benefits * Juvenile justice * Legal aid * Low-income housing * Low-wage work * Medicaid * Microfinance * Minimum wage * Newly poor * No Child Left Behind * Ontario * Paid family leave * Payday lending * Persistent poverty * Poverty measurement * Poverty rate * Prisons * Privatization * Public Housing * Rural poverty * Safety net * SCHIP * Section 8 (Housing) * Seniors * Single parents * SNAP/Food Stamps * Supplemental Security Income * Taxes * Teen pregnancy * Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) * Unemployment rate * Uninsured * Urban poverty * Utilities * Welfare reform * Welfare-to-work * Women Infants and Children (WIC) * Work requirements * Youth employment * many more tags...

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

February 24:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/02/24/
Children in High-Poverty Areas
Extreme Poverty in the US
School Grading System - Indiana
State Minimum Wage - New Jersey
Hiring Discrimination and the Unemployed

February 23:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/02/23/

Children in High-Poverty Areas
Child Welfare System - Minnesota
Stimulus Spending and Assistance Programs - Ohio

February 22:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/02/22/

Unemployment Insurance System
Post Office Closings in Rural Areas
Community Colleges and Student Achievement

February 21:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/02/21/
State Medicaid Programs - Maine, New Mexico
Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program
Child Welfare System - Nebraska

February 20:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/02/20/

Hybrid Welfare Eligibility System - Indiana
Unemployment Benefit Cards - Rhode Island
State Budget Cuts and Disability

---------------------------------

Earlier Poverty Dispatches (back to July 2006):
1. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/
2. Click on a date in the calendar (top right-hand corner of the page) to see the links for that date.
Change the month by clicking the link at the bottom of the calendar.
OR
3. Click on a category or a tag (right-hand margin) to access all relevant links.
[ e.g., 588 links under the category "Poverty" - http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/categories/poverty/ ]
OR
4. Scroll down the home page to the Archives section, where you can view the full content of the dispatches by month back to July 2006 (although *some* media links tend to go 404 after awhile)...
NOTE: I highly recommend this excellent U.S. media resource!
The only shortcoming I encountered was the lack of a table of contents for each daily dispatch, which forces visitors to click each date in the calendar to see the contents of the daily dispatch for that day. So I've created my own archive (the link below), starting in mid-December of 2011, that is a table of contents of each dispatch as per the latest dispatches above, that lets you scan contents without opening each damn dispatch:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/povdispatch_archive.htm

---

NOTE : You can subscribe to this email list or RSS feed
by clicking "Subscribe" in the right-hand margin on any page of the Poverty Dispatch website

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)

http://www.irp.wisc.edu

University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://www.wisc.edu/

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

16. How to Remove Your Google Search History Before Google's New Privacy Policy Takes Effect - February 21
(Electronic Frontier Foundation)

From the
Electronic Frontier Foundation:

How to Remove Your Google Search History
Before Google's New Privacy Policy Takes Effect

http://goo.gl/Y75Tq
February 21, 2012
By Eva Galperin
On March 1st, Google will implement its new, unified privacy policy, which will affect data Google has collected on you prior to March 1st as well as data it collects on you in the future. Until now, your Google Web History (your Google searches and sites visited) was cordoned off from Google's other products. This protection was especially important because search data can reveal particularly sensitive information about you, including facts about your location, interests, age, sexual orientation, religion, health concerns, and more. If you want to keep Google from combining your Web History with the data they have gathered about you in their other products, such as YouTube or Google Plus, you may want to remove all items from your Web History and stop your Web History from being recorded in the future.
Here's how you can do that.

[ It is important to note that disabling Web History in your Google account will not prevent Google from gathering and storing this information and using it for internal purposes. Read the complete article for more information. ]

Source:
Electronic Frontier Foundation

https://www.eff.org/
When our freedoms in the networked world come under attack, the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) is the first line of defense. EFF broke new ground when it was founded in 1990—well before the Internet was on most people's radar—and continues to confront cutting-edge issues defending free speech, privacy, innovation, and consumer rights today.
NOTE: The Electronic Frontier Foundation's home base is located in San Francisco, but their advice also applies to Canada.

http://goo.gl/1B0zu


Source: http://www.robcottingham.ca/cartoon/

17. The Joy of Stats (Hans Rosling)

The Joy of Stats (video, duration 59:06)
http://ww3.tvo.org/video/172756/joy-stats
Hans Rosling can tell the story of the world in 200 countries over 200 years using 120,000 numbers - in just four minutes. Rosling's passion for using statistics to understand the world and his entertaining online lectures have made him a YouTube legend. In this mind-expanding roller coaster ride through the world of statistics, Rosling explores the history of statistics, how stats work mathematically, and how, using statistics, we can take the massive deluge of data of today's computer age and use it to see the world as it really is.

---

- Go to the Social Statistics Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm

18. CRINMAIL (Newsletter of the Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):
http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

The latest information on children's rights around the world:
CRINMAIL
http://www.crin.org/email/
CRIN publishes several email lists on children's rights issues in English, French, Spanish and Arabic. We also issue thematic editions on armed conflict, violence against children and strategic litigation. You can subscribe to any of these email lists and unsubscribe at any time.

CRINMAIL - Children's Rights Newsletter (weekly)
Latest issue:

22 February 2012 - CRINMAIL Issue 1264
http://www.crin.org/email/crinmail_detail_popup.asp?crinmailID=4111
In this issue:
Latest news and reports
- Inhuman sentencing
- Deliberate and indiscriminate attacks
- 'Gulags' for children
- Banning books
- Grey area in equality law
- UN news
Children's Rights Wiki: Spotlight on Iceland
Upcoming events
Employment
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Issues * Law
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

-----------------------------------------------

CRINMAIL Archive (earlier issues):

Option 1:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/CRINMAIL_archive.htm
- includes a table of contents for each issue, as above, back to 2009-2010:

Option 2:
http://goo.gl/C0JNx
- does *not* include the table of contents for each issue (so you must click on each link to see its contents), but it goes back much further (pre-2006). Follow this link to see hundreds of earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

--------------------------------------------------

NOTE:
The CRINMAIL Children's Rights Newsletter is only ONE of several weekly newsletters produced and distributed by CRIN.
See the complete list of newsletters:
http://www.crin.org/email/

Source:
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):

http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

---

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

 


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
http://www.cupe.ca/
Thanks, CUPE!

------------------------

If you wish to receive this weekly newsletter by email, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly newsletter.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

 

The Rise of 'New English'

A new grammar order is dawning.

Here are 10 ways to tell if you speak the New English of youth or the Old English of age.
If these sentences sound OK to you, you're New English; if they don't, good luck finding a nursing home where they'll understand you.

1. "Thank you very much." "No problem."
In Old English, the answer would be: "You're welcome."

2. "Me and him went to the Canucks game."
In Old English, "me" and "him" are in the objective case, not the subjective; in New English, "I" and "me" and "he" and "him" are interchangeable: "Dad gave he and I tickets to the Canucks game."

3. "Snow and sleet is falling on the Coquihalla."
Old English treats a compound subject as plural. New English doesn't know what a compound subject is.

4. "The Sedins played great in the third period."
In Old English, verbs take adverbs, not adjectives: "The Sedins played brilliantly in the third period."

5. "You did real good in your presentation, you're sure to make the sale."
In Old English, you do real good when you donate to the Red Cross, and you do really well when your presentation impresses your audience. Also, in Old English, you put a period or semicolon between one independent clause and another if you don't want to use a conjunction like "so."

6. "We've done alright since we moved to Calgary."
In Old English, "alright" is alwrong. We say "all right."

7. "The company has less full-time employees, but the amount of part-timers has grown."
In Old English, "less" and "amount" apply only to non-count nouns like "flour" and "wealth."
It says "fewer employees" and "number of part-timers."

8. "The committee made a fulsome study of the problem."
In Old English, "fulsome" means insincerely flattering.
In New English, it somehow means "full."

9. "She's an alumni of Simon Fraser."
In Old English (and Old Latin), "alumni" is the male plural of "alumnus," and she must be an alumna of SFU.

10. "So I'm like, ‘What's your problem?'"
In Old English, "I'm like" is pronounced "I said."

New English isn't "wrong." It's just the latest mutation of an endlessly evolving language. And language usage helps to define who's in and who's out. Speak the language like a native, and the natives accept you. Speak it with an accent, or ungrammatically, and the natives will know you're not one of them.

"Whatever," as New English speakers would say.

Source:
The Rise of 'New English'
http://thetyee.ca/Opinion/2012/02/16/New-English/

---------------------------------------

And, in closing...

----------------------------------------

Rolf Harris and 'Stairway to Heaven' like you've never heard it: (video, duration 3:38)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UBzJQ6ZA6oA

---

Hoverthings: (video, duration 5:32)
http://youtu.be/v-B2yfmU89k
(I *want* one!)

---

Down the HATCH, Angela --- the HATCH! (video, duration :30)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E78506JG_Oc

---

Incredible painting skills: (video, duration 3:10)
http://www.wimp.com/paintingskills/

---