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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
April 26, 2009

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2012 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes and a disclaimer.

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian content

1. The Fiscal Monitor for February 2009 (Department of Finance Canada) - April 24
2. Income Levels of BC Employment and Assistance (BCEA) Clients after They Leave Income Assistance (BC Ministry of Housing and Social Development) - April 24
3. New from the Caledon Institute of Social Policy:
--- Canada's Shrinking Safety Net: Employment Insurance in the Great Recession - April 2009
--- Ontario Poverty Conference (June 10-12, 2009, Kitchener)
4. Canadian Labour Online Newsletter - April 24 issue (Canadian Labour Congress)
5. Proceedings of the Standing Senate Committee on National Finance hearings on Employment Insurance held April 1 (Progressive Economics Forum) - April 23
6. Final Report: Canada’s Aging Population: Seizing the Opportunity (Special Senate Committee on Aging) - April 21
7. What's new in The Toronto Star:
--- Frayed safety net for unemployed - April 21
--- Strengthen poverty bill - April 20
8. BC Commentary: A Review of Provincial Social and Economic Trends (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - BC Office) - April 21
9. British Columbia Provincial Election May 12
10. [Alberta] Small hike in welfare budget criticized (Edmonton Journal) - April 15
11. What's new in The Daily (Statistics Canada):
--- Study: Hours and earnings of dual-earner couples, 1997 to 2008 - April 24
--- National Graduates Survey, 2007 - April 22
--- Leading indicators, March 2009 - April 22
12. Canadian Social Forum (Calgary, May 19-22, 2009)
13. 2009 Canadian Administrators of Volunteer Resources (CAVR) Conference (Edmonton), May 31-June 3, 2009
14. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - April 22

International content

15. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs (Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)
16. Australian Policy Online Weekly Briefing - selected recent content
17. CRINMAIL (April 2009) - (Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

Have a great week!

Gilles

************************
Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net


E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com


1. The Fiscal Monitor - February 2009 - April 24
(Department of Finance Canada)

Release of The Fiscal Monitor
April 24, 2009
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, today released The Fiscal Monitor for February 2009.
Highlights
* February 2009: budgetary surplus of $0.8 billion
* April 2008 to February 2009: budgetary surplus of $1.3 billion

Related document:

* The Fiscal Monitor - February 2009

[ Earlier releases of The Fiscal Monitor - by year ]

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

2. Income Levels of BC Employment and Assistance (BCEA) Clients after They Leave Income Assistance - April 24
(BC Ministry of Housing and Social Development)

Province refused to release report on welfare leavers
By Andrew MacLeod
April 24, 2009 (09:30 am)
The British Columbia government has suppressed a report on what happens to people who leave the province's welfare system, but now is promising to release it today.
(...) The province has insisted that the rapidly declining welfare caseload has been the result of more people finding employment. Other research, including a landmark study (PDF - 599K, 8 pages) by Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives researchers, and past Tyee coverage, suggests tightening eligibility rules in 2002 played a large role in the decline. A recent report by provincial Ombudsman Kim Carter, Last Resort (PDF - 2.2MB, 132 pages) , noted, “The ministry lacks evidence to support its conclusion that the reduction in the income assistance caseload is a result of people leaving assistance for employment.”
NOTE: The above article was posted in the morning on April 24and the Ministry posted its report (below) at 2pm (the timestamp on the PDF file).
The Tyee will quite likely have a followup article early in the coming week; check the Tyee home page for updates.
Source:
The Tyee

Related link from the
Ministry of Housing and Social Development
(HSD):

Income Levels of BC Employment and Assistance (BCEA) Clients after They Leave Income Assistance (PDF - 279K, 16 pages)
2009 (PDF file dated April 24/09, 2pm)
The analysis in this report uses tax data from Statistics Canada to examine the income of clients that left assistance and never returned. It is a followup to a previous report, Outcome of those Leaving Assistance, which found that over 80 percent of employable clients who left assistance had employment income.
Specific findings of the report:
· Median total family income of clients, defined as aftertax aftertransfer income including employment income, is higher after clients leave income assistance and increases over time.
· Clients who left income assistance have income significantly higher, in some cases two to three times higher, than they would have receiving income assistance for the entire year.
· Most of the increase is attributable to increases in employment income.
· More...
Source:
Ministry of Housing and Social Development
[ Ministry reports ]

Related link from HSD:

Outcomes of Those Leaving Assistance (PDF - 61K, 6 pages)
February 2007
"(...) Since 2002, 88.2% of Expected to Work (ETW) clients who have left assistance and have not returned as of 2005 have employment income, are attending education or have other income in the year following their exit from IA."

- Go to the BC Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

3. New from the Caledon Institute of Social Policy:
---
Canada's Shrinking Safety Net: Employment Insurance in the Great Recession - April 2009
--- Ontario Poverty Conference (June 10-12, 2009, Kitchener)

Canada's Shrinking Safety Net:
Employment Insurance in the Great Recession
(PDF - 41K, 5 pages)
Michael Mendelson, Ken Battle and Sherri Torjman
April 2009
Belt-tightening changes made to Employment Insurance in the 1990s have decimated the program’s coverage over the years and substantially reduced the value of payments. Today only three in ten unemployed Canadians receive regular EI benefits in contrast to eight in ten in the last recession, in 1990. There is a gender gap in coverage, and it has widened. Both eligibility for benefits and the maximum duration of benefits vary widely from community to community and province to province, leading to unfair treatment of the unemployed. Caledon proposes several immediate changes to strengthen EI, including: a uniform set of rules governing entrance requirements and length of benefits, increasing the earnings-replacement rate from the current 55 to 70 percent of insurable earnings, and setting premium rates higher in good economic times and lower in bad times.

Reducing Poverty in Ontario: A Place-Based Approach
Ontario Poverty Conference
(PDF - 3MB, 8 pages)
June 10-12, 2009
The release of Ontario’s first comprehensive anti-poverty strategy makes now the ideal time for community leaders from across Ontario to come together and be inspired by the stories and experiences from Vibrant Communities and other successful poverty reduction initiatives throughout Canada that are producing real results. The purpose of Reducing Poverty in Ontario: A Place-Based Approach – a three-day learning event in Kitchener, Ontario from June 10 to 12 – is to offer community leaders a rich learning experience that will explore the distinction between reducing and alleviating poverty, and introduce concepts and tools that demonstrate how to build and sustain the multi-sector teams needed to engage citizens in comprehensive poverty reduction efforts.
Speakers include:
· Deb Matthews, Minister of Children & Youth Services and Minister Responsible for Women’s Issues
· Sherri Torjman, Vice-President of the Caledon Institute of Social Policy
· Robin Cardozo, CEO of The Ontario Trillium Foundation
· Tim Brodhead, CEO of The J.W. McConnell Family Foundation
· Frances Lankin, CEO of United Way Toronto
· Liz Weaver, Director of the Hamilton Roundtable for Poverty Reduction
· Mark Chamberlain, Chair of the Hamilton Roundtable and CEO of Trivaris; and,
· Paul Born, CEO of the Tamarack Institute for Community Engagement
[ Online Conference Registration ]

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy

- Go to the Conferences and Events Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/confer.htm
- Go to the Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/hrsdc.htm
- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

4. Canadian Labour Online Newsletter - April 24 issue
(Canadian Labour Congress)

Canadian Labour Online - April 24 issue of the
Newsletter of the Canadian Labour Congress
In this Issue:
* Ottawa must protect hard-earned pensions;
* Dispatches from the United Nations Durban Review Conference;
* CBC has been under-funded for years – If Parliament does not intervene immediately, 800 jobs will be cut!
* Put the Canada-Colombia free trade deal on hold;
* New on the Web.
Source:
Canadian Labour Congress

- Go to the Union Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/unionbkmrk.htm

5. Proceedings of the Standing Senate Committee on National Finance hearings on Employment Insurance held April 1- April 23
(
Progressive Economics Forum)

EI Financing: We Told You So
Posted by Erin Weir
April 23, 2009
On the first of this month, I appeared before the Senate’s Standing Committee on National Finance regarding the Employment Insurance (EI) provisions of the 2009 Budget Implementation Act. The Senate recently posted the transcript online (see below).
A fellow panellist was Michel Bédard, former Chief Actuary of the EI Fund. Last year, he and I appeared in the same panel before the same committee regarding the 2008 Budget Implementation Act. We both argued then that, if unemployment increased, the government’s quasi-reserve of $2 billion would quickly prove insufficient to maintain (let alone improve) EI benefits without hiking premiums. Budget 2009 implicitly acknowledges that this concern was valid. Specifically, it suggests that a further $4.5 billion will be needed to freeze premiums for two years given higher unemployment.

See also:

Worsening Unemployment Calls for Better Employment Insurance
April 9 2009

Source:
Relentlessly Progressive Economics
[A Blog of the Progressive Economics Forum]

Related links:

Proceedings of the
Standing Senate Committee on National Finance
Issue 5 - Evidence - Meeting of April 1, 2009
Panel members:
Michel Bédard, Member, Task Force on the Financing of Employment Insurance, Canadian Institute of Actuaries
Erin Weir, Economist, United Steelworkers
Phil Benson, a lobbyist with Teamsters Canada
Source:
Senate Standing Committee on National Finance - 40th Parliament, 2nd Session (January 26, 2009 - )

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links section: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/hrsdc.htm#ei

6. Final Report: Canada’s Aging Population: Seizing the Opportunity - April 21
(Special Senate Committee on Aging)

More federal assistance for seniors: Senate report
April 21, 2009
By Joan Bryden, The Canadian Press
OTTAWA - The federal government needs to do much more to assist the aging population, including beefing up pension, old age assistance and compassionate care benefits, says a new report. The final report of the special Senate committee on aging, released Tuesday, concludes there are serious gaps in health care, housing, transportation and support systems for seniors. And those problems are only going to grow as the baby boom generation enters the retirement years.
Source:
Yahoo Canada News

Complete report:

Canada’s Aging Population:
Seizing the Opportunity
(PDF - 1.4MB, 237 pages)
April 2009
In November 2006, the Special Senate Committee on Aging was created with a broad mandate to review a wide range of complex issues to determine if Canada is providing the right programs and services at the right time to the individuals who need them. The Committee has reviewed public programs and services for seniors, identified the gaps that exist in meeting their needs, and examined the implications for service delivery in the future as the population ages. [Excerpt from the Foreword]

* Recommendations
* Setting the Vision
* Background

Source:
Reports
(40th Parliament, 2nd Session: January 26, 2009 - )
of the
Special Senate Committee on Aging
[ Parliament of Canada website ]

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm
- Go to the Seniors (Social Research) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/seniors.htm

7. What's new in The Toronto Star:
--- Frayed safety net for unemployed - April 21
--- Strengthen poverty bill - April 20

What's new in The Toronto Star:

Frayed safety net for unemployed
Unequal access to jobless benefits worsens impact of `Great Recession'
By Michael Mendelson, Ken Battle and Sherri Torjman
[ Caledon Institute of Social Policy ]
April 21, 2009
An additional 41,000 Canadians were out of work this March, bringing unemployment close to one and a half million. This frightening number will almost certainly keep climbing in the next several months. Bailouts and building projects will help, but the essential program for most jobless Canadians remains the Employment Insurance system. The program was introduced in the wake of the Great Depression and got us through many difficult times since, most recently the recessions of 1982 and 1990. Is the program up to the challenge of the Great Recession of 2009? In the 1982 recession, jobless benefits helped 76 per cent of the unemployed. During the 1990 recession, fully 83 per cent received benefits. Today coverage is down to 43 per cent – half of what it was in 1990.

Strengthen poverty bill
Editorial
April 20, 2009
Unemployment numbers are soaring, welfare cases are rising and food banks are reporting shortages. The economic downturn has made Ontario's plan to reduce poverty even more crucial than when it was first promised by the Liberals. The initial target is to reduce child poverty by 25 per cent within five years. We have seen targets like that before, and they have been missed. But what makes this plan somewhat different is the accompanying legislation, which would make poverty-reduction an ongoing government responsibility. Children's Minister Deb Matthews, who designed the province's anti-poverty strategy, states: "The only way we're ever going to succeed in the fight against poverty is for it to become a core responsibility of governments now and in the future." Political interests and governments come and go, so the anti-poverty bill – now before a legislative committee – would be a tool to hold politicians to account.
Source:
Toronto Star

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

8. BC Commentary: A Review of Provincial Social and Economic Trends - April 21
(Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - BC Office)

New from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives:

BC Commentary:
A Review of Provincial Social and Economic Trends
(PDF - 644K, pages)
Spring 2009, Volume 12, Number 2
April 21, 2009
Inside this pre-election special edition:
BC’s Growing Gap
Vanilla, No Sprinkles: A Review of BC Budget 2009
A Closer Look at Single Transferable Vote
* An STV Primer
* The Case for STV
* The Case Against STV
* Reflections on the Citizens’ Assembly
* STV is Worth Trying
* The Ghost of Elections Past: STV in the 1952 and 1953 BC Elections
Source:
CCPA BC Office Publications
[ CCPA British Columbia Office ]
[ Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)]

Related links found in the above BC Commentary:

No to BC-STV:
www.nostv.org

British Columbians for STV:
www.stv.ca

Citizens’ Assembly on Electoral Reform:
www.citizensassembly.bc.ca/public

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (A-C) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk2.htm
- Go to the Political Parties and Elections Links in Canada (Provinces and Territories) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_prov_terr.htm

9. British Columbia Provincial Election May 12

British Columbia Election - May 12, 2009

Provincial Election Campaign Officially Underway
April 14, 2009
Ministry of Attorney General
VICTORIA – The British Columbia general election has now been called as the Lieutenant Governor has published a proclamation dissolving the 38th parliament of the Legislative Assembly. British Columbia voters will go to the polls on Tuesday, May 12.

Elections B.C.
- govt. site, includes links to info about parties, candidates, ridings and other election logistics

2009 Referendum on Electoral Reform
The 2009 referendum on electoral reform will be held together with the May 12, 2009 provincial general election. During this referendum, voters will be asked which electoral system British Columbia should use to elect members to the Legislative Assembly: the existing electoral system (First-Past-the-Post) or the single transferable vote electoral system (BC-STV) proposed by the Citizens’ Assembly on Electoral Reform.

From The Tyee:

The Hook - "Political News, Freshly Caught. A Tyee Blog."
- includes blogs on the following topics:
* BC Politics * Federal Politics * Municipal Politics * Election Central * 2010 Olympics * Aboriginal Affairs * Education * Environment * Food + Farming * Health * Housing * Labour + Industry * Media * Rights + Justice * transportation

BC Election Central

Digest of 20 most recent articles in BC Votes '09

Guide to BC election blogs
By Crawford Kilian
April 18, 2009
Never before has a B.C. provincial election been blogged like this one. To ensure that voters are informed on all issues, The Hook offers a rough guide to blogs covering the current campaign. We've organized them in clusters: Election-dedicated blogs and websites; politics blogs by individuals, advocacy groups, and communities; and media blogs.

Source:
TheTyee.ca
"...your independent alternative daily newspaper reaching every corner of B.C. and beyond"

Also from The Tyee:

BC's Badly Broken Welfare System
BC Libs created 'overly complex' maze that kept needy off rolls: ombudsman
By Andrew MacLeod
April 13, 2009
The good news is the provincial government is promising to fix the welfare system.
The bad news is they broke it really, really badly and much damage is already done.
[NOTE: includes five links to related resources and four links to related Tyee articles.]

More BC election 2009 links
(from PovNet.org):

SPARC: BC Votes 2009

CCPA:The Lead-Up Blog

First Call: Advocating for Children and Youth in BC's General Election

- Go to the Political Parties and Elections Links in Canada (Provinces and Territories) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_prov_terr.htm
- Go to the BC Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk.htm

10. [Alberta] Small hike in welfare budget criticized - April 15
(
Edmonton Journal)

Small hike in welfare budget criticized
By Trish Audette
April 15, 2009
Despite a recession that has cost the provincial economy more than 44,000 jobs since the start of the year, the government topped up income support funding by just two per cent in this year's budget, drawing criticism from those who work with unemployed Albertans. But Employment and Immigration Minister Hector Goudreau said the cash injection to Alberta Works, which funds people on welfare, should be seen as a positive "in that it wasn't cut. I think that the mandate is not to provide welfare or financial support. Our mandate is to try to take people and put them into training positions and get them into the workforce as soon as possible," he said. "We're trying to move people through the system."
Source:
The Edmonton Journal

- Go to the Alberta Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/abkmrk.htm
- Go to the 2009 Canadian Government Budgets Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets.htm

11. What's new in The Daily (Statistics Canada):
--- Study: Hours and earnings of dual-earner couples, 1997 to 2008 - April 24
---
National Graduates Survey, 2007 - April 22
---
Leading indicators, March 2009 - April 22

What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

April 24, 2009
Study: Hours and earnings of dual-earner couples, 1997 to 2008
The relative contributions of wives and husbands to paid work hours and earnings have become closer over the past 12 years. Wives now work longer hours at their paid jobs and they earn more than in the past.
[ The family work week (article) ]

April 22, 2009
National Graduates Survey, 2007
More than 80% of college and university students who graduated in 2005 and did not pursue further studies had found full-time employment by 2007. In general, earnings increased by level of study. In 2007, two years after graduation, just over one-quarter of those who owed student debt at the time they graduated had paid it off.
[ Graduating in Canada:
Profile, Labour Market Outcomes and Student Debt of the Class of 2005
]

April 22, 2009
Leading indicators, March 2009
The composite leading index fell 1.3% in March following a 1.4% drop in February. The contraction in the manufacturing sector intensified as widespread cutbacks were implemented in the auto industry early in the new year. This was offset by a marked slowdown in the fall of the housing and stock markets.

The Daily Archives - select a year and month from the drop-down menu to view releases in chronological order
[ Statistics Canada ]

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

12. Canadian Social Forum (Calgary, May 19-22, 2009)

Canadian Social Forum
(Calgary, May 19-22, 2009)
The Canadian Council on Social Development (CCSD) invites you to the first Canadian Social Forum, which will take place in Calgary, May 19-22, 2009. We're bringing together a dynamic combination of unusual suspects from social development, public health, environment, community safety and recreation to brainstorm about poverty.

Preliminary Program (latest version)
HTML version
PDF version
(114K, 9 pages)
- incl. links to : * Preliminary Program * Speakers' Bios * Advisory Committee * Registration Information * Accommodations * Calgary * Abstracts * more...

Registration info

Speakers/moderators include:
* Richard Harwood * Sheila Watt-Cloutier * Charles Karelis * Alain Noël * Cornelia Wieman * Alain Noël * Richard Shillington * Michael Creek * Ruth MacDonald * Shirley Soleil * Steve Snyder * Roger Gibbins * Christine Walsh * Michael Prince * Yvonne Peters * Deborah Parkes * Lucie Dumais * Laurie Beachell * Cam Crawford * Michael Bach * Bruce Porter * Lois Klassen * Cindy Blackstock * Uzma Shakir * Tim Draimin * Michel Venne * Tim Draimin * Michel Venne * Mike McCracken * Jim Mulvale * Jacquie Maund * Laurel Rothman * Adrienne Montani * Ian Renaud–Lauze * Hugh Segal * Françoise David * Mark Kelley * James Hughes * Seth Klein * Derek Cook * Linda Hawke * Lois Klassen * more...

Source:
Canadian Council on Social Development

13. 2009 Canadian Administrators of Volunteer Resources (CAVR) Conference
Edmonton, May 31-June 3, 2009

2009 Canadian Administrators of Volunteer Resources (CAVR) Conference
Edmonton, May 31-June 3, 2009
Try to imagine your work or personal life without community structures in place. Thousands of nonprofit/voluntary sector organizations exist because of the magnitude of volunteer engagement - engagement needing constant tending and nurturing to sustain our enviable quality of life in Canada. Volunteerism in the 21st century has moved far beyond motherhood and apple pie – requiring educated, connected, competent leaders to recruit, retain and recognize the volunteers presently engaged and able to meet the challenges of engaging new Canadians, youth and highly skilled baby boomers as volunteers for the next decade.
Registration details (PDF - 362K, 1 page)
Online registration

Source:
Canadian Administrators of Volunteer Resources
CAVR strives to promote competence and excellence in the professional administration of volunteer resources and to acknowledge the accomplishments of its members. CAVR is the only National Professional Association that offers ongoing certification in the field of volunteer resources management.

- Go to the Conferences and Events Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/confer.htm
- Go to the Voluntary Sector Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/voluntary.htm

14. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - April 22

From the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):

April 22, 2009

Canada’s quiet bargain: The benefits of public spending
22 Apr 09
- Report from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives examining Canadians’ significant dependence on public services and the fiscal capacity lost through tax cuts.

Multiple child-care arrangements and young children’s behavioural outcomes
22 Apr 09
- Report from the Society for Research in Child Development Congressional Fellow examining the association between multiple care arrangements and children’s behaviour.

Early childhood education and care in Europe: Tackling social and cultural inequities
22 Apr 09
- Report from EACEA and Eurydice exploring data, policies, general issues and efforts to improve efficiency and equity in the European ECEC sector.

Cost-benefit review of work-life balance practices-2009
22 Apr 09
- Report from the Centre for Families, Work and Well-Being, University of Guelph on how best to support employees facing diverse caregiving and personal responsibilities.


more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news


· Region ponders ‘bad’ choices for child care [CA-ON]
22 Apr 09

· Budget help poor families condemned [UK]
22 Apr 09

· Govt mulls regulating pre-school education [IN]
21 Apr 09

· National failing in Early Childhood Education [NZ]
20 Apr 09

· ABC Learning disaster could happen again: union [AU] 17 Apr 09

more CC IN THE NEWS »

Related Links:

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

15. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(
Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S). ===> the content of this link changes twice a week
IRP compiles and distributes Poverty Dispatches twice a week. Each issue of the dispatch provides links to U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.
Each Dispatch lists links to current news in popular print media.

April 23, 2009
* Antipoverty Plans - Delaware, New York City
* Public Assistance Programs
* Joblessness and Unemployment
* Homelessness and Housing
* Health Insurance Coverage
* School Funding Formula
* High School Graduation Rates
* Child Wellbeing - Europe
* Opinion: Recession and Child Wellbeing
* State Minimum Wages
* Public Defenders and Legal Aid

April 20, 2009
* States' Joblessness and Unemployment
* Homelessness and Housing - Minnesota, Hawaii
* Children and Dental Care - Milwaukee, WI
* Poverty and School Funding
* Children of Immigrants in the U.S.
* Health Care and Insurance Coverage
* Poverty in Haiti and Trinidad
* Payday Lending Regulation
* Opinions: Cash Assistance Programs
* Opinions: Anti-poverty Forums
* G8 Meeting and UN Millennium Goals

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to two dispatches a week back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

If you wish to receive Poverty Dispatches by e-mail,
please send a request to rsnell@ssc.wisc.edu

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

16. Australian Policy Online Weekly Briefing - selected recent content

APO Weekly Briefing
The content of this page changes each week, and it includes links to a few book/report reviews, about two dozen new reports, a few job ads and 60 events (mostly conferences) of interest to social researchers...
Source:
Australian Policy Online (APO) - home page
With nearly 120 member centres and institutes, Australian Policy Online offers easy access to much of the best Australian social, economic, cultural and political research available online.

NOTE: the APO home page includes links to the five most popular reports on the APO website, and this list is updated each week.

APO Archive
The APO archive is grouped into 23 subject areas, with entries appearing in reverse chronological order.
* Ageing *Asia and the pacific * Citizenship and the law * Disability * Economics and trade * Education * Employment and workplace relations * The environment * Foreign policy and defence * Gender and sexuality * Health * Housing * Families and households * Immigration and refugees * Income, poverty and wealth * Indigenous * Media, communications and cultural policy * Politics and government * Population, multiculturalism and ethnicity * Religion and faith * Rural and regional * Science and technology * Social policy * Urban and regional planning * Youth

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

17. CRINMAIL - April 2009
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):

23 April 2009 - CRINMAIL 1078 - Special edition on children and the media
* Representations of children in news media
* Resources and organisations on children and the media
* New: You can now follow CRIN on Twitter!
* CRIN's Media Toolkit
* Employment: European Interagency Security Forum
**News in Brief**
**Quiz** Children and the media

21 April 2009 - CRINMAIL 1077
* ISRAEL: Implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child [publication]
* AFRICA: Advancing Children’s Rights: A Guide for Civil Society Organisations on how to engage with the African child rights committee [publication]
* ADVOCACY: General Comment on Children’s Rights in Juvenile Justice [publication]
* INDIA: Child rights election manifesto launched [news]
* VIOLENCE: Doorways Training Manuals On School-Related Gender-Based Violence Prevention and Response [publication]
* UN: 51st session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child [event]
* EMPLOYMENT: ECPAT
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

Earlier issues of CRINMAIL
- links to 300+ earlier weekly issues
, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


 

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http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com


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Zen Sarcasms

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1. Do not walk behind me, for I may not lead. Do not walk ahead of me, for I may not follow. Do not walk beside me either. Just pretty much leave me alone.
2 The journey of a thousand miles begins with a broken fan belt or a leaky tire.
3. It's always darkest before dawn , so if you're going to steal your neighbor's newspaper, that's the time to do it.
4. Don't be irreplaceable. If you can't be replaced, you can't be promoted.
5. Always remember that you're unique. Just like everyone else.
6. Never test the depth of the water with both feet.
7. If you think nobody cares if you're alive, try missing a couple of car payments.
8. Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.
9. If at first you don't succeed...... skydiving is not for you.
10. Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach him how to fish, and he will sit in a boat and drink beer all day.
11. If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything.
12. Some days you're the bug, some days you're the windshield.
13. Everyone seems normal until you get to know them.
14. The quickest way to double your money is to fold it in half and put back in your pocket.
15. A closed mouth gathers no foot.
16. Duct tape is like 'The Force'. It has a light side and a darkside, and it holds the universe together.
17. There are two theories to arguing with a woman - Neither one works.
18. Generally speaking, you aren't learning much when your lips are moving.
19. Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.
20. Never, under any circumstances, take a sleeping pill and a laxative on the same night.

Source:
Unknown email



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Reality Check for Moi

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So I'm just tryin' to watch what I eat these days - not saying I'm chubby or anything, y'know, but...

My better half / spousal unit being out of town for a few days, I thought I could treat myself yesterday and grab a quick meal at Wendy's. 
I'd been good, eating plenty of salads and veggies, so I figured that I deserved a little self-indulgence.

Because I was sitting in front of my computer at the time of this decision, I googled one of the healthier (!?!) non-salad items on the menu,"Spicy Chicken Sandwich", to see how much calorific damage I'd be inflicting on my good weight control intentions.

I found a site called Calorie King that tells everything you wanted to know about the calories we consume.
http://www.calorieking.com/
From that page, I found the Wendy's page and clicked "Combo, Spicy Chicken Sandwich, with Medium French Fries & Medium Coca-Cola"
(after all, what's the point of cheating if you're not gonna have fries, eh?)

According to Calorie King, the above-note Wendy's combo has 1,070 calories, 36.0g of fat and 158.0g of carbs in each meal.

That's almost exactly one-half of the number of calories a male person of my age, weight and lifestyle should be ingesting daily - in one meal (if you can call that a meal, and many do, often.)

How many calories do *you* need every day?
http://www.shapefit.com/dailycalorie-calc.html

The Calorie King page goes on to suggest different ways to burn the calories in the same combo:
"To burn the calories in Meals: Combos, Spicy Chicken Sandwich, with Medium French Fries & Medium Coca-Cola, you* could do any of the following:
- 297 mins of walking
- 122 mins of jogging
- 89 mins of swimming
- 163 mins of cycling

*(Based off a 35 year old female who is 5'7" and weighs 144lbs.)

***

To be honest, the first thing I'd checked in the list was the Wendy's Baconator Burger Combo (w/med. fries & med.Coke)
That particular combo has 1,460 calories, 71.0g of fat and 147.0g of carbs.

I had a fried egg sandwich at home.
Gilles


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And, in closing...

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Top 10: Iconic Canadian Food Products
http://ca.askmen.com/top_10/entertainment/top-10-iconic-canadian-food-products.html
My personal favourites: 7 - 6 - 3 - 2 -  1

(Not to give anything away, but I'm disappointed they omitted  Map-O-Spread. Now, that's *gotta* be Canadian.)