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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
December 26, 2010

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,367 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...



IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. The poor still pay more: Challenges low income families face in consuming a nutritious diet (Institute for Competitiveness and Prosperity, John Stapleton and Toronto City Health) - December 21
2. Basic Income Earth Network [guaranteed annual income] Newsflash 63 - November 2010

3. Guaranteed income: an idea worth rethinking (Montreal Gazette) - November 27
4. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]

--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, October 2010 - December 23
--- Canada's population estimates, third quarter 2010 - December 22
--- Consumer Price Index, November 2010 (correction) - December 21
--- Total income of farm families in 2008 - December 21
--- Study: Why has the gender wage gap narrowed? (1988 to 2008) - December 20
--- Public school indicators for Canada, the provinces and territories, 2008-2009
- December 20
5. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

6. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
7. Australian Policy Online - selected content (December 26)
----- Asset rich, but income poor: Australian housing wealth and retirement in an international context - December 15
8. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week...
...and a safe, healthy and Happy New Year!!

     Gilles
..

[ gilseg@rogers.com ]



1. The poor still pay more: Challenges low income families face in consuming a nutritious diet - December 21
(Institute for Competitiveness and Prosperity, John Stapleton and Toronto City Health)

New from the
Institute for Competitiveness and Prosperity:

The poor still pay more:
Challenges low income families face in consuming a nutritious diet

Press Release
December 21, 2010
The Institute for Competitiveness & Prosperity, in collaboration with Open Policy Ontario’s John Stapleton and research consultant from Toronto Public Health, Brian Cook, releases its report recommending initiatives to help low income families overcome challenges in consuming a nutritious diet.

The report:

The poor still pay more: Challenges
low income families face in consuming a nutritious diet
(PDF - 941K, 20 pages)
December 2010
Challenges:
* Low income households cannot afford a healthy diet
* Low income households are not consuming a healthy diet
* Low income households have greater difficulty accessing a healthy diet

Report recommendations:
* A new housing benefit geared to income and rental costs to free up constrained finances to purchase food
* Improved incentives for retailers and community groups to increase accessibility by low income communities to lower priced and healthier food options, particularly in urban “food deserts”
* The eventual elimination of the price influence of dairy marketing boards

Related links:

* Institute for Competitiveness and Prosperity
The Institute for Competitiveness & Prosperity is an independent, not-for-profit organization that deepens public understanding of macro and microeconomic factors behind Ontario’s economic progress. We are funded by the Government of Ontario and are mandated to share our research findings directly with the public.
The Institute serves as the research arm of the Task Force on Competitiveness, Productivity and Economic Progress.

* Toronto Public Health

* Open Policy - personal website of John Stapleton, co-author of The Poor Still Pay More
--- Check out John's Publications - Media Commentaries - Presentations

---

CTV News coverage:

Poor are hit hardest by rising food prices: study
December 21, 2010
Although social assistance in Canada has more or less kept pace with inflation in recent years, it has not kept up with the speed at which food prices have increased, making it more and more expensive for poor Canadians to eat healthy.A study from the Toronto-based Institute for Competitiveness and Prosperity released a report Tuesday looking at some of the major issues low-income Canadians face when grocery shopping.
[ Comments (75) ]
Source:
CTV News

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

2. Basic Income Earth Network Newsflash 63 - November 2010

Basic Income Earth Network (BIEN)
The Basic Income Earth Network was founded in 1986 as the Basic Income European Network. It expanded its scope from European to the Earth in 2004. It is an international network that serves as a link between individuals and groups committed to or interested in basic income, and fosters informed discussion of the topic throughout the world.
- incl. links to: * About BIEN * About Basic Income * NewsFlash * Congresses * Papers and Resources * Membership * Links * Contact

Latest issue of
NewsFlash - the BIEN newsletter:

NewsFlash 63, November 2010 (PDF - 173K, 20 pages)

1. Editorial: BIEN archives
2. Two issues of Basic Income Studies
3. Events (excerpts):

CALGARY (CA), 29 March 2010: Conference by Senator Hugh Segal
On March 29, 2010, Canadian Senator Hugh Segal spoke to the Sheldon Chumir Foundation for Ethics in Leadership in Calgary. Senator Segal made an impassioned argument for the ethical necessity of a Guaranteed Annual Income as a means of eliminating poverty.
His remarks can be viewed at:
http://www.youtube.com/user/ChumirEthics
Further information:
http://www.chumirethicsfoundation.ca/

Upcoming
North American event:
NEW YORK (US), 25 – 27, February 2011: The Tenth Annual North American Basic
Income Conference: Models for Social Transformation

This conference will be held in conjunction with the Annual Meeting of the Eastern Economic Association (EEA). Attendees at the USBIG conference are welcome to attend any of the EEA’s events. The North American Basic Income Conference was originally 'the U.S. Basic Income Guarantee Network Conference,' and was organized by the U.S. Basic Income Guarantee (USBIG) Network. It expanded in 2010 to become a joint event of the USBIG Network and the Basic Income / Allocation Universelle Canada (BI/AU Canada). Since then, it has been a North American Conference held on alternate years in the United States and Canada.

Chair of the organizing committee:
Karl Widerquist: Karl@Widerquist.com
For more information,
see the USBIG Website: www.usbig.net

4. Glimpses of National Debates (excerpts):

CANADA: Yukon government urged to implement a basic income

The leader of the New Democratic Party (NDP) in Yukon, Steve Cardiff, has put forward a notice of motion for the Yukon Government to introduce a Guaranteed Minimum Annual Income Allowance. According to the official report from Yukon's legislative assembly, he urged "the Yukon government to implement a guaranteed minimum annual income allowance for all eligible Yukon citizens as recommended by Conservative Party Senator Hugh Segal, the Royal Commission on the Status of Women, the Macdonald Commission, the National Council of Welfare, the Special Senate Committee on Poverty and the federal working paper on social security.

Yukon Legislative Assembly
Motion #438 Mr. Cardiff
:
May 1, 2008
"THAT this House urges the Yukon Government and the Government of Canada to address the widening gap between rich and poor through arrange of measures including progressive tax changes, introduction of an Annual Guaranteed Income, and creation of a comprehensive Anti-Poverty Strategy."
Source:
Page 28,
Motions Other than Government Motions
Yukon Legislative Assembly
(First Session, 32nd Legislative Assembly)
(PDF - 521K, 110 pages)
November 9, 2010

CANADA: Poverty Free Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan is one of few provinces in Canada that does not have a formally adopted and detailed plan to tackle poverty. During the International Week for the Elimination of Poverty (17 – 23 October) a new network called Poverty Free Saskatchewan released a discussion paper calling upon the provincial government to develop such a plan, in collaboration with people living in poverty and other community sectors. This paper is entitled “Let’s Do Something about Poverty” and can be found at http://www.povertyfreesask.ca/
Further information:
Jim Mulvale, Faculty of Social Work, University of Regina
jim.mulvale@uregina.ca

5. Publications
6. New Links

* News from BIEN Canada
BIEN Canada has adopted a constitution and is in the process of incorporating and registering
an official name. The website address is http://biencanada.wordpress.com/

7. About BIEN
Source:
NewsFlash - newsletter (incl. archives)
BIEN's NewsFlash is mailed electronically every two months to over 1,500 subscribers throughout the world.
Free subscription : send a request by email to bien@basicincome.org

BIEN links to other relevant websites
- incl. links to National Affiliates and general GAI/Basic Income resources

Source:
BIEN - Basic Income Earth Network

- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

3. Guaranteed income: an idea worth rethinking - November 27
(Montreal Gazette)

Guaranteed income: an idea worth rethinking
November 27, 2010
The idea of a guaranteed annual income for all Canadians has long provoked a knee-jerk reaction of rejection from many people. Such handouts, the assumption runs, would create a work-resistant underclass prepared to milk the state for all it's worth. But the time has come to rethink the idea, without preconceptions.

A guaranteed annual income (GAI) might well allow us to sweep away the burdensome, confusing, inefficient, intrusive, overlapping tangle of current federal and provincial programs for income support. And a number of pilot studies seem to suggest that the disincentive to work is not enormous, while immediate benefits, notably in improved nutrition and health, are significant for the individuals and for the whole economy.
Source:
Montreal Gazette

Related link:

Yukon Legislative Assembly
Motion #438 Mr. Cardiff
:
May 1, 2008
" THAT this House urges the Yukon Government and the Government of Canada to address
the widening gap between rich and poor through arrange of measures including progressive
tax changes, introduction of an Annual Guaranteed Income, and creation of a comprehensive
Anti-Poverty Strategy."
Source:
Page 28,
Motions Other than Government Motions
Yukon Legislative Assembly
(First Session, 32nd Legislative Assembly)
(PDF - 521K, 110 pages)
November 9, 2010

- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

4. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, October 2010 - December 23
--- Canada's population estimates, third quarter 2010 - December 22
--- Consumer Price Index, November 2010 (correction) - December 21
--- Total income of farm families in 2008 - December 21
--- Study: Why has the gender wage gap narrowed? (1988 to 2008) - December 20
---
Public school indicators for Canada, the provinces and territories, 2008-2009 - December 20

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

December 23, 2010
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, October 2010
Between October 2009 and October 2010, average weekly earnings of non-farm payroll employees rose 4.4% to $863.33

Source:
Employment, Earnings and Hours - product main page*
This publication presents a timely picture of employment, earnings and hours.
The tabulations focus on monthly labour market information and some historical data series.
NOTE:
Online data on payroll employment, earnings and hours for the current month is usually posted to the site a month after this report first appears in The Daily.
* On the product main page,click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:

* Labour
* Employment and unemployment
* Hours of work and work arrangements
* Industries
* Wages, salaries and other earnings


December 22, 2010
Canada's population estimates, third quarter 2010
As of October 1, 2010 ,Canada's population was estimated at 34,238,000, an increase of 129,300 (+0.4%) from July 1, 2010. During the third quarter, 84,200 immigrants arrived in Canada, 8,800 more than in the same quarter of 2009.
- includes two tables:
* Components and factors of demographic growth
*
Quarterly demographic estimates

Quarterly Demographic Estimates - product main page*
This publication presents quarterly estimates of population for Canada, provinces and territories as well as statistics on the following components of population change: births, deaths, immigration, emigration, returning emigration, net temporary emigration, net non-permanent residents and interprovincial migration, the latter by origin and destination.
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Annual Demographic Estimates: Canada, Provinces and Territories - product main page
This publication presents annual estimates of the total population and annual estimates by age and sex for Canada, provinces and territories. It also presents estimates of the following components of population change: births, deaths, immigration, emigration, returning emigration, net temporary emigration, net non-permanent residents and inter-provincial migration, the latter by origin and destination. As in the case of population estimates, the components are also available for the total population and by age and sex.
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:

* Ethnic diversity and immigration
* Immigrants and non-permanent residents
* Population and demography


December 21, 2010
Consumer Price Index, November 2010 (correction)
Correction: Consumer prices rose 2.0% in the 12 months to November, following a 2.4% increase in October. The 0.4 percentage point decrease can be largely attributed to a slowdown in the growth rate of energy and food prices, and a decline in clothing prices.

- includes links to three tables:
* Consumer Price Index and major components, Canada
* Consumer Price Index by province, and for Whitehorse, Yellowknife and Iqaluit
* Consumer Price Index and major components

Related report:

The Consumer Price Index
This monthly release of the The Consumer Price Index (CPI) for Canada, the provinces, Whitehorse and Yellowknife, provides a descriptive summary of retail price movements, inflation rates and the factors underlying them. The CPI also contains the following tabular information: latest price index movements for the eight major components; price index changes on one and 12-month bases for an extensive number of components and groups; historical monthly information; and price indices reclassified according to categories of goods and services.
Click the link above, then "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

[ earlier editions of this report ]

Guide to the Consumer Price Index (1998)

Related subjects:
* Prices and price indexes
* Consumer price indexes


December 21, 2010
Total income of farm families in 2008
Data on total income of farm families for 2008 are now available.
* The (free) Canadian Farm Financial Database is now available from the Key resource module of our website under Publications.
* Data tables are also available from the Key resource module of our website under Summary tables.
* The publication Statistics on Income of Farm Families, 2008 will be released at a later date.

Related subjects:
* Agriculture
* Farm financial statistics
* Farms and farm operators


December 20, 2010
Study: Why has the gender wage gap narrowed? (1988 to 2008)
During the past two decades, the gap in average hourly wages between men and women has narrowed steadily. In 1988, women earned 75.7 cents in wages for every $1 earned by men. By, 2008, they were earning 83.3 cents on the dollar. The wage gap converged in all age groups during this period, although older workers experienced the largest change. The gap among workers age 25 to 29 narrowed by 5.6 percentage points, while among older workers age 50 to 54, it converged by 16.2 percentage points. A key factor in the convergence was that the growth in relative wages of women outpaced the gains of men.

Complete article:

Why has the gender wage gap narrowed?
December 2010
Highlights

Full article:
HTML

PDF (146K, 11 pages)

Source:
December 2010 issue of
Perspectives on Labour and Income

Perspectives on Labour and Income - product main page*
This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of labour and income data. Topics include youth in the labour market, pensions and retirement, work arrangements, education and training, and trends in family income.
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues

Related subjects:
* Families, households and housing
* Income, pensions, spending and wealth
* Household, family and personal income
* Low income and inequality
* Labour
* Wages, salaries and other earnings


December 20, 2010
Public school indicators for Canada, the provinces and territories, 2008-2009
Just under 5.1 million students were enrolled in publicly funded elementary and secondary schools in Canada during the academic year 2008/2009, down 0.5% from the previous year. This was the lowest level since 1998/1999 when data for the Elementary-Secondary Education Survey were first collected. Enrolment peaked at nearly 5.4 million students in 2001/2002.
- includes one table:
* Enrolment (headcount)

Related subjects:

* Education, training and learning


The Daily Archives
- select a month and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

5. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
:

-------

Seasonal pause...

------

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

6. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

December 21, 2010
Report: The Recession and Working Poor Families
State Unemployment Fund - Ohio

December 20, 2010
American Community Survey
Poverty up by 10% in most Wisconsin counties
Poverty deepens its hold on some metro-east communities
Survey finds Southern Nevada increasingly educated and diverse
Extension of Jobless Benefits

December 20, 2010
Benefits: Jobless relieved life raft still afloat
Jobless benefits are extended - but hold the applause

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

7. Australian Policy Online - selected recent content
---
Asset rich, but income poor: Australian housing wealth and retirement in an international context - December 15

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia.
[ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page.

Most viewed this week (ending December 26) on APO:

1. POLITICS - Coalition still favourite for the poll
2. Ampe Akelyernemane Meke Mekarle "Little children are sacred": Report of the NT Board of Inquiry into the protection of Aboriginal children from sexual abuse
3. Green housing, digital storytelling and Sudanese Australians - new project funding awarded to the Institute for Social Research
4. Garma Festival 2009 key forum address
5.No quick fix

[You'll find these links on the APO home page.]

-------------------------------------------------------

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social Inclusion * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

Most viewed this week (ending December 26):

1. Green housing, digital storytelling and Sudanese Australians - new project funding awarded to the Institute for Social Research
2. Social media and young adults
3. Social capital by numbers
4. Top Social Policy reports 2010
5. Multiculturalism: a review of Australian policy statements and recent debates in Australia and overseas

[You'll find these links on the APO Social Policy page.]

---

Asset rich, but income poor:
Australian housing wealth and retirement in an international context

15 December 2010
This paper looks at patterns of own-home wealth across the life cycle in Australia and in several North American and Western European countries and finds that Australia is out of step with comparable countries.
In the mid-1990s, the Australian elderly had the lowest relative incomes (compared to national averages) across 19 OECD countries. Including housing in the calculation increases the resources of the Australian elderly up to a more internationally typical level, but this potentially implies an unbalanced pattern of consumption (compared to the international norm).
Source:
Social Policy Research Centre

---------------

On the APO Home Page:
* Top Economics reports 2010 * Top Justice reports 2010 * Top Environment & Planning reports 2010 * Top Politics reports 2010 * Top Indigenous reports 2010 * Top Social Policy reports 2010 * Top Creative & Digital reports 2010 * Top International reports 2010 * Top Education reports 2010 * Top Health reports 2010

---------------

Top Social Policy reports 2010
Australian Policy Online
The five most read reports and commentary pieces in the Social Policy area in 2010 were:
1. Who will benefit from the 1 July 2010 tax cuts?
2. Asylum seekers and refugees: what are the facts?
3. Boat arrivals in Australia since 1976: January 2010 update
4. Poverty versus inequality (July 2009)
5. Welfare quarantining: reversing the burden of truth (February 2010)
Source:
New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social Inclusion * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

--------------

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

8. CRINMAIL
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
:

Latest issue of CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter):

22 December 2010, CRINMAIL issue 1206
In this issue:
* Top story : CRC election results
* Latest news and reports
--- Violence against children (Yemen, China, Indonesia)
--- Forced labour (Uzbekistan, Romania)
--- Legal action (Nigeria, India)
--- Budget cuts and child poverty (Europe)
Employment : Save the Children Finland

NOTE: see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm for the table of contents for, and links to, several months' worth of issues of CRINMAIL.

------------------------------------------

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL (from CRINMAIL)
- links to earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


 


 


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com


****************************

In any language...
Happy New Year!

****************************


Afrikaans     Gelukkige nuwe jaar
Arabic             Sana Sa-eeda
Bengali             Shuvo Nabo Barsho
Cambodian     Soursdey Chhnam Tmei
Catalan             Feliç Any Nou
Chinese (Mandarin)     Xin Nian Kuai Le  謹 賀 新 年
Croatian     Sretna Nova godina
Danish             Godt Nytår
Dutch             Gelukkig Nieuwjaar
Eskimo             Kiortame pivdluaritlo
Esperanto     Felican Novan Jaron
Finnish             Onnellista Uutta Vuotta
French             Bonne Année
Gaelic             Bliadhna mhath ur
German             Prosit Neujahr
Greek             Kenourios Chronos
Hawaiian     Hauoli Makahiki Hou
Hebrew             L'Shannah Tovah
Hindi             Naye Varsha Ki Shubhkamanyen
Hong Kong     Sun Leen Fai Lok
Hungarian     Boldog Ooy Ayvet
Indonesian     Selamat Tahun Baru
Iranian             Saleh now mobarak
Iraqi             Sanah Jadidah
Irish             Bliain nua fe mhaise dhuit
Italian             Felice anno nuovo
Icelandic     Farsælt komandi ár
Japanese     Akimashite Omedetto Gozaimasu
Korean             Saehae Bock Mani ba deu sei yo
Kurdish             Newroz Pirozbe
Latvian             Laimīgo Jauno Gadu!
Lithuanian     Laimingu Naujuju Metu
Maltese             Is Senat Tajba
Nepal             Nawa Barsha ko Shuvakamana
Norwegian     Godt Nyttår
Papua New Guinea Nupela yia i go long yu
Persian             Saleh now ra tabrik migouyam
Philippines     Manigong Bagong Taon
Polish              Szczesliwego Nowego Roku
Portuguese     Feliz Ano Novo
Punjabi             Nave sal di mubarak
Romanian     An Nou Fericit
Russian             С Новым Годом (S Novim Godom)
Samoa             Manuia le Tausaga Fou
Serbo-Croatian     Sretna nova godina
Slovak             A stastlivy Novy Rok
Slovenian     Sreèno novo leto
Somali             Iyo Sanad Cusub Oo Fiican
Spanish             Féliz Año Nuevo
Swahili             Heri Za Mwaka Mpyaº
Swedish             Gott nytt år!
Sudanese     Warsa Enggal
Tamil             Eniya Puthandu Nalvazhthukkal
Thai             Sawadee Pee Mai
Turkish             Yeni Yiliniz Kutlu Olsun
Ukrainian     С Новым Годом Z novym rokom
Urdu             Naya Saal Mubbarak Ho
Vietnamese     Chuc Mung Tan Nien
Welsh             Blwyddyn Newydd Dda

Happy New Year to all!

Gilles
The Canadian Social
Research Links Guy


-----------------------

And, in closing...

-----------------------

Top Twenty Funny, Fascinating
and Unusual World Wide Customs To Celebrate New Year
http://www.guy-sports.com/humor/christmas/world-wide_new_year_customs.htm


"New Year's Day… now is the accepted time to make your regular annual good resolutions.
Next week you can begin paving hell with them as usual."
[Mark Twain]