Canadian Social Research Links logo 
Canadian Social Research Newsletter
September 27, 2009

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,100 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian content

1.   The Affordability Gap: Spending differences between Canada's rich and poor (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - September 23
2. Proposed indicators of poverty, inequality and social exclusion to measure progress in Québec (Centre d'étude sur la pauvreté et l'exclusion) - September 24
3. New from The Wellesley Institute:
--- Big news: Ontario inclusionary housing legislation passes second reading - September 24
--- $125 billion for banks; $2 billion for affordable housing - September 24
4. From IsThatLegal.ca:
--- Ontario Works (welfare) law - updated to May 2009
--- Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) Law - updated to May 2009
5. Ontario: Pressure on Premier McGuinty to act on the Pascal Blueprint for Early Learning (People for Education) - September 22
6. Canadian Child Welfare Research Portal
7. New on the Social and Enterprise Development Innovations (SEDI) website:
--- Independent Living Accounts: Leaving Homelessness in the Past - June 2009
--- Financial Inclusion for Homeless Persons and Those At Risk - Spring 2008
8. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Study: Canadian nine-year-olds at school, 2006/2007 - September 25
--- Health and employment - September 25
--- Births, 2007 - September 22
9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - September 27

International content

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs (Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)
11. A Tiny (Tobin) Tax Could Do a World of Good (New York Times) - September 23
12. New from the World Forum of Civil Society Networks - UBUNTU
--- UN to establish a new single entity for women's rights defense - September 14
--- UNIFEM has released the report Progress of the World's Women 2008/2009 - July 30
13. Council for Employment, Income and Social Cohesion (CERC, Paris) Bulletin - selected content
--- Measuring the size andimpact of public cash support for children in cross-national perspective - August 2009
--- Poverty, inequality and human rights - September 2009
--- The welfare effects of social mobility - September 2009
--- Early childhood education and care : Key lessons from research for policy makers - June 2009
14. Australian Policy Online
15. CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter) - September 2009

Have a great week!
Gilles

************************
Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net


E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com

1. The Affordability Gap: Spending differences between Canada's rich and poor - September 23
(Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

Affordability gap between rich and poor
Press Release
September 23, 2009
OTTAWA – There is a major affordability gap between Canada’s richest and poorest households, says a new Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives study released today. The Affordability Gap: Spending Differences Between Canada’s Rich and Poor reveals how Canada’s poorest households often forego buying things most Canadians consider essential, from eyeglasses and dental care to computers and newspapers. (...) The study looks at new data from Statistics Canada on how households spent their money in 2007 – one of the best years for gains in personal income in recent history. It finds Canada’s poorest households are much less likely to buy sporting equipment for themselves or their children. They often don’t spend money on eyeglasses, dental care and home furnishings. They often don’t have cell phones, personal computers and high-speed Internet access. Even going to a movie or buying a newspaper can be a rare treat.

The Affordability Gap:
Spending differences between Canada's rich and poor
(PDF - 396K, 17 pages)
September 2009
By Steve Kerstetter
"(...)Much of the recent research on poverty talks about social exclusion or social inclusion as the best way of defining poverty. Poverty, according to this view, isn’t strictly a matter of very low income. It is also based on whether people are able to participate in a meaningful way in the society around them. In other words, can poor people purchase the goods and services that most people would consider reasonable for normal living in 21st century Canada? The latest spending data suggest the answer to that question is no.

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social and economic justice. Founded in 1980, the CCPA is one of Canada’s leading progressive voices in public policy debates.

Related media coverage:

Poor households in a world `far removed'
Forget cellphones, poorest can't afford life's basics, and the recession has only made their plight worse
September 24, 2009
By Rita Trichur
The poorest Canadians are struggling to pay for life's necessities, forcing them to do without such everyday basics as eyeglasses, dental care and furniture – and the recession has only made their plight worse, says a major think-tank. In a study to be released today, the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives paints a disturbing picture of how the poor are unable to afford many of the goods and services that most Canadians consider "reasonable for normal living" in modern society.
Source:
Toronto Star

- Go to the Asset-Based Social Policies Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/assets.htm

2. Taking the Measure of Poverty, Proposed indicators of poverty, inequality and social exclusion to measure progress in Québec - September 24
(Centre d'étude sur la pauvreté et l'exclusion)

[NOTE: the English links follow the French version below.)

Prendre la mesure de la pauvreté, Proposition d’indicateurs de pauvreté,
d’inégalités et d’exclusion sociale afin de mesurer les progrès réalisés au Québec
Avis au ministre
(fichier PDF - 668 Ko., 71 pages)
2009 (fichier daté septembre 2009)
L’un des mandats du Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion est de proposer au ministre de l’Emploi et de la Solidarité sociale des mesures et des indicateurs de pauvreté, d’inégalités et d’exclusion sociale afin de mesurer les progrès réalisés au Québec dans la mise en oeuvre de la Loi visant à lutter contre la pauvreté et l’exclusion sociale. Cet avis constitue une première proposition en ce sens.

Présentation de l'Avis du CEPE,
par Alain Noël et Vivian Labrie
(fichier PDF, 2,9 Mo, 89 pages)

Documents du CEPE

Source:
Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion
Le Centre d'étude sur la pauvreté et l'exclusion (CEPE) est un lieu d'observation, de recherche et d'échanges visant à fournir des informations fiables et rigoureuses en matière de pauvreté et d'exclusion sociale. C'est dans l'esprit de la Loi visant à lutter contre la pauvreté et l'exclusion socialeDirige vers un site externe. que le CEPE a été mis en place au printemps 2005 et rattaché au ministère de l'Emploi et de la Solidarité sociale (MESS).

---

English version:

Taking the Measure of Poverty, Proposed indicators of poverty,
inequality and social exclusion to measure progress in Québec:
Advice to the Minister
(PDF - 311K, 80 pages)
Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion
(Centre for the study of poverty and exclusion)
2009
One of the mandates of the Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion is to propose, to the minister of Emploi et Solidarité sociale, measures and indicators of poverty, inequality and social exclusion to measure progress in Québec in the implementation of the Act to combat poverty and social exclusion. This advice is a first proposition in that direction.
[ more reports by CEPE ]
Source:
Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion (English home page)
The Centre d’étude sur la pauvreté et l’exclusion (CEPE) is an observation, research and discussion centre entrusted with providing reliable and rigourous information, notably of a statistical nature, on poverty and social exclusion issues. (...) One of the main mandates of the CEPE is to develop and recommend to the Minister a series of indicators to be used in measuring poverty and social exclusion and social and economic disparities, as well as other indicators of poverty.

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the Poverty Measures - Canadian Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty.htm
- Go to the Québec Links (English) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qce.htm
- Rendez-vous à la page de liens de recherche sociale au Québec: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/qcbkmrk.htm

3. New from The Wellesley Institute:
--- Big news: Ontario inclusionary housing legislation passes second reading - September 24
--- $125 billion for banks; $2 billion for affordable housing - September 24

New from
The Wellesley Institute:

Big news: Ontario inclusionary housing legislation passes second reading
September 24, 2009
By Michael Shapcott
Inclusionary housing (and the promise of thousands of new affordable homes in new developments across the province) is one step closer in Ontario as MPP Cheri DiNovo’s Bill 198 (PDF - 326K, 5 pages) passed second reading in the Ontario Legislature this afternoon. The legislation would amend the Planning Act to give municipalities the power to require developers to include affordable housing in new developments.

$125 billion for banks; $2 billion for affordable housing
September 24, 2009
By Michael Shapcott
Sixty-two and one-half years – that’s how long the federal government will have to spend on affordable housing, at the current rate, to equal the $125 billion “emergency” bailout package for banks and other mortgage lenders that federal finance minister James Flaherty has just extended. The profits of Canadian banks have slipped slightly from the record-breaking levels of 2005, 2006 and 2007, but the big six are still racking up billions in profits.

Source:
Wellesley Institute Blog
[ The Wellesley Institute ]
The Wellesley Institute is a Toronto-based non-profit and non-partisan research and policy institute. Our focus is on developing research and community-based policy solutions to the problems of urban health and health disparities.

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

4. [Ontario] From IsThatLegal.ca:
--- Ontario Works (welfare) law - updated to May 2009
--- Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) Law
- updated to May 2009

Welfare (Ontario Works) Law
Updated to May 2009

1. Overview 2. Claimants 3. Basic Assistance 4. Benefits 5. Information Eligibility 6. Income Rules 7. Asset Rules 8. Applications and Procedures 9. Administrator Decisions 10. Appeals and Other Remedies 11. Workfare 12. Fraud and Prosecutions 13. Advocacy

Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) Law
Updated to May 2009

1.Overview 2. Claimants 3. Basic Assistance 4. Benefits 5. Information Eligibility 6. Income Rules 8. Asset Rules 9. "Person With a Disability" 10. Applications and Procedures 11. Director Decisions 12. Appeals and Other Remedies 13. Workfare 14. Fraud and Prosecutions 15. Advocacy

Source:
Isthatlegal.ca (Ontario)
The purpose of the Isthatlegal.ca website is to provide, in one convenient and generally accessible on-line location, detailed and thorough legal guides to areas of Ontario and Canadian law of general importance to the economically
vulnerable in our society, and to their advocates. All users should ensure that they meet the Terms of Use of the site.
[
Terms of Use ]

- incl. links to the following on the home page:
* Animal Law * Employment Law (Ontario and Canada) * Property Law * Civil and Administrative Litigation * Freedom of Information and Privacy Law * Income Maintenance and Related * Legislative Process * Constitutional, Human Rights and Related * Miscellaneous Law (Canadian Maritime Law, Charity and Not-for-Profit Law, Church Law) * More

- Go to the Ontario Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Guide to Welfare in Ontario page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onwelf.htm
- Go to the Key Provincial/Territorial Welfare Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare.htm

5. Ontario: Pressure on Premier McGuinty to act on the Pascal Blueprint for Early Learning (People for Education) - September 22
(
People for Education)

Ontario: Pressure on Premier McGuinty
to act on the Pascal Blueprint for Early Learning

Budget clouds early-learning plans
September 23, 2009
The province will go ahead with full-day learning starting next September, but says it might not be able to move as quickly on implementing changes because of budgetary restraints, Education Minister Kathleen Wynne said yesterday. Her comments came as a group of high-profile community members and educators urged the province to act on all aspects of a report by early learning adviser Charles Pascal – the full-day, before- and after- school and summer care for children from ages 4 to 12, as well as turning schools into local hubs with parenting and other family supports.
Source:
ParentCentral (Toronto Star)

---

From People for Education:

OPEN LETTER to Premier McGuinty urging
action on the Pascal Blueprint for Early Learning
(PDF - 45K, 6 pages)
September 22, 2009
- incl. names of more than 130 individuals and organizations endorsing the letter
"The Ontario government has before it a blueprint for major educational reform, one that will make Ontario the best place there is to raise a child. To do the best for our children, we need to create the finest possible education and family service system. With Our Best Future in Mind, the report of the Premier’s early learning advisor, maps out how Ontario can achieve more family-centred schools that are vibrant learning hubs for children and their parents.

Ontario urged to enact early learning report (PDF - 79K, 1 page)
Press Release
TORONTO, Sept. 22 - Premier Dalton McGuinty should act now to implement a blueprint for major educational reform that will make Ontario the best place there is to raise a child, say the province's leading early learning experts and champions of publicly funded education.

Source:
People for Education
People for Education is an independent parent-led organization, working to improve public education in Ontario's English, Catholic and French schools.

---

Related news coverage
- links to eight related articles in the Toronto/Hamilton media
Source:
Atkinson Charitable Foundation

---

More about the Pascal Blueprint for early learning
In June of 2009, Charles E. Pascal of the Atkinson Charitable Foundation submitted his report,
With Our Best Future in Mind, to the Premier on how to implement full day learning for 4- and 5-year-olds.
Click the link above to read the report, supporting documents and much more...
- from the Government of Ontario

See also:

Early Learning : A Star special on a new vision for Ontario Children
- includes links to a number of articles on the report on early learning
Source:
ParentCentral (Toronto Star)

- Go to the Ontario Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm

6. Canadian Child Welfare Research Portal

Canadian Child Welfare Research Portal
[ version française:
Portail canadien de la recherche en protection de l’enfance
]

This website has been designed to be a clearinghouse of information for child welfare professionals, researchers, and the general public. It is searchable by keywords and organized according to major topic areas.
Topics include: * Child Abuse & Neglect * Intervention & Prevention * Families & Communities * Children & Youth in Care * Aboriginal Child Welfare * Policy & Legislation * Provinces & Territories.

The Portal contains a library of Canadian research content as well as an extensive database of child welfare researchers from across Canada.

---

Provincial-territorial child welfare and child protection resources
- includes, for each Canadian jurisdiction, the following links:
* Legislation * Researchers * Publications * Statistics * Links

---

NOTE: the home page of the Canadian Child Welfare Research Portal
is the home page of the Centre of Excellence for Child Welfare.
[ More info about the Centre ]

This website is an initiative of the partner organizations of the Centre of Excellence for Child Welfare and supported through funding from the Public Health Agency of Canada.
The Centre of Excellence for Child Welfare (CECW) is one of four Centres of Excellence for Children’s Well-Being funded by Public Health Agency Canada.

- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnbkmrk.htm

7. New on the Social and Enterprise Development Innovations (SEDI) website:
--- Independent Living Accounts: Leaving Homelessness in the Past - June 2009
---
Financial Inclusion for Homeless Persons and Those At Risk - Spring 2008

New on the Social and Enterprise Development Innovations (SEDI) website:

Independent Living Accounts:
Leaving Homelessness in the Past
(PDF - 5.8MB, 91 pages)
June 2009
This report was made possible through a Vital Ideas grant from the Toronto Community Foundation that recognized SEDI’s Independent Living Account (ILA) for its innovative approach in assisting residents of Toronto’s shelter system to save, build life skills and subsequently move onto independent living. This report quantifies the benefit of the ILA model through a return on investment calculation and highlights how an investment of $1 into this program can result in a $2.19 return to society at large within the first year following program graduation. Feedback from current ILA partners was also gathered in an attempt to reflect the strengths and weaknesses of the model and to evaluate the potential of bringing these benefits to scale. This study also explores the potential of expanding the ILA program to a wider audience of people vulnerable to homelessness including newcomers to Canada, urban Aboriginal Peoples, youth, children/youth living in care, people with mental health and/or addiction issues and people who have come into conflict with the law. This report provides evidence to suggest that there is a significant group of homeless individuals that can achieve a positive housing outcome in an effective and efficient manner and through a somewhat limited intervention.

Related links:
* More information about SEDI's Independent Living Accounts
*
Independent Living Accounts Final Report - July 2006 (PDF - 667K, 84 pages)
The ILA demonstration was to measure the impacts of providing persons living within transitional housing facilities with a mix of financial and training incentives as a means of facilitating their entry into the mainstream housing and rental markets.
* Research highlights - February 2003 (PDF - 168K, 8 pages)
* SEDI Asset-Building Publications and Reports
[ Complete SEDI Publications list ]

---

Financial Inclusion for
Homeless Persons and Those At Risk
(PDF - 646K, 58 pages)
Spring 2008
This report emphasizes the need for suitable policy responses and intervention models to improve the financial literacy and financial inclusion for Canadians who are homeless and insecurely housed. It also identifies the necessity for investment in staff training and organizational capacity building among transitional shelters and rent banks to offer intensive and ongoing financial learning opportunities for their clients. Outcomes of the study identify that residents of transitional housing and users of rent banks do not enjoy a full degree of financial inclusion in mainstream banking services. However, they express a strong demand for financial education and for opportunities to practice new financial skills with real money, real financial goals and real financial rewards when they succeed. In addition, housing service providers recognized the importance of financial literacy and financial inclusion among the essential life skills their clients express a need for.
Related link:
* SEDI Financial Capability Publications and Reports

Source:
Social and Enterprise Development Innovations (SEDI)
SEDI is a national nonprofit organization that uses innovative approaches to help low-income Canadians reach self-sufficiency. For over 20 years, SEDI has worked with more than 800 nonprofit and government agencies across Canada to deliver its programs. SEDI's expertise allows it to influence public policy, opening the way for Canadians to enter the social and economic mainstream. The organization's initiatives focus on three areas: financial literacy, asset-building and entrepreneurship.

- Go to the Asset-Based Social Policies Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/assets.htm

8. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Study: Canadian nine-year-olds at school, 2006/2007 - September 25
--- Health and employment - September 25
--- Births, 2007 - September 22

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

September 25, 2009
Study: Canadian nine-year-olds at school, 2006/2007
At the age of 9, children varied widely in their school achievement. Some of these variations were linked to their gender, the income level of their household and the province of residence. There were also marked differences in the "education environment" of the child. These differences were linked to levels of household income.
Report:
HTML
PDF
(523K, 68 pages)
Source:
Children and Youth Research Paper Series
[ links to six reports in this series ]

Related subjects:
o Children and youth
o Child development and behaviour
o Education
o Education, training and learning

---

September 23
Health and employment
* Highlights
* Full article:
HTML

PDF
(127K, 9 pages)
Abstract: This article examines the relationship between health and work. Poor mental and physical health were found to decrease the probability of being employed, particularly among men. For women, mental health problems were also associated with working fewer hours.
Source:
September 2009 online edition of
Perspectives on Labour and Income
[ Topics of interest on labour and income
- incl. latest updates on labour market and household issues such as gambling, minimum wages, work absences, retirement and unionization.]

---

September 22, 2009
Births, 2007
Canadian women gave birth to 367,864 babies in Canada in 2007, up 13,247 or 3.7% from 2006 and the fastest annual increase since 1989. The number rose in all age groups, particularly among mothers aged 30 to 34, and in nearly all provinces and territories.

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - September 27

What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

September 27, 2009

15 by 15: A comprehensive policy framework for early human capital investment in BC
23 Sep 09
- Report from the Human Early Learning Partnership proposing a policy framework shift in health care and human capital focusing on the early years.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE
(includes some links that don't appear above because they have already appeared in a previous newsletter)

· Don’t lose focus on early learning
[CA-ON] 23 Sep 09

· Budget clouds early-learning plans
[CA-ON] 23 Sep 09

· Province on verge of giving in to teachers
[CA-ON] 22 Sep 09

· Older moms spur mini baby boom
[CA] 22 Sep 09

· There’s a lot to learn from the new education system
[CA-ON] 21 Sep 09

· Government making money available for child-care centres
[CA-NS] 20 Sep 09

· Mumsy Merkel woos women voters
[DE] 20 Sep 09

· Raising the bar
[CA-BC] 17 Sep 09

more CC IN THE NEWS »

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest content from the Poverty Dispatch:

September 25:
State Poverty Rates - Rhode Island, West Virginia, Texas
Poor Neighborhoods and Access to Groceries - New York City
Teenage Job Program
Jobless Claims and Benefits

September 24:
Food Stamp Program Enrollment
Report: Income and Poverty - Israel
American Community Survey 2008: Children’s Health Insurance Coverage

September 23:
American Community Survey 2008
Low-income Students and Higher Education - Iowa
Grandparents Raising Grandchildren - Michigan

September 22:
Budget Cuts and Classroom Size - Los Angeles, CA
Climate Change and Developing Countries
Conditional Cash Incentive Programs - Latin America, New York City

September 21:
Free and Reduced-price Lunch Program - Wisconsin, Florida
Schools and Homeless Students - Oregon
Poverty and Housing - Fresno, CA
County Funding and Cash Assistance - Los Angeles, CA
Health Care Reform and the Uninsured
Extension of Unemployment Benefits

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

11. A Tiny (Tobin) Tax Could Do a World of Good - September 23
(New York Times)

A Tiny Tax Could Do a World of Good
By Philippe Douste-Blazy
September 23, 2009
As leaders of the world’s largest economies gather today in Pittsburgh for the Group of 20 meeting, people in the world’s poorest countries will likely look on with a mix of hope and trepidation, wondering whether their needs will figure in the deliberations at all. The G-20 nations could help both the poor and the global economy by fully financing lagging efforts to fight poverty and disease worldwide, and the best way to do this would be to impose a very small tax on the prosperous foreign exchange industry.
Source:
New York Times
Author Philippe Douste-Blazy, the French foreign minister from 2005 to 2007, is the chairman of UNITAID and a special adviser to the United Nations secretary general on innovative financing.
UNITAID’s mission is to contribute to scaling up access to treatment for HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis, primarily for people in low-income countries, by leveraging price reductions for quality diagnostics and medicines and accelerating the pace at which these are made available.

Related links:

Tobin-lite could raise £3 Billion for third world
By Ashley Seager
7 April 2005
A new campaign will be launched today to persuade the government to levy a stamp duty on foreign exchange trading that would raise billions of pounds for poverty relief in developing countries.
Source:
The Guardian

Stamp Out Poverty (U.K.)- Campaigning for new sources of development finance
We are committed to the implementation of additional sources of finance, specifically duties or levies, to generate reliable income streams for the provision of long term sustainable development; and to combat, where linked, causes of poverty such as economic and environmental harm to developing countries.

War on Want (U.K.)
War on Want fights poverty in developing countries in partnership with people affected by globalisation.
We campaign for human rights and against the root causes of global poverty, inequality and injustice.

United Nations Millennium Development Goals
* End Poverty and Hunger
* Universal Education
* Gender Equality
* Child Health
* Maternal Health
* Combat HIV/AIDS
* Environmental Sustainability
* Global Partnership
Source:
United Nations

- Go to the The Tobin Tax Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/tobin.htm

12. New from the World Forum of Civil Society Networks - UBUNTU
--- UN to establish
a new single entity for women's rights defense - September 14
--- UNIFEM has released the report Progress of the World's Women 2008/2009
- July 30

UBUNTU and Civil Society News
18 September 2009
On the 14th of September the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution to establish a new single entity for women's rights defense. The agencies and offices relative to gender issues will be merged into one. The organization WEDO (Women's Environment and Development Organization), member of the GEAR campaign (Gender Equality Architecture Reform Campaign), has been one of its main developers.

30 July 2009
UNIFEM has released the report Progress of the World's Women 2008/2009, which recognizes that gender issues and the achievement of the MDGs cannot be separated from a strong recognition of women's problematic and the defense of their rights.

UNIFEM is the women's fund of the United Nations
It provides financial and technical assistance to innovative programmes and strategies to foster women's empowerment and gender equality. Placing the advancement of women's human rights at the centre of all of its efforts, UNIFEM focuses its activities on four strategic areas:

* Reducing feminized poverty.
* Ending violence against women.
* Reversing the spread of HIV /AIDS among women and girls.
* Achieving gender equality in democratic governance in times of peace as well as war.

Source:
World Forum of Civil Society Networks - UBUNTU
[ UPC- Barcelona Tech University ]

- Go to the Links to International Sites about Women's Social Issues page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/womeninternat.htm

13. Council for Employment, Income and Social Cohesion (CERC, Paris) Bulletin - selected content

From the Council for Employment, Income and Social Cohesion - Paris
Conseil de l'emploi, des revenus et de la cohésion sociale - CERC [version française]

---

Selected content from CERC Bulletin N°188 - September 21, 2009
(Click on this link to see the complete list of studies in that issue...)

---

Measuring the size and impact of public cash support for children in cross-national perspective, (PDF _ 164K, 25 pages)
August 2009
By F. Figari, A. Paulus and H. Sutherland
Institute for Social and Economic Research Colchester
Summary : We suggest a new comprehensive measure of support given through tax-benefit systems to families with children. Using microsimulation techniques, this accounts for all provisions contingent on the presence of children, while usually only gross child/family benefits are considered. We use EUROMOD, the European Union tax-benefit microsimulation model, to quantify the support for children and analyse its impact on household incomes and child poverty for 19 countries.
NOTE: Does not include Canada or the U.S.

---

Poverty, inequality and human rights, (PDF - 1.3MB, 61 pages)
September 2009
By A. Donald and E. Mottershaw
Joseph Rowntree Foundation, London
Human rights have been used to shape new conceptions of poverty and new approaches to tackling it, in both the developed and developing worlds. There is potential to replicate and develop this work in the UK. However, there is a need to build the evidence base to demonstrate the pragmatic value of using human rights in combating poverty.

---

The welfare effects of social mobility [Europe] (PDF - 487K, 55 pages)
September 2009
By J. A. V. Fischer,
Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD), Paris
- incl. Canada & U.S.
Summary : The question whether a socially mobile society is conducive to subjective well-being (SWB) has rarely been investigated. This paper fills this gap by analyzing the SWB effects of intergenerational earnings mobility and equality in education at the societal level. Using socio-demographic information on 44 000 individuals in 30 OECD countries obtained from the World Values Survey, this study shows that living in a socially mobile society is conducive to individual life satisfaction.

---

Early childhood education and care : Key lessons from research for policy makers, (PDF - 549K, 72 pages)
June 2009
This report is a review of the international evidence about the social benefits of early childhood education and care (ECEC). It provides an analytic overview of the various rationales that drive the development of ECEC services. It summarizes existing knowledge from research and highlights policy lessons and measures that are shown to contribute to successful ECEC policy development and implementation.
- incl. references to Canada & U.S.
Source:
Nesse network (Network of Experts in Social Sciences of Education and Training)
[ European Commission - Brussels ]

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More studies like this (this link takes you to the table of contents for Bulletin #188)
HINT: scroll to the bottom of Bulletin #188 for links to reports on Education in Europe
(key statistics for 2007 and education expenditures for 2006)
from Eurostat, the European counterpart to Statistics Canada.

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CERC Bulletin - links to all CERC semi-monthly bulletins
Subscribe - To be informed of CERC activities and to receive the bulletin

Online Information Service
Information and online resources organized under five themes: Poverty * Social minima * In-work benefits * Minimum wage * Unemployment and return to work .
- includes links and resources for Canada...
HINT: click on the links in the right-hand margin of each theme page for more content

CERC Bulletins/Reports/Studies/Working papers
- Click on the links in the left margin of the CERC website home page for access to a large collection of online resources

- Go to the Government Social Research Links in Other Countries page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internat.htm

14. Australian Policy Online

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia. [ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week
appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page, and the downloads vary depending on the topic you select.

Most viewed: This week (ending September 27, 2009)
(Click the APO home page link to access these reports.)
1. The crumbling estate
2. User behaviours and intentions with digital news media in Australia
3. Material or post-material?
4. Accumulating poverty? Women's experiences of inequality over the lifecycle
5. Towards climate safe homes: The case for zero emissions and water saving homes and neighbourhoods

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New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

Most viewed: This week (ending September 27, 2009)
(Click the New Research link to access these reports.)
1. Accumulating poverty? Women's experiences of inequality over the lifecycle
2. Gender (in)equality in participation and opportunity: the case of Australia
3. Policy Adviser
4. Moving knowledge into action: applying social marketing principles to crime prevention
5. Indigenous portal

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Also noteworthy:

Poverty versus inequality
06 July 2009
How does income inequality compare to more traditional measures of disadvantage, like poverty, asks Robert Tanton

Pulling our welfare weight (Australia)
05 August 2009
Contrary to popular perception, Australia's welfare system is up there with Scandinavian countries in addressing disadvantage, according to Peter Whiteford

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

15. CRINMAIL - September 2009
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)

Latest issues of CRINMAIL:

24 September 2009 - CRINMAIL 1111
* EUROPE: Discover children's rights! [publication]
* MADAGASCAR: Poverty Forces Two Million Children into Hard Labour [news]
* EUROPE: Ways of Implementing the EU Directives on Violence against Women, Children and Youth: Good Practices and Recommendations [publication]
* GLOBAL: Killing of women, child "witches" on rise, UN told [news]
* HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL: Reports concerning child rights [publication]
* HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL: Civil society and the UPR
* CALL: Child participation in government
**NEWS in BRIEF**

22 September 2009 - CRINMAIL 1110
* VIETNAM: Multinationals break Vietnam law in formula sales [news]
* NEW ZEALAND: Overstayers' children to be allowed to go to school [news]
* BOLIVIA: Govt 'to ban child labour [news]
* AWARDS: Free the Slaves 2010 Freedom Awards
* RESOURCE: Guide to Electronic Resources for International Law
* SIERRA LEONE: Out of Reach: The Cost of Maternal Health in Sierra Leone [publication]
* EMPLOYMENT: Scotland's Commissioner for Children and Young People (SCCYP)
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

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Earlier issues of CRINMAIL
- links to 200+ earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm




Disclaimer/Privacy Statement


Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com



*****************************

Eight Confusing Words

*****************************


1. Irregardless

People think it means:
Regardless.

Actually means:
Nothing. It's not a word.

***

2. Peruse

People think it means:
To skim over or browse something.

Actually means:
To read with thoroughness or care.

***

3. Ironic

People think it means:
Any kind of amusing coincidence.

Actually means:
An outcome that is the opposite of what you'd expect.

***

4.
Pristine

People think it means:
Spotless, good as new.

Actually means:
Ancient, primeval; in a state virtually unchanged from the original.

***

5. Nonplussed

People think it means:
Unperturbed, not worried.

Actually means:
Utterly perplexed or confused.


***

6. Bemused

People think it means:
Mildly amused.

Actually means:
Bewildered or confused.


***

7. Enormity

People think it means:
Enormous.

Actually means:
Outrageous or heinous on a grand scale.


***

8. Plethora

People think it means:
A lot of something.

Actually means:
Too much of something, an over-abundance.


***
Source:
http://www.cracked.com/

***

Gratuitous addition by me (Gilles):


9. Myself

People think it means:
Me, as in "If you wish any further information,please contact myself."

Actually means:
Myself.
1.Used as the object of the first person of a reflexive verb, without emphasis; as, I will defend myself. (NOT "you can reach myself at this number.")
2.Used for emphasis, as in "I myself will do it" or "I've done it myself."

(And don't get me going on "My mother and me were in the Superstore when a
grocery  cart bumped into her and I"!!)

---
---

And, in closing...

---
---

Two YouTube videos:

Charlotte Whitton, Mayor of Ottawa, Canada 1951-1956 and 1960-1964,
as a guest on the 23 October 1955 episode of What's My Line.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U4kJxZHOrvQ
Moderator:
"Is it Miss or Mrs?"

Charlotte Whitton:
"Humph. It's Miss -- I've made enough mistakes in my life"

I (Gilles) was a kid growing up in Ottawa during her two terms as mayor, and I know that anyone who remembers her will enjoy this six-minute clip.
Her pithy answer to the marital status question quoted above is the quintessential Charlotte Whitton.
She is famous for the quotation:
"Whatever women do they must do twice as well as men to be thought half as good. Luckily, this is not difficult."
Charlotte Whitton was director and driving force behind the Canadian Council on Child Welfare
(later the Canadian Welfare Council and the Canadian Council on Social Development.)

More about Charlotte Whitton:
* http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0001276
* http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlotte_Whitton

I found this video in :
The Bulldog
(My neighbour Ken Gray's Ottawa Citizen blog)
http://communities.canada.com/ottawacitizen/blogs/bulldog/default.aspx
Thanks, Ken!

***

U.S. Evangelism and Politics:
Frank Schaeffer on Rachel Maddow
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPwGV1h4lW8
("More than one in three conservatives believes that the President [Obama] might be the Anti-Christ")

***

Canpages
Use the above link to access all four of the tools below
Business Search


***

Linguistic Purity

Hey, shouldn't that be "YOUSE guys"?? (53K, 2 pages)
http://www.openpolicyontario.com/So%20you%20Guys%20are%20%281%29.pdf
Source:
Open Policy (John Stapleton)
http://www.openpolicyontario.com/



***


STILL A FEW GOOD SEATS LEFT !!


Income Security for All Canadians:
A Workshop to Explore the Potential for a
Guaranteed Income Framework for Canada
October 1-2, 2009
Ottawa
http://www.cpj.ca/en/bien-canada-ottawa-conference
Sponsored by:
Basic Income Earth Network Canada (BIEN Canada
)