Canadian Social Research Newsletter
October 27, 2013

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

This week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,662 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. [Ontario] Poverty patchwork : Can the grassroots trust the Wynne government after missing targets? (Now Toronto) - October 2013
2. Social Assistance in Canada (Conference Notes by Nick Falvo) - October 24
3. Vibrant Communities Canada : Cities Connect – October 2013 updates
4. Ten Things You Might Not Know About Poverty In Canada (CBC) - October 17
5. Harper Government on Track for Balanced Budget in 2015 (Finance Canada) - October 2013
6. Harper Government Focused on Job Creation and Economic Growth with Economic Action Plan 2013 Act, No. 2 (Finance Canada) - October 22
7. Bank of Canada Inflation Calculator and Investment Calculator (updated links)
8. [Ontario] Social Assistance, Pension and Tax Credit Rates, October to December 2013 (Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services) - October 2013
9. [Ontario] Submission to the Cabinet Committee on Poverty Reduction and Social Inclusion (Ottawa Poverty Reduction Network) - October 2013
10.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Employment Insurance, August 2013 - October 24
--- Job vacancies in brief, three-month average ending in July 2013 - October 22
--- Population estimates by census subdivision, 2011 and 2012 - October 22
11. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

12. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
13. [United States] Drug Tests Falter as Way for States to Deny Public Aid (New York Times) - October 25
14. [United States] How do you solve a problem like poverty? (The Scout Report)
- October 25
15. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/personal.htm ]
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------------------------------------------------

Go to the home page of the
Canadian Social Research Links website:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/index.htm


1. Poverty patchwork : Can the grassroots trust the Wynne government after missing targets? - October 2013
(Now Toronto)

Poverty patchwork
Can the grassroots trust the Wynne government after missing targets?
http://www.nowtoronto.com/news/story.cfm?content=194968
By Paul Weinberg
(...)
John Clarke of the Ontario Coalition Against Poverty (OCAP) is very critical of the willingness of groups like the 25-in-5 Network (reduce poverty 25 per cent within five years) to participate in ongoing dialogue with the government. (...) Clarke doesn’t see the point in participating in the Ministry of Community and Social Services’ new round of info-seeking on poverty.
(...)
Policy expert John Stapleton from the 25-in-5 Network wants to “cut a bit of slack” for the government. He believes it was essentially the recession that got in the way of poverty reduction. What we have at Queen’s Park, he says, is a welcome relief from the dictates of the right-wing governments at the national and city level.

TOP FIVE POVERTY FACTS:
12.9% - Ontarians living below the poverty line
$626 - What single people on welfare live on monthly
25% Peoportion of Food bank users in downtown T.O. with a university education or above
40% Food bank clients in the Greater Toronto Area who have gone hungry at least once a week due to lack of money
21% Toronto youths who are unemployed

Source:
Now Toronto
(October 24 issue)
http://www.nowtoronto.com/

---

- Go to the Ontario Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty_ontario.htm

2. Social Assistance in Canada (Conference Notes by Nick Falvo) - October 24

Social Assistance in Canada (Notes by Nick Falvo)
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/2013/10/24/social-assistance-in-canada/
October 24
, 2013
By Nick Falvo
This week I am [in Regina] attending a conference entitled “Welfare Reform in Canada: Provincial Social Assistance in Comparative Perspective,” organized by Professor Daniel Béland.

The focus of the conference is “social assistance,” which typically encompasses both last-resort social assistance (i.e. ‘welfare’) and disability benefits. In Ontario, the former is known as Ontario Works and the latter as the Ontario Disability Support Program. Every Canadian province and territory has its own social assistance system—that is, its own legislation, its own policies and its own regulations. First Nations with self-government agreements have their own income assistance programs. And for First Nations without self-government agreements, income assistance is funded by Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (but “aligned with the rates and eligibility criteria for off-reserve residents of the reference province or territory”).

I was a discussant on two papers at the conference.
Some of the points I made in that capacity include the following:
* Social Assistance has Mixed Objectives – to give their recipients enough money to live on; and to NOT give their recipients enough money to live on.
* Tax credits (federal, provincial and territorial) have taken on greater importance for social assistance recipients over the past 15 years.
* Senior levels of government in Canada do not make substantial investments in training for workers. Nor do employers (for the most part).
* Most provinces and territories have implemented ‘poverty reduction strategies‘ in recent years. The jury is still out on how effective they will prove to be...

Source:
Progressive Ecomomics Blog

http://www.progressive-economics.ca/relentless/

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Organizations Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ngobkmrk.htm

3. Vibrant Communities Canada : Cities Connect – October 2013 updates

Vibrant Communities
http://www.vibrantcommunities.ca/
Vibrantcanada.ca is a learning community of members from diverse sectors, multi-sector roundtables, who share a common interest in reducing poverty, community engagement and collaboration. It is made up of individuals who are united in our desire to see one million people move beyond poverty all across Canada.

Resource Library
http://vibrantcanada.ca/resource-library
- includes links to resources on the following topics:
* Multi-sector Collaboration * Comprehensive Community Change * Poverty Reduction * Collective Impact * Asset Based Community Development * Community Engagement * Innovation * Social Enterprise * Small & Rural Communities * Income Security * Food Security * Transportation * Housing & Homelessness * Health Equity & Social Inclusion * Neighbourhood Revitalization & Economic Development * Tools & Templates * Advocacy & Policy * Evaluation * Governance & Leadership * Case Studies & Community Stories * Funding & Fundraising * About Roundtables for Poverty Reduction * Lived Experience * Vibrant Communities

Recent Publications
http://vibrantcanada.ca/publications
* Health Care In Canada - What Makes Us Sick?
* Community Social Profile Of Waterloo Region
* Poverty Or Prosperity (Indigenous Children in Canada)
* Empower The Community: New Brunswick's Approach To Overcoming Poverty
* Funding Learning Networks For Community Impact
* Cities Reducing Poverty Charter
* Household Food Insecurity In Canada

Ressources en français
http://vibrantcanada.ca/resource-library/ressources-en-francais

---

Working Poor Families Project (U.S.)
http://www.workingpoorfamilies.org/
January 24, 2013
The Working Poor Families Project (WPFP) is a American initiative to strengthen state policies that can assist families striving to work their way into the middle class and achieve economic security.

This group recently released a report entitled:
LOW-INCOME WORKING FAMILIES: THE GROWING ECONOMIC GAP (PDF - 1MB, 9 pages)
http://vibrantcanada.ca/files/low-income_working_poor_families_in_us.pdf
It makes the case that even though the economy appears to be recovering many families are being left behind and the income inequality gap is only expanding.
From the introduction:
While the U.S. economy has shown some signs of recovery—the U.S. unemployment rate has dipped below 8 percent from 10 percent three years ago—the economic outlook for many working families is bleak. New data from the U.S. Census Bureau show that the number of low-income working families in the United States increased to 10.4 million in 2011, up from 10.2 million a year earlier.

---

Cities Reducing Poverty Blogs
http://vibrantcanada.ca/city-blogs

Sample blog content:

Cities Connect – October 2013 updates
A weekly roundup of news and ideas about Poverty Reduction in Canada

http://vibrantcanada.ca/blogs/donna-jean-forster-gill/cities-connect-october-2013
This week has several new resources – a community response to poverty in PEI, the Thunder Bay Poverty reduction Strategy, the Canadian Index of Well-Being’s Community Survey, the Yukon’s poverty action week and a video about how to build better brains.
By Donna Jean Forster-Gill

NOTE : Each issue of Cities Connect includes the following sections:
* Cities Reducing Poverty Member News
* Community Update of the Week
* Tool of the Week
* Other News, Resources and Events

Recommended reading!

Earlier issues of Cities Connect:
Donna Jean Forster-Gill's blog
http://vibrantcanada.ca/blogs/donna-jean-forster-gill

Donna Jean Forster-Gill is with
Vibrant Communities Canada – Cities Reducing Poverty
http://vibrantcanada.ca/

Source:
Tamarack Institute for Community Engagement

http://tamarackcommunity.ca/index.php
Tamarack is a charity that develops and supports learning communities that help people to collaborate, co-generate knowledge and achieve collective impact on complex community issues. Our vision is to build a connected force for community change. Join us as we discover how communities can act together for positive change!

---

- Go to the Municipal Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/municipal.htm

4. Ten Things You Might Not Know About Poverty In Canada - October 17
(CBC)

Ten Things You Might Not Know About Poverty In Canada
http://www.cbc.ca/strombo/news/10-things-you-might-not-know-about-poverty-in-canada
October 17, 2013

In 1993, the UN designated October 17 the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty, and later adopted the eradication of extreme poverty and hunger as the core of its Millennium Development Goals.
To mark the day, here are some things about poverty in Canada that you might not know:
[Click the link above for links to more info on each of these.]
10. It's hard to measure

9. It varies widely between different groups
8. Child poverty is high in Canada
7. It's a significant burden on the economy
6. Many Canadians spend too much on shelter
5. Poverty can shorten your life
4. Many don't have enough to eat
3. Homelessness is widespread
2. Debt levels are on the rise
1. Early investment can yield big dividends

Source:
CBC

http://www.cbc.ca/

---

- Go to the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/october_17.htm

5. Harper Government on Track for Balanced Budget in 2015 - October 22
(Finance Canada)

Harper Government on Track for Balanced Budget in 2015
http://www.fin.gc.ca/n13/13-138-eng.asp
October 22, 2013
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, today released the Annual Financial Report of the Government of Canada for 2012–13. The report shows the continued downward track of Canada’s annual deficit. In 2012–13, the deficit fell to $18.9 billion. This was down by more than one-quarter ($7.4 billion) from the deficit of $26.3 billion in 2011–12 and down by nearly two-thirds from the $55.6-billion deficit recorded in 2009–10.

Related Documents:

Annual Financial Report of the Government of Canada: Fiscal Year 2012-2013
http://www.fin.gc.ca/afr-rfa/2013/index-eng.asp

Fiscal Reference Tables – October 2013
http://www.fin.gc.ca/frt-trf/2013/frt-trf-13-eng.asp

Frequently Asked Questions About the Annual Financial Report
http://www.fin.gc.ca/n13/data/13-138_1-eng.asp

Source:
Department of Finance Canada

http://www.fin.gc.ca/fin-eng.asp

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

- Go to the 2013 Canadian Government Budgets Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets_2013.htm

6. Harper Government Focused on Job Creation and Economic Growth with Economic Action Plan 2013 Act, No. 2 - October 22
(Finance Canada)

Harper Government Focused on Job Creation and Economic Growth with Economic Action Plan 2013 Act, No. 2
http://www.fin.gc.ca/n13/13-137-eng.asp
October 22, 2013
News Release
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, today introduced the Economic Action Plan 2013 Act, No. 2. The Act implements key measures from Economic Action Plan 2013, as well as certain previously announced tax measures, to help create jobs, stimulate economic growth and secure Canada’s long-term prosperity.

Measures in the Economic Action Plan 2013 Act, No. 2 aimed at spurring job creation and economic growth include:
*
Providing support for job creators
* Closing tax loopholes and combating tax evasion
* Respecting taxpayers’ dollars

Related Documents:

Economic Action Plan 2013
http://www.actionplan.gc.ca/en

Economic Action Plan 2013 Act, No. 2
http://www.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?Language=E&Mode=1&DocId=6263082

Source:
Department of Finance Canada

http://www.fin.gc.ca/fin-eng.asp

---

- Go to the 2013 Canadian Government Budgets Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets_2013.htm

7. Bank of Canada Inflation Calculator and Investment Calculator (updated links)

From the Bank of Canada:
(updated links)

*** Inflation Calculator
The Inflation Calculator uses monthly consumer price index (CPI) data from 1914 to the present to show changes in the cost of a fixed "basket" of consumer purchases. These include food, shelter, furniture, clothing, transportation, and recreation.

*** Investment Calculator
The Investment Calculator shows the effects of inflation on investments and savings. This tool allows you to see what a current investment will be worth in the future based on different assumptions on the annual interest rate and the annual rate of inflation. You can also enter a dollar amount to see how much you would have to invest today to reach a specific target value in the future, based on different rates of interest and inflation.

---

- Go to the Reference Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/reference.htm

8. Social Assistance, Pension and Tax Credit Rates, October to December 2013 - October 2013
(Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services)

Welfare benefit levels in Ontario
and much more...

------------------------

Social Assistance, Pension and Tax Credit Rates, October to December 2013 (PDF - 168K, 2 pages)
http://www.communitylegalcentre.ca/legal_information/Tips/IM/SA_pension_rate_Oct-Dec_2013.pdf

Prepared by the
Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services
[ http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/mcss/english/ ]
Recommended reading/saving/printing!
All in two pages, (just about) everything you ever
wanted to know about federal and provincial social program benefit levels in Ontario.
NOTE :
This factsheet is mostly benefit levels and rates - to find corresponding program information, do a Google search using any program name from the list below...

This factsheet contains current rate information (benefit levels)
for the following federal and Ontario programs:

* Federal Income Security and tax benefit programs
----- Old Age Security, Guaranteed Income Supplement, the Allowance (formerly Spouse's Allowance)
----- Canada Pension Plan
----- Harmonized Sales Tax Credit
----- Medical Expense Tax Credit
----- War Veterans Allowance
----- Employment Insurance
----- Canada Child Tax Benefit (incl. the Basic Child Tax Benefit, the National Child Benefit Supplement, the Child Disability Benefit and the Universal Child Care Benefit)

* Ontario income assistance programs
----- Ontario Works - Social Assistance rates + earnings exemptions and incentives
----- Ontario Disability Support Program - Social Assistance rates
----- Ontario Guaranteed Annual Income System (provincial top-up for Ontario seniors receiving the Guaranteed Income Supplement under the federal Old Age Security program)
----- Ontario Child Benefit
----- Ontario Child Care Supplement for Working Families
----- Ontario Trillium Benefit
(replaces former property and sales tax credits)
----- Assistance for Children with Severe Disabilities

Found in:
Tip Sheet List - (check this link for more recent updates)
[ Community Advocacy & Legal Centre - a non-profit community legal clinic
serving low income residents of Hastings, Prince Edward and Lennox & Addington counties.]

---

- Go to the Ontario Government Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-N) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (O-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk4.htm

9. [Ontario] Submission to the Cabinet Committee on Poverty Reduction and Social Inclusion - October 2013
(Ottawa Poverty Reduction Network)

From the
Ottawa Poverty Reduction Network:

Making Ontario a place where
everyone has the same opportunities ...

Submission to the Cabinet Committee on Poverty Reduction and Social Inclusion
Recommendations for the 2014 - 2018 Provincial Poverty Reduction Strategy
(Word file - 39K, 11 pages)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ottawa_2014-18_PRS.docx
Prepared by the Ottawa Poverty Reduction Network
in consultation with our community.
October 2013
The Ottawa Poverty Reduction Network is presenting these recommendations to the Cabinet Poverty Reduction and Social Inclusion Committee on behalf of the Ottawa community.
(...)
Recommendations regarding the 2014-2018
phase of the Provincial Poverty Reduction Strategy :

* The Strategy should contain specific measures that will reduce the poverty rate, each year, of one of five specific groups by 5% per year over the five-year life of the Strategy.
* While maintaining the delivery of current programs (OW, ODSP, Employment Ontario, etc.) as separate entities, integrate the administration of all income-related, personal support and training programs at the municipal level (2015).
* Effective July 1st, 2014, all decisions made regarding any benefit or allowance, whether mandatory or discretionary, should be made appealable including through both internal review and external processes.
* Increase the minimum wage by $1.00 per hour PLUS inflation every year for five years on July 1st of each year.
* Increase the Ontario Child Benefit (OCB) by inflation PLUS $20 per month on July 1st each year for five years; continue eligibility for the OCB past 18 if the young person is in full-time school.
* Increase the earnings exemption in 2014 and 2015 for all social assistance recipients by $25 per month for each dependent in the family.
* Redefine "earned income" to include income replacement programs such as WSIB, EI, LTD and CPP and use the net rather than the gross income to calculate deductions from Social Assistance (2015).
* Restructure social assistance rates so that the cheque has three basic components: shelter, nutrition and basic needs (July 2014)
* Develop a handbook specific to each municipality detailing all low-income federal, provincial and municipal support programs in that community that would be available to low income individuals and community agencies.
* While these measures will improve the incomes of low income Ontarians, care needs to be taken to ensure that the increases are not taxed back through increases in rent, child care fees, taxes and other government charges.
* Cap the co-pay on the Ontario Drug Benefit (ODB) program at $10 per month (2014) so that people with multiple prescriptions can still afford to purchase their medications and also eat.
* Provide medically-required supplemental nutrition requirements through the Special Diet Allowance (SDA) to all social assistance recipients and all low-income seniors according to the pre-2009 formulary (2014) and extend the SDA to all low-income residents (2017).
* Provide preventative and restorative dental care to all low-income children (2014); all social assistance recipients (2015); all working poor (2016); and all low-income seniors (2017).
* Develop a vision care program for the working poor and children (2015) and extend it to all low income Ontarians (2018).
* Develop a program to provide medical necessities to the working poor (2016) and to all low income Ontarians (2018).
* Restore all items cut from EHSS in recent budgets as well as cuts made to discretionary health benefits (2014).
* Create an infrastructure program that invests in housing and creates jobs.
Set the rent in all social housing at 30% of net household income regardless of source of income effective July 2015 for tenants not receiving social assistance and July 2017 for those receiving assistance.
* Restructure housing with supports so that the supports are tied to the person, not the housing (2015).
* Provide incentives to employers to hire and/or train and/or accommodate low-income Ontarians living with a disability and social assistance recipients for permanent positions (2015).
* Introduce a voluntary participation agreement for all social assistance recipients that provides tangible supports.
* Through the Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP), provide supports to cover education-related expenses for students from families living below the Low Income Cut-Offs (LICO) in the form of 50% grants and 50% forgivable loans for the first four years of post-secondary study (Sept 2014).
* Child care allowances should be provided to all low income parents who are involved in training programs, attending school or employed (2017).

Source:
Ottawa Poverty Reduction Network

http://www.oprn-rrpo.ca/en/oprn-rrpo/

------------

For more info on the above, please contact Linda Lalonde:
linda_lalonde_ottawa@yahoo.com

---

- Go to the Ontario Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty_ontario.htm

10. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Employment Insurance, August 2013 - October 24
--- Job vacancies in brief, three-month average ending in July 2013
- October 22
--- Population estimates by census subdivision, 2011 and 2012 - October 22

What's new from The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

October 24, 2013
Employment Insurance, August 2013
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/131024/dq131024a-eng.htm
In August, 511,900 people received regular Employment Insurance benefits, up 1.5% (+7,800) from July. Compared with August 2012, the number of beneficiaries fell by 7.8%.

- includes the following charts and tables:

Chart 1 : Slight increase in the number of regular Employment Insurance beneficiaries in August
Chart 2 : Number of regular Employment Insurance beneficiaries by occupation, percentage change, August 2012 to August 2013
Chart 3 : Employment Insurance claims decline in August

Table 1 : Beneficiaries receiving regular income benefits by province and territory, sex and age – Seasonally adjusted
Table 2 : Initial and renewal claims received, by province and territory – Seasonally adjusted
Table 3 : Beneficiaries receiving regular income benefits by census metropolitan area – Seasonally adjusted
Table 4 : Beneficiaries receiving regular income benefits by occupation, Canada – Seasonally adjusted

CANSIM Tables:

* Table 276-0003 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=276-0003&p2=31
* Table 276-0004 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=276-0004&p2=31
* Table 276-0011 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=276-0011&p2=31
* Table 276-0020 to 276-0022 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=276-0020..276-0022&p2=31
* Table 276-0030 to 276-0032 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=276-0030..276-0032&p2=31
* Table 276-0040 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=276-0040&p2=31
* Table 276-0041 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=276-0041&p2=31

More info about Employment Insurance
from Service Canada
:
http://www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/sc/ei/index.shtml

Related subjects:

Labour
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2621&id=2621&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Employment insurance, social assistance and other transfers
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2621&id=2627&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Non-wage benefits
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2621&id=2628&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm

October 22, 2013
Job vacancies in brief, three-month average ending in July 2013
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/131022/dq131022b-eng.htm
In July, there were 210,000 job vacancies among Canadian businesses, down 54,000 from July 2012. There were 6.5 unemployed people for every job vacancy, up from 5.2 one year earlier. The increase in the ratio of unemployment to job vacancies was all the result of the decline in job vacancies. The national job vacancy rate was 1.4% in July, down from 1.8% 12 months earlier.

CANSIM Tables 284-0001 to 284-0004 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=284-0001..284-0004&p2=31

Related subjects:

Labour
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2621&id=2621&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Employment and unemployment
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2621&id=1803&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Industries
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2621&id=2623&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Related link:

No Widespread Labour Shortage, widespread information gaps.
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/2013/10/24/no-widespread-labour-shortage-widespread-information-gaps/
By Angella MacEwen
October 24, 2013
A TD Economics Special Report released on October 22nd [ (PDF) : http://goo.gl/O21yOP ] debunked the popular economic myth spread by Minister Kenney that there are too many jobs without people [ http://goo.gl/gTXqiJ ] . The report looks at changes in employment, unemployment, job vacancy rates, and wages. Job vacancy rates are higher for trades occupations in Western Canada, but overall job vacancy rates are low.
(...)
Highlighting the inadequacy of current labour market information, the most recent data on job vacancies was released by Statistics Canada on the same day. It tells us that nationally there are 6.5 unemployed persons for every job vacancy.

October 22, 2013
Population estimates by census subdivision, 2011 and 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/131022/dq131022d-eng.htm
Population estimates by census subdivision for the reference year 2011 (according to the geographical limits effective as of January 1, 2012) and for reference year 2012 (according to the geographical limits effective as of January 1, 2013) are now available free of charge in electronic format upon request. Revised data for the reference years 2006 to 2010 are also available.

NOTE by Gilles:
If the population estimates are "...now available free of charge in electronic format", WHY are interested parties forced to request them by email or phone from StatCan?? Who's the control freak? (HINT : his initials are SH)
Email: infostats@statcan.gc.ca
Phone : 1-800-263-1136

StatCan Note to readers:
Estimates released today are based on 2006 Census counts adjusted for census net undercoverage and incompletely enumerated Indian reserves to which is added the estimated demographic growth for the period from May 16, 2006 and the reference date of the estimates.

These estimates are not to be confused with the 2011 Census population counts that were released on February 8, 2012.

Related subjects:

Population and demography
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3867&id=3867&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Population estimates and projections
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3867&id=3433&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Check past issues of The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/DAILY/daily.cgi?s=last
Select a month and year from the two drop-down menus to access all issues of The Daily for a particular month.



Source:
The Daily

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]


StatCan Blog
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/blog-blogue/eng
The goal of the StatCan Blog is to pull back the curtain to explain some of the agency’s inner workings, and to show the links between quality statistics and the lives of Canadians.

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

11. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
http://www.childcarecanada.org

October 27, 2013
What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

--------------------------------

Recommended reading:

The daycare project
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/13/10/daycare-project
21 Oct 2013 | Canada
The Globe and Mail's major multi-part series on child care in Canada includes six major articles, a number of supplementary articles and commentaries and an online poll asking "Based on your experience, are you happy with the availability and cost of daycare in Canada?"

--------------------------------

Full-day kindergarten study evaluation
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/13/10/full-day-kindergarten-study-evaluation
23 Oct 2013 | Ontario
Final reports and analysis of findings from a study of full-day kindergarten (FDK) conducted in partnership with Queen's and McMaster universities from 2010-2012.

Investing in our future: The evidence base on preschool education
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/13/10/investing-our-future-evidence-base-preschool-education
23 Oct 2013 | United States
Research conducted by a coalition of 10 researchers across the U.S. concludes that "the evidence is clear that middle-class children can benefit substantially [from universal preschool], and that benefits outweigh costs for children from middle-income as well as those from low-income families".

Comparing child care policy in the Canadian provinces
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/13/10/comparing-child-care-policy-canadian-provinces
22 Oct 2013 | Canada
Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Canadian Political Science Association argues that "existing research that attempts to describe and understand variation in [provincial] child care policy is problematic because it fails to account for the complex, multidimensional nature of variation in child care policies".

Hard on families, light on crime: Some thoughts on the Throne Speech
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice/13/10/hard-families-light-crime-some-thoughts-throne-speech
21 Oct 2013 | Canada
Kate McInturff's analysis of the Throne Speech concludes that "for a government that claims to understand "the daily pressures ordinary Canadian families face," they seem to be significantly underestimating the pressure of finding affordable and safe childcare spaces".

MORE research, policy & practice
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice

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2. Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad

Daycare plan should be a priority for Christy Clark
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/13/10/daycare-plan-should-be-priority-christy-clark
25 Oct 2013 | British Columbia

The childcare conundrum: who will pay?
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/13/10/childcare-conundrum-who-will-pay
25 Oct 2013 | Australia and New Zealand

String of unregulated home daycares dominate Toronto street
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/13/10/string-unregulated-home-daycares-dominate-toronto-street
25 Oct 2013 | Ontario

Language-gap study bolsters a push for pre-k
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/13/10/language-gap-study-bolsters-push-pre-k
23 Oct 2013 | United States

Ofsted gets tough on teaching, safeguarding and safety
http://www.childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news/13/10/ofsted-gets-tough-teaching-safeguarding-and-safety
23 Oct 2013 | Europe

MORE child care in the news
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

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CRRU Archive

All newer content from January 2013 to date is archived in a special section of the Early Childhood Development Links page of this site.
Click the link immediately below to go there:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm#crru

For links to weekly issues of this weekly alert from June 2009 to December 2012*,
check out the CRRU Links Archive on this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/crru_links_archive.htm

* NOTE (by Gilles):
I recently (Dec. 2012) discovered that my HTML editing software crashes when I try to open the above archive page to add or edit something.
After several hours of tinkering in a vain attempt to make everything work, I finally decided to go with Plan B : you can still click the link above to access the CRRU archive (including contents of each issue from June 2009 to December 2012), but all new content since then is archived on the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page : http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm.

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Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
http://www.childcarecanada.org/res/enews/index.html
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere
http://www.childcarecanada.org/links/index.html

CRRU Publications
http://www.childcarecanada.org/pubs/
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

ISSUE files
http://www.childcarecanada.org/resources/issue-files
- theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

http://www.childcarecanada.org
CRRU is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

12. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.. The Dispatch is distributed by the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. News articles from online newspapers are posted here in a number of general categories, and are tagged with more specific keywords relevant to each article.

Tags
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/tags/

Clicking on a word or expression in the list of tags will call up all relevant news items from past Dispatches under that tag. The list contains a tag for each U.S. state so you can view jurisdiction-specific news, and tags for a huge list of topics, including :
* Basic needs * Canada * Caseloads * Cash assistance * Cellular phones * Census * Charities * Child care * Child hunger * Child poverty * Child support * Child welfare * Child well-being * Chronic homelessness * Cohabitation * Cost of living * Crime * Crimes against the homeless * Debt * Deep poverty * Disability * Early childhood education * Earned income tax credit * Electronic benefit transfers * Eligibility * Food insecurity * Food programs * Foster care* Fuel poverty * Health care costs * Health insurance coverage * Homeless children * Homeless families * Homeless veterans * Housing First * Housing subsidies * Immigrant workers * Income * Income inequality * Jobless benefits * Juvenile justice * Legal aid * Low-income housing * Low-wage work * Medicaid * Microfinance * Minimum wage * Newly poor * No Child Left Behind * Ontario * Paid family leave * Payday lending * Persistent poverty * Poverty measurement * Poverty rate * Prisons * Privatization * Public Housing * Rural poverty * Safety net * SCHIP * Section 8 (Housing) * Seniors * Single parents * SNAP/Food Stamps * Supplemental Security Income * Taxes * Teen pregnancy * Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) * Unemployment rate * Uninsured * Urban poverty * Utilities * Welfare reform * Welfare-to-work * Women Infants and Children (WIC) * Work requirements * Youth employment * many more tags...

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

October 25, 2013
Student Homelessness (2 articles)
Long-Term Joblessness
Teen Pregnancy in the US (3 articles)

October 24, 2013
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2013/10/24/
Teen Birthrate – Milwaukee, WI
Affordable Care Act (2 articles)

October 23, 2013
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2013/10/23/
Medicaid Expansion – Ohio

October 22, 2013
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2013/10/22/
Early Childhood Education
September 2013 US Unemployment Rate (5 articles)

October 21, 2013
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2013/10/21/
American Youth Not Employed or in School
Low-Income Students in Public Schools (2 articles)

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Earlier Poverty Dispatches (back to July 2006):
1. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page: [ http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/ and click on a date in the calendar in the top right-hand corner of the page. Change the month by clicking the link at the bottom of the calendar.
OR
3. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page and click on a category or a tag in the right-hand margin.
4. See http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/povdispatch_archive.htm (more complete listing, but only goes back to December 2011)

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NOTE : You can subscribe to this email list or RSS feed
by clicking "Subscribe" in the right-hand margin on any page of the Poverty Dispatch website

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)

http://www.irp.wisc.edu

University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://www.wisc.edu/

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

13. [United States] Drug Tests Falter as Way for States to Deny Public Aid - October 25
(New York Times
/)

Drug Tests Falter as Way for States to Deny Public Aid
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/26/us/state-drug-tests-for-public-aid-recipients-have-limited-effect.html
By Steven Yaccino
October 25, 2013
With safety-net spending under review around the country, proposals to make welfare and unemployment checks contingent on drug testing have become a routine rallying cry in dozens of states. But the impact of drug-testing measures has been limited. Supporters say the tests are needed to protect welfare and unemployment compensation funds as the nation emerges from the recession. But their enactment has often been hampered by legal challenges and the expense of running the programs, which generally uncover relatively few drug users.
(...)
This year, at least 29 states considered drug testing for people who receive cash assistance from the primary federal welfare program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, but only two measures passed, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Source:
New York Times

http://www.nytimes.com/

---

- Go to the Ontario Drug Testing for Welfare Recipients Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/drug_testing.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

14. [United States] How do you solve a problem like poverty? October 25
(The Scout Report)

From The Scout Report
(University of Wisconsin) :

[United States] How do you solve a problem like poverty?
October 25, 2013

Around the world, thousands of policy makers, elected officials, and NGOs work to address the problem of poverty. It is vastly different in the developing world of course, and many additional elements must be considered before rolling out a new set of policy initiatives. Recently, the World Bank released a new strategy earlier this month that announced that their "value proposition" is to end extreme poverty by 2030 and to foster income growth among the poorest 40% in every country. It's a worthy goal and to achieve this, commentators like policy experts at The Economist have noted that they will need to correctly diagnose "the worst constraints on poverty reduction and focus mainly on those." Others have noted that the Bank will need to address problems with functional "silos" within the organization that keep experts on different regions of the world from communicating best practices and difficulties with each other.

The first link below will take users to a recent piece from last week's Economist on the World Bank's shift in their focus on alleviating poverty throughout the world. The second link will take curious visitors to a recent piece from Bloomberg News about World Bank President Jim Yong Kim's official announcement about their pledge to reduce global poverty. The third link will take visitors to a piece by development consultant Syed Mohammad Ali that offers comments on this recent major decision. The fourth link will take visitors to the official transcript from World Bank Vice President Sanjay Pradhan of his speech regarding the organization's new strategy for reducing poverty. The fifth link will whisk users away to the official World Bank Poverty page. Here, visitors can read more about specific initiatives around the world and also find more details about their long-term goals. The last link will take visitors to the complete World Bank data archive for information on poverty around the world.

Zen and the art of poverty reduction
http://www.economist.com/news/finance-and-economics/21588119-calm-and-confusion-worlds-biggest-development-institution-zen-and-art

World Bank President Pledges to Reduce Poverty in Half by 2020
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-10-09/world-bank-president-pledges-to-reduce-poverty-in-half-by-2020.html

Is the World bank reforming its approach?
http://tribune.com.pk/story/616278/is-the-world-bank-reforming-its-approach/

A Solutions Partnership to End Poverty
http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/speech/2013/10/16/solutions-partnership-end-poverty

Poverty Home: World Bank
http://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/poverty

World Bank Data: Poverty
http://data.worldbank.org/topic/poverty

Source:
The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout 1994-2013

https://www.scout.wisc.edu/

---

Previous issues of The Scout Report
https://scout.wisc.edu/report/past (back to 1994)

---

- Go to the National/Federal and International Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty2.htm

15. CRINMAIL (Newsletter of the Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):
http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

The latest information on children's rights around the world:
CRINMAIL
http://www.crin.org/email/
CRIN publishes several email lists on children's rights issues in English, French, Spanish and Arabic. We also issue thematic editions on armed conflict, violence against children and strategic litigation. You can subscribe to any of these email lists and unsubscribe at any time.

CRINMAIL - Children's Rights Newsletter (weekly)

Here's the link to the latest issue of CRINMAIL:

23 October 2013 - CRINmail issue 1350
http://www.crin.org/email/crinmail_detail_popup.asp?crinmailID=4919
In this issue:
Latest news and reports
- Court in France sentences father for corporal punishment
- Juvenile justice reforms and concerns
- Media responsibility in Roma news
- Anti-gay law repealed ahead of EU admission
- Saudi Arabia snubs UN Security Council
- Exam tweaking and political propaganda in schools
Children's Rights Wiki: Spotlight on Sri Lanka
Upcoming events
Employment
Also in this issue:
- World news
- Reports
- Events
- Issues
- Law
- Advocacy
- Challenging breaches
- Take action
- Campaigns

---------------------------------------------

CRINMAIL Archive (earlier issues)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/CRINMAIL_archive.htm
- includes a table of contents for each issue, as in the above, back to 2009-2010

NOTE : The official CRINMAIL archive [ http://goo.gl/C0JNx ] --- does *not* include the table of contents for each issue as in the most recent issues above. Users must click on the link to each issue to see its contents, but the collection of links goes back much further (pre-2006).

--------------------------------------------------

The CRINMAIL Children's Rights Newsletter is one of several weekly newsletters produced and distributed by CRIN.
See the complete list of newsletters:
http://www.crin.org/email/

Source:
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):

http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

---

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong to me, Gilles Séguin.
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/personal.htm

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
http://www.cupe.ca/
Thanks, CUPE!

------------------------

If you wish to receive this weekly newsletter by email, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter online subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly newsletter.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

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My job search

1. My first job was working in an Orange Juice factory,but I got canned. Couldn't concentrate.
2. Then I worked in the woods as a Lumberjack, but just couldn't hack it, so they gave me the axe.
3. After that, I tried being a Tailor, but wasn't suited for it mainly because it was a sew-sew job.
4. Next, I tried working in a Muffler Factory, but that was too exhausting.
5. Then, tried being a Chef figured it would add a little spice to my life, but just didn't have the thyme.
6. Next, I attempted being a Deli Worker, but any way I sliced it, I couldn't cut the mustard.
7. My best job was a Musician, but eventually found I wasn't noteworthy.
8. I studied a long time to become a Doctor, but didn't have any patience.
9. Next, was a job in a Shoe Factory. Tried hard but just didn't fit in. They gave me the boot.
10. I became a Professional Fisherman, but discovered I couldn't live on my net income.
11. Managed to get a good job working for a Pool Maintenance Company, but the work was just too draining.
12. So then I got a job in a Workout Center, but they said I wasn't fit for the job.
13. After many years of trying to find steady work, I finally got a job as a Historian until I realized there was no future in it.
14. My last job was working in Starbucks, but had to quit because it was always the same old grind.
15.So I tried retirement, and I found I'm perfect for the job!

Source:
A retired friend

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And, in closing...

--------------------------------------------

Last-minute
newsletter addendum:

Release of The Fiscal Monitor - August 2013
http://www.fin.gc.ca/n13/13-140-eng.asp
(From Finance Canada)

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Marg Delahunty & Mike Duffy (viudeo, duration two minutes)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ka93rytRe8
First it was Rob Ford, now it's the Duffster who gets ambushed by Marg Warrior Princess.
Right on Parliament Hill, no less!

My favourite lines:

* Duffy's first words to Marg : " I thought they'd have put you in the asylum by now."

* Marg predicts the Duffster's future:
"You're a Senator. What are they gonna do --- fire ya?"

* Marg is shy about telling Duffy exactly what she thinks about his antics:
"If brown-nosing suck-holery goes up above $100 a barrel, can I have drilling rights on your head?"

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Ottawa Citizen editorial cartoons
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/opinion/editorial-cartoons/index.html

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