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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
November 27, 2005

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter, a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 1536 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes and a disclaimer.

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IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian Content

1.  Sixth National Child Benefit Progress Report (Federal-Provincial-Territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services) - November 25
2. Meeting of First Ministers and National Aboriginal Leaders (Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat) - November 24-25
3. Early Learning and Child Care (ELCC) Agreements (Federal and Provincial Governments)
4. 2005 Report Card on Child Poverty in Canada (Campaign 2000) - November 23 + Provincial child poverty reports for BC, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Nova Scotia
5. Hunger Count 2005 (Canadian Association of Food Banks)
- November 23
6. What's New from Statistics Canada:
--- Leading Indicators, October 2005 - November 23
--- Study: Youth and the labour market, 1997 to 2004
--- Consumer Price Index, October 2005

7. Division of Childhood and Adolescence (Public Health Agency of Canada)
8. 2005 Report of the Auditor General of Canada - November 22

9. What's New from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit ( University of Toronto) - November 25

International Content

10. Poverty Dispatch Digest : U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs --- November 23

Have a great  week!
gs

Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net

E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com

1. Sixth National Child Benefit Progress Report - November 25
(Federal-Provincial-Territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services)

Ministers Responsible for Social Services Release the Sixth National Child Benefit Progress Report
[version française]
News Release
November 25, 2005
"Federal, Provincial and Territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services are pleased to release to Canadians the sixth report on the progress of the National Child Benefit. The National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2004 shows that the National Child Benefit is improving the economic well-being of families with children. 'We know that our actions are having an impact in reducing child poverty,' said Ken Dryden, Minister of Social Development and federal co-chair of Federal, Provincial and Territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services. 'The National Child Benefit is a joint federal, provincial and territorial initiative. It has been directly responsible for reducing the number of children and their families living in low income.' The report shows that the National Child Benefit prevented 106,000 children in 45,900 families from living in low income in 2002."

Complete report:

The NCB Progress Report: 2004
HTML version - [version française]
PDF version
(2.5MB, 110 pages)[version française]
Table of Contents:
Message from Federal/Provincial/Territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services
Executive Summary
Chapter 1: What is the National Child Benefit Initiative?
Chapter 2: The National Child Benefit Supplement
Chapter 3: Components of the National Child Benefit Initiative
Chapter 4: First Nations and the National Child Benefit
Chapter 5: Monitoring Progress - Societal Level Indicators
Chapter 6: Assessing the Direct Impact of the National Child Benefit
Chapter 7: The Way Ahead|
Appendix 1: Glossary
Appendix 2: Provincial, Territorial and First Nations NCB Reinvestments and Investments
Appendix 3: Results of the SLID Analysis
Appendix 4: Additional Statistical Information
Pamphlet (PDF file - 526K, 4 pages) - [version française]

National Child Benefit Clawback Misconception

The Misconception:
"The federal government should take measures to make sure that provinces don't claw back the federal increase in the Canada Child Tax Benefit from families' social assistance benefits."

The Fact: The clawback is actually part of the NCB design, by agreement of the governments of all provinces and territories (except Quebec) and the federal government.
Read the excerpt below from the Second Report on Social Policy Renewal:

Progress Report to Premiers - No. 2 (PDF file - 72K, 18 pages)
July 1997
Excerpt (page 8)
"Federal/provincial/territorial governments have agreed on a joint NCB approach that involves three simultaneous steps.
First, the federal government will increase its benefits for low-income families with children through an increase in the Canada Child Tax Benefit.
Second, provinces and territories will make corresponding decreases in their social assistance payments for families with children while ensuring these families receive at least the same level of income support from governments.
Third, provinces and territories will reinvest these newly-available funds in complementary programs targeted at benefits and services for low income families with children."

News Release:
Social Policy Renewal

August 8, 1997
From the 38th Annual Premiers' Conference

St. Andrews-by-the-Sea, New Brunswick

See also:

"Building a Better Future for Canadian Children" - click on "Social Assistance Adjustments"
National Child Benefit Booklet
September 1997
"As the federal benefit increases, provinces and territories will decrease benefits for social assistance recipients. This decrease will not exceed the amount of the federal increase - the total benefit available to social assistance families will remain at least the same"

- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Unofficial Social Union / National Child Benefit Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/socu.htm

2. Meeting of First Ministers and National Aboriginal Leaders - November 24-25
(Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat)

Meeting of First Ministers and National Aboriginal Leaders  (PDF file - 63K, 19 pages)
Kelowna, British Columbia
News Release
November 24-25, 2005
"First Ministers and National Aboriginal Leaders agree to take immediate action to improve the quality of life for the Aboriginal peoples of Canada in four important areas – health, education, housing and relationships. They also agree that enhancing economic opportunities is a key priority area for multilateral action. To ensure that tangible progress is made, First Ministers and National Aboriginal Leaders have set goals and agreed on the need for indicators to measure progress."
Source:
Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat

Meeting of First Ministers and
National Aboriginal Leaders
November 24-25, 2005
Kelowna, British Columbia
- includes links to:
* Address by Prime Minister Paul Martin at the First Ministers Meeting External link to a Government of Canada site - A new browser window will open.
* BACKGROUNDERS - Meeting of First Ministers and National Aboriginal Leaders External link to a Government of Canada site - A new browser window will open.
* External link to a Government of Canada site - A new browser window will open.
* Prime Minister invites Premiers, Territorial Leaders, and Leaders of National Aboriginal Organizations to a First Ministers' meeting External link to a Government of Canada site - A new browser window will open.
* Frequently Asked Questions about Aboriginal Peoples
Source:
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada

Backgrounders - Meeting of First Ministers and National Aboriginal Leaders
November 24, 2005
Kelowna, British Columbia
- includes links to : General Information - Accountability - Aboriginal Education - The Blueprint on Aboriginal Health - Aboriginal Health - Aboriginal Housing - Federal Aboriginal Economic Development Programming
Source:
Prime Minister's Office

Also from the PMO:

Results
- includes links to:
* News release
* Strengthening Relationships and Closing the Gap
* Financial Commitments
* News Release announcing the meeting
* Address by Prime Minister Paul Martin at the First Ministers Meeting
* Backgrounders (pdf files)
* Photo Slide Show

Government of Canada invests in immediate action to improve lives of Aboriginal People in Canada
News Release
November 25, 2005
"Prime Minister Paul Martin today announced more than $5 billion over the next five years to close the gap between Aboriginal peoples and other Canadians in education, health, housing and economic opportunities. The announcement was made at an historic meeting of First Ministers and Aboriginal Leaders that set out an ambitious plan of action."

Google Web Search Results : "Meeting, First Ministers, National Aboriginal Leaders, Kelowna, 2005"
Google News search Results : "Meeting, First Ministers, National Aboriginal Leaders, Kelowna, 2005"
Source:
Google.ca

 

3. Early Learning and Child Care (ELCC) Agreements
(Federal and Provincial Governments)

Early Learning and Child Care (ELCC) Agreements

Since late April 2005, the governments of Canada and the provinces have been negotiating and signing agreements-in-principle on early learning and child care. After an initial spate of announcements in late spring, the initiative appeared to move to the back burner, but bilateral negotiations continued on a number of fronts. "These historic agreements build on a meeting of the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services in November 2004 and a subsequent meeting in February 2005. They (with the exception of Quebec) agreed to shared principles to guide the development of a new national system of early learning and child care." The anticipated election call has precipitated things, to lock in federal financial commitments before Parliament shuts down for the duration of the election campaign.

The best way to catch up on the latest flurry of activity is to start with the article below and then explore the website whose link appears below that article.

Dryden achieves 10 child care agreements
25 Nov 05
Globe and Mail
"Social Development Minister Ken Dryden achieved his goal of obtaining early-learning and child care deals with all 10 provinces as his Liberal government counts down its final days in office. Agreements yesterday with New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island leaves just the three territories to sign on to Mr. Dryden's plan to create a national system of child care for Canada -- a promise the Liberals have been making for more than a decade."

The most current and comprehensive ELCC website:

Early Learning and Child Care (ELCC) Agreements:
Towards a national system of early learning and child care

The link above is from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) at the University of Toronto. It's where you'll find the largest and most timely collection of reports, press releases, news articles and other pertinent documents related to the Canadian ELCC policy developments. The file is categorized into government documents, responses, and news articles.

Federal/Provincial/Territorial Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care
- joint federal-provincial-territorial government website
- incl. links to : Multilateral Framework - Funding Profile - P/T Investments Tracking Government Progress

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Google Web Search Results : "Child care, Canada"
Google News search Results : "Child care, Canada"
Source:
Google.ca

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What's New from Social Development Canada:

Governments of Canada and Ontario sign funding agreement on Early Learning and Child Care (ELCC)
News Release
November 25, 2005
"Social Development Minister Ken Dryden and Mary Anne Chambers, Ontario’s Minister of Children and Youth Services, today signed a multi-year funding agreement on early learning and child care. Under this initiative Ontario will receive approximately $1.9 billion over five years to support its early learning and child care goals. Ontario signed an Agreement-in-Principle on May 6, 2005 , in which it committed to release an action plan identifying its priorities and how it intends to meet them."

Related Links:

Best Start: Helping Young Children Get the Best Start in Life
[NOTE: scroll down the page to see seven links to additional resources, including the one in the next line below]
- Ontario Best Start Action Plan – A Progress Report (November 2005 - PDF file - 89K, 9 pages)
Source:
Ontario Ministry of Children and Youth Services

July 28, 2005
Ontario's Best Start Plan to Expand Early Learning and Child Care
- scroll down the page for links to:
---
Allocation of New Federal Funds to Municipalities, over Three Years, by March 31, 2008
---
Ontario's Best Start Plan for Early Learning and Child Care Provincial Allocations, over Three Years, by March 31, 2008

Google Web Search Results : "Ontario, early learning and child care, agreement"
Google News search Results : "Ontario, early learning and child care, agreement"
Source:
Google.ca

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Governments of Canada and Prince Edward Island sign an Agreement on Early Learning and Child Care
News Release
November 24, 2005— Social Development Minister Ken Dryden and Chester Gillan, Prince Edward Island’s Minister of Social Services and Seniors, announced today an historic Agreement in Principle that further supports the development of quality early learning and child care (ELCC) for young children and their families in Prince Edward Island.

Related Links:

Healthy Child Development - from PEI Health and Social Services

Google Web Search Results : "Prince Edward Island, early learning and child care agreement"
Google News search Results : "Prince Edward Island, early learning and child care agreement"
Source:
Google.ca

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Governments of Canada and Manitoba sign funding agreement on Early Learning and Child Care
November 18, 2005
"Social Development Minister Ken Dryden today signed a funding agreement with Manitoba on early learning and child care. Under the new initiative, Manitoba will receive $174.4 million over five years to support its early learning and child care goals. Manitoba signed an Agreement-in-Principle on April 29, 2005, in which it committed to release an action plan identifying its priorities and how it intends to meet them."

Google Web Search Results : "Manitoba, early learning and child care agreement"
Google News search Results : "Manitoba, early learning and child care agreement"
Source:
Google.ca

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Moving Forward: Governments of Canada and New Brunswick sign an Agreement on Early Learning and Child Care
News Release
"November 24, 2005— Social Development Minister Ken Dryden and Joan MacAlpine-Stiles, New Brunswick’s Minister of Family and Community Services,announced today an historic Agreement-in-Principle that further supports the development of quality early learning and child care (ELCC) for young children and their families in New Brunswick. 'This Agreement-in-Principle sets out the framework for delivering high-quality and affordable Early Learning and Child Care throughout the province, whether in urban areas or in rural or remote communities,' said Minister Dryden. 'It is one more piece in the development of an ambitious system of Early Learning and Child Care in every province and territory in the country. This Agreement-in-Principle means more opportunities for a better future for New Brunswick children and their parents.'”

Related Links:

Moving Forward on Early Learning and Child Care : Agreement in Principle Between the
Government of Canada and the Government of New Brunswick
(PDF file - 401K, 10 pages)

Google Web Search Results : "New Brunswick, early learning and child care agreement"
Google News search Results : "New Brunswick, early learning and child care agreement"
Source:
Google.ca

------------------------------------------------------------------------

- Go to the Government Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd.htm

4. 2005 Report Card on Child Poverty in Canada - November 23
+ Provincial reports
for BC, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Nova Scotia
(Campaign 2000 et al.)

From Campaign 2000:

First Ministers told to take action to lower shameful poverty rates
News alert - Campaign 2000
Kelowna, BC, 23 Nov 05
"Activists took their annual child poverty report directly to the First Ministers meeting here today. The findings are discouraging. For almost 30 years the poverty rate has been stuck at one-in-six children. Whether families are mother-led, have two parents, are working full time or on social assistance the numbers are static. A particularly disturbing finding is that child poverty rates for Aboriginal, immigrant, and visible minority children are twice the national rate. Campaign 2000 National Coordinator Laurel Rothman, whose organization prepares the annual update, was joined by Peter Dinsdale of the National Association of Friendship Centres. They are clearly frustrated by misplaced government priorities and jurisdictional wrangling."

Provincial Child Poverty Report Cards were also released in BC, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Nova Scotia (see below).

Complete report:

Decision Time for Canada: Let’s Make Poverty History
2005 Report Card on Child Poverty in Canada
[pdf, 12pp, 500KB]

Version française:

Une décision s’impose au Canada : Abolissons la pauvreté
Rapport 2005 sur la pauvreté des enfants au Canada
[pdf, 12pp, 500KB]

--------------------------------------

Provincial reports

British Columbia
Fact Sheets on Child Poverty in British Columbia, 2005 [pdf, 14pp, 300KB]
BC Campaign 2000
November 2005
Source:
First Call BC

Saskatchewan
Report Card on Child Poverty in Saskatchewan, 2005 [pdf, 12pp, 422KB]
November 2005
Source:
Social Policy Research Unit - University of Regina

Manitoba
Where There's a Will There's a Way: If Not Now, When?
Manitoba Child and Family Report Card 2005
. [pdf, 21pp, 658KB]
November 2005
Source:
Social Planning Council of Winnipeg

Nova Scotia
The Nova Scotia Child Poverty Report Card 2005: 1989–2003 [pdf, 20 pp, 508KB]
Source:
Nova Scotia Office - Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

--------------------------------------

- Go to the Non-Governmental Organizations Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ngobkmrk.htm
- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (C-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm
- Go to the Saskatchewan Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/skbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Manitoba Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/mbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Nova Scotia Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nsbkmrk.htm

5. Hunger Count 2005 - November 23
(
Canadian Association of Food Banks)

Winter will be hard, food-bank report warns
November 23, 2005
CBC News
"The number of people using food banks is almost unchanged, but the outlook is grim, the Canadian Association of Food Banks said Wednesday. "We are concerned this situation will only worsen this winter, given the rise in the cost of living and especially the cost of energy," Charles Seiden, executive director of the association, said in releasing a report on food-bank usage."

Complete report:
Time for Action - Hunger Count 2005 (PDF file - 452K, 47 pages)
"Canada's only annual survey of food banks & emergency food programs"

Summary:
Hunger Count 2005 Summary (PDF file - 53K, 1 page)
November 2005

Earlier HungerCount reports - back to 1997

Source:
Canadian Association of Food Banks (CAFB)

Google Web Search Results : "hungercount 2005, canada, food "
Google News search Results : "hungercount 2005, canada, food"
Source:
Google.ca

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm

6. What's New from Statistics Canada:
--- Leading Indicators, October 2005 - November 23
--- Study: Youth and the labour market, 1997 to 2004
--- Consumer Price Index, October 2005

What's New from The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

November 23, 2005
Leading indicators, October 2005
The leading indicator posted a solid 0.5% gain in October, up from a 0.4% advance in September.

November 23, 2005
Study: Youth and the labour market, 1997 to 2004
The labour market for young Canadians aged 15 to 24 has rebounded sharply from a 21-year low in 1997 thanks to a stronger economy, according to a study published today in Perspectives on Labour and Income. The recession at the beginning of the 1990s had a lasting effect on the youth labour market. By 1997, the employment and participation rates for this age group were at their lowest point since the mid-1970s. Since then, employment among these young people has grown at a fast pace, even faster than among adult workers. Between 1997 and 2004, job creation among youth rose 21.1%, the equivalent of 428,000 new jobs. This compares with a growth rate of just 15.8% among adults aged 25 and over.

November 22, 2005
Consumer Price Index, October 2005
Consumer prices eased off on average in October as the price of gasoline fell from record highs in September. The all-items Consumer Price Index declined 0.5% from September, the fastest monthly decrease since April 2003

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

7. Division of Childhood and Adolescence
(Public Health Agency of Canada)

The links below are all new because the Division of Childhood and Adolescence moved from Health Canada to the Public Health Agency of Canada; all of the Division's programs were moved to their new Department and website.

Division of Childhood and Adolescence - part of the Public Health Agency of Canada
The Division Childhood and Adolescence is a focal point for policy development, research, and strategic analysis of trends regarding broad determinants of health regarding children and youth in Canada.

Centres of Excellence
The Centres of Excellence for Children's Well-Being conduct research on key child health issues, develop policy advice based on solid evidence and disseminate information to a broad audience

Aboriginal Head Start
Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities is a Public Health Agency of Canada and Health Canada-funded early childhood development program for First Nations, Inuit and Métis children and their families.

Community Action Program for Children (CAPC)
CAPC provides long term funding to community coalitions to deliver programs that address the health and development of children (0-6 years) who are living in conditions of risk. It recognizes that communities have the ability to identify and respond to the needs of children and places a strong emphasis on partnerships and community capacity building.

Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program.Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program (CPNP)
CPNP is a comprehensive community-based program designed to meet the needs of pregnant women facing difficult life circumstances that threaten their health and the development of their babies.

CAPC/CPNP National Projects Fund
The CAPC/CPNP National Projects Fund (NPF) provides financial assistance to initiatives supporting the objectives of CAPC/CPNP projects and has direct relationships with projects across Canada. The NPF is designed to support time-limited projects sponsored by voluntary, non-profit, non-governmental organizations, which will be national in scope and result in the strengthening of CAPC/CPNP projects.

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
The goal of the national Fetal Alcohol Syndrome / Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAS/FAE) Initiative is to develop a broad-based collaborative effort to prevent FAS/FAE and improve the quality of life of all people affected by FAS/FAE.

National Plan of Action
The Canadian government is moving forward in the development of Canada's national plan of action (NPA) for children

- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnbkmrk.htm

8. 2005 Report of the Auditor General of Canada - November 22

2005 Report of the Auditor General of Canada
November 22, 2005
Click the above link to access the individual chapters of the November Auditor General's report.
NOTES:
1. there's also a news release for each chapter --- see the right-hand column of the A-G report page.
2. on the A-G report page, scroll down past the November report to see links to the April 2005 report and the 2005 Status Report
Contents of the November 2005 Report:
Matters of Special Importance—2005
Chapter 1 — Royal Canadian Mounted Police—Contract Policing
Chapter 2 — The Quality and Reporting of Surveys
Chapter 3 — Canada Revenue Agency—Verifying Income Tax Returns of Individuals and Trusts
Chapter 4 — Managing Horizontal Initiatives
Chapter 5 — Support to Cultural Industries
Chapter 6 — Elections Canada—Administering the Federal Electoral Process
Chapter 7 — Indian and Northern Affairs Canada—Meeting Treaty Land Entitlement Obligations
Chapter 8 — Other Audit Observations
Appendices
* Appendix A — Auditor General Act
* Appendix B — Reports of the Standing Committee on Public Accounts to the House of Commons, 2004–05
* Appendix C — Report on the audit of the President of the Treasury Board's report Tabling of Crown Corporations Reports in Parliament
* Appendix D — Costs of Crown corporation audits conducted by the Office of the Auditor General of Canada

Source:
Office of the Auditor General of Canada

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

9. What's New from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - November 25
( University of Toronto)


What's New - from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) - University of Toronto

Each week, the Childcare Resource and Research Unit disseminates its "e-mail news notifier", an e-mail message with a dozen or so links to new reports, studies and child care in the news (media articles) by the CRRU or another organization in the field of early childhood education and care (ECEC). What you see below is content from the most recent issue of the notifier.

25-Nov-05
NOTE: you'll find a bit of repetition below with the content of the rest of this newsletter, but I copied the entire CRRU e-mail news notifier to show how much info CRRU produces each week...

---------------------------------------------------
WHAT’S NEW
---------------------------------------------------

>> Decision time for Canada: Let’s make poverty history
Annual Report Card from Campaign 2000 finds that there are 1.2 million children living in poverty in Canada; recommends a universal ELCC system as one “benchmark for success” in fight against poverty.

>> Moving forward on early learning and child care:
Agreement-in-principle between the government of Canada and the
government of New Brunswick
Bilateral agreement between the federal government and NB secures federal funding for “provincially regulated early learning and care programs and services, including public and private providers.”

>> Moving forward on early learning and child care: Agreement-in-principle
between the government of Canada and the government of Prince Edward Island
The federal government and PEI announce a bilateral agreement to “support the development of regulated early learning and child care in both private and non-profit settings.”

>> What participants value: Practices and outcomes at family resource programs
by Susan Silver, Rachel Berman & Susan Wilson
Report from the FRP Participants’ Voices project at Ryerson University presents "an evaluation tool for FRPs, as well as a theoretical overview of the themes on which the tool is based."

>> A place to go: Stories from participants of family resource programs
by Susan Silver, Rachel Berman & Susan Wilson
Report from the FRP Participants’ Voices project at Ryerson University provides the perspectives of families who use FRP services, garnered from over 200 interviews.

>> Governments of Canada and Manitoba sign funding agreement on early
learning and child care

Following on April’s bilateral agreement, press release from Social Development Canada announces the final funding deal that will see $174.4 million over five years go to ELCC in Manitoba.

---------------------------------------------------
CHILD CARE IN THE NEWS
---------------------------------------------------

>> Legislation would destroy $7-a-day daycare [CA-QC]
Montreal Gazette, 25 Nov 05
A civil war is ripping through Quebec's daycare system. Bill 124, presented by Family Minister Carole Theberge, is the battleground between two schools of thinking on how daycare should be organized in Quebec.

>> Dryden achieves 10 child care agreements [CA]
Globe and Mail, 25 Nov 05
Social Development Minister Ken Dryden achieved his goal of obtaining early learning and child care deals with all 10 provinces as his Liberal government counts down its final days in office. Meanwhile, in Quebec, the Parti Québécois said yesterday the provincial Liberal government was bowing to lobby groups that want to bring in American-style daycare centre chains to the province.

>> Aboriginal, immigrant kids suffer in poverty [CA]
CTV News, 24 Nov 05
Child poverty rates for aboriginal, immigrant, and visible minority children are twice the national rate, according to an annual Report Card on Child Poverty in Canada.

>> Secret Tory leaflet pledged middle-income tax cut [CA]
Globe and Mail, 24 Nov 05
A Conservative government would cut income taxes for middle-income Canadians, and provide daycare money directly to parents under plans included in the party's confidential spring campaign brochure.

>> Child care reforms look promising: Changes should improve access to higher-quality, affordable, regulated care [CA-AB]
Edmonton Journal, 23 Nov 05
This year, there is reason to be cautiously optimistic that Alberta families needing child care will finally have better access to higher-quality, more affordable programs. But while the plan offers hope that more parents will finally have access to programs they can both afford and trust, a closer look reveals that it also creates pitfalls.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
This message was forwarded through the Childcare Resource
and Research Unit e-mail news notifier. For information on the
CRRU e-mail notifier, including instructions for (un)subscribing,
see http://www.childcarecanada.org

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Related Links:

What's New? - Canadian, U.S. and international resources from Jan 2000 to the present.
Child Care in the News - media articles from January 2000 to the present
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info
Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere
CRRU Publications
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

Also from CRRU:

Towards a national system of early learning and child care
Regularly updated
"(...) On April 29, 2005 the governments of Canada and Manitoba struck an historic Agreement-in-Principle on early learning and child care. This was followed by a similar agreement between the federal government and the province of Saskatchewan. These agreements are the beginning of what is hoped to be a series of strong bilateral agreements between the federal government and the provinces/territories. These historic agreements build on a meeting of the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services in November 2004 and a subsequent meeting in February 2005. They (with the exception of Quebec) agreed to shared principles to guide the development of a new national system of early learning and child care."
NOTE: this is a large (and growing) collection that includes government and non-governmental reports, press releases, news articles and other documents dealing with the new federal-provincial-territorial arrangements for early learning and child care in Canada.

Quality by Design Project - Early Learning and Child Care
"The Quality by Design project is intended to facilitate dialogue, debate and knowledge development regarding conceptions of and approaches to high quality early learning and child care (ELCC) programs that both enhance children’s development and support families. Quality by Design is a project of the Childcare Resource and Research Unit, University of Toronto and is funded by Social Development Canada. It has a duration of three years (2004-2007).

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

10. Poverty Dispatch Digest :
U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs --- November 23

POVERTY DISPATCH Digest
Institute for Research on Poverty - U. of Wisconsin
This digest offers dozens of new links each week to full-text articles in the U.S. media (mostly daily newspapers) on poverty, poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, and much more...
The Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison offers a free e-mail service that consists of an e-mail message sent to subscribers each Monday and Thursday, containing a dozen or so links to articles dealing with the areas mentioned above. The weekly Canadian Social Research Links Poverty Dispatch Digest is a compilation, available online, of the two dispatch e-mails for that week --- with the kind permission of IRP.

Here's the complete collection of U.S. media articles in this week's Poverty Dispatch Digest:
(click the link above to read all of these articles)

November 23, 2005

Today's subjects include: No Child Left Behind Act // Social Service Budget Cuts - Opinion // Environmentally Conscious Affordable Housing // World Poverty // Proposed New Welfare Requirement - Wisconsin // Medicaid - Ohio, Kansas // Minimum Wage - Ohio // Low-Income Transportation Assistance - Wisconsin // Low-Income Heating Assistance - Massachusetts // Unemployment Rate - Montana // Food Assistance - Ohio, Arizona, Long Island // Homelessness - Los Angeles

November 21, 2005

Today's subjects include: Budget Legislation and the Poor // Changing Approach to Homelessness - Opinion // Providing Children with Health Insurance // Role of Fathers in Raising Children // Concentrated Poverty - Fresno, CA // Philanthropy and Poverty - Maryland // Plight of the Working Poor - Oklahoma // Child Poverty - Connecticut // Education and Poverty - Indiana // Child Support and Driver's Licenses - Ohio // Welfare Reform and Work - Michigan // Welfare Reform and Sanctions - Washington // Concern over Proposed Medicaid Cuts - Florida // Cuts in Facilitated Enrollment for Medicaid - New York // Data on Recipients Cut from Health Care Program - Tennessee // Fixing New Computer System for Social Services - Colorado // Black Incarceration Rate - Wisconsin

Each of the weekly digests offers dozens of links or more to media articles that are time-sensitive.
The older the link, the more likely it is to either be dead or have moved to an archive - and some archives [but not all] are pay-as-you-go.
[For the current week's digest, click on the POVERTY DISPATCH Digest link above]

The Poverty Dispatch weekly digest is a good tool for monitoring what's happening in the U.S.; it's a guide to best practices and lessons learned in America.

Subscribe to the Poverty Dispatch!
Send an e-mail message to John Wolf [ jwolf@ssc.wisc.edu ] to receive a plain text message twice a week with one to two dozen links to media articles with a focus on poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, health, Medicaid from across the U.S.
And it's free...

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

For the current week's digest, click on the POVERTY DISPATCH Digest link at the top of this section.
Recently-archived POVERTY DISPATCH weekly digests:

- November 17, 2005
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NOTE: this archive is part of the Canadian Social Research Links American Non-Governmental Social Research page.

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You'll thank me later for this.

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The 29 Healthiest Foods on the Planet

The following is a "healthy food hot list" consisting of the 29 food that will give you the biggest nutritional bang for you caloric buck, as well as decrease your risk for deadly illnesses like cancer, diabetes and heart disease. Along with each description is a suggestion as to how to incorporate these power-foods into your diet.

(Guess who just went for his annual physical?)
(;-D



FRUITS

01. Apricots
The Power: Beta-carotene, which helps prevent free-radical damage and protect the eyes. The body also turns beta-carotene into vitamin A, which may help ward off some cancers, especially of the skin. One apricot has 17 calories, 0 fat, 1 gram of fiber. Snacks on them dried, or if you prefer fresh, buy when still firm; once they soften, they lose nutrients.

02. Avocados
The Power: Oleic acid, an unsaturated fat that helps lower overall cholesterol and raise levels of HDL, plus a good dose of fiber. One slice has 81 calories, 8 grams of fat and 3 grams of fiber. Try a few slices instead of mayonnaise to dress up your next burger.

03. Raspberries
The Power: Ellagic acid, which helps stall cancer-cell growth. These berries are also packed with vitamin C and are high in fiber, which helps prevent high cholesterol and heart disease. A cup has only 60 calories, 1 gram of fat and 8 grams of fiber. Top plain low-fat yogurt or oatmeal (another high fiber food) with fresh berries.

04. Mango
The Power: A medium mango packs 57mg of vitamin C, almost your whole-recommended daily dose. This antioxidant helps prevent arthritis and boosts wound healing and your immune system. Mangoes also boast more than 8,000 IU of vitamin A (as beta-carotene). One mango has 135 calories, 1 gram of fat and 4 grams of fiber. Cut on up and serve it over leafy greens. Bonus: Your salad will taste like dessert!

05. Cantaloupe
The Power: Vitamin C (117mg in half a melon, almost twice the recommended daily dose) and beta-carotene - both powerful antioxidants that help protect cells from free-radical damage. Plus, half a melon has 853mg of potassium - almost twice as much as a banana, which helps lower blood pressure. Half a melon has 97 calories, 1 gram of fat and 2 grams of fiber. Cut into cubes and freeze, then blend into an icy smoothie.

06. Cranberry Juice
The Power: Helps fight bladder infections by preventing harmful bacteria from growing. A cup has 144 calories, 0 grams of fat and 0 fiber. Buy 100 percent juice concentrate and use it to spice up your daily H20 without adding sugar.

07. Tomato
The Power: Lycopene, one of the strongest carotenoids, acts as an antioxidant. Research shows that tomatoes may cut the risk of bladder, stomach and colon cancers in half if eaten daily. A tomato has 26 calories, 0 fat and 1 gram of fiber. Drizzle fresh slices with olive oil, because lycopene is best absorbed when eaten with a little fat.

08. Raisins
The Power: These little gems are a great source of iron, which helps the blood transport oxygen and which many women are short on. A half-cup has 218 calories, 0 fat and 3 grams of fiber. Sprinkle raisins on your morning oatmeal or bran cereal - women, consider this especially during your period.

09. Figs
The Power: A good source of potassium and fiber, figs also contain vitamin B6, which is responsible for producing mood-boosting serotonin, lowering cholesterol and preventing water retention. The Pill depletes B6, so if you use this method of birth control, make sure to get extra B6 in your diet. One fig has 37 to 48 calories, 0 fat and 2 grams of fiber. (Cookie lovers - fig bars have around 56 calories, 1 gram of fat and 1 gram of fiber per cookie). Fresh figs are delicious simmered alongside a pork tenderloin and the dried variety make a great portable gym snack.

10. Lemons/Limes
The Power: Limonene, furocoumarins and vitamin C, all of which help prevent cancer. A wedge has 2 calories, 0 fat and 0 fiber. Buy a few of each and squeeze over salads, fish, beans and vegetables for fat free flavor.



VEGETABLES

11. Onions
The Power: Quercetin is one of the most powerful flavonoids (natural plant antioxidants). Studies show it helps protect against cancer. A cup (chopped) has 61 calories, 0 fat and 3 grams of fiber. Chop onions for the maximum phyto-nutrient boost, or if you hate to cry, roast them with a little olive oil and serve with rice or other vegetables.

12. Artichokes
The Power: These odd-looking vegetables contain silymarin, an antioxidant that helps prevent skin cancer, plus fiber to help control cholesterol. One medium artichoke has 60 calories, 0 fat and 7 grams of fiber. Steam over boiling water for 30 to 40 minutes. Squeeze lemon juice on top, then pluck the leaves off with your fingers and use your teeth to scrape off the rich-tasting skin. When you get to the heart, you have found the best part!

13. Ginger
The Power: Gingerols may help reduce queasiness; other compounds may help ward off migraines and arthritis pain by blocking inflammation-causing prostaglandins. A teaspoon of fresh gingerroot has only 1 calorie, 0 fat and 0 fiber. Peel the tough brown skin and slice or grate into a stir-fry.

14. Broccoli
The Power: Indole-3-carbinol and sulforaphane, which help protect against breast cancer. Broccoli also has lots of vitamin C and beta-carotene. One cup (chopped) has 25 calories, 0 fat and 3 grams of fiber. Don't overcook broccoli - instead, microwave or steam lightly to preserve phytonutrients. Squeeze fresh lemon on top for a zesty and taste, added nutrients and some vitamin C.

15. Spinach
The Power: Lutein and zeaxanthin, carotenoids that help fend off macular degeneration, a major cause of blindness in older people. Plus, studies show this green fountain of youth may help reverse some signs of aging. One cup has 7 calories, 0 fat and 1 gram of fiber. Add raw leaves to a salad or sauté with a little olive oil and garlic.

16. Bok Choy (Chinese cabbage)
The Power: Brassinin, which some research suggests may help prevent breast tumors, plus indoles and isothiocyanates, which lower levels of estrogen, make this vegetable a double-barreled weapon against breast cancer. A cup will also give you 158mg of calcium (16 percent of your daily recommended requirement) to help beat osteoporosis. A cup (cooked) has 20 calories, 0 fat and 3 grams of fiber. Find it in your grocer's produce section or an Asian market. Slice the greens and juicy white stalks, then sauté like spinach or toss into a stir-fry just before serving.

17. Squash (Butternut, Pumpkin, Acorn)
The Power: Winter squash has huge amounts of vitamin C and beta-carotene, which may help protect against endometrial cancer. One cup (cooked) has 80 calories, 1 gram of fat and 6 grams of fiber. Cut on in half, scoop out the seeds and bake or microwave until soft, then dust with cinnamon.

18. Watercress and Arugula
The Power: Phenethyl isothiocyanate, which, along with beta-carotene and vitamins C and E, may help keep cancer cells at bay. One cup has around 4 calories, 0 fat and 1 gram of fiber. Do not cook these leafy greens; instead, use them to garnish a sandwich or add a pungent, peppery taste to salad.

19. Garlic
The Power: The sulfur compounds that give garlic its pungent flavor can also lower LDL ("bad") cholesterol, lower blood pressure and even reduce your risk of stomach and colon cancer. A clove has 4 calories, 0 fat and 0 fiber. Bake a whole head for 15 to 20 minutes, until soft and sweet and spread on bread instead of butter.



GRAINS/BEANS/NUTS

20. Quinoa
The Power: A half cup of cooked quinoa has 5 grams of protein, more than any other grain, plus iron, riboflavin and magnesium. A half-cup has 318 calories, 5 grams of fat and 5 grams of fiber. Add to soup for a protein boost. Rinse first, or it will taste bitter.

21. Wheat Germ
The Power: A tablespoon gives you about 7 percent of your daily magnesium, which helps prevent muscle cramps; it is also a good source of vitamin E. One tablespoon has 27 calories, 1 gram of fat and 1 gram of fiber. Sprinkle some over yogurt, fruit or cereal.

22. Lentils
The Power: Isoflavones, which may inhibit estrogen-promoted breast cancers, plus fiber for heart health and an impressive 9 grams of protein per half cup. A half-cup (cooked) has 115 calories, 0 fat and 8 grams of fiber. Isoflavones hold up through processing, so buy lentils canned, dried or already in soup. Take them to work, and you will have a protein packed lunch.

23. Peanuts
The Power: Studies show that peanuts or other nuts (which contain mostly unsaturated "good" fat) can lower your heart-disease risk by over 20 percent. One ounce has 166 calories, 14 grams of fat and 2 grams of fiber. Keep a packet in your briefcase, gym bag or purse for a protein-packed post-workout nosh or an afternoon pick me up that will satisfy you until supper, or chop a few into a stir-fry for a Thai accent.

24. Pinto Beans
The Power: A half cup has more than 25 percent of your daily requirement of folate, which helps protect against heart disease and reduces the risk of birth defects. A half-cup (canned) has 103 calories, 1 gram of fat and 6 grams of fiber. Drain a can, rinse and toss into a pot of vegetarian chili.

Low fat Yogurt
25. The Power: Bacteria in active-culture yogurt helps prevent yeast infections; calcium strengthens bones. A cup has 155 calories, 4 grams of fat, 0 grams of fiber. Get the plain kind and mix in your own fruit to keep calories and sugar down. If you are lactose intolerant, never fear - yogurt should not bother your tummy.

26. Skim Milk
The Power: Riboflavin (a.k.a. vitamin B2) is important for good vision and along with vitamin A might help improve eczema and allergies. Plus, you get calcium and vitamin D, too. One cup has 86 calories, 0 fat and 0 fiber. If you are used to high fat milk, don't go cold turkey; instead, mix the two together at first. Trust this fact: In a week or two you won't miss it!



SEAFOOD

27. Shellfish (Clams, Mussels)
The Power: Vitamin B12 to support nerve and brain function, plus iron and hard-to-get minerals like magnesium and potassium. Three ounces has 126 to 146 calories, 2 to 4 grams of fat and 0 fiber. Try a bowl of tomato-based (and low fat) Manhattan clam chowder.

28. Salmon
The Power: Cold-water fish like salmon, mackerel and tuna are the best sources of omega-3 fatty acids, which help reduce the risk of cardiac disease. A 3-ounce portion (cooked) has 127 calories, 4 grams of fat, 0 fiber. Brush fillets with ginger-soy marinade and grill or broil until fish flakes easily with a fork.

29. Crab
The Power: A great source of vitamin B12 and immunity-boosting zinc. A 3-ounce portion has 84 calories, 1 gram of fat, 0 fiber. The "crab" in sushi is usually made from fish; buy it canned instead and make your own crab cakes.

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