Canadian Social Research Newsletter
November 27, 2011

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail alert for this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,505 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1.
Revisiting Family Security in Insecure Times : 2011 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada + provincial reports for BC - AB - NB - NS - MB (Campaign 2000) - November 23
2. Statistics Canada to make all online data free
[starting in February 2012] (Embassy Newsweekly) - November 25
3. The Federal Government’s Northern Strategy and Implications for Housing in the Northwest Territories
(Frances Abele and Nick Falvo) - November 24
4. Canada’s federal Arctic policy must start with the people who live there
(Liberal MP Carolyn Bennett in The Hill Times) - November 21
5. 2011 Fall Report of the Auditor General of Canada - November 22
6.
[Ontario]
Reviewing the welfare system – again (By Deborah O’Connor, Northumberland County) - November 23
7.
Call for Proposals : The 11th North American Basic Income Guarantee Congress (May 3-5, 2012 in Toronto)
8.
Poverty and taxes in Calgary (Joe Ceci, Action to End Poverty in Alberta) - November 23

9.
The harm inflicted by public-sector unions (CanadianBusiness.com) - November 22
10. PM Harper takes communications strategy to new level
(The Hill Times) - November 21
11. A Progressive Alternative to the Harper Agenda
(Andrew Jackson, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - November 18
12. Crime Bill C 10 - Safer or Meaner? (29-minute video from Pacifik.ca)
- November 18
13.
[New Brunswick]
Mr. Higgs [Finance Minister], how far should we tighten our belt in 2012? (New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice) - November 14
14. Ontario media scan by Jennefer Laidley of the Income Security Advocacy Centre in Toronto
15. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, September 2011 - November 24
--- Hours worked and labour productivity in the provinces and territories, 2010 - November 23
--- Study: Aboriginal people and the labour market, 2008 to 2010 - November 23
--- Study: Income adequacy in retirement
- November 21
16. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

17. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
18. Social Justice in the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) — How Do the Member States Compare? Sustainable Governance Indicators 2011 (Bertelsmann Stiftung Foundation, Germany) [incl. Canada & U.S.] - October 27
19.
Basic Income Earth Network Newsflash 65 (November 2011) - November 23
20. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

[ Go to Canadian Social Research Links Home Page ]



1. Revisiting Family Security in Insecure Times : 2011 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada + provincial reports for BC - AB - NB - NS - MB (Campaign 2000) - November 23

Revisiting Family Security in Insecure Times:
2011 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada

From Campaign 2000:

Canada Told to Stop Failing Its Children (PDF - 187K, 2 pages)
Media Release
November 23, 2011
Toronto –
The 2011 Report Card, Revisiting Family Security in Insecure Times, explores child poverty, the conditions it creates, and the issues faced by families living on low-income. The report finds that the number of children living in poverty has only decreased by 20% in 20 years. With 639,000 children still living in poverty, proactive social policies will need to be introduced and implemented immediately if Canada is to avoid an increase in the depth and rate of poverty.

The national report:

Revisiting Family Security in Insecure Times:
2011 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada
(PDF - 2.8MB, 16 pages)
November 2011
All we are asking is to give children a chance. Campaign 2000 is looking for a real commitment from this Parliament to reduce poverty by at least 50% by the year 2020, creating a pathway to eventual eradication. The federal government, in our view, must play a lead role.

[ Version française:
Réexaminer la sécurité des familles en cette période d'insécurité:
Rapport 2011 sur la pauvreté des enfants et des familles au Canada
(fichier PDF - 2,8 Mo., 16 pages)

Source:
Campaign 2000
Campaign 2000 is a non-partisan, cross-Canada coalition of over 120 national, provincial and community organizations, committed to working together to end child and family poverty in Canada.

------------------------------------------

2011 Provincial Report Cards:

British Columbia:

British Columbia Child Poverty Report Card (PDF - 2.4MB, 28 pages)
November 2011
Campaign 2000 calls on all provinces and the federal government to commit themselves to a 50 percent reduction in poverty among all Canadians by 2020. BC supporters of Campaign 2000 hope to see a provincial child poverty rate before taxes of seven percent or less by 2020. We are also calling for the appointment of a BC cabinet minister with the authority and responsibility to ensure that a poverty reduction plan is developed and implemented and that the province is on track for achieving its poverty reduction targets and meeting its timelines. (p. 23)
Source:
First Call: BC Child and
Youth Advocacy Coalition

First Call is a cross-sectoral, non-partisan coalition of provincial and regional organizations, engaged communities and individuals whose aim is to raise public awareness and mobilize communities around the importance of public policy and social investments that support the well-being of children, youth and families.

---

Alberta

In This Together : Ending Poverty in Alberta (PDF - 2.3MB, 16 pages)
November 2011
This report shows that 73,000 Alberta children lived below Statistics Canada's low-income cut-off (after-tax) in 2009. This was a 40% increase from the year before. The document also offers solutions to alleviating poverty in Alberta.
(...)
The recession caused a sharp increase in poverty rates for children living in two-parent families (Chart 3). In 2007, only 3.4% of these children lived in poverty. In 2009, this increased to 8.0%. The increase is likely due to low income families with both parents working experiencing job loss, reduction in hours and/or pay cuts.
(Excerpt, p. 2)
Source:
Edmonton Social Planning Council
Alberta College of Social Workers
Public Interest Alberta

---

New Brunswick

2011 New Brunswick Child Poverty Report Card (PDF - 472K, 15 pages)
November 2011
The latest Statistics Canada data, from 2009, shows that 14,000 New Brunswick children (9.9%) are living in families with incomes below the poverty line—a drop since 2008 (12.0%). In November 2009, New Brunswick joined the ranks of provinces that have adopted comprehensive poverty reduction strategies. Overcoming Poverty Together: The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan has set a target of reducing income poverty by 25% and deep income poverty by 50% by the year 2015. These targets and timetables are set out in the Economic and Social Inclusion Act, which received Royal Assent in April 2010.

[ Version française:
Rapport sur la pauvreté des enfants en 2011 (fichier PDF - 495K, 15 pages)]

Source:
Human Development Council
The Human Development Council is a local social planning council that co-ordinates and promotes social development in Greater Saint John.

---

Nova Scotia

2011 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Nova Scotia: 1989-2009 (PDF - 690K, 11 pages)
November 2011
Clearly, the goal was not achieved; in fact, in 2000 the child poverty rate in Nova Scotia was higher than in 1989, the year the promise was made. Did nine additional years bring us any closer to the goal? While child poverty rates did show a steady decline after 2003, our most recent figures (regardless of the poverty measured used) now show a reversal of this trend. With 14,000 children living below the After-Tax Low-Income Cut Off (LICO-AT) in 2009, progress has stalled and we are far from realizing child poverty eradication.

Source:
Nova Scotia Office of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

---

Manitoba

Manitoba's Child Poverty Report Card was released September 22, and it is accessible on the website of the NGO which produced the report, the Social Planning Council of Winnipeg

---

Ontario

The Ontario Child Poverty Report Card will be released in the New Year prior to the provincial budget announcement.

---

- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

2. Statistics Canada to make all online data free (starting in February 2012) - November 25
(Embassy Newsweekly)

Statistics Canada to make all online data free
National Statistics Council, which opposed scrapping the long-form census, applauds the move

November, 25, 2011
By Carl Meyer
All of Statistics Canada’s standard online products, including the census, socioeconomic and geographic data, will be offered to the public for free starting February 2012, Embassy has learned. In 2010, the agency was rocked when the government dropped the mandatory long-form census, and its chief statistician resigned in protest. Immigration experts slammed the decision for jeopardizing the targeted delivery of services like languages training and job-search workshops. Now, the agency will not charge for the information it gathered during the 2011 census. Instead, as it releases the first set of census data this February, it will also announce that it will be free—as well as the rest of its online, readily-available data.
Source:
Embassy - Canada's Foreign Policy Newsweekly
Embassy is Canada’s influential foreign policy newspaper. With a weekly readership of over 60,000 it is the forum for debate on international issues for politicians, foreign policy experts, diplomats, aid workers, the military, leaders in trade and business and immigrant communities in Canada. Embassy Newspaper is the Wednesday edition of The Hill Times, the best-read political newspaper in Canada.

---

- Go to the Social Statistics Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm

3. The Federal Government’s Northern Strategy and Implications for Housing in the Northwest Territories - November 24
(Frances Abele and Nick Falvo)

The Federal Government’s Northern Strategy and
Implications for Housing in the Northwest Territories

On November 24, Frances Abele and Nick Falvo presented findings from their respective chapters in How Ottawa Spends 2011-12: Trimming Fat or Slicing Pork?
at an official launch and panel discussion (small PDF file), in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories.

Housing in the Northwest Territories
By Nick Falvo
November 26, 2011
Last week, I was in Yellowknife, where I released results of new research on affordable housing in the Northwest Territories (NWT). The research project was sponsored by the Social Economy Research Network of Northern Canada, and was a collaboration with the Centre for Northern Families. (...) The research results, which appear as a chapter in the 2011-2012 edition of How Ottawa Spends, suggest that a long-term, permanent commitment is required by the federal government in order to sustain housing in the NWT. The chapter argues that it’s more cost effective for the federal government to reinvest the savings it accrues (as current agreements run out) into fixing already-existing housing, than it would be to allow current units to disappear completely and to then rebuild from scratch.
Source:
Progressive Economics Forum

---

Use it or Lose It : The Conservatives’
Northern Development Strategy:
Summary
(PDF - 146K, 1 page)
By Frances Abele
This chapter is about the Conservative government’s policies and actions towards the North since 2006. The Conservative policies are compared to those of earlier Liberal federal governments. They are also compared to the needs and wishes of northerners.

---

Government-Assisted Housing in the Northwest
Territories and the Role of the Federal Government:
Summary
(164K, 1 page)
By Nick Falvo
This chapter is about housing (especially for low-income households) in the Northwest Territories. The chapter compares housing in the NWT with housing in the rest of Canada.

[ Download Nick's Powerpoint presentation - (1.7MB, 37 slides)] [ Free Powerpoint viewer ]

Source:
The Homeless Hub : Northwest Territories
[ The Homeless Hub : National (Canada) ]
The mission of the Homeless Hub is to provide a single online tool for homelessness stakeholders from across Canada to use, to find the research, strategy and policy information they need to make informed decisions when creating effective solutions. (...) As a one-stop-shop, the Homeless Hub is a place where community services providers, researchers, government representatives, people who have experienced homelessness and the general public can access and share research, stories, and best practices

---------------------------

From CBC North:

New Report Paints Grim Picture of Public Housing in the NWT
CBC Special Report
November 24, 2011
This is a transcript of the interview by the CBC's Joslyn Oosenbrug with the authors of the study, Nick Falvo from the Carleton University School of Public Policy and Administration, and Arlene Hache from the Centre of Northern Families in Yellowknife to discuss their findings.

---

- Go to the Northwest Territories Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ntbkmrk.htm

4. Canada’s federal Arctic policy must start with the people who live there - November 21
(Liberal MP Carolyn Bennett in The Hill Times)

Canada’s federal Arctic policy must start with the people who live there
By Carolyn Bennett, Liberal MP
November 21, 2011
This ‘father knows best’ prime minister writes prescriptions for the North without any comprehension of, or consideration for the real challenges of the people living there. (...) Since taking office, Mr. Harper has embraced a simplistic, narrow, and purely militaristic approach to the North, with the recent addition of a little nod to resource extraction. Nowhere in this annual rite is there a commitment to additional housing, education or community-based health care supports.
Source:
The Hill Times

---

- Go to the Northwest Territories Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ntbkmrk.htm

5. 2011 Fall Report of the Auditor General of Canada - November 22

Auditor general finds 'disturbing' flaws in visa system
Government did 'good job' on tracking stimulus money but National Defence plans questioned

By Meagan Fitzpatrick
November 22, 2011
The auditor general's office is expressing frustration about the way Citizenship and Immigration Canada continues to hand out visas, and is concerned about delays on drug safety at Health Canada and planned spending by National Defence. Overall, the report released Tuesday gives a passing grade to the Conservative government on how it tracked spending for three of the programs under its $47-billion Economic Action Plan introduced in 2009, but said it's not clear how the government is going to determine the effectiveness of one of them
Source:
CBC

---

From the
Office of the Auditor General of Canada:

2011 Fall Report of the Auditor General of Canada
November 22, 2011

Matters of Special Importance—2011
Chapter 1—Canada’s Economic Action Plan
Chapter 2—Issuing Visas
Chapter 3—Payments to Producers—Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Chapter 4—Regulating Pharmaceutical Drugs—Health Canada
Chapter 5—Maintaining and Repairing Military Equipment—National Defence
Appendices:

*
Appendix A—Auditor General Act
* Appendix B—Reports of the Standing Committee on Public Accounts to the House of Commons, 2010–11
* Appendix C—Report on the audit of the President of the Treasury Board’s Annual Report to Parliament on the Tabling of Crown Corporations’ Reports 2011
* Appendix D—Costs of Crown corporation audits conducted by the Office of the Auditor General of Canada

News Releases
The following news releases were issued on November 22:
* Improvements made in some support programs, but problems remain
* Successful government programs share some fundamental elements, says Auditor General
* Health Canada struggles with transparency, timeliness
* Monitoring of progress and spending was well-managed in three programs
* National Defence slow to act on opportunities to improve
* Longstanding fundamental weaknesses continue in issuing visas

Earlier reports from the Office of the Auditor General - right back to 1981

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- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

6. [Ontario] Reviewing the welfare system – again - November 23
(By Deborah O’Connor, Northumberland County)

Ontario

Reviewing the welfare system – again
Posted on November 23, 2011
By Deborah O’Connor
The author of this article, who is the founder of the Northumberland Coalition Against Poverty, offers her perspective and a number of interesting insights on welfare reforms in Ontario right back to the Social Assistance Review and the Transitions report of the mid-1980s.
Source:
Consider This - A blog about politics, life and journalism in Northumberland County, Ontario

---

- Go to the Ontario Social Assistance Review Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/on_sa_review.htm

7. Call for Proposals : The 11th North American Basic Income Guarantee Congress (May 3-5, 2012 in Toronto)

The 11th North American Basic Income Guarantee* Congress - Call for Proposals
November 23, 2011
The 11th North American Basic Income Guarantee Congress will take place May 3-5, 2012 at the University of Toronto
Theme : Putting Equality Back on the Agenda: Basic Income and Other Approaches to Economic Security for All.

[ * Basic income is an income guaranteed by government for all, without condition,
means test or work requirement; it's also known as guaranteed annual income. ]

---

Featured speakers at the Congress will include:

* Richard Wilkinson, Professor Emeritus of Social Epidemiology at the University of Nottingham Medical School and co-author of The Spirit Level: Why More Equal Societies Almost Always Do Better;
* Armine Yalnizyan, Senior Economist with the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives;
* John Rook, Chair of the National Council of Welfare and Senior Associate with Housing Strategies, Inc.;
* Evelyn Forget, Professor, University of Manitoba Faculty of Medicine; and
* Trish Hennessy, Director of Strategic Issues for the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.
The North American Basic Income Guarantee Congress is a joint Conference of the U.S. and Canadian Basic Income Guarantee Networks. It takes place in Canada and the United States on alternating years.


Scholars, activists, and others are invited to propose papers or presentations, organize panel discussions, or submit posters.
Topics:
* What are the costs of economic disparity (economic, social and political)?
* What are the implications for pursuing (or not pursuing) basic income options?
* What are possible models for generating revenue to sustain a basic income and what are their implications for economic disparity?
* What are the practical issues for implementing a basic income policy and what are their implications for economic disparity?
* What communication and engagement strategies are necessary to raise awareness about economic disparity and basic income in the public sphere?

Please click the link above for guidelines on submitting a proposal.

DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS is January 13, 2012.

Source:
Basic Income Canada Network

BIEN Canada is the Canadian affiliate of the Basic Income Earth Network. BIEN Canada was founded at the 2008 international BIEN Congress to promote dialogue, public education and networking about basic income in Canada. BIEN Canada is composed of individuals and organizations interested in promoting dialogue around basic income.

NOTE : BIEN Canada is part of the Basic Income Earth Network (BIEN). The second-last item at the bottom of this newsletter is the November 2011 issue of BIEN Newsflash (newsletter).

---

- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

8. Poverty and taxes in Calgary - November 23
(Joe Ceci, Action to End Poverty in Alberta)

Poverty and taxes
November 23, 2011
Clicking this link will open a web page from CBC Calgary with the description that appears below and a link to an audio-only podcast lasting almost seven minutes.

"As Calgary city council hammers out the 3 year budget plan for this city a tax increase might be manageable for some taxpayers but not necessarily for the working poor. Joe Ceci knows all too well the challenges of building a fair budget that doesn't leave the poor behind. He was Ward 9 Alderman for 15 years and is now the Coordinator of the group called Action to End Poverty in Alberta."

---

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

- Go to the Alberta Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/abkmrk.htm

9. The harm inflicted by public-sector unions - November 22
(CanadianBusiness.com)

The harm inflicted by public-sector unions
By Larry MacDonald
November 22, 2011
The programs and policies of the welfare state begin with good intentions but ultimately prove naïve. What happens in the real world is that organized groups end up bending the sovereign power of government toward transferring resources to themselves, away from the less organized. (...) A new book, Pension Ponzi: How Public-sector Unions are Bankrupting Canada's Health Care, Education and Your Retirement, highlights another instance. As you can guess from the title, the culprit in this instance is public-sector unions. (...) The bill [for government concessions to public sector unions] will come due for Canadians in the form of substantially higher taxes, reduced benefits and eroded purchasing power (due to higher inflation). (...) The cost of all those civil servants, politicians, teachers, firefighters, police officers and armed forces explains much of the overspending and indebtedness of the government sector, in the authors’ view.
Source:
CanadianBusiness.com

BULLSHIT.

Watch this two-minute video:

What have the unions ever done for US? (video, duration 2:09)
[Hint : Higher wages, better benefits, pensions, health and safety, medical coverage, equal rights on the job, paid vacations, the abolition of child labour, whistle blower protection, etc.]

See also:

Small Business and the Attack on Unions
Posted by Andrew Jackson
October 14, 2011
"...it does not seem especially rational for small business to embrace so fervently the extremist anti union ideology of the Fraser Institute and their political allies."
Source:
Progressive Economics Forum

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- Go to the Union Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/unionbkmrk.htm

10. PM Harper takes communications strategy to new level - November 21
(The Hill Times)

And while we're on the subject of disinformation...

PM Harper takes communications strategy to new level
There are an estimated 1,500 communications staffers working in ministers’ offices and departments, including 87 in the PMO and PCO
By Laura Ryckewaert
November 21, 2011
(...)Soon after Mr. Harper won power, the Prime Minister’s staff started deciding which reporters could ask questions, skipping those they suspected weren’t in the government’s favour. Media access to the Prime Minister and his caucus, in general, has become minimal, with MPs and ministers kept on a short, silent leash. (...) Interestingly, Mr. Harper’s new ball game, which has changed both political and departmental communications, seems to contradict the government’s stance stated in multiple Throne Speeches and the government’s own communications policy, introduced in 2006.
Source:
The Hill Times

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- Go to the Media Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/mediabkmrk.htm

11. A Progressive Alternative to the Harper Agenda - November 18
(Andrew Jackson, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

A Progressive Alternative to the Harper Agenda
November 18, 2011
By Andrew Jackson
The Harper government is set to cut spending on public services and social programs in the name of deficit reduction, but implemented mainly to increase reliance on the market, to create new sources of profit for the private sector, and to finance future tax cuts. This ideological agenda will take place against the background of a sluggish economy, a very weak job market, rising inequality, and increased insecurity for the great majority of working families.
The Harper government agenda must be confronted by an equally coherent alternative which resonates with currently centrist voters.
(...)
Here are five key social democratic propositions which can frame specific policies which attract broad support.
1.
More – not less – public investment is needed to increase private sector productivity and future economic growth.
2.
Expanding public programs is a more equitable, and also a much more cost effective, way to provide the services we all need.
3.
Expanding public programs is key to shoring up an equal opportunity, middle class society.
4.
We need a strong and productive private sector as well.
5.
Unions shape an equal society.
This is a debate that social democrats need not be afraid of, a debate that we can win.
Source:
Behind the Numbers
[ Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives ]

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- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

12. Crime Bill C 10 - Safer or Meaner? (29-minute video) - November 18
(Pacifik.ca)

Crime Bill C 10 - Safer or Meaner?
November 18, 2011
In a public forum in Victoria, B.C., hosted by Denise Savoie, MP on November 10, 2011, the following panel members spoke about their serious concerns with the Conservatives' Omnibus Crime Bill C-10.
Robert Mulligan – a Victoria criminal lawyer
Bruce Parisian – Executive Director of the Victoria Native Friendship Centre
Sibylle Artz – Professor at UVic’s School of Child and Youth Care
David Hough – Founder of the Restorative Justice Coalition at William Head Institution
Chris Beresford – Board member of the John Howard Society of Victoria
---
Click the link above, then click the image to view the 29-minute video of the forum, edited by Pedro Mora for community media and Democracy Now.

Source:
Pacifik.ca - a non-profit, non-partisan collective of concerned citizens aiming towards the development of direct democracy.

- Go to the Conservative Omnibus Crime Bill (2011) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/crime_bill.htm

13. [New Brunswick] Mr. Higgs [Finance Minister], how far should we tighten our belt in 2012? - November 14
(New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice)

New Brunswick

Mr. Higgs [Finance Minister], how far should we tighten our belt in 2012? (PDF - 162K, 2 pages)
News Release
November 14, 2011

(...) Here are four demands which the Common Front for Social Justice asks you to support:
1. An immediate increase in the minimum wage to $10.00 an hour.
2. The rejection of a two-tier minimum wage system for NB workers.
3. An increase in the basic rates of welfare recipients to bring them to the Atlantic average and an indexation of
these rates thereafter.
4. The establishment of a solidarity program of $50 per month that would help 25,105 households to buy food;
this is the number of individuals who depend on social assistance in November 2011.

[ Version française:
Monsieur Higgs, à quel trou voulez-vous que nous nous serrions la ceinture en 2012 ?
(fichier PDF - 161K, 2 pages) ]

Source:
New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice
The Common Front for Social Justice is one of the largest democratic and popular organizations in New Brunswick, with close to 75,000 group and individual members. The Common Front brings together individuals as well as local, regional and provincial organizations to work towards the eradication of poverty.

Front commun pour la justice sociale
Le Front commun pour la justice sociale est un des plus importants organismes démocratiques et populaires au NB. Il compte environ 75 000 membres individuels et collectifs. Il regroupe des individus et des organisations locales, régionales et provinciales travaillant ensemble à l'élimination de la pauvreté.

---

- Go to the New Brunswick Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nbkmrk.htm

14. Ontario media scan by Jennefer Laidley of the
Income Security Advocacy Centre in Toronto

Queen’s Park offers crumbs to Ontario’s poor
November 24, 2011
By Carol Goar
Next week, welfare rates go up — but not by enough to buy a child a Christmas present, to put healthy food on the table or even to stave off eviction for many families. On Dec. 1, the province’s 475,000 neediest people get a 1 per cent raise. For an individual, that amounts to an extra $7 a month. For a single parent raising two children, it is $9 more.
Source:
Toronto Star

---

More Ontario media coverage of welfare and poverty issues
from Jennefer Laidley of the Income Security Advocacy Centre (Toronto):

A recent op-ed on the same issue, from the Hamilton Roundtable:
http://www.thespec.com/opinion/editorial/article/625486--adding-insult-19-cents-worth-to-injury

An online petition:
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/1/19-Cents-Is-Not-Enough/

Pat Capponi at an OW forum in Chatham
http://www.chathamdailynews.ca/ArticleDisplay.aspx?archive=true&e=3370606

The latest Voices from the Street program gives women a voice:
http://www.thestar.com/news/article/1085830--new-program-women-speak-out-gives-the-marginalized-a-voice

Yutaka Dirks from ACTO, on how social change happens:
http://briarpatchmagazine.com/articles/view/from-the-jaws-of-defeat

Ontario’s got a $443 million pinch:
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1091436--ontario-takes-443-million-hit

Campaign 2000’s national report on child poverty:
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/1091130--ottawa-lacks-plan-to-fight-child-poverty-coalition-says

Canada Without Poverty blog on poverty in the North:
http://www.cwp-csp.ca/2011/11/looking-at-nutrition-in-northern-canada/

Star editorial on making EI standards national:
http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorialopinion/article/1083599--set-national-standards-for-ei

From British Columbia:

A BC MLA re-introduces his Poverty Reduction legislation in the BC legislature:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ThWywAgu91M&feature=share

And, from the United Kingdom:

“Cracking down” on disability benefits in the UK
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2060594/Disability-benefit-crackdown-hurt-vulnerable-society-claim-campaigners.html

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

15. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, September 2011 - November 24
--- Hours worked and labour productivity in the provinces and territories, 2010 - November 23
--- Study: Aboriginal people and the labour market, 2008 to 2010 - November 23
--- Study: Income adequacy in retirement
- November 21

What's new from
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]:

---

November 24, 2011
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, September 2011
Average weekly earnings of non-farm payroll employees declined 0.3% to $872.75 in September, partly offsetting an increase in August. Earnings have been relatively flat since the start of the year. On a year-over-year basis, average weekly earnings rose 1.1%, the smallest increase since November 2009.
- includes two tables:
* Average weekly earnings (including overtime) for all employees
* Number of employees

Related report:

Employment, Earnings and Hours - main product page*
This publication presents a timely picture of employment, earnings and hours.
The tabulations focus on monthly labour market information and some historical data series.
NOTE: Online data on payroll employment, earnings and hours for the current month is usually posted to the site a month behind this report.
Click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:

* Labour
* Employment and unemployment
* Hours of work and work arrangements
* Industries
* Wages, salaries and other earnings

November 23, 2011
Hours worked and labour productivity in the provinces and territories, 2010
Labour productivity in the business sector increased in every province and in Nunavut in 2010. At the national level, business productivity rose 1.9% in 2010 after declining by 0.3% in 2009.
- includes the following two tables:
Table 1 : Labour productivity and other related variables for the business sector, 2010
Table 2 : Businesses producing goods and businesses producing services, 2010

Related subjects:
* Economic accounts
* Productivity accounts

November 23, 2011
Study: Aboriginal people and the labour market, 2008 to 2010
In the economic downturn that began in 2008, employment fell further and over a longer period among Aboriginal people than in the non-Aboriginal workforce. This was true for all age groups. (...) Declines for core-aged Aboriginal workers were all in full time in both years. For their non-Aboriginal counterparts, the losses in 2009 were all in full-time work, while the gains in 2010 were a combination of full- and part-time jobs.

The study :

Aboriginal People and the Labour Market: Estimates from the Labour Force Survey, 2008-2010
by Jeannine Usalcas
Table of contents:
Acknowledgements
Abstract
Highlights
Source, data history and definitions
Main article
Tables
Charts
User information
PDF version (155K, 29 pages)

Source:
Aboriginal People and the Labour Market:
Estimates from the Labour Force Survey, 2008-2010
- product main page*
This report provides an overview of the labour market outcomes of Aboriginal people during and after the labour market downturn. It covers the period of 2008 to 2010, using annual averages by several demographic and labour market activity indicators available from the Labour Force Survey (LFS).
---
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related links : Go to the First Nations Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/1stbkmrk.htm

November 21, 2011
Study: Income adequacy in retirement
The financial well-being of retirement-age households headed by seniors would increase markedly if their "potential income" from assets such as housing and mutual funds were included in their total income. Research into the adequacy of pensions has focused on the income and consumption streams of households following retirement. However, these do not incorporate the potential income that could be realized from owned assets, which can be used in retirement to supplement reported income. The study, "Income Adequacy in Retirement: Accounting for the Annuitized Value of Wealth in Canada," takes this potential income into account when comparing the pre- and post-retirement financial situation of Canadian households.

The study:

Income Adequacy in Retirement:
Accounting for the Annuitized Value of Wealth in Canada

By John R. Baldwin et al.
Table of contents:
Acknowledgements
Abstract
Executive summary
Main article
Tables
Charts
Appendices
User information
PDF version (1MB, 35 pages)


Related subjects:
* Income, pensions, spending and wealth
* Household, family and personal income
* Seniors
* Income, pensions and wealth

---

The Daily Archives
- select a month and year from the drop-down menus and click on a date for that day's Daily

-----------------------------

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

16. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
:

November 27, 2011

What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

Revisting family security in insecure times
23 Nov 2011
Campaign 2000's latest Report Card on child and family poverty in Canada finds 1 in 10 children still lives in poverty; recommendations include "a public system of high-quality early childhood education and child care services that is affordable and available to all children". Presentations from the Report Card launch by Armine Yalnizyan, Thaddeus Hwong and Marvyn Novick also available.

Campaign 2000: Twenty years of fighting for action on child poverty
23 Nov 2011
This week's Know Thy History looks back at the 1989 House of Commons resolution to eliminate child poverty by 2000; follows the continuing advocacy to push for government action.

The annual report of Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Education, Children’s Services and Skills 2010/11
22 Nov 2011
Annual report from Ofsted in England suggests 'that inspection against Early Years Foundation Stage requirements has contributed to an overall increase in quality'; describes persistent gaps in quality between types of care and populations served.

Early years study 3: Making decisions, taking action
22 Nov 2011
Latest early years study 'documents the social, economic and scientific rationale for increased investments in early childhood education'.

Sowing the seeds: Reconnecting London's children with nature
21 Nov 2011
Report commissioned by London Sustainable Development Commission highlights the decline in children's experiences of natural places; 12 recommendations are put forward to address the issue.

MORE research, policy & practice

2. Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad.

Ottawa lacks plan to fight child poverty, coalition says
23 Nov 2011 Canada

Ofsted figures underline need for improvement
22 Nov 2011 Europe

Start school at 2, study urges
22 Nov 2011 Canada

‘Princess Nancy’ Pelosi calls Cain ‘clueless’; vows to do more for child care
21 Nov 2011 United States

Children growing up 'disconnected from the natural world'
21 Nov 2011 Europe

MORE child care in the news

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Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

17. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.. The Dispatch is distributed by the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. News articles from online newspapers are posted here in a number of general categories, and are tagged with more specific keywords relevant to each article.

Tags
Clicking on a word or expression in the list of tags will call up all relevant news items from past Dispatches under that tag. The list contains a tag for each U.S. state so you can view jurisdiction-specific news, and tags for a huge list of topics, including :
* Basic needs * Canada * Caseloads * Cash assistance * Cellular phones * Census * Charities * Child care * Child hunger * Child poverty * Child support * Child welfare * Child well-being * Chronic homelessness * Cohabitation * Cost of living * Crime * Crimes against the homeless * Debt * Deep poverty * Disability * Early childhood education * Earned income tax credit * Electronic benefit transfers * Eligibility * Food insecurity * Food programs * Foster care* Fuel poverty * Health care costs * Health insurance coverage * Homeless children * Homeless families * Homeless veterans * Housing First * Housing subsidies * Immigrant workers * Income * Income inequality * Jobless benefits * Juvenile justice * Legal aid * Low-income housing * Low-wage work * Medicaid * Microfinance * Minimum wage * Newly poor * No Child Left Behind * Ontario * Paid family leave * Payday lending * Persistent poverty * Poverty measurement * Poverty rate * Prisons * Privatization * Public Housing * Rural poverty * Safety net * SCHIP * Section 8 (Housing) * Seniors * Single parents * SNAP/Food Stamps * Supplemental Security Income * Taxes * Teen pregnancy * Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) * Unemployment rate * Uninsured * Urban poverty * Utilities * Welfare reform * Welfare-to-work * Women Infants and Children (WIC) * Work requirements * Youth employment * many more tags...

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

November 24-25 - No dispatch (Thanksgiving long weekend in the U.S.)

November 23, 2011
Child Poverty - Canada
High School Graduation Rate - Missouri
State Earned Income Tax Credits

November 22, 2011
Medicaid and Adult Day Health Care - California
Foster Children and Antipsychosis Drug Prescriptions
Child Welfare System - Pennsylvania

November 21, 2011
Census Poverty Data
State Medicaid Cuts - Texas

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NOTE : You can subscribe to this email list or RSS feed
by clicking "Subscribe" in the right-hand margin on any page of the Poverty Dispatch website

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

18. Social Justice in the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) — How Do the Member States Compare? Sustainable Governance Indicators 2011 (Bertelsmann Stiftung Foundation, Germany) [incl. Canada & U.S.] - October 27

From the
Bertelsmann Stiftung Foundation (Germany)
:

Strong variations in Social Justice within the OECD
Bertelsmann Foundation publishes Social Justice Index for 31 OECD countries

News Item
October 27, 2011
Discrepancies in poverty prevention and fair access to education within the OECD are significant

US lags in all Areas of Social Justice
World's largest economy ranks 27th among 31 OECD nations

News Item
October 27, 2011

The United States may still lead the world in the size of its economy, but it performs poorly in a host of areas that make for a socially just country.
(...) Overall, the United States ranked 27th, ahead of only Greece, Chile, Mexico and Turkey.

The report:

Social Justice in the OECD — How Do the Member States Compare?
Sustainable Governance Indicators 2011
(PDF - 3.1MB, 56 pages)
Excerpt from "Key Findings" (page 6):
A cross-national comparison of social justice in the OECD shows considerable variation in the extent to which this principle is developed in these market-based democracies. According to the methodology applied in this study, Iceland and Norway are the most socially just countries. Turkey, which ranks among the bottom five in each of the six targeted dimensions, is the OECD’s least socially just country.
(...) Canada is the top performer among the non-European OECD states. Its high ranking can be attributed to strong results in the areas of education, labor market justice and social cohesion.

In this report, "social justice" includes:
* Poverty prevention
* Access to education
* Labor market inclusion
* Social cohesion and non-discrimination
* Health
* Intergenerational justice

Source:
Bertelsmann Stiftung Foundation (Germany)
The Bertelsmann Stiftung is dedicated to serving the common good. Our work is based on the conviction that competition and civic engagement are essential for social progress.

---

The Canadian Perspective on this report
By Tracey Lauriault:

Data and public policy – OECD Social Justice Report
October 29, 2011
I entered into the discourse on open data to facilitate the production of these types of reports. I am really interested in public policy issues such as social justice, health inequality and the environment and hope that open data and open government policies will lead to being able to access these types of data, especially at the neighbourhood scales. I hope that apps will open the door to access, but that eventually we will work toward comprehensive access to data for this type analysis and develop new ways to dialogue between citizen and government using data for evidence-based decision-making. (...) Apps rely on one or two datasets, these reports rely on hundreds. I want the hundreds, which requires a broader open data policy in Canada at all levels of government and I would go further to suggest that open data needs to move beyond the institutional boundaries of IT and CIO divisions and into thematic areas, as that is where data for these indicators are produced and owned.

Source:
datalibre.ca
datalibre.ca is a blog that's maintained mostly by Tracey Lauriault.
It's inspired by civicaccess.ca, which believes all levels of Canadian governments should make civic information and data accessible at no cost in open formats to their citizens.
Tracey is also responsible for the Census Watch page.

---

The American
(New York Times) Perspective on this report:

America’s Exploding Pipe Dream
By Charles M. Blow
October 28, 2011
We are slowly — and painfully — being forced to realize that we are no longer the America of our imaginations. Our greatness was not enshrined. Being a world leader is less about destiny than focused determination, and it is there that we have faltered. (...) We have not taken care of the least among us. We have allowed a revolting level of income inequality to develop. We have watched as millions of our fellow countrymen have fallen into poverty. And we have done a poor job of educating our children and now threaten to leave them a country that is a shell of its former self. We should be ashamed. Poor policies and poor choices have led to exceedingly poor outcomes. Our societal chickens have come home to roost. This was underscored in a report released on Thursday by the Bertelsmann Stiftung foundation of Germany entitled Social Justice in the OECD — How Do the Member States Compare?” It analyzed some metrics of basic fairness and equality among Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development countries and ranked America among the ones at the bottom.

[ 392 comments ]

Source:
New York Times

---

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

19. Basic Income Earth Network (BIEN) Newsflash 65 (November 2011) - November 23

BIEN
(BASIC INCOME EARTH NETWORK)
NEWSFLASH 65, November 2011
(PDF - 136K, 18 pages)
November 23, 2011

Table of contents:
Editorial: BIEN’s 25th anniversary, by Guy Standing
1. Basic Income News great success
2. New issue of Basic Income Studies
3. Events
4. Glimpses of National Debates
5. Publications
6. New Links
7. About BIEN

Source:
Basic Income Earth Network (BIEN)

The Basic Income European Network (BIEN) was founded in 1986 to serve as a link between individuals and groups committed to, or interested in, basic income, i.e. an income unconditionally granted to all on an individual basis, without means test or work requirement, and to foster informed discussion on this topic throughout Europe. BIEN expanded its scope from European to the Earth in 2004.

---

- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

20. CRINMAIL (Newsletter of the Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
:

CRINMAIL - children's rights newsletter
Latest issue:

23 November 2011 - CRINMAIL Issue 1252
In this issue:
Latest news and reports
- Building a child-friendly Europe: Council of Europe
- Civil society ups and downs: Israel, Egypt
- State violence: Bahrain, Syria, Yemen, India
- Children's rights hearings: Americas
- LGBT rights: Nigeria, Belize
- Unlawful restraint: United Kingdom
- Age-based legislation: New report!
- New advice line for professionals
- Funding opportunity
Upcoming events
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Issues * Law
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

---------

See http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm
for the table of contents for, and links to, a large collection of issues of CRINMAIL.
NOTE : The CRIN "Links to Issues of CRINMAIL" (next link below) doesn't include the table of contents for each issue.

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL (from CRIN)
- links to earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL (incl. subscription info)

[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

---

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter alert using software on the web server of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE)
.
Thanks, CUPE!

------------------------

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail alert for this newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

In September 2011, I discontinued the plain-text e-mail version (i.e., no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) of this newsletter that I'd created to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. In reality, the text-only format caused as many problems as it solved.

LONG STORY SHORT:
Every week, I send out a brief email alert to all subscribers to say that I've posted the latest newsletter to my site; in that alert, you'll find both the table of contents for, and the link to, that week's newsletter.


Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly newsletter alert.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

 

Ten Top Feline Physics Laws +
Physics 101 for Dogs and their Owners

---------------------------------------


Ten Top Feline Physics Laws

Law of Cat Inertia
A cat at rest will tend to remain at rest, unless acted upon by some outside force – such as the opening of cat food, or a nearby scurrying mouse.

Law of Cat Motion
A cat will move in a straight line, unless there is a really, really good reason to change direction.

Law of Cat Magnetism
All blue blazers and black sweaters attract cat hair in direct proportion to the darkness of the fabric.

Law of Cat Thermodynamics
Heat flows from a warmer to a cooler body, except in the case of a cat, in which case all heat flows to the cat.

Law of Cat Stretching
A cat will stretch to a distance proportional to the length of the nap just taken.

Law of Cat Sleeping
All cats must sleep with people whenever possible, in a position as uncomfortable for the people involved, and as comfortable as possible for the cat.

Law of Cat Elongation
A cat can make her body long enough to reach just about any counter top that has anything remotely interesting on it.

Law of Cat Obstruction
A cat must lay on the floor in such a position to obstruct the maximum amount of human foot traffic.

Law of Cat Acceleration
A cat will accelerate at a constant rate, until he gets good and ready to stop.Law of Obedience Resistance

A cat’s resistance varies in proportion to a human’s desire for her to do something.


Source:
http://consciouscat.net/
(Click this link for more...)


-------------------------------


Physics 101 for Dogs and their Owners

Energy.
* What your dog has and you don't but wish you did.
* How active your dog is when you don't want him to be.

Laws of Conservation.
* A closed mouth will not gain or lose anything -- a dog will open its mouth to receive treats and close its mouth to refuse medicine.
* A dog at rest will not lose any energy.

Black Hole.
* The craters in your yard that are a direct result of your dog's boredom.
* Where dogs hide the evidence of the stuff they've destroyed.

Law of Gravity.
* Food going down tastes better then when coming back up, but a dog will eat it either way.

Particle.
Microscopically small crumb of a treat that your dog can sniff out and eat from an impossibly remote crevice of the sofa.

Speed of Light.
* The speed with which your steak will disappear from the grill if you turn your back when a dog is present.

Inequality Effect.
* The pitiful expression your dog gives you when you eat a food he is not allowed to have.

Photoelectric Effect.
* What happens when your dog is doing something unbelievably smart or cute --- you grab the camera, take a picture, and all you capture is a streak of blurry fur.

Uncertainty Principle.
* The more you study and read about dogs, the less you understand their behavior.

Cosmological Constant.
You are the center of your dog's universe. In his eyes, the sun rises and sets in your smile towards him. Be kind to him, take good care of him, and love him everyday of his life.*

Source:
http://www.cyberpet.com/dogs/articles/lexi/physics.htm
(Click this link for more...)

----------------------------------------

And, in closing...

----------------------------------------

It's Time.
Really.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_TBd-UCwVAY
(video, duration 1:56)

---

Historically accurate model of the Titanic.
http://www.wimp.com/titanicrendered/
Wow, that is so cool (well, except for the part about 1,500 people dying, y'know.)

---

Fallacies
http://www.nizkor.org/features/fallacies/
Otherwise known as the Harper Government™ Communications Strategy...

---

Find the &*#%?@ cat:
http://imgur.com/r/pics/jFkV2
Search Tip: Click the photo to enlarge it.
Yes, there IS a cat in there, and yes, I found it all by myself.

I had a lot of practise trying to find the cat in this one (but I did!):
http://amazingezone.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/amazingezone-find-the-cat.jpg

If you're having a problem finding the kitties, perhaps you need to start a bit more modestly:
*
http://www.scenicreflections.com/files/Find%20the%20Cat%20Wallpaper__yvt2.jpg
* http://9gag.com/gag/111930

(Of course, if you're willing to swallow your pride and admit defeat, send me an email [gilseg@rogers.com] and I'll tell you where the kitties are...)

---