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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
December 27, 2009

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,166 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian content

1.  Canada Child Tax Benefit Guideline Table effective July 2009 - June 2010 (Canada Revenue Agency)
2. Death rate worse for poor diabetics: Ont. report (Canadian Medical Association Journal) - December 21
3. Newfoundland and Labrador Market Basket Measure (Government of Newfoundland and Labrador)
4.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Canada's population estimates, third quarter 2009 - December 23
--- Pension Coverage, Retirement Status, and Earnings Replacement Rates Among a Cohort of Canadian Seniors - December 23
--- Employment Insurance, October 2009 - December 22
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, October 2009 - December 22
--- Canada's employment downturn - December 21
--- Immigrant low-income-rates: The role of market income and government transfers
- December 21
5. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - December 20

International content

6. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs (Institute for Research on Poverty - U. of Wisconsin-Madison)
7. Australian Policy Online - recent content
8. CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter) - December 2009

Have a great week!
Gilles

************************
Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net


E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com

1. Canada Child Tax Benefit Guideline Table effective July 2009 - June 2010
(Canada Revenue Agency
)

Canada Child Tax Benefit Guideline Table
The Government of Canada’s Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB) system comprises the CCTB Base Benefit and the NCB Supplement. The CCTB targets low-and middle-income families with children, and the NCB Supplement provides low-income families with child benefits in addition to the CCTB base benefit. Links to the two tables for the 2009-2010 benefit year appear immediately below, followed by selected links to related information.

Canada Child Tax Benefit Guideline Table effective July 2009 - June 2010 (based on 2008 tax year)
This table shows the amount of the Canada Child Tax Benefit that's payable from July 2009 to June 2010 to a household with one, two, three, four and five children with family income ranging from $23,710 to over $200,000.
[FACTOID: according to this table, a family with five children and an annual family income of $210,000 (in 2008) is entitled to a monthly CCTB payment of $17.33.]

Monthly NCB Supplement only entitlement - July 2009 - June 2010 (based on 2008 tax year)

Links to more information
about the CCTB, the NCB and the NCB Supplement:

Canada Child Benefits, July 2009 to June 2010
(Including related federal, provincial, and territorial programs)

Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB) payment amounts, tax years 1999 to 2008 (July 2005 to July 2009)
* Tax Years 1999 to 2003
* Tax Years 2004 to 2008
- incl. basic benefit - supplement for 3rd and following child(ren) - supplement for children under age seven - base threshold - benefit reduction rates, one child - benefit reduction rates, two or more children - NCBS amount for first child - NCBS amount for second child - NCBS amount for each additional child - NCBS threshold - NCBS phase-out rate, one child - NCBS phase-out rate, two children - NCBS phase-out rate, three or more children - Child Disability Amount (CDB) - CDB base threshold, one child - CDB phase-out rate, one child - CDB phase-out rate, two children - CDB phase-out rate, three or more children

Source:
Canada Child Tax Benefit
[ Child and Family Benefits - includes links to : * Canada Child Tax Benefit * Universal Child Care Benefit * GST/HST credit * Working Income Tax Benefit * Provincial and territorial programs ]

Provincial and territorial child benefit and credit programs
that are related to the Canada Child Tax Benefit:
* Alberta Family Employment Tax Credit * BC Family Bonus (and British Columbia Earned Income Benefit) * New Brunswick Child Tax Benefit * Nova Scotia Child Benefit * Newfoundland and Labrador Child Benefit (and Mother Baby Nutrition Supplement) * Northwest Territories Child Benefit * Nunavut Child Benefit * Ontario Child Benefit * Yukon Child Benefit
[NOTE: residents of Québec must apply to the
Régie des rentes for the child assistance payment.]

Source:
Canada Revenue Agency

Related links from the Government of Canada:

More information about the
National Child Benefit Supplement

Source:
2006 National Child Benefit Progress Report
[ National Child Benefit website ]

Also from the NCB website:

The Government of Canada's
Contribution to the National Child Benefit Initiative

Comparing welfare rates for families in different provinces?
Be careful..

Because Canadian jurisdictions have adopted different approaches in their treatment of the CCTB and provincial-territorial child benefits for welfare rate calculations, it's becoming exceptionally difficult to compare welfare rates across provinces and territories for families with children. For more detailed information on child benefit clawbacks and pass-ons, see Approaches to Replacing Social Assistance Benefits for Children from the 2006 National child Benefit Progress Report. For more on this, see the special note on welfare rates for families in the Key Provincial/Territorial Welfare Links page of this site (the 2nd link below).

- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Key Provincial/Territorial Welfare Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare.htm

2. Death rate worse for poor diabetics: Ont. report - December 21
(Canadian Medical Association Journal)

Income-related differences in
mortality among people with diabetes mellitus

Lorraine L. Lipscombe, MD et al.
December 21, 2009
[includes an abstract and a link to the full study]
Income-related differences in mortality among people with diabetes mellitusMortality declined overall among people with diabetes from 1994 to 2005; however, the decrease was substantially greater in the highest income group than in the lowest, particularly among those aged 30–64 years. These findings illustrate the increasing impact of income on the health of people with diabetes even in a publicly funded health care setting.

Complete study (PDF - 1MB, 17 pages)

Source:
Canadian Medical Association Journal

Related link:

Death rate worse for poor diabetics: Ont. report
December 21, 2009
People with diabetes in Ontario are dying prematurely less frequently, but the decline in mortality rate was smaller among those who earn less, researchers say. The study's authors found the death rate for diabetics fell by 33 per cent across the province between 1995 and 2006, after taking age and sex into account. But the group also found that a person's chances of survival with the disease improved as income increased.
Source:
CBC

- Go to the Health Links (Canada/International) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/health.htm

3. Newfoundland and Labrador Market Basket Measure
(Government of Newfoundland and Labrador)

Newfoundland and Labrador
Market Basket Measure
(NLMBM)
Thanks to an anonymous newsletter subscriber for pointing out that Newfoundland and Labrador's new customized Market Basket Measure doesn't appear on the Antipoverty Links page of this website. In my haste to share the link to the First Progress Report on the NL Poverty Reduction Strategy
(PDF - 4MB, 76 pages, December 2009) last week, I skimmed past the section on the NLMBM in that report. According to my subscriber's email, "... NL has developed their own variation on the market basket measure, the NLMBM, which uses tax data rather than surveys, and therefore purports to capture the entire population. They've also developed a NLMBM of Housing Affordability. Part of what's interesting is that they've got gender analysis embedded in the NLMBM data that's being developed - not a claim that can be made about any of the other poverty measures."
---
I can't find any technical information on the NLMBM online at this point in time (Dec. 22/09),
but I've pulled together a few tidbits of information from NL reports that might pique your curiosity if you're interested in poverty measurement.
---

Newfoundland and Labrador
Market Basket Measure (NLMBM)
In the 2006 Action Plan:
[ Reducing Poverty: An Action Plan for Newfoundland and Labrador (PDF file - 1.6MB, 60 pages), 2006]
...a commitment was made to improve capacity to measure and track progress in poverty reduction.
[Excerpts] A major innovation has been the development of the Newfoundland and Labrador Market Basket Measure (NLMBM). This new measure uses a similar approach to the federal government's Market Basket Measure (MBM). Like the MBM, it compares the incomes of families to the cost of a basket of goods and services necessary to live a productive and socially inclusive life.
Unlike the MBM and all other available measures of low-income that use surveys to estimate low-income levels, the NLMBM uses tax-filer data and other sources to provide more accurate income and expense information for all tax-filers. This allows for the reporting of low-income levels in communities and neighbourhoods, as well as results for other subgroups such as different age groups or family types. This is important because it allows for the tracking of progress for different parts of the province as well as for different vulnerable groups so that it can be ensured that PRS is working for all. The NLMBM is available on Community Accounts [ www.communityaccounts.ca]

The NLMBM is developed and maintained by the Newfoundland and Labrador Statistics Agency.
In future years, NLMBM depth, persistence and other indicators of low income will be reported as they become available.

NOTE: For more info on the NLMBM, see Appendix II of the first progress report (PDF - 4MB, 76 pages, December 2009) or
request information from povertyreduction@gov.nl.ca

Related link:

Newfoundland and Labrador
Poverty Reduction Strategy

The Poverty Reduction Strategy is a Government-wide approach to transform Newfoundland and Labrador from a province with the most poverty to one with the least over a ten year period. The strategy includes initiatives and programs which target the groups most vulnerable to poverty.
- includes * Poverty Reduction Initiatives * Guiding Principles * Documents and News Releases * Partner Departments and Agencies
Source:
Human Resources, Labour and Employment

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the Newfoundland and Labrador Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nfbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Poverty Measures - Canadian Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty.htm

4. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Canada's population estimates, third quarter 2009 - December 23
--- Pension Coverage, Retirement Status, and Earnings Replacement Rates Among a Cohort of Canadian Seniors - December 23
--- Employment Insurance, October 2009 - December 22
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, October 2009 - December 22
---
Canada's employment downturn - December 21
--- Immigrant low-income-rates: The role of market income and government transfers
- December 21

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

December 23, 2009
Canada's population estimates, third quarter 2009
On October 1, 2009, Canada's population was estimated at 33,873,400. In the third quarter, Canada's population grew by 133,500 (+0.40%). Net international migration (+90,500) accounted for just over two-thirds of the increase.
- includes two tables:
* Components and factors of demographic growth
* Quarterly demographic estimates

Related report:

Quarterly Demographic Estimates July to September 2009
1. Notice to readers
2. Highlights
3. Analysis
4. Tables
5. Charts
6. Data quality, concepts and methodology
7. Appendices
8. User information
9. Related products
10. PDF version (399K, 66 pages)

Related subjects:
* Ethnic diversity and immigration
* Immigrants and non-permanent residents
* Population and demography

---

December 23, 2009
Pension Coverage, Retirement Status, and
Earnings Replacement Rates Among a Cohort of Canadian Seniors

By Yuri Ostrovsky and Grant Schellenberg
1. Abstract
2. Executive summary
3. Main article
4. Tables
5. Charts
6. Appendices
7. User information
8. PDF version (294K, 33 pages)
Source:
Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series - incl. links to a few hundred studies going back to 1996

---

December 22, 2009
Employment Insurance, October 2009
The number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits in October edged down 0.5% to 809,600. In the year since October 2008, the number of regular EI beneficiaries increased by 309,300, or 61.8%. During this 12-month period, the number rose in every province and territory. The largest gains occurred in Ontario (+122,200), Alberta (+56,400), British Columbia (+52,500) and Quebec (+49,200). The number of regular EI beneficiaries peaked in June at 829,300. Since then, it has declined slightly. This is in contrast with the trend from October 2008 to June 2009, when monthly increases averaged 41,100 people.
- includes the following tables:
* Employment Insurance: Statistics by province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by age group, sex, province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by census metropolitan areas

Related link:

Employment Insurance Statistics Maps - October 2009
-
these maps show percent changes in the number of people receiving regular EI benefits for all census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations in Canada.
Source:
Employment Insurance Statistics Maps (main page)

---

December 22, 2009
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, October 2009
Non-farm payroll employment increased by a moderate 34,500 in October. Since June, the trend in non-farm payroll employment has been flat, as a number of industries have shown a marked shift away from the large cuts that occurred during the first eight months in the economic downturn.

[ Related link: Employment, Earnings and Hours - click "View" to see the latest issue]

Related subjects:
o Labour
o Employment and unemployment
o Hours of work and work arrangements
o Industries
o Wages, salaries and other earnings
o Non-wage benefits

---

December 21, 2009
Perspectives on Labour and Income - December 2009 issue
The December 2009 online edition of Perspectives on Labour and Income, released today, features two articles.
* Canada's employment downturn
- examines changes in employment levels from October 2008 to October 2009 and compares findings with earlier recessions and the US labour market.

* Immigrant low-income-rates: The role of market income and government transfers
- looks at long-term trends in the incidence of low income among working-age immigrants, immigrant seniors and the children of immigrants.

Check The Daily Archives
- select a month and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm
- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page : http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm
- Go to the Social Statistics Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm

5. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto)

What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

CRRU is on break over the holidays.
The latest postings appear below.

December 20, 2009

Child's play
16 Dec 09
- Article from BC Business looking at the economic value of investing in early child care and education.

A bit rich: Calculating the real value to society of different professions
16 Dec 09
- Report from The New Economics Foundation examining the economic value of six professions in the UK, one being childcare workers.

Models of earning and caring: Trends, determinants and implications
16 Dec 09
- Report commissioned by the Policy Research Directorate at HRSDC looking at the division of earning and caring activities in Canadian households.

Children in immigrant families in eight affluent countries: their family, national and international context
16 Dec 09
- Report from the unicef Innocenti Research Centre looking at eight affluent countries and the situation of immigrant children.

The 2009 R.W.B. Jackson Lecture
16 Dec 09
- Mediacast of speakers from the R.W.B. Jackson Lecture held at OISE on November 18, 2009.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news

· Cleaners [and childcare workers] more valuable than bankers
[GB] 16 Dec 09

· Child care centres continue to deliver strong investment returns
[AU] 16 Dec 09

· Gender roles still loom large in modern parenting
[CA] 16 Dec 09

· Kindy programs for childcare
[AU] 15 Dec 09

· All-day kindergarten: a teachable moment
[CA-ON] 15 Dec 09

· Caught in a conundrum
[CA-BC] 8 Dec 09

more CC IN THE NEWS »

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

6. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Poverty Dispatch is on break break over the holidays.
The latest postings appear below.

December 16:
States and the Federal Poverty Guidelines - Vermont
Measuring Unemployment - Detroit, MI
Extending Jobless Benefits - Florida, Wisconsin, Michigan
State Health Insurance Programs - Wisconsin
Payments to Foster Care Providers - California
Cancer Screenings for the Low-income
Louisville Courier-Journal Series on Child Abuse and Neglect
Kids Count Reports - Louisiana, Kansas

December 15:
Error in Food Stamp Reporting Rate - Missouri
Report: Foster Care - Nebraska
Child Welfare Systems - Pittsburgh and Milwaukee
Poverty Measurement - Vietnam
Poll of Unemployed Adults

December 14:
Report: Juvenile Prison System - New York
Child Hunger in the US
Welfare Delivery System - Indiana
Children on Medicaid and Antipsychotic Prescription Drugs

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

7. Australian Policy Online - recent content

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia. [ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week
appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page, and the downloads vary depending on the topic you select.

-------------------------------------------------------

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

8. CRINMAIL - December 2009
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)

Latest issue of CRINMAIL:

22 December 2009 - CRINMAIL 1136
* COMPLAINTS MECHANISM: Mixed feelings as meeting closes [news]
* GLOBAL: International Migrants Day [news]
* MIGRANT WORKERS: Call for information for General Comment [news]
* IRELAND: Access to contraceptives for teenagers proposed in report [news]
* KENYA: Ensure safeguards in HIV testing campaign [news]
* INDIA: Appointments to child rights panel subject to review [news]
* UN: Ugandan rebel attacks may have been war crimes [news]
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

---

Earlier issues of CRINMAIL
- links to 200+ earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm




Disclaimer/Privacy Statement


Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com



***********************************

Top 10 Ways to Ensure
New Years Resolution Success

***********************************


Did you know that fewer than 10% of people who set New Years' Resolutions actually achieve them?
How can you ensure YOUR success?
Try using the Top 10 Tips below.

1. Write Them Down. It's a fact: writing down your goals gives you a higher chance of success.

2. Commit. Move beyond the land of "good ideas" to the land of true "commitment". Make the decision that you will show up for your goals. Perhaps you can do a ritual or ceremony to symbolize your commitment.

3. Go Public. Let your biggest fans in on your new commitments and goals for the year.

4. Get Accountability. Even better than just letting others in on your "secret" dreams and goals-get some accountability. Meet for lunch once a month with a group that will ask you, "So, how's it going with your goal?" Hire a Coach. Talk to your best friend or partner. Get some support!

5. Make a Plan. Ensure success with a step-by-step plan. I love to work backwards by starting with the end vision of where you want to be and working backwards to where you are today. You'll find an easy action plan to make your goals a reality.

6. Do a Goal Check-In. Before you decide on what you'll take on for the year, make certain you can answer, "YES!" to the following questions: "Am I the primary reason for setting this goal (vs. your mom, boyfriend, wife, boss, society)? Do I feel alive and energized by this goal? Is this goal in line with my life purpose or mission?"

7. Get Real! If you're contemplating putting a goal down that you always put down and never achieve, take a second look. How will this goal end DIFFERENTLY this year? Is this goal something you need to let go of? What purpose is it serving you each year? Is this goal masking as a form of self-punishment? What is the good enough reason to truly commit?

8. Focus With Reminders. Once you've written down your goals, created a plan and made sure they are worthy to pursue, figure out ways to remind yourself. Some clients post their goals in on their bathroom mirror or in their car. Others put reminders in their blackberries, iPhones or cell phones. Figure out what works for you.

9. Believe and Visualize. Do you know the story about the group of basketball players who spent one hour visualizing making baskets, while another group actually practiced? The visualizing players had better seasons! So visualize yourself on New Years Eve with all your goals achieved. What would that look like? How would it feel? Visualize once a day and see the difference it can make in your life.

10. Use anchors. Tie your goal to a habit you already have in place. Perhaps you decide to do your exercise right after brushing your teeth, or practice meditation after checking email. Anchoring your new behavior and goals to an existing habit is a great tool for success.

Source:
http://tinyurl.com/e35jq


----------------------------

And, in closing...

----------------------------



Top Ten New Year's Resolutions and Resources to help you:
http://www.penguin.ca/nf/shared/SharedDisplay/0,,214613_0,00.html
[Not me, of course. You.]

***

New Year's Traditions Around the World and Throughout History
http://tinyurl.com/yczcwo7

***

Unique New Year's Resolutions
http://tinyurl.com/y9m7mqj

***

Ten New Year's Resolutions for My Cat
http://tinyurl.com/y9qeath

***
 
A Dog's New Year's Resolutions
http://tinyurl.com/yekzg5x

***


Happy New Year to one and all!!

Gilles


P.S. I agree with Jesper that Elin should've used a driver instead of the 3-iron.
http://tinyurl.com/yg4lyf2