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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
March 28, 2005

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter, a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 1338 subscribers. If you're actually keeping track  of the number of subscribers, there were 1,374 last week, but the newsletter mailing list administration system periodically and automatically deletes subscribers whose issues bounce back week after week.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes and a disclaimer.

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IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian Content

1. Family Day Care as a Welfare-to-Work Option (Ontario Coalition for Better Child Care) - April 2000
2.
Expert Panel on Equalization and Territorial Formula Financing (Department of Finance Canada) - March 21
3.
British Columbia Welfare Resource Guide for Women (Vancouver Status of Women) - March 24
4. Canadian Human Rights Commission 2004 Annual Report - March 24
5. Saskatchewan 2005-2006 Provincial Budget - March 23
6. Inclusive Cities : Community Voices, Perspectives and Priorities (Inclusive Cities Canada) - March 23
7. Disability Newsletters Online - Manitoba, Ontario (March 2005 Issue)
8. What's New from Statistics Canada - March 22:
--- Canada's visible minority population in 2017
--- Household spending and debt, 1982 and 2001
--- The relationship between property tax and income, 2001
--- Employment Insurance - January 2005
9. 2005-2006 Provincial Budgets - March 21 (Manitoba + Newfoundland and Labrador)
10. Alberta Works (Welfare) Changes - Effective April 1 (Alberta Human Resources and Employment)
11. New from The Centre for the Study of Living Standards - February 2005
--- Labour Market Seasonality in Canada: Trends and Policy Implications
--- Measuring the Impact of Research on Well-being: A Survey of Indicators of Well-being
12. What's New from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) - University of Toronto - March 24


International Content

13. Poverty Dispatch Weekly Digest : U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs --- March 24, 2005
14. U.S. Federal Expenditures on Children, 1960-1997 (The Urban Institute, April 2001) + Child Benefits in 22 Countries (U.K. Department for Work and Pensions, October 2002)


Have a great week!

Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net

E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com

1. Family Day Care as a Welfare-to-Work Option - April 2000
(Ontario Coalition for Better Child Care)

When Mom Must Work : Family Day Care as a Welfare-to-Work Option
April 2000
By Colin Hughes and Kerry McCuaig
Published by the Ontario Coalition for Better Child Care
Hosted by the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (University of Toronto)

Attention welfare reform researchers!
Excellent overview of American and Canadian welfare reforms - highly recommended!

Executive Summary
"This study examines the potential of family day care as an employment option for people on social assistance [bolding added]. It responds to the new era of welfare reform with its emphasis on labour market participation and corresponding efforts by policy makers to simultaneously address several important social and economic needs: welfare 'dependency', and the lack of jobs and child care. The project begins with the premise that employing social assistance recipients in family day care is inherently neither a good nor a bad idea. (...) the study undertook: a national and international review of literature pertaining to family day care, social assistance and community development; a review of U.S. welfare-to-work evaluation studies; a survey of provincial/territorial/municipal officials and community key informants to determine welfare-to-work policies, practices, pilots and training programs in their respective jurisdictions designed to encourage social assistance recipients to become family caregivers. The study also sought to determine what impediments or supports exist for the practice."

Content List - table of contents with links to all sections of the report
- incl. links to : Introduction - Changes in Federal Guidelines and Funding for Social Assistance - International Trends and Perspectives - Welfare and Low-Income Dynamics - Themes and Approaches in OECD and Europe - Family Day Care As an Employment Option in Europe - Welfare-to-Work in North America - U.S. Welfare Reform and Child Care - Welfare-to-Work in Canada - Child Care Quality, the Status of Providers and the Market for Care - The Community Status of Home Child Care and Key-Informant Perspectives - The Canadian Potential: The Case Studies - Policy/Program Options - Bibliography - Appendix (Provincial Regulations in Family Day Care)

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

2. Expert Panel on Equalization and Territorial Formula Financing - March 21
(Department of Finance Canada)

Minister of Finance Announces Members of Expert Panel on Equalization and Territorial Formula Financing
News Release
March 21, 2005
"Minister of Finance Ralph Goodale today announced the membership of the independent Panel of Experts to review Equalization and Territorial Formula Financing (TFF). The establishment of the Panel follows on the announcement made after the October 2004 First Ministers’ meeting."
- incl. biographical notes for the members of, and the Terms of Reference for the Expert Panel on Equalization and Territorial Formula Financing
Source:
Finance Canada

Related Links:

Equalization Program
- incl. detailed info on how equalization is calculated, plus total equalization entitlements by province and territory from 1993-94 to 2004-05.

Territorial Formula Financing (TTF)
Territorial Formula Financing Renewal
(a separate page)

Source:
Federal Transfers to Provinces and Territories (Finance Canada)
- this is the best federal government source of info about federal transfers for health and social programs; here, you'll find general and specific information about Canada's five major social transfer programs --- Canada Health Transfer - Canada Social Transfer - Health Reform Transfer - Equalization - Territorial Formula Financing --- plus a chronology of federal transfers from 1966 to 2004.

- Go to the Canada Assistance Plan / Canada Health and Social Transfer / Canada Social Transfer Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/cap.htm

3. British Columbia Welfare Resource Guide for Women - March 24
(Vancouver Status of Women)

Vancouver Status of Women Launches the Revised and Updated
Welfare Resource Guide for Women (2nd Edition)
Community Press Release
March 24th, 2005
"Vancouver Status of Women (VSW) launched its 2nd Edition of the Welfare Resource Guide for Women this week. This guide provides updated general information to women about British Columbia's welfare system or Employment and Assistance Regulations within a feminist framework. This Guide is meant to help women apply for welfare, disability, and child benefits, and offers guidance in application or appeal processes. The Guide especially focuses on the needs of single mothers."

Welfare Resource Guide for Women in BC
March 2005
Click this link to read the intro, then scroll down the page to download the complete report in PDF format (565K, 57 pages) or to view the table of contents and download the individual chapters.
Chapter 1: Welfare and Employment Assistance
Chapter 2: Disability Benefits
Chapter 3: Federal and Provincial Child Benefits
Chapter 4: Reconsiderations and Appeals
Chapter 5: Welfare Advocacy Resources

Source:
Vancouver Status of Women
"2004 is our 33rd Anniversary of working for and with women in Vancouver. Ours is a long and proud herstory that includes the work of thousands of women. Over the course of herstory we have seen a lot of changes. Through all these changes, the one thing that remains constant is our belief that women working together towards common goals can change their lives."

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (C-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm
- Go to the the Canadian Non-Governmental Sites about Women's Social Issues page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/womencanngo.htm

4. Canadian Human Rights Commission 2004 Annual Report - March 24

Canadian Human Rights Commission 2004 Annual Report
March 24, 2005
Tabled in Parliament on March 24, 2005

PDF version (378K, 46 pages)

Source:
Canadian Human Rights Commission

- Go to the Human Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/rights.htm

5. Saskatchewan 2005-2006 Provincial Budget - March 23
(Saskatchewan)

Saskatchewan 2005-2006 Provincial Budget
March 23, 2005
- incl. links to : Budget and Performance Plan - Summary - Budget Address - Budget Address (French) - Performance Plans - Estimates - Supplementary Estimates - Greensheet - Budget Highlight Card - Budget Highlight Card (French)

Google.ca News Search Results : "Saskatchewan Budget 2005"
Google.ca Web Search Results : "Saskatchewan Budget 2005"
Source:
Google.ca

- Go to the Canadian Government Budgets Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets.htm
- Go to the Saskatchewan Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/skbkmrk.htm

6. Inclusive Cities : Community Voices, Perspectives and Priorities - March 23
(Inclusive Cities Canada)

Reports provide wake-up call on future of Canada’s cities
Media Release
March 23, 2005
"‘Social inclusion’ reports were released today in five cities -- Saint John, Toronto, Burlington, Edmonton and Vancouver. They are the work of Inclusive Cities Canada, a unique, participatory research initiative that uses a social inclusion framework to build people-friendly cities, promote good urban governance and develop strategies for supporting urban diversity. The federally-funded initiative set up Civic Panels made of community and municipal leaders to conduct social inclusion ‘audits’. Over 1,000 participants contributed to the findings. The research examined important dimensions of social inclusion, such as how cities respond to diversity, levels of civic engagement, living conditions, opportunities for human development and community services."

Download the reports (all in PDF format):

St. John
* Full Report (895K, 49 pages)
The Human Development Council (HDC) is a local social planning council working with citizens to improve the overall quality of life in Greater Saint John. It was formed in 1979 and seeks to coordinate and promote social development in the region. Our goals are to: study and identify social needs within the community, and the services that exist to meet those needs; advise and assist in planning and developing new services and improving existing ones; initiate opportunities for joint action in the development, coordination, and delivery of services appropriate to community needs; and facilitate local citizens’ access to information about community programs and services.

Toronto
* Full Report (287K, 64 pages)
* Executive Summary (74K, 11 pages)
The Community Social Planning Council of Toronto (CSPC-T) is a not-for-profit community organization. The CSPC aims to promote equitable, effective and inclusive policies for improving the quality of life in Toronto. Collectively, the predecessor organizations have over 100 years of experience in social planning, community development, policy analysis and research, advocacy, and service coordination. The work of CSPC-T is fuelled by the efforts and commitment of highly qualified staff and dedicated volunteers from the public, private, and not-for-profit sectors. The Community Social Planning Council of Toronto also serves as project sponsor (as an incorporated charitable organization) and provides administrative support for the ICC initiative.

Burlington
* Full Report (1.1MB, 138 pages)
* Executive Summary (138K, 16 pages)

Community Development Halton (CDH) is an intermediary organization that through social research, needs identification, volunteerism and education serves the voluntary sector, municipal and regional government and local grass roots organization. Our purpose is to build the capacity of our community to improve the quality of life for all residents of Halton.

Edmonton
* Full Report (655K, 45 pages)
The Edmonton Social Planning Council (ESPC) is a non-profit, independent social research and advocacy organization. The ESPC provides leadership to the community and its organizations in addressing social issues and effecting changes to social policy. Our work includes the definition of the scope and nature of social issues (social research), facilitation of community based solutions to social problems (social planning), the promotion of strategies which will reduce the long term costs and problems caused by unresolved social issues (advocacy), information and referral regarding human service and health programs, and the demonstration of new models of service delivery (innovation).

Vancouver/North Vancouver
* Preliminary Findings (975K, 25 pages)
The Social Planning and Research Council of British Columbia (SPARC BC) works with communities to build a just and healthy society for all. Founded in 1966, SPARC is a non-partisan organization whose members and directors are drawn from throughout British Columbia. SPARC BC is guided by the values of social justice, integrity, learning and inclusion and as such we conduct research, consulting, public education, and advocacy on issues of accessibility, income security, and community development.

Federation of Canadian Municipalities
[Inclusive Cities Canada works in collaboration with the Federation of Canadian Municipalities]
The Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) is a national organization of 1000 plus cities in Canada. Comprised of locally elected politicians, FCM endeavours to support local governments through conferences, research and information and acts as a lobby for the interests of cities with the Federal Government. Over the past 15 years besides issues of local infrastructure, FCM has advocated for a better quality of life in our local communities. To achieve our goals, FCM liaises and works with numerous other Canadian groups and organizations.

Source:
Inclusive Cities Canada
"Inclusive Cities Canada: A Cross-Canada Civic Initiative is a unique partnership of community leaders and elected municipal politicians working collaboratively to enhance social inclusion across Canada. The goals of Inclusive Cities Canada (ICC) are to strengthen the capacity of cities to create and sustain inclusive communities for the mutual benefit of all people, and to ensure that community voices of diversity are recognized as core Canadian ones."

- Go to the Municipalities Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/municipal.htm

7. Disability Newsletters Online - Manitoba, Ontario
(March 2005 Issues)

Disability Research Digest (Manitoba)
- includes links to all monthly issues, with archives back to June 2001, available in HTML or PDF format.
- each issue of the digest varies from 12 to 25+ printed pages, and each contains 125-150 links.

Content of the March 2005 Issue:
* Accessibility and Technology * Advocacy * Employment * General Interest * Government * Health * Legal * Medical * Media * Policy/Research * Rehabilitation * Conferences

HTML version of the March 2005 issue
PDF version of the March 2005 issue

Source:
Society for Manitobans with Disabilities

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Gateway News - Paths to Equal Opportunity (Ontario)
Online Newsletter (monthly)
Content of the March 2005 issue:
# Learning Disabilities on the Job!
# York Region’s Accessibility Planning Process: A Case Study
# Customer Respect Study of Largest Airline, Travel Firms
# Usability & Accessibility Market Set to Grow
# TTC Promotes Accessible Services
# Unique Mail Service Fills Niche
# Universal Park Design for the 21st Century

Newsletter Archive - back to November 2001
Source:
Paths to Equal Opportunity
[Accessibility Ontario]
[Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration]

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- Go to the Disability Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/disbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Manitoba Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/mbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Ontario Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk.htm

8. What's New from Statistics Canada - March 22
- Canada's visible minority population in 2017
- Household spending and debt, 1982 and 2001
- The relationship between property tax and income, 2001
- Employment Insurance - January 2005

What's New from The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

March 22, 2005
Study: Canada's visible minority population in 2017
Roughly one out of every five people in Canada, or between 19% and 23% of the nation's population, could be a member of a visible minority by 2017 when Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary, according to new ethno-cultural population projections.
Complete report:
Population Projections of Visible Minority Groups, Canada, Provinces and Regions, 2001 to 2017 (PDF file - 518K, 86 pages)

March 22, 2005
Study: Household spending and debt, 1982 and 2001
Study: The relationship between property tax and income, 2001

NOTE: these two studies are reported in the March 2005 online issue of Perspectives on Labour and Income, Vol. 6, no. 3 (75-001-XIE, $6/$52)

March 22, 2005
Employment Insurance - January 2005 (preliminary)
The estimated number of Canadians (adjusted for seasonality) receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits in January was 519,820, a slight 0.6% increase from December. This was the first increase in five months. Provincially, the largest increases occurred in Saskatchewan (+3.7%), Manitoba (+2.3%) and British Columbia (+1.1%). These were offset in part, by a 1.1% decline in Ontario. Compared with January 2004, the number of regular beneficiaries fell by 6.6% nationally.

9. 2005-2006 Provincial Budgets - March 21
(Manitoba + Newfoundland and Labrador)

Manitoba Budget 2005 : Balancing Priorities. Building Opportunities. Investing in Tomorrow.
- incl. links to : Minister's Budget Message -
Speech - Budget In Brief - Budget Papers - The Manitoba Advantage - Addressing Poverty in Manitoba - Manitoba's Action Strategy for Economic Growth - Revenue and Expenditures - Tax Savings Estimator - News Releases - 2005 Budget Documents Request Form

Addressing Poverty in Manitoba
[2005 Budget Paper]
"Finding the right mix of policy options to ensure that all members of society who are able to, have the opportunity to participate in the work force is a key challenge facing governments across Canada. In Manitoba, the challenge is complicated by several factors..."
[
Previously published as “Welfare to Work: Creating a Community Where all Can Work,” Canadian Journal of Career Development 3, #2 2004]

Google.ca News Search Results : "Manitoba Budget 2005"
Google.ca Web Search Results : "Manitoba Budget 2005"
Source:
Google.ca

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Newfoundland and Labrador Budget 2005
A New Future. A Renewed Pride.

March 21, 2005
- incl. links to : Budget Speech - Budget Highlights - News Releases - Estimates - The Economy 2005

Building pathways to poverty reduction
March 21, 2005
Human Resources, Labour and Employment
"Joan Burke, Minister of Human Resources, Labour and Employment, said today that several Budget 2005 measures help lessen poverty in Newfoundland and Labrador, including funding for the development of a strategic plan on addressing the issue of poverty."
- highlights include a two-part increase in income support (welfare) for couples and single clients without children (1% in July 2005 and 1% in January 2006), a 10% increase in the earnings exemption level and more funds for employment-related activities for people with disabilities, for the Newfoundland and Labrador Child Benefit and for "a second pilot project to assist single parents in receipt of income support prepare for, find and keep employment."

Google.ca News Search Results : "Newfoundland Budget 2005"
Google.ca Web Search Results : "Newfoundland Budget 2005"
Source:
Google.ca

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- Go to the Canadian Government Budgets Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets.htm
- Go to the Manitoba Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/mbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Newfoundland and Labrador Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nfbkmrk.htm

10. Alberta Works (Welfare) Changes - Effective April 1
(Alberta Human Resources and Employment)

More supports help families invest in children's futures - Alberta
News Release
March 15, 2005
Edmonton
"Effective April 1, 2005, changes to Alberta Works will increase the time low-income parents have at home with young children, make it easier for youth to finish high school and help families save for their children's education."
Changes include:
- a parent receiving income support will have one year instead of the current six months to stay home with a child before being required to seek or accept employment
- the requirement to be out of school for one year before receiving training benefits to complete high school is waived.
- a new one-time $100 benefit for Albertans receiving income support to help offset the costs of setting up a Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP) to participate in Alberta's Centennial Education Savings program (to help cover costs such as the fee for obtaining a birth certificate and the initial deposit required to open an RESP account).
- to better address domestic violence, the existing $1,000 allowance to set up a new household for a person fleeing a violent spouse will now be extended to anyone eligible for income support and who needs help to leave an abusive situation, such as individuals who experience abuse by people other than a spouse.
Source:
Alberta Works
(Human Resources and Employment)

- Go to the Alberta Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/abkmrk.htm

11. New from The Centre for the Study of Living Standards - February 2005
--- Labour Market Seasonality in Canada: Trends and Policy Implications
--- Measuring the Impact of Research on Well-being: A Survey of Indicators of Well-being

Two new research reports from The Centre for the Study of Living Standards:

Labour Market Seasonality in Canada: Trends and Policy Implications (PDF file - 249K, 51 pages)
February 2005
discusses the challenges and realities of Canada’s labour market seasonality.
Some of the report's findings are the following.
* Seasonal unemployment represents an important public policy issue. The basic problem is a lack of employment opportunities in rural and remote areas where seasonal unemployment is concentrated.
* There has been a decline in the dependence of the labour force on seasonal employment in Canada since 1976. However, since 1996 the seasonality of unemployment has increased.
* Atlantic Canada has higher levels of seasonal unemployment than the other regions. This in part reflects a greater propensity for employers to hire part-year workers in this region.
* In relation to other OECD countries, Canada has an average rate of seasonal unemployment rate but a high rate of employment seasonality. Relative to the United States, employment seasonality is three times greater in this country.

Measuring the Impact of Research on Well-being: A Survey of Indicators of Well-being (PDF file - 673K, 119 pages)
February 2005
The second report, entitled “Measuring the Impact of Research on Well-being: A Survey of Indicators of Well-being”, was originally prepared for the Prime Ministers Advisory Council on Science and Technology. The report provides insight into and explanations of indicators that are used to measure and assess well-being in Canada and other industrialized countries. The report concludes that it is entirely feasible to assess the impact of research investments in Canada on various dimensions of well- being. But it would be important to specify what particular research investments and what dimensions of well-being are of interest given the many types of research investments and well-being dimensions as well as the complex interrelationships between research and well-being.

- Go to the Canadiana Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/patriot.htm

12. What's New from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) - March 24
( University of Toronto)

What's New - from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) - University of Toronto

24-Mar-05

---------------------------------------------------
WHATS NEW
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>> Perfect madness: Motherhood in the age of anxiety
by Warner, Judith
Book by Judith Warner explores "that caught-by-the-throat feeling so many mothers have today of always doing something wrong".

>> Women, equality & social programs: The vital connection
by Day, Shelagh
Notes from a talk by Shelagh Day, Director of the Poverty and Human Rights Project.

>> The federal budget and the child care promise: Promise made but not yet kept
by Child Care Advocacy Association of Canada
Brief from the Child Care Advocacy Association of Canada outlines the differences between child care advocates’ expectations and what the federal budget delivered.


---------------------------------------------------
CHILD CARE IN THE NEWS
---------------------------------------------------

>> Child care: Third phase of project gets $444,000 [CA-NB]
Telegraph-Journal, 23 Mar 05
New Brunswick is investing $444,000 to fund the third phase
of the Opening the Door to Quality Childcare and Development
project.

>> College will save day-care centres, board announces [CA-BC]
Times Colonist, 23 Mar 05
Camosun College will continue to operate its two child care centres, threatened with closure last year due to rising costs.

>> Judy Rebick is a feminist [CA]
CanWest News Service, 22 Mar 05
Judy Rebick is a feminist. And proud to say so. In a time when some women fear the radical bra-burning, man-hating connotations of this particular F-word, Rebick wears it with dignity. After reading her book, Ten Thousand Roses: The Making of a Feminist Revolution (Penguin; $24), other women may choose to reclaim the title.

>> Child Care Working Group reinstated [CA-YT]
Yukon News, 18 Mar 05
The Yukon government is reconvening the Child Care Working Group. The move is part of the territory's response to Ottawa's plans to create a national child care program, and its promise to fund it to the tune of $5 billion over the next five years.

>> Coming to grips with frustrations of motherhood [US]
Seattle Times, 5 Mar 05
Review of the book "Perfect Madness: Motherhood in the Age
of Anxiety" by Judith Warner.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
This message was forwarded through the Childcare Resource and Research Unit e-mail news notifier.
For information on the CRRU e-mail notifier, including subscription instructions , see http://www.childcarecanada.org
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (University of Toronto, Canada)
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

More Important CRRU Links

What's New? - Links to 100+ Canadian, U.S. and international resources from Jan 2000 to the present.
Child Care in the News - 200+ media articles from January 2000 to the present
ISSUE files - links to 20+ theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info
Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere
CRRU Publications
- links to ~60 briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

Also from CRRU:

Current developments in Early Childhood Education and Care: Provinces and territories
Regularly updated
"This resource is a collection of useful online readings about current early childhood education and care policy and program delivery issues in each province and territory. Within each jurisdiction, information is organized into three sections: news articles, online documents and useful websites."

- Go to the Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd.htm

13. Poverty Dispatch Digest :
U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs --- March 24
, 2005

POVERTY DISPATCH Digest (Institute for Research on Poverty - U. of Wisconsin)
This digest offers dozens of new links each week to full-text articles in the U.S. media (mostly daily newspapers) on poverty, poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, and much more...
The Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison offers a free e-mail service that consists of an e-mail message sent to subscribers each Monday and Thursday, containing a dozen or so links to articles dealing with the areas mentioned above. The weekly Canadian Social Research Links Poverty Dispatch Digest is a compilation, available online, of the two dispatch e-mails for that week --- with the kind permission of IRP.

Here's a one-day sample of the subjects covered in the Poverty Dispatch Digest:

March 24, 2005

Today's subjects include: No Child Left Behind Act // Minimum Wage - Commentary // Urban Housing and Jobs Program Evaluation // Single-Payer Health Care - Opinion // American Indian Students // Poverty in Red Lake, MN - Editorial //  Medicaid - New York, Texas // Minimum Wage - New Hampshire // Early Childhood Education - California // High School Dropout Rate - California  // No Child Left Behind Act - Minnesota, Oregon // Homelessness - Racine WI, Alexandria VA, Colorado, Tampa FL

NOTE: "Poverty Dispatch is compiled and distributed to e-mail subscribers twice a week -- Mondays and Thursdays. We plan to maintain a broad coverage of poverty-related issues as reported all week in U.S. newspapers and other news sources." (Institute for Research on Poverty)

Most of the weekly digests below offer 100 links or more to media articles that are time-sensitive.
The older the link, the more likely it is to either be dead or have moved to an archive - and some archives [but not all] are pay-as-you-go.
[For the current week's digest, click on the POVERTY DISPATCH link above]

The Poverty Dispatch weekly digest is a good tool for monitoring what's happening in the U.S.; it's a guide to best practices and lessons learned in America.

Subscribe to the Poverty Dispatch!
Send an e-mail message to John Wolf < jwolf@ssc.wisc.edu > to receive a plain text message twice a week with one to two dozen links to media articles with a focus on poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, health, Medicaid from across the U.S.
And it's free...

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

POVERTY DISPATCH description/archive - weekly issues back to July 2004 , avg. 100+ links per issue before December 2004!
NOTE: this archive is part of the Canadian Social Research Links American Non-Governmental Social Research page.

For the current week's digest, click on the POVERTY DISPATCH link at the top of this section.
Recently-archived POVERTY DISPATCH weekly digests:

- March 17 - oops, accidentally deleted. Sorry
- March 10
- March 3
- February 24
- February 17

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

14. U.S. Welfare and Child Care Reauthorization Update - March 15
(Center for Law and Social Policy)

Testimony of Mark Greenberg to the
Subcommittee on 21st Century Competitiveness
(PDF file - 74K, 14 pages)
Committee on Education and the Workforce, U.S. House of Representatives
March 15, 2005
Mark Greenberg
Director of Policy
Center for Law and Social Policy
This testimony discusses the work and child care provisions of the 1996 welfare law, pending reauthorization proposals, and CLASP’s recommendations.
"Between 1996 and 2000, combined federal and state funding for child care tripled. Most of the growth was attributable to federal funds, and the single biggest factor was the ability of states to redirect TANF funds. As a result of this increased funding, the number of children receiving subsidies grew from an estimated 1 million in 1996 to 2.4 million in 2001, and states were able to improve child care payment rates to providers, reduce required family copayments to make child care more affordable, and expand quality initiatives. (...) During the last three years, several key indicators have become less positive. (...) The economy entered into a recession, after which initial job growth was slow. States entered into a period of large budget deficits, placing strains on TANF funds and other state resources, and forcing cutbacks in child care and other services. The pressures resulting from the economy and state budget crises are apparent in indicators of employment, child poverty, child care, and welfare participation." (Excerpt, p. 2)
Source:
Center for Law and Social Policy

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

15. U.S. Federal Expenditures on Children, 1960-1997 (The Urban Institute, April 2001)
+ Child Benefits in 22 Countries (U.K. Department for Work and Pensions, October 2002)

I just stumbled across the first report below on the Urban Institute website, and I found it interesting enough to pass along and to recommend to you. Below that one, I've added a link to the UK report (children's benefits in 22 countries) for context. Both links are now at the top of the Canadian Social Research Links Children, Families and Youth International Links page.

---------------------

Federal Expenditures on Children: 1960-1997 - U.S.
April 2001
"This paper provides the most comprehensive examination ever made of trends in federal spending, including tax subsidies, on children. (...) Some 66 federal programs are classified within eight major budget categories: tax credits and exemptions (including the Earned Income Tax Credit and the dependent exemption), income security (including Aid to Families with Dependent Children), nutrition (including Food Stamps), health (including Medicaid), education, housing, social services, and training.1 Children are defined as individuals 18 years of age or younger." [Source: Executive Summary]
HTML version - includes the executive summary
PDF version (243K, 25 pages)
Source:
The Urban Institute

---------------------

A Comparison of Child Benefit Packages in 22 Countries
October 2002
-
tax allowances, cash benefits, exemptions from charges, subsidies and services in kind, which assist parents with the costs of raising children.
- an investigation of variations in the structure and level of this package in 22 countries as at July 2001.
- includes Canada...
-Nine PDF files include the complete report (in two files), plus the table of contents, appendices, references, a list of other reports and a summary of the child benefit package for each of the 22 countries.
Source:
U.K. Department for Work and Pensions

- Go to the International Children, Families and Youth Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chn2.htm



Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page and submit your coordinates:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to include a link back to the home page of Canadian Social Research Links.

Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

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Ya don't say!

The combination "ough" can be pronounced in nine different ways. The following sentence contains them all: "A rough-coated, dough-faced, thoughtful ploughman strode through the streets of Scarborough; after falling into a slough, he coughed and hiccoughed."

The airplane Buddy Holly died in was the "American Pie." (Thus the name of the Don McLean song.)

Pamela Anderson Lee is Canada's Centennial Baby, being the first baby born on the centennial anniversary of Canada's independence.

Pinocchio is Italian for "pine head."

Cats have over one hundred vocal sounds, while dogs only have about ten.

Cat urine glows under a black light.

"Dreamt" is the only English word that ends in the letters "mt."

Facetious and abstemious contain all the vowels in the correct order, as does arsenious, meaning "containing arsenic."

No word in the English language rhymes with month, orange, silver or purple

There are only four words in the English language which end in "-dous":  tremendous, horrendous, stupendous, and hazardous.

Source:
http://humour.50megs.com/

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Happy Easter to those who celebrated, happy long weekend to others!

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