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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
June 28, 2009

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2045 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes and a disclaimer.

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian content

1. [British Columbia] Campbell turns back on kids (Victoria Times Colonist) - June 27
2. Aboriginal Children’s Health: Leaving No Child Behind (UNICEF Canada) - June 24
3. Manitoba’s poverty reduction plan : All Aboard – Destination Unknown (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - June 22
4. [Ontario] Social Assistance Rate Restructuring and the Ontario Child Benefit : fact sheet (Income Security Advocacy Centre) - June 2009
5. Ontario Social Assistance Review - new website (Income Security Advocacy Centre)
6. Fighting Hunger : Who’s Hungry - 2009 Profile of Hunger in the Greater Toronto Area (Daily Bread Food Bank) - June 18
7. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]
--- General Social Survey: How social networks help Canadians deal with major change, 2008 - June 26
--- Canadian Community Health Survey, 2008 - June 26
--- Health Profile - June 25
--- Health Indicators 2009 - June 25
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, April 2009 - June 25
--- Canada's population estimates, first quarter 2009 - June 23
--- International differences in low-paid work - June 23
--- Employment Insurance, April 2009 - June 22
--- National balance sheet accounts, first quarter 2009 - June 22
--- Sub-provincial and demographic overview - June 22
8. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - June 27

International content

9. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs (Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)
10. The State of the World’s Children, 2009: Maternal and Newborn Health (United Nations Children's Fund) - January 2009
11. Australian Policy Online
12. CRINMAIL - (Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

HAPPY CANADA DAY!

Gilles

************************
Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net


E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com


1. [British Columbia] Campbell turns back on kids - June 27
(Victoria Times Colonist)

British Columbia:

Campbell turns back on kids
June 27, 2009
What is Premier Gordon Campbell thinking? The province, according to Statistics Canada, has had the highest rate of child poverty in Canada for the past six years. The problems are increasing as more people lose their jobs. Yet Campbell has refused to meet with the Representative for Children and Youth to discuss ways of improving the lives of poor children. Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond asked for a joint meeting with Campbell and NDP Leader Carole James. The situation is urgent, she said, and should be above partisan politics. The leaders should co-operate on plans to make things better for children at a tough time. James said yes. Campbell refused even a meeting.
Source:
Victoria Times Colonist

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

2. Aboriginal Children’s Health: Leaving No Child Behind - June 24
(UNICEF Canada)

UNICEF Canada Report on Aboriginal Children’s Health Shows Disparities
Between Aboriginal Children and National Averages a Major Children’s Right Challenge

Health of First Nations, Inuit and Métis Children Well Below National Averages
News Release
June 24, 2009
Toronto - UNICEF Canada is marking the 20th anniversary of the Convention on the Rights of the Child with the release today of a report called Aboriginal Children’s Health: Leaving No Child Behind- the Canadian Supplement to State of the World’s Children 2009. UNICEF Canada partnered with the National Collaborating Centre on Aboriginal Health to produce the report, which examines the health of Aboriginal children in Canada through the perspectives of national experts and analysis of existing data. The report concludes that health disparities between First Nations, Inuit and Métis children relative to national averages is one of the most significant children’s rights challenges facing our nation.

Aboriginal Children’s Health: Leaving No Child Behind:
The Canadian Supplement to State of the World’s Children 2009
* Complete report (PDF - 6.6MB, 61 pages)
* Summary (PDF - 379K, 4 pages)
* Highlights (HTML)

[ Other UNICEF Canada Publications ]

Source:
UNICEF Canada
Since 1955, UNICEF Canada has grown into a recognized national symbol for the world’s children and the most visible United Nations presence across the country. UNICEF Canada’s mandate is to raise funds in support of UNICEF’s work for children in more than 150 countries and territories and build awareness among Canadians about the issues facing the world’s children.

NOTE: A link to the report The State of the World's Children, 2009: Maternal and Newborn Health appears near the bottom of this newsletter

Related link:

Aboriginal children's health below national averages: UNICEF
By Amy Minsky, Canwest News Service
The infant mortality rate across Canadian First Nations reserves is up to seven times higher than among the general population, according to a report released Wednesday from UNICEF Canada. And between 2002 and 2006, the tuberculosis rate among the Inuit was 90 times higher than in the non-Aboriginal population in Canada, the study said. The report's authors said this disparity is a symptom of a larger problem — not all Canadian children are treated equally when it comes to health care.
Source:
Canada.com

- Go to the First Nations Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/1stbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm
- Go to the Health Links (Canada/International) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/health.htm
- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

3. Manitoba’s poverty reduction plan : All Aboard – Destination Unknown - June 22
(Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

NEW from the Manitoba Office of Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA):

Manitoba’s poverty reduction plan:
All Aboard – Destination Unknown
(PDF - 500K, 2 pages)
June 22, 2009
On May 21st, the Manitoba government released All Aboard: Manitoba’s Poverty Reduction Strategy. The 8-page glossy document outlines some solid “values and guiding principles” that provide a foundation for a plan, as well as a list of initiatives that the NDP government has introduced since first elected in 1999. (...) However, All Aboard falls seriously short as a comprehensive plan and their “strategy” will be meaningless without a clear destination and a map to get there. The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, Manitoba recently released The view from here: Manitobans call for a poverty reduction plan. Our plan, developed in collaboration with Make Poverty History Manitoba and others brings together several years of research and consultation with individuals and community organizations directly involved with Manitoba’s most vulnerable citizens. Over 70 organizations representing thousands of Manitobans have now endorsed The view from here and more continue to sign on. (...) Our plan is comprehensive, and most importantly it outlines timelines and targets that, if implemented within the context of a legislated framework, would hold governments, present and future, accountable to ensuring that poverty is significantly reduced. But the Doer government has been consistently resistant to setting timelines and targets and they appear unlikely to pass supporting legislation.

Related links from CCPA:

The view from here:
Manitobans call for a poverty reduction plan
(PDF - 1.9MB, 76 pages)
June 2009 (file dated May 21)
This report looks at the emergence of poverty reduction plans in other jurisdictions; it outlines the essential components of a meaningful poverty reduction plan; it makes the case for a made in Manitoba poverty reduction plan; it includes the latest poverty statistics for Manitoba; it proposes indicators with targets and timelines to measure progress; and it outlines a large package of policies and programs that should be at the heart of a comprehensive poverty reduction plan, highlighting items for immediate action.

Research for Communities:
The view from here – Manitobans call for a poverty reduction plan
- PDF File, 177K, 4 pages)
Spring 2009
This booklet offers information about elsewhere in Canada, what should be included in a poverty reduction plan for Manitoba, common elements of successful poverty reduction programs, etc.
Source:
Manitoba Office - Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
[ More publications from CCPA-Manitoba ]
[ Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - National Office ]

Related links from
the Government of Manitoba:

ALL Aboard: Manitoba’s Poverty Reduction Strategy
On May 21, 2009, Manitoba announced its poverty reduction strategy, ALL Aboard, which formalizes and builds upon poverty reduction efforts underway in the province.
- incl. links to : *ALL Aboard Report * ALL Aboard News Release * HOMEWorks! Homeless Strategy * Housing and Supports for People with Mental Illness * Contacts

All Aboard - Manitoba’s Poverty Reduction Strategy (PDF - 562K, 8 pages)
In Manitoba, we believe that all people deserve a high quality of life and the opportunity to realize their potential.
Taking action to reduce poverty is the right thing to do.
Source:
Manitoba Family Services and Housing

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the Manitoba Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/mbkmrk.htm

4. [Ontario] Social Assistance Rate Restructuring and the Ontario Child Benefit : fact sheet - June 2009
(Income Security Advocacy Centre)

Ontario:

Social Assistance Rate Restructuring and the Ontario Child Benefit (MS Word file - 118K, 4 pages)
Fact sheet
June 2009
If you are a parent with dependent children under 18 and are on Ontario Works (OW) or the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP), there are changes to your benefits coming soon. Starting in July 2009, the Ontario Child Benefit will increase to $92 per month per child. However, social assistance rates for families with dependent children are being further restructured.
- includes a description of the changes coming into effect on July 1 along and maximum monthly
Ontario Works and Ontario Disability Support Program rates before and after July 2009 for different family sizes.

Source:
Income Security Advocacy Centre (ISAC)
Our vision is to work with the community to advocate for and seek legal remedies to address systemic issues and improve income security for people in Ontario. ISAC was established in 2001 by Legal Aid Ontario to serve low income Ontarians by conducting test case and Charter litigation relating to provincial and federal income security programs. These programs include Ontario Works, the Ontario Disability Support Program , (un)Employment Insurance, and the Canada Pension Plan. ISAC's legal work takes place in the broader context of law reform, public legal education and community development.

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm
- Go to the Key Provincial/Territorial Welfare Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare.htm

5. Ontario Social Assistance Review - new website
(Income Security Advocacy Centre)

Ontario Social Assistance Review
On December 4, 2008, the Ontario government released its Poverty Reduction Strategy. The Strategy made a commitment to “undertake a review of social assistance” (p30). But what this means is still unclear. The government has not yet released any terms of reference for the Review – so there is no indication how it will proceed, who will lead it, or how people with lived experience and local communities can be involved. But we know it won’t be enough for the Review to simply tinker with program rules, changing bits and pieces here and there. Ontario Works and the Ontario Disability Support Program are built on a foundation of ideas that work against the principle of poverty reduction.
- incl. links to: About - Take Action - Tell Your Story - Resources - News
Source:
Income Security Advocacy Centre (ISAC)

Related links:

Are welfare laws oppressing the poor?
Activists say old social assistance rules hurt disabled, drive people further into poverty
June 24, 2009
By Laurie Monsebraaten
"(...) Queen's Park had promised to review the [welfare] system this year as part of its groundbreaking poverty reduction plan, released in December. The government repeated the pledge in its March budget but has yet to say when the review will start, how broad it will be and how the community will participate. A spokesperson for social services minister Madeleine Meilleur, whose ministry will lead the review, said the government is still committed to the initiative and "eager" to get started but has yet to determine its scope. (...) Ontario's social assistance system must be part of the government's strategy for a prosperous Ontario, said Mary Marrone, legal director for the Income Security Advocacy Centre, which staged the forum [Toronto Forum on welfare reform, held June 23].
Source:
The Toronto Star

- Go to the Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

6. Fighting Hunger : Who’s Hungry - 2009 Profile of Hunger in the Greater Toronto Area - June 18
(Daily Bread Food Bank)

Report illustrates food bank use spike to over 1 million visits
Food bank clients going into debt and selling assets to pay for food and rent

June 18, 2009
TORONTO - Government programs are failing to support people ravaged by the recession, according to Daily Bread Food Bank's latest Who's Hungry: Profile of Hunger in the GTA. Client visits to GTA food banks over the past year exceeded 1 million for the first time ever. Total client visits were 1,030,568, a rise of 8% over last year. More disturbingly, the increase in client visits in the first three months of 2009 averaged 17%. The spike in food bank use is directly related to the current recession. Over half of new clients surveyed accessed a food bank for economic reasons due to job loss (35%), reduced hours at work (6%), or had no current source of income and were living on savings (11%).
Source:
Canada Newswire

Complete report:
Fighting Hunger : Who’s Hungry
2009 Profile of Hunger in the GTA
(PDF - 798K, 28 pages)
June 2009

Key findings (PDF - 51K, 1 page)
[there's more info on each finding below in the PDF file.]
* Food bank use in the GTA has rapidly increased in the past year due to the recession.
* The largest portion of new clients is people who have lost their jobs or have had their hours cut. A substantial number are not accessing welfare because of their savings.
* The majority of people using food banks do so for a relatively short period of time.
* Over one third of food bank clients are children. However, single adults remain the largest household type using a food bank.
* The majority of respondents are Canadian citizens, and many are immigrants who have been in Canada for 10 years or more.
* A significant percentage of respondents are highly educated, and include newcomers who cannot get work in their field.
* The cost of housing is the largest expense for most people.
* Hunger in the GTA is the result of lack of money, not lack of food.
* Being employed is not always a ticket out of poverty.
* People living in poverty have a high level of vulnerability to costly forms of debt in order to pay for their basic needs

Source:
Daily Bread Food Bank (Toronto)

[ More reports by the Daily Bread Food Bank ]

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

7. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]
--- General Social Survey: How social networks help Canadians deal with major change, 2008 - June 26
--- Canadian Community Health Survey, 2008 - June 26
--- Health Profile - June 25
--- Health Indicators 2009 - June 25
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, April 2009 - June 25
--- Canada's population estimates, first quarter 2009 - June 23
--- International differences in low-paid work - June 23
--- Employment Insurance, April 2009 - June 22
--- National balance sheet accounts, first quarter 2009 - June 22
--- Sub-provincial and demographic overview - June 22

What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

June 26, 2009
General Social Survey: How social networks help Canadians deal with major change, 2008
Despite changing family structures, the geographic dispersion of families and increased dependence on the Internet as a source of information, Canadians identified the family as the most helpful resource in an individual's social network during times of major change.
* Family is the social network most helpful at any life stage
* Internet more common as a social network resource during early life stages
* Other social network resources used during major transitions

Related links:

2008 General Social Survey Report: Social networks help Canadians deal with change
By Leslie-Anne Keown
June 26, 2009
HTML
PDF
(169K, 24 pages)
More than four in ten Canadians reported a major change in their lives in the last twelve months. Using the 2008 General Social Survey on social networks, this article examines the types of change, their impact and how they are handled at various life stages. Results show that social networks, especially family, played an important role in dealing with change.

2008 General Social Survey:
Selected Tables on Social Engagement
(PDF - 546K, 88 pages)
June 2009
- data tables based on the 2008 General Social Survey on the subjects of civic and political engagement, sense of belonging, and unpaid work.
[ "The General Social Survey (GSS) gathers data on social trends in order to monitor changes in Canadian society over time, and to provide information on specific social issues of current or emerging interest. The main purpose of the 2008 GSS was to better understand how Canadians mobilize their social networks to access resources at important periods of change in their lives. These changes include finances, employment, health, care of a sick person, death of a family member, etc. The survey collected information on topics such as changes experienced by respondents in the past 12 months, the resources they used during these events and unmet needs for help. Other topics included contact with family and friends, participation in organizations, voting, sense of belonging to Canada and unpaid care of children and seniors.

Related subjects
o Society and community
o Social networks and civic participation

---

June 26, 2009
Canadian Community Health Survey, 2008
In 2008, 84% of Canadians aged 12 or older reported that they had a regular medical doctor, down from 86% in 2003. Between 2005 and 2008, the rate of Canadians who reported high blood pressure, diabetes and influenza immunization increased. The reported prevalence of asthma remained stable over this period.

---

June 25, 2009
Health Profile
This profile features community-level data from a number of sources including Statistics Canada's health surveys, administrative data, and the census of population. The application is designed to give quick access to the latest health-related data available for a selected health region, providing the corresponding provincial data by default, but users can easily select any region of choice for comparison.

---

June 25, 2009
Health Indicators, 2009
Providing the latest readings on the health of Canadians – region by region
This publication, produced jointly by Statistics Canada and the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI), is a compilation of over 80 indicators measuring health status, non-medical determinants of health, health–system performance and community and health-system characteristics.

---

Health Indicators 2009
June 2009
Health Indicators 2009 is the tenth in a series of annual reports containing the most recently available health indicators data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information and Statistics Canada. In view of the 10-year anniversary, this issue of the report also presents national trends over time for selected indicators focusing on the following six themes: heart attacks and cardiac revascularization; stroke; women's health and men's health—selected surgical procedures; hip fractures; joint replacements; and preventing hospital admissions. The aim of this information is to assist stakeholders and decision makers in the use and interpretation of the indicator data.
- Table of contents, includes links to PDF files for each chapter:
* Celebrating Ten Years of Health Indicators
* Health Indicator Framework
* In Focus: Heart Attacks and Cardiac Revascularization
* In Focus: Stroke
* In Focus: Women's Health, Men's Health - Selected Surgical Procedures
* In Focus: Hip Fractures
* In Focus: Joint Replacement Surgery
* In Focus: Preventing Hospital Admissions
* Health Indicators-Region by Region
* Regional Map

Source:
Canadian Institute for Health Information

Download the
complete report in one file
*
(PDF - 4.4MB, 148 pages)
June 2009
*NOTE: Read the following before clicking the PDF link above:

< Begin Privacy Rant >

Any visitor who clicks the PDF link above will be taken to an online form that demands information about the visitor, including email address, in order to access the report.
To the nice folks at the Canadian Institute for Health Information:
STOP THAT!
Never, ever, force people to give you their email address in order to access a public document on your site.
When a government website does that, it's obstruction and intimidation. Period.
Stop it.

TIP - for visitors who wish to download the complete PDF without adding your email address to their list:
The report isn't sent to the email address that you enter on the form - it just opens the next page.
So make up an email address - I used "private@rogers.com" and I was able to download the report .

< / End Privacy Rant >

[I rant because you can't...]

---

June 25, 2009
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, April 2009
Total non-farm payroll employment fell by 51,400 in April, down 0.4% from March. Since the peak in October 2008, the number of employees has fallen every month, bringing total losses over this period to 376,500. Job losses occurred in 64% of industries, unchanged from a month before.
Detailed industry data, data by size of enterprise based on employment, and other
labour market indicators will be available soon in the monthly publication Employment, Earnings and Hours

Related subjects:
o Labour
o Employment and unemployment
o Hours of work and work arrangements
o Industries
o Wages, salaries and other earnings

---

June 23, 2009
Canada's population estimates, first quarter 2009
Canada's population increased by 0.26% in the first quarter of 2009, the fastest first-quarter growth rate since 2001.
The increased pace in population growth was due mainly to a rise in the number of non-permanent residents in most of the provinces and territories.
As of April 1, 2009, Canada's population was an estimated 33,592,700.
[ Quarterly Demographic Estimates January to March 2009 (PDF - 413K, 84 pages) ]
[ earlier editions of Quarterly Demographic Estimates - back to 1996 ]

---

June 23, 2009
International differences in low-paid work
Highlights
Full article:
* HTML
* PDF
(191K, 9 pages)
Abstract:
Like the United States and the United Kingdom, Canada has a higher proportion of low-paid jobs than Australia and most countries in continental Europe. While the differences with continental Europe highlight different approaches to the labour market, the much lower rate of low-paid work in Australia is more puzzling since that country shares many similarities with Canada. Differences in wage-setting mechanisms appear to play a role in explaining the disparity in rates of low-paid jobs.
Source:
Perspectives on Labour and Income - June 2009 issue
[ Perspectives on Labour and Income - earlier issues ]
[ Statistics Canada Publications by subject ]

---

June 22, 2009
Employment Insurance, April 2009
In April, 697,000 people received regular Employment Insurance benefits, up 18,600 from a month earlier.
This 2.7% increase was the smallest in six months.
- incl. four tables showing monthly and annual changes in the number of beneficiaries receiving regular benefits as at April 2009 by province and territory, by age group, and by sex, as well as beneficiaries of regular benefits by census metropolitan areas.

---

June 22, 2009
National balance sheet accounts, first quarter 2009
Household net worth declined by $72 billion (-1.3%) in the first quarter of 2009, a much slower rate of decline than in the last two quarters of 2008 during which cumulative losses totalled $438 billion.

---

June 22, 2009
Sub-provincial and demographic overview
New publication presenting Employment Insurance statistics in a set of maps.
The maps show changes in the number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits across Canada.Employment Insurance data by sub-provincial region, sex and age are not seasonally adjusted and therefore should only be compared on a year-over-year basis. All census metropolitan areas in Canada have seen an increase in the number of regular beneficiaries in the past year.

---

The Daily Archives - select a year and month from the drop-down menu to view releases in chronological order
[ Statistics Canada ]

- Go to the Social Statistics Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm
- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

NOTE: Just before the joke that appears near the bottom of this newsletter, you'll find a link to my speaking notes on "The Federal Role in Poverty Reduction in Canada."
[BRING BACK CAP!]

That's sure to excite a few gray-hairs!


8. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - June 27

Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

June 27, 2009

About Canada: Childcare
24 Jun 09
- Just published – a new book co-authored by CRRU director Martha Friendly and University of Manitoba Sociologist Susan Prentice.

Atkinson Summer Institute on Early Childhood Development: Engaging families and community in early years programs
24 Jun 09
- Presentations from the 6th annual Summer Institute hosted by George Brown and the Atkinson Centre for Society and Child Development.

Special review: Reroute the Preschool Juggernaut
24 Jun 09
- Book review by Steven Barnett on Reroute the Preschool Juggernaut describing the inaccuracy of the book and giving evidence why preschool for all benefits all.

Foundations of inclusion birth to five
24 Jun 09
- Video from CONNECT focusing on inclusion and effective practices to help providers develop evidence-based decision making skills.

Parents and the high price of child care: 2009 update
24 Jun 09
- Report from NACCRRA presenting 2008 data on child care costs in the United States. Child care costs are increasing and often exceed other household expenses.

With our best future in mind: Implementing early learning in Ontario
17 Jun 09
- Report to the Premier of Ontario from Charles Pascal, the Premier's Special Advisor on Early Learning.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news

· The payback on early learning makes it a dollars and sense proposition
[CA-ON] 23 Jun 09

· Letters to the editor regarding the Early Learning Advisor’s report
[CA-ON] 22 Jun 09

· Alberta minister ignites furor over ‘raising kids right'
[CA-AB] 22 Jun 09

· Early learning makes business sense
[CA] 22 Jun 09

· What's best for children?
[CA] 20 Jun 09

· Iris, eyes are rolling over parenting views
[CA-AB] 18 Jun 09

· Parents shouldn't have to settle
[CA-ON] 18 Jun 09

· The Agenda with Steve Paikin: Interview with Charles Pascal
[CA-ON] 16 Jun 09

more CC IN THE NEWS »

Related Links:

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm


9. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.) ------------ (the content of this link changes twice a week)
IRP compiles and distributes Poverty Dispatches twice a week. Each issue of the dispatch provides links to U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.
Each Dispatch lists links to current news in popular print media.

Latest issues of the Poverty Dispatch:

June 25, 2009
* Joblessness and Unemployment
* TANF Programs - Massachusetts, Florida
* Free and Reduced-price Lunch Program - Sacramento, CA
* Homelessness Programs - New York City
* Cellular Technology and Banking for the Poor
* Microlending and Business Training Programs
* States and Health Care Coverage
* Economic Stimulus Spending - Michigan, Kansas
* Report: Zero-tolerance and School Expulsions - Michigan
* Family and Sick Leave

June 22, 2009
* Joblessness and Unemployment
* State Medicaid Cuts
* Medicaid Reform - Illinois, Florida
* Increasing Need for Assistance Programs
* Debt and Poverty Measurement
* Homelessness and Housing Programs
* State Budget Cuts
* Utility Bills and Shut-offs - Michigan
* UN Report: World Hunger
* State Minimum Wage - Illinois
* Job Losses and Child Support Payments
* Grandparents Caring for Grandchildren - United Kingdom

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to two dispatches a week back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

If you wish to receive Poverty Dispatches by e-mail,
please send a request to rsnell@ssc.wisc.edu

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

10. The State of the World’s Children, 2009: Maternal and Newborn Health - January 2009
(United Nations Children's Fund)

The State of the World’s Children, 2009:
Maternal and Newborn Health

January 2009
"The State of the World's Children 2009 examines critical issues in maternal and newborn health, underscoring the need to establish a comprehensive continuum of care for mothers, newborns and children. The report outlines the latest paradigms in health programming and policies for mothers and newborns, and explores policies, programmes and partnerships aimed at improving maternal and neonatal health. Africa and Asia are a key focus for this report, which complements the previous year's issue on child survival."

[ Previous editions of The State of the World's Children reports - back to 1996]

Source:
United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
UNICEF is on the ground in over 150 countries and territories to help children survive and thrive, from early childhood through adolescence. The world’s largest provider of vaccines for developing countries, UNICEF supports child health and nutrition, good water and sanitation, quality basic education for all boys and girls, and the protection of children from violence, exploitation, and AIDS. UNICEF is funded entirely by the voluntary contributions of individuals, businesses, foundations and governments.

- Go to the International Children, Families and Youth Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chn2.htm

11. Australian Policy Online

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia. [ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week
appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page, and the downloads vary depending on the topic you select.

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

12. CRINMAIL - June 2009
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
CRIN is a global network coordinating and promoting information and action on child rights. More than 2,000 member organisations and tens of thousands more activists from across the world rely on CRIN for research and information. CRIN presses for rights, not charity, for children and is guided by a passion for putting children’s rights at the top of the global agenda by addressing root causes and promoting systematic change. Its guiding framework is the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC).

Latest issue
of CRINMAIL
(email newsletter on child rights):

16 June 2009 - CRINMAIL 1093
* REPORT: Easier said than done: 20 years of children's rights [conference report]
* CRC: Committee adopts concluding observations for the 51st session [news]
* EDUCATION: Right to education survey
* PERU: First World Congress on Restorative Juvenile Justice [event]
* TANZANIA: Influencing Policy for Children in Tanzania: Lessons from Education, Legislation and Social Protection [publication]
* CHILD LABOUR: Give Girls a Chance: Tackling child labour, a key to the future [publication]
* EXPLOITATION: Travelling Child-Sex Offenders in South East Asia: A Regional Review [publication]
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

Links to all issues of CRINMAIL
- links to 300+ weekly issues
, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

 

Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

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The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com


BONUS summer reading:
The Federal Role in Poverty Reduction in Canada

The Federal Role in Poverty Reduction in Canada

Why  was the federal government wrong  when it told the United Nations that poverty reduction was a provincial responsibility?
(1) Because previous Canadian governments have signed international covenants and agreements  that the Harper government must respect or else risk losing credibility on a global scale; and
(2) Because the federal government can get around the constitutional  separation of powers pretty much anytime they want by dangling some big bucks in front of provincial noses.

I was recruited to speak for 10 minutes about "the federal role in poverty reduction in Canada" at the Ottawa Poverty Reduction Network meeting on June 22.
It was a real honour for me to sit on a panel with, and to listen to presentations from, two of Ottawa's respected social justice champions (Hélène Ménard and Lynne Brown) and Jacquie Maund of Ontario Campaign 2000.

The link below is to my speaking notes:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ottawa_poverty.htm


Source of most of
the content in my presentation:
Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns Links
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
(A Canadian Social Research Links page)



**************************

60's Songs Revised
for Baby Boomers

***************************


Some of the pop artists of the 60's are revising their hits with new lyrics to accommodate aging baby boomers.
They include:

Bobby Darin ---
Splish, Splash, I Was Havin' a Flash.

Herman'sHermits ---
Mrs. Brown, You've Got a Lovely Walker

Ringo Starr ---
I Get By With a Little Help From Depends.

The Bee Gees -- -
How Can You Mend a Broken Hip.

Roberta Flack---
The First Time Ever I Forgot Your Face.

Johnny Nash ---
I Can't See Clearly Now.

Paul Simon---
Fifty Ways to Lose Your Liver

The Commodores ---
Once, Twice, Three Times to the Bathroom..

Marvin Gaye ---
Heard It Through the Grape Nuts.

Procol Harum---
A Whiter Shade of Hair.

Leo Sayer ---
You Make Me Feel Like Napping.

The Temptations ---
Papa's Got a Kidney Stone.

Abba ---
Denture Queen.

Tony Orlando ---
Knock 3 Times On The Ceiling If You Hear Me Fall.

Helen Reddy ---
I Am Woman, hear me snore.

 Leslie Gore ---
It's My Procedure, and I'll Cry If I Want To.

And Last but NOT least

Willie Nelson ---
On the Commode Again

Source:
I can't remember.


*****************

And, in closing...

*****************


Grizzly Bears Catching Salmon (BBC One)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0NcJ_63z-mA&feature=PlayList&p=769661F6DEB6BA55&index=10

Reminds me of...
http://images.despair.com/products/demotivators/ambition.jpg

---

Canada and Mexico vs the US: A Visual Comparison

http://www.mint.com/blog/finance-core/canada-and-mexico-vs-the-us-a-visual-comparison/