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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
November 28, 2010

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,354 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

************************************************************************

IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1.  Release of The Fiscal Monitor – September 2010 (Finance Canada) - November 26
2. 2010 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada: 1989 – 2010 (Campaign 2000) - November 24
3. Young men the face of poverty in post-recession Canada: study (Winnipeg Free Press) - November 23
4. Saskatchewan welfare caseload information, March to September 2010
5. [British Columbia] Labour Ministry to discuss minimum wage and other employment standards with stakeholders - November 25
6. European Union scolds Harper government for StatsCan Census form controversy - November 23
7. Prince Edward Island Government promises a poverty reduction strategy - November 2010
8. Poverty reduction in Nunavut - update
9. Poverty reduction in the Northwest Territories - update
10. Poverty reduction in Yukon - update

11. Housing Vulnerability and Health: Canada's Hidden Emergency (St. Michael's Hospital - Toronto) - November 2010
12. Determining the Happiness of Canadians (report and conference) (Centre for the Study of Living Standards) - November 2010
13. Dignity for All Campaign Applauds Report Calling for Federal Poverty Reduction Plan - November 18
14. Guaranteed Annual Income - moved to the front burner? - two recent articles from the Globe and Mail
15. [National] Poverty strategy: Tories display apathy on issue (Toronto Star) - November 21
16. Recent releases from the New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice:
--- Increase social assistance rates, says Common Front - November 17
--- Report on the 3rd Summit on Poverty in New Brunswick (October 16-17, 2010)
--- Inequality in Canada and New Brunswick : A Brief History, Why it Matters, and What WE can Do - October 2010
17. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]

--- Study: Temporary employment in the downturn, 1997 to 2009 - November 26
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, September 2010
- November 25
--- Consumer Price Index, October 2010
- November 25
18. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - November 27

International content

19. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
20. Sickness, Disability and Work: Breaking the Barriers - A Synthesis of Findings across OECD Countries (Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) - November 24
21. Microfinance: Little loans, big trouble (Globe and Mail) - November 12
22. Australian Policy Online - selected recent content - November 28
23. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!
Gilles

[ gilseg@rogers.com ]


1. Release of The Fiscal Monitor – September 2010 - November 26
(Finance Canada)

Release of The Fiscal Monitor
News Release
November 26, 2010
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, today released The Fiscal Monitor for September 2010.
Highlights:
September 2010: Budgetary Deficit of $3.9 Billion
April to September 2010: Budgetary Deficit of $17.4 Billion

Related document:

* The Fiscal Monitor – September 2010

[ earlier editions of The Fiscal Monitor - going back to 1996 ]

Source:
Department of Finance Canada

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

2. 2010 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada: 1989 – 2010 - November 24
(Campaign 2000)

2010 Report Cards on Child and Family Poverty in Canada and [selected] provinces
November 24, 2010
Campaign 2000
[NOTA : Le lien vers la version française se trouve à la suite des liens vers l'anglais.]

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The National child poverty report for 2010:

2010 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada: 1989 – 2010
Reduced Poverty for All
(PDF - 389K, 12 pages)
The 2010 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada, Reduced Poverty = Better Health for All, looks at the nation’s most recent child and family poverty rate compared to 21 years ago, when Parliament unanimously resolved to end child poverty by 2000, and finds that 610,000 children (2008 LICO after-tax) and their families lived in poverty even before the recession hit. The child poverty rate of 9.1 per cent is slightly less than when it was 11.9 per cent in 1989. Lessons from past recessions tell us that poverty will rise before the recovery is complete.
See also:
[ Press release - November 24, 2010 (PDF - 52K, 2 pages) ]

The report card’s key findings show Canada has a long way to go to prevent and reduce poverty:

• One in 10 children still lives in poverty in Canada. It’s worse for children living in First Nations communities: one in four grow up in poverty;
• Employment is not always an assured pathway out of poverty: 1 in 3 low-income children lives in families where at least one parent works full-time year round and almost 400,000 adult full-time workers earn less than $10 per hour.
• Child poverty is persistent across Canada: rates of child and family poverty (LICO before-tax) are in the double digits in all provinces.
• The gap between rich and poor has widened: On average, for every dollar the families in the poorest 10 per cent had, families in the richest 10 per cent had almost 13 times as much ($12.66) in 2008.

Source:
Campaign 2000
Campaign 2000 is a cross-Canada public education movement to build Canadian awareness and support for the 1989 all-party House of Commons resolution to end child poverty in Canada by the year 2000.
[ Campaign 2000 Partners - national AND provincial/territorial organizations, incl. links to their websites ]
[ Links to national child and family poverty report cards for earlier years - back to 2000 ]

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Version française:
Rapport 2010 sur la pauvreté des enfants et des familles au Canada: 1989 – 2010
Moins de pauvreté = meilleure santé pour tous et toutes
(PDF - 326Ko., 12 pages) ]

Source:
Campagne 2000
Campagne 2000 est un réseau pancanadien, non partisan et non gouvernemental de plus de cent vingt organismes nationaux, provinciaux, territoriaux et communautaires qui ont pris l’engagement de « promouvoir et d’assurer la mise en œuvre complète de la résolution du 24 novembre 1989 de la Chambre des communes ».
Voir également:
[ Communiqué de presse - 24 novembre - (petit fichier PDF, 2 pages) ]

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Media coverage of the
release of the national report:

Number of seniors living in poverty soars nearly 25%
By Joe Friesen
November 24, 2010
The number of seniors living in poverty spiked at the beginning of the financial meltdown, reversing a decades-long trend and threatening one of Canada’s most important social policy successes. The number of seniors living below the low-income cutoff, Statistics Canada’s basic measure of poverty, jumped nearly 25 per cent between 2007 and 2008, to 250,000 from 204,000, according to figures released on Wednesday by Campaign 2000. It’s the largest increase among any group, and as the first cohort of baby boomers turns 65 next year, could place increased pressure on families supporting elderly parents.
[ 79 comments ]
Source:
Globe and Mail

Provincial child poverty reports

British Columbia

BC Campaign 2000 : 2010 Child Poverty Report Card (PDF - 2.4MB, 22 pages)
BC Campaign 2000 Recommendations:
Campaign 2000 calls on all provinces and the federal government to commit themselves to a 50 percent reduction in poverty among all Canadians by 2020. BC supporters of campaign 2000 hope to see a provincial child poverty rate before taxes of seven percent or less by 2020. We are also calling for the appointment of a BC cabinet minister with the authority and responsibility to ensure that a poverty reduction plan is developed and implemented and that the province is on track for achieving its poverty reduction targets and meeting its timelines.

A Time for Leadership in Fighting Child Poverty (PDF - 2 pages)
Media Release
November 24, 2010
Children need the political leaders of British Columbia to step forward and commit themselves to fighting poverty, BC Campaign 2000 said today in its latest annual report on child poverty. (...) The child poverty rate in British Columbia dropped to 14.5 percent in 2008, according to the latest figures published by Statistics Canada. The number of poor children was 121,000 - or about one of every seven BC children. Alarmingly, the poverty rate for children under age six was 19.6%, or one in five young children.

Source:
First Call : BC Child and youth Advocacy Coalition
First call is a cross-sectoral, non-partisan coalition of provincial and regional organizations, engaged communities and individuals whose aim is to raise public awareness and mobilize communities around the importance of public policy and social investments that support the well-being of children, youth and families.

---

Sign the petition for a
BC Poverty Reduction Plan

"We, the undersigned, re-affirm the call for the Government of British Columbia to launch a comprehensive and accountable poverty reduction plan, aimed at dramatically reducing homelessness and poverty in our province...."
Source:
BC Poverty Reduction

------------------------------------------

Related links:

Putting a face on poverty
By Mark Hume
November 24, 2010
VANCOUVER
(...) The [child poverty] report, with a focus on the provincial situation, was released by First Call: BC Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition. Relying on 2008 Statistics Canada data, the most recently available, it shows one in ten children nationally live in poverty; in B.C. it is one in seven. The rates are the lowest in a decade, but a spike is expected when the 2009 data is released next spring because of the economic crisis that began in the fall of 2008.
[ 178 comments ]
Source:
Globe and Mail

---

1 in 7 B.C. children live in poverty
NOVEMBER 24, 2010
An anti-poverty group says the recession will likely make B.C. child poverty rates worse.
Source:
Toronto Star


Alberta

Time For Action: Working Together To End Poverty In Alberta (PDF - 1.6MB, 16 pages)
(...)Work on developing an Alberta poverty strategy has continued throughout 2010. Public Interest Alberta formed a task force to coordinate activities province-wide.
Using the Ten-Year Plan to End Homelessness as a model, Alberta should develop its own comprehensive initiative to reduce, eliminate, and prevent poverty.

53,000 Alberta Children Live Below Poverty Line
Report Calls on Governments and Others to Work Together to End Poverty
News Release
November 24, 2010
The Edmonton Social Planning Council and Public Interest Alberta released a new report that shows 53,000 Alberta children lived below Statistics Canada's low-income cut-off (after-tax) in 2008, and that number is probably higher today due to the effects of the recession on our economy

Source:
Edmonton Social Planning Council
The ESPC is an independent, non-profit, charitable organization. Our focus is social research – particularly in the areas of low income and poverty. The ESPC provides leadership within the community by addressing and researching social issues, informing public discussion and influencing social policy.

Public Interest Alberta
Public Interest Alberta is a non-profit, non-partisan, province-wide organization focused on education and advocacy on public interest issues. PIA exists to foster an understanding of the importance of public spaces, services and institutions in Albertans' lives, and to build a network of people and organizations committed to advancing the public interest.

------

Related link:

Alberta child poverty a 'hidden' crisis: report
53,000 kids affected, perhaps more

By Jana G. Pruden and Amy Minsky
November 25, 2010
Despite a government pledge to end child poverty 20 years ago, a new report says there are 53,000 children living below the poverty line in Alberta -- and possibly more, given downturns in the economy in the past two years, (...)The Alberta report says more than half of the children who live in poverty are from a household in which at least one person works full time year-round.
Source:
Edmonton Journal


Saskatchewan

Child and Family Poverty in Saskatchewan: November 2010 (PDF - 618K, 10 pages)
November 24, 2010
New data from Statistics Canada for the year 2008 show that Saskatchewan has an overall poverty rate of 12.1%. This represents 115, 000 people — equivalent to more than half the population of Regina — living below the poverty line. Of those, 33,000 are children under the age of 18. In recent years, Saskatchewan’s poverty rate has fallen below the national rate. This trend continues in 2008 with the provincial poverty rate slightly below the national rate of 13.6%, or 4,426,000 people
Source:
Social Policy Research Unit
[ Faculty of Social Work ]
[ University of Regina ]


Manitoba

Manitoba Child Poverty Report Card - 2010
The Challenge for Manitoba’s Provincial Government
(PDF - 2.8MB, 27 pages)
Manitoba maintains it s title as the “Child Poverty Capital of Canada. The November 16, 2010 Throne Speech, The Government of Manitoba claimed to have the second lowest child poverty rate in Canada. This rating used the Market Basket Measure, which is not based on a comprehensive concept which takes into account all of the aspects of poverty. The methodology is also suspect because shelter is so undervalued. Using the comprehensive LICO, which considers income in a manner consistent with how Canadians at all levels see their own economic well-being, the picture is very different. Manitoba has the worst poverty rate in the country, almost 3 percent above the Canadian rate and 1.5% above the next worst province. These figures translate into 43,000 children live in poverty or 1.1 times the size of Brandon.
Source:
Social Planning Council of Winnipeg
The Social Planning Council of Winnipeg (SPC) is a membership-based organization in the voluntary sector committed to providing leadership in social planning and effecting social policy changes.


Ontario

2010 Report Card on Child & Family Poverty in Ontario
Poverty Reduction: Key to Economic Recovery for Ontario Families
(PDF - 182K, 8 pages)
(...) Despite tight fiscal times the 2009 and 2010 provincial budgets included a number of measures that have benefited low income families, including increases to the minimum wage and the Ontario Child Benefit, stimulus spending on affordable housing, funding to save child care subsidies, and implementation of full day kindergarten for 4 and 5 year olds. But the poorest 6.5% of Ontario’s population, those who receive social assistance, have seen no increase in welfare benefits in real dollars. In terms of purchasing power, benefits are as low now as in 1967.
Source:
Ontario Campaign 2000

Related link:

Family Service Toronto
Family Service Toronto (FST) helps people face a wide variety of life challenges. For over 90 years, we have been assisting families and individuals through counselling, community development, advocacy and public education programs. Our services are available to everyone who lives or works in Toronto.

---

Child poverty up in Ontario
By Laurie Monsebraaten
November 24, 2010
Queen’s Park needs to step up efforts if it hopes to cut child poverty by 25 per cent by 2013, advocates say
Source:
Toronto Star

---

Number of seniors living in poverty soars nearly 25%
By Joe Friesen
November 25, 2010 9
The number of seniors living in poverty spiked at the beginning of the financial meltdown, reversing a decades-long trend and threatening one of Canada’s most important social policy successes. The number of seniors living below the low-income cutoff, Statistics Canada’s basic measure of poverty, jumped nearly 25 per cent between 2007 and 2008, to 250,000 from 204,000, according to figures released on Wednesday by Campaign 2000. It’s the largest increase among any group, and as the first cohort of baby boomers turns 65 next year, could place increased pressure on families supporting elderly parents.
[ 435 comments ]
Source:
Globe and Mail


New Brunswick

Child Poverty Report Card : New Brunswick (PDF - 980K, 16 pages)
November 2010
Prepared by Kathryn Asher, Researcher with the Human Development Council, a local social planning council that co-ordinates and promotes social development in Greater Saint John.

Related link
Human Development Council - Saint John
The Human Development Council provides information about community services throughout New Brunswick. (...) The Council works collaboratively with community agencies, individuals, government departments, businesses, churches, and labour to initiate, develop and implement creative strategies to meet the needs of the community.

Also from the Human Development Council:
Saint John Poverty Reduction Strategy

----------------

Related link:

N.B. child poverty on decline: report
Province's rate lowest in national average, third lowest in country
November 25, 2010
By Alexandra Davis
FREDERICTON - A child-poverty report card released yesterday indicates that New Brunswick is making progress in reducing poverty levels compared with other provinces. The report on child and family poverty shows that the province's child poverty rate for 2008 was 12 per cent, which is lower than the national average of 14.2 per cent. It's the third lowest rate in the country, with only Alberta and Prince Edward Island showing lower percentages.
Source:
http://timestranscript.canadaeast.com/


Nova Scotia

From the Nova Scotia Office
of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA):

The Nova Scotia Child Poverty Report Card 2010 : 1989–2008 (PDF - 816K, 27 pages)
by Lesley Frank
November 24, 2010
This year’s report card examines the period 1989 to 2008, the year for which the most recent data is available. It also reviews changes for a later period (1997 to 2008) to assess the impact of the 1998 National Child Benefit initiative, which is specifically aimed at preventing and reducing child poverty.

News Release:

14,000 children in Nova Scotia still living in poverty is 14,000 too many
November 24, 2010
HALIFAX, NS –Twenty-one years ago (in 1989), the government of Canada promised to end child poverty by the year 2000. In 2000, not only had they not kept the promise - the child poverty rate was even higher. Today, ten years after the goal date, the broken promise remains. This year’s annual report published by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives –Nova Scotia and Campaign 2000 reports that 14,000 Nova Scotia children were living in poverty in 2008. Based on the most recent available data (for 2008), the report card shows that there has been some progress made, however.

---------------------------

Earlier related report
from the CCPA Nova Scotia Office:

The Cost of Poverty in Nova Scotia (PDF - 822K, 34 pages)
By Angella MacEwen and Christine Saulnier
October 16, 2010

News Release:

Poverty costs Nova Scotia over $1billion a year
October 16, 2010
HALIFAX- The total economic cost of poverty in Nova Scotia is at least $1.5 to $2.2 billion dollars per year, accounting for between 5% - 7% of Nova Scotia’s GDP in 2008. The portion of the total cost borne by society (the social cost) is at least $500 to $650 million dollars. This corresponds to 6% - 8% of Nova Scotia’s 2007/2008 budget, or around $1,400 to $1,700 for each Nova Scotian household

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) - Nova Scotia Office
[ CCPA National Office ]
The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social, economic and environmental justice. Founded in 1980, the CCPA is one of Canada’s leading progressive voices in public policy debates.


- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

3. Young men the face of poverty in post-recession Canada: study - November 23
(Winnipeg Free Press)

Young men the face of poverty in post-recession Canada: study
By Heather Scoffield
November 23, 2010
OTTAWA - The recession has left a lingering bruise on an increasingly vulnerable sector of Canadian society: young, single men.(...) John Stapleton, a social policy researcher [who] has just completed an exhaustive study of social assistance during the recession, for the Mowat Centre for Policy Innovation. Stapleton has sifted through welfare data from five provinces representing 79 per cent of the country's population, and found that the recession has revealed two key trends. The good news, he writes in his draft paper, is that federal and provincial programs for families have helped single mothers deal with poverty. (...) The opposite is true for young, single men. In Ontario, the number in this group on welfare has risen 61 per cent in nine years, to 148,000 from 92,000. Similar increases were found in British Columbia, Quebec, New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador, Stapleton writes. "Single, young men are the new face of poverty in Canadian cities," he says.
(...) For Stapleton, the solution lies partly in the success governments have had in helping single moms.
If provincial, federal and municipal governments can target young single people with a variety of supports — the way they've done with lone parents — then impoverished young men will find it easier to make ends meet, he says.
Source:
Winnipeg Free Press

Related links:

Mowat Centre for Policy Innovation
Applied public policy research informed by Ontario's reality

Open Policy - John Stapleton's website
TIP: Check out John's Publications - Media Commentaries - Presentations

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

4. Saskatchewan welfare caseload information, March to September 2010

Saskatchewan welfare caseload information (PDF - 200K, 22 pages)
[Saskatchewan Legislative Assembly Votes and Proceedings for Monday November 8, 2010.]
See Appendix I "Questions and Answers" starting on the fourth page of text for caseload information from March to September 2010.
NOTE : This information is provided in question-and-answer format. Unless you're familiar with Saskatchewan's mix of income support programs, your head will spin from all the SIPs, SAPs, TEAs and SAIDs. Use the Saskatchewan section of the Key Welfare Links page of this website to translate the acronyms and to find relevant program information to help you to understand the statistics.

NOTE to the nice folks in Saskatchewan Social Services:
Please consider joining the six provinces that are now uploading current welfare statistics to their websites (Newfoundland and Labrador, New Brunswick, Québec, Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia). If Saskatchewan Social Services posted their welfare stats to their website, that would make life so much easier for social researchers of every stripe. See why Welfare stats are Important! - including links to the types of welfare statistics that are currently available from provinces across Canada. Join the movement, won't you?

- Go to the Saskatchewan Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/skbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Key Provincial/Territorial Welfare Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare.htm

5. [British Columbia] Labour Ministry to discuss minimum wage and other employment standards with stakeholders - November 25

British Columbia

Labour Ministry to Gather Input on Employment Standards
November 25, 2010
VICTORIA — Labour Minister Iain Black today announced that he has asked senior ministry staff to meet with key business and labour stakeholders to discuss employment standards, including minimum wage. (...) Black said staff will have focused discussions with organizations that represent the interests of employees and employers, as well as independent experts, over the next two to three months.
Source:
Ministry of Labour

-----------

November 26, 2010
Vulnerable BC Workers
On November 1st, 2001,BC's minimum wage was set at $8.00 an hour. It is now the lowest minimum wage in Canada. Labour Minister Iain Black announced that he has asked senior ministry staff to meet with key business and labour stakeholders to discuss employment standards, including minimum wage. (...) A myth advanced by critics of a higher minimum wage is that it kills entry level jobs for young people...
Source:
StrategicThoughts.com

-----------

Related links from the
Progressive Economics Forum Blog:

The Economics of the Minimum Wage
By Andrew Jackson
January 27, 2007

Revisiting the minimum wage disemployment effects
By Iglika Ivanova
August 6, 2008

- Go to the BC Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

6. European Union scolds Harper government for StatsCan Census form controversy - November 23

European Union scolds Harper government for StatsCan controversy
By Shannon Proudfoot
November 23, 2010
The European Union's statistical gurus have taken the Canadian government to task for denting the professional independence of Statistics Canada through the census debate.
In the newly released report, the European Statistical Governance Advisory Board decries the government's decision to replace the mandatory long-form census with a voluntary survey, citing Canada as a cautionary tale of statistical agencies losing their traditional autonomy.
[ 65 comments ]
Source:
Ottawa Citizen

Related links:

Latest Census-related
blog posts from datalibre.ca:

Posted November 26, 2010

The Ottawa Citizen: European Union scolds Harper government for StatsCan controversy
The Tyee: Pro-census group applies pressure in federal byelections with radio ads, flyers
The Ottawa Citizen: All Canadians should be concerned
Canadian Press: Huge demand for mandatory long-form census data to aid minorities, women
Winnipeg Free Press: Group takes long-census fight to byelections
The Capital Works: Census change ignores women’s unpaid work, advocates say
The Montreal Gazette: Dozens of federal departments, agencies count on census

Source:
datalibre.ca
datalibre.ca is a blog that's maintained mostly by Tracey Lauriault.
It's inspired by civicaccess.ca, which believes all levels of Canadian governments should make civic information and data accessible at no cost in open formats to their citizens.

Tracey is also responsible for the Census Watch page.

- Go to the Census 2011 questionnaire links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/2011_census_questionnaire.htm

7. Prince Edward Island Government promises a poverty reduction strategy - November 2010

Prince Edward Island is the latest
province to commit to a poverty reduction strategy.

From the PEI Throne Speech (November 12, 2010):
"(...) in the New Year, my government will release a Poverty Reduction discussion paper that will begin the process, in consultation with Islanders, of examining further options to improve the well -being of Islanders who are vulnerable are in need."
Also in the same Throne Speech:

"...on April 1, 2011, my government will end the so-called ‘clawback’ of the National Child Benefit from our families on Social Assistance."

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the Prince Edward Island Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/pebkmrk.htm

8. Poverty reduction in Nunavut - update

Govt. of Nunavut, Inuit orgs launch Nunavut anti-poverty effort
Government, NTI, business, non-profits to work together
October 18, 2010
By Chris Windeyer
The Government of Nunavut and Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. announced Oct. 18 the launch of a massive, Nunavut-wide “public engagement process” they hope will culminate in the creation of the territory’s first anti-poverty strategy. The process will include government, Inuit organizations, business groups, municipalities, the non-profit sector and Nunavummiut. The strategy is expected within a year.
Source:
Nunatsiaq Online

---

Towards a poverty reduction strategy for Nunavut - YouTube video (Duration: 9.5 minutes)
Presentation by Economic Development Minister Peter Taptuna
October 18, 2010

---

Government of Nunavut, Nunavut Tunngavik Inc.,
call on Nunavummiut to help reduce poverty

News Release
October 18, 2010
IQALUIT, Nunavut – The Honourable Eva Aariak, Premier of Nunavut, and James Eetoolook, Acting President, Nunavut Tunngavik Inc., today announced they have joined forces to combat poverty in Nunavut. They are inviting all Nunavummiut to get involved. (...) The poverty reduction strategy will be completed by the end of 2011. It will be prepared in three stages: a community dialogue in every community; regional roundtables; and, a final poverty summit in Iqaluit. The result will be the preparation and implementation of a poverty reduction strategy for Nunavut.

---

Nunavut unveils 'prudent' $1.3B budget
March 8, 2010
Nunavut Finance Minister Keith Peterson has tabled a budget that aims to balance the territory's books. (...) The budget's expenditures top $1.3 billion, with only a two per cent increase in spending. Some of the new spending proposals include:
...
... $500,000 towards developing a poverty reduction strategy.
Source:
CBC North

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

9. Poverty reduction in the Northwest Territories - update

From the
Government of the Northwest Territories:

Poverty in the Northwest Territories
Premier Floyd K. Roland
May 19, 2010
16th Legislative Assembly
"Mr. Speaker, in February this House passed a motion calling on the government to develop a comprehensive anti-poverty strategy for the Northwest Territories. This motion also noted the need to work with key stakeholders, to develop a definition of poverty, and to include measureable targets and mechanisms for cross-departmental coordination. (...) Mr. Speaker, we are prepared to undertake the work required to develop an overarching discussion paper that would address issues of defining and measuring progress on poverty, summarize current programs and strategic direction related to reducing poverty, and identify areas for further action."

Northwest Territories Supplementary Health Benefits
Hon. Sandy Lee
Wednesday, March 24, 2010
16th Legislative Assembly
"Mr. Speaker as we begin our public meetings on Supplementary Health Benefits, I would like to take this opportunity to reiterate the substance of the changes being proposed. (...) During last Session, Members of this House passed a unanimous motion calling on the Government to come up with an Anti-Poverty Strategy. The changes being proposed under Supplementary Health Benefits are a step forward in poverty reduction and addressing the cost of living issue in our Territory."

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

10. Poverty reduction in Yukon - update

A social inclusion symposium to discuss reduction of poverty
News Release
March 23, 2010
WHITEHORSE – Senator Hugh Segal will be one of the keynote speakers at an April 9 symposium where interested Yukoners will gather to discuss reduction of poverty and social inclusion in Yukon. The symposium is the first of two, planned by the Office of Social Inclusion and Poverty Reduction, which was established by Health and Social Services Minister Glenn Hart last October. It follows a day of workshops in which frontline government and non-government workers who help Yukoners, join members of the public to discuss how to improve access to government services, and break down the barriers preventing some Yukoners from fully participating in Yukon society. (...) The symposium is one tool the Office of Social Inclusion and Poverty Reduction will use in reaching its goal of creating a Social Inclusion and Poverty Reduction Strategy by March 31, 2011. A follow-up symposium is slated for fall 2010.

Yukon Social Inclusion and Poverty Reduction Strategy
"(...) From increasing social assistance rates by over 25 per cent, doubling and indexing the Yukon Seniors Income Supplement, increasing and indexing the Pioneer Utility Grant, increasing Child Care Subsidies, increasing the Yukon Child Benefit, constructing a residence for Single Parents—each and every day that promise is renewed—a promise which ultimately is about ending poverty and social exclusion."
[Excerpt from the Minister's Message]

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

11. Housing Vulnerability and Health: Canada's Hidden Emergency - November 2010
(St. Michael's Hospital - Toronto)

Bad housing as unhealthy as no housing: study
400,000 live in housing that is unsafe, crowded or costs more than 50% of income
November 19, 2010
People living in extremely poor housing conditions face the same health risks as those who are homeless, a study by researchers at Toronto's St. Michael's Hospital suggests. The report, Housing Vulnerability and Health: Canada's Hidden Emergency, revealed that for every person in Canada who is homeless, another 23 live in housing that is unsafe, crowded or costs more than 50 per cent of their income.
Source:
CBC News

Complete report:

Housing Vulnerability and Health: Canada's Hidden Emergency
A report on the REACH3 Health and Housing in Transition study
(PDF - 355K, 12 pages)
November 2010

Key findings: People who don’t have a healthy place to live - regardless of whether they’re vulnerably housed or homeless - are at high risk of serious physical and mental health problems and major problems accessing the health care they need. Many end up hospitalized or in the emergency department. 40 per cent of people who don’t have a healthy place to live have been assaulted at least once in the past year, and one in three have trouble getting enough to eat.

Key recommendations: We’re calling for the federal government to respond by setting national housing standards that ensure universal, timely access to healthy (i.e. decent, stable, and affordable) housing.

Research Team:
Research Alliance for Canadian Homelessness, Housing, and Health (REACH3)

Source:
Keenan Research Centre
[ St. Michael's Hospital ]

- Go to the Health Links (Canada/International) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/health.htm
- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

12. Determining the Happiness of Canadians (report and conference) - November 2010
(Centre for the Study of Living Standards)

Recent Release from the
Centre for the Study of Living Standards:

Does Money Matter? Determining the
Happiness of Canadians
(PDF - 1.5MB, 138 pages)
November 2010
On November 23, 2010 the Centre for the Study of Living Standards released this major study on factors influencing the happiness or life satisfaction of Canadians. The report, based on data for 70,000 Canadians from Statistics Canada’s Canadian Community Health Survey and prepared in partnership with the Institute for Competitiveness and Prosperity (ICP), provides a comprehensive analysis of the happiness landscape in Canada, quantifies the many variables that determine happiness, and explains the variation in happiness across provinces, CMAs and health regions. The report provides strong support for the 2009 Stiglitz report commissioned by French President Nicholas Sarkozy that recommended greater emphasis be placed on happiness relative to GDP in the development of public policy.
* Press release (small PDF file)
* Executive Summary (small PDF file)

Related link:

Conference on Happiness
On December 1, 2010, CSLS and the Institute for Competitiveness and Prosperity are hosting a conference on happiness in Ottawa, Canada at the Chateau Laurier Hotel in Ottawa. This conference will take stock of our existing research on happiness and consider whether governments should have happiness as an objective for public policy and, if so, what policies they should adopt.
* Conference program (small PDF file)
* Registration information - incl. link to online registration + list of speakers
* Recent National Post article on the development of a happiness index by the UK government.

Source:
Centre for the Study of Living Standards
The two main objectives of CSLS are to contribute to a better understanding of trends in living standards and factors determining trends through research and to contribute to public debate on living standards by developing and advocating specific policies through expert consensus.

- Go to the Poverty Measures - Canadian Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty.htm

13. Dignity for All Campaign Applauds Report Calling for Federal Poverty Reduction Plan - November 18

Dignity for All Campaign Applauds Report Calling for Federal Poverty Reduction Plan
Government Urged to Respond Favourably to Committee Recommendations
November 18, 2010
Dignity for All: the Campaign for a Poverty-Free Canada – a coalition of over 430 organizations from across the country – applauds the report from the Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities Committee which calls for the federal government to immediately commit to a federal action plan to reduce poverty in Canada. The report, Federal Poverty Reduction Plan: Working in Partnership Towards Reducing Poverty in Canada, is the result of an extensive three-year study on the federal role in addressing poverty.

Key components of a poverty reduction plan the committee recommends the federal government take action on include:

* Raising the Canada Child Tax Benefit and supplement to $5000 within 5 years;
* A long-term national housing and homelessness strategy;
* Measures to help the most vulnerable – a refundable Disability Tax Credit, easing EI qualifications; increasing adult literacy; increasing and indexing GIS for seniors, implementing an early learning and child care strategy; and
* Major help for Aboriginal People for housing, education and social services; including elimination of the two per cent cap on federal funding.

Related links:

Dignity for All: The Campaign for a Poverty-Free Canada is a national coalition of over 430 organizations and 7000 individuals co-convened by Canada Without Poverty, Citizens for Public Justice, and Make Poverty History. Together, we are calling for vigorous and sustained action by the federal government to combat the structural causes of poverty in Canada.

Canada Without Poverty is a federally incorporated, non-partisan, not-for-profit and charitable organization with a mission to eliminate poverty in Canada by promoting income and social security for all Canadians, and by promoting poverty eradication as a human rights obligation. Canada Without Poverty was founded in 1971 as the National Anti-Poverty Organization.

Citizens for Public Justice is a national organization of members inspired by faith to act for justice in Canada by shaping key public policy debates through research and analysis, publishing and public dialogue. Since 1963, CPJ has encouraged citizens, leaders in society and governments to support policies and practices which reflect God’s call for love, justice and stewardship.

The Canadian Make Poverty History campaign was launched in February 2005 with the support of a wide cross-section of public interest and faith groups, trade unions, students, academics and literary, artistic and sports leaders. Make Poverty History is part of the Global Call to Action against Poverty (GCAP) a global campaign pressing for action on global poverty issues.

- Go to the National/Federal and International Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty2.htm

14. Guaranteed Annual Income - moved to the front burner? - two recent articles from the Globe and Mail

Guaranteed Annual Income - moved to the front burner?

From the Globe and Mail:

To end poverty, guarantee everyone in Canada $20,000 a year.
But are you willing to trust the poor?

By Erin Anderssen
November 20, 2010
(...)what if we gave ... poor Canadians something to count on: cash directly in their pockets, with no conditions, trusting people to do what's right for them? It's a bold idea, and it runs counter to the paternal approach to poverty that polices what is done with “our” money and tries to strong-arm the poor into better lives. That approach has had limited success: The wage gap continues to grow, and one in 10 Canadians still struggles below the low-income line. The idea of giving money to the poor without strings is not new. It melds altruism and libertarianism, saying both that the best way to fight poverty is to put cash in poor people's pockets and that people can make their own choices better than bureaucrats can. As a result, it can find support in theory from both left and right. It has been tested with success in other countries, and now it has re-entered the Canadian political conversation. This week, a House of Commons committee on poverty released a report proposing a guaranteed basic income for Canadians with disabilities, on the model already available to seniors. The Senate released a similar report this spring calling for a study of how it would work for all low-income Canadians.
[ 1410 comments ]
Source:
Globe and Mail

Earlier related
Globe & Mail article:

Should Canada have a guaranteed annual income?
By Kevin Milligan
October 20, 2010
The idea of a guaranteed annual income (GAI) periodically surfaces in Canadian policy discussions as a transformational change to income support programs. Advocates can be found coming both from the left and the right. What is the GAI and should it be adopted?
[ 176 comments ]
Source:
Globe and Mail

- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

15. [National] Poverty strategy: Tories display apathy on issue - November 21
(Toronto Star)

Poverty strategy: Tories display apathy on issue
November 21, 2010
After three years of study, a House of Commons committee has put forward solid recommendations to combat the scourge of poverty suffered by more than 3 million Canadians. The federal government has 120 days to respond to the report, which calls on Ottawa to create a national poverty reduction plan, a long-term housing strategy, and boost income supports and tax credits for low-income Canadians. Unfortunately, by filing a supplementary report, the Conservative committee members have already signalled that the government has little interest in tackling poverty. In their supplementary filing, the Conservative MPs said they “strongly support the intent of the report” but expressed concerns over costs. “Canadians need to comprehend what impact implementing the report’s recommendations will have on their pocketbooks and their ability to provide for their families,” they said.
[ 45 comments ]
Source:
Toronto Star

- For a link to the Committee report and related resources, go to the National/Federal and International Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty2.htm

16. Recent releases from the New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice:
--- Increase social assistance rates, says Common Front - November 17
--- Report on the 3rd Summit on Poverty in New Brunswick (October 16-17, 2010)
--- Inequality in Canada and New Brunswick : - A Brief History, Why it Matters, and What WE can Do - October 2010

Recent releases from the
New Brunswick Common Front for Social Justice (CFSJ):
[ Site en français:
Front commun pour la justice sociale du Nouveau-Brunswick ]

---

The new government of David Alward should immediately
increase revenues for people who are living on social assistance
(PDF - 69K, 2 pages)
November 17, 2010
News release
“The last two Hunger Count Reports have revealed that during the last two years, there was an 18% increase in food bank usage in N.B. Just this year, the number of people using food banks has also increased. Thirty-four percent of food bank clients are children; thirteen percent are wage earners but the majority of them (61%) are social assistance recipients. This is completely unacceptable in a country as rich as Canada”, says Linda McCaustlin, co-chair of the Common Front for Social Justice.
[ Version française:
Le nouveau gouvernement de David Alward devrait immédiatement augmenter le revenu des personnes qui dépendent de l'aide sociale
- Communiqué de presse, le 17 novembre 2010 ] (fichier PDF) ]

POVERTY : A VIOLATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS
Report on the 3rd Summit on Poverty in New Brunswick
(PDF - 2.2MB, 5 pages)
Moncton, NB – October 16 & 17, 2010
(...) Under the theme “Poverty, a Violation of Human Rights”, 150 participants heard the views of several speakers, who concurred in affirming society’s responsibility for guaranteeing everyone’s right to a standard of living sufficient to ensure their health and welfare and that of their family.
* Panel: Why does society tolerate poverty?
* What is being done internationally to enforce the human rights of the poor?
* Human Rights: From principles to practice
* What can be done in New Brunswick to increase respect for human rights? (incl. recommended action to reduce poverty)
[ Version française:
Rapport du 3e Sommet sur la pauvreté, octobre 2010 (fichier PDF) ]

---

Impact of Food Cost on Food Security in New Brunswick:
Survey conducted by the Common Front for Social Justice during the summer of 2010
(PDF - 2.4MB, 27 pages)
October 2010
Conclusions:
* Food cost has dramatically increased.
* There were no major differences in food cost between cities and the few rural areas surveyed.
* Cost of the 66 items in the food basket: $254 at Coop Stores, $257 at Superstores and $259 at Sobeys
* Seniors with guaranteed income supplement: 15% of income goes toward food (10.4% is the Canadian average.)
* Minimum wage worker: 17% of income for food
* People on social assistance: 35 - 50% of income for food
[ Version française:
Répercussion du coût des aliments sur la sécurité alimentaire au N.-B. - novembre 2010 (fichier PDF) ]

October 6 (2010) Press conference document (PDF - 62K, 2 pages)
A food costing survey conducted by the CFSJ in July and August 2010 documented what many people living on limited income already knew from
experience, namely that food is considerably more expensive now that four to five years ago. Overall, people on social assistance, minimum wage workers and seniors on fixed income have an incredibly small amount of money to feed themselves adequately. Housing cost competes for a large portion of their monthly income. Some spend as much as 60% of their income on housing alone. With the current cost of nutritious food alone, they would need to spend from one-third to one-half of their allocation for food, leaving them empty-handed for all other necessities of life.
[ Version française:
Document pour la conférence de presse du 6 octobre 2010 (fichier PDF) ]

---

Inequality in Canada (and New Brunswick)
- A Brief History, Why it Matters, and What WE can Do
By Rob Moir, Economist at UNBSJ
October 2010
PDF version (11.4MB, 27 pages)
Powerpoint version (2.1MB, 27 slides)
[ Aucune version française ]

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm
- Go to the New Brunswick Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nbkmrk.htm

17. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]
--- Study: Temporary employment in the downturn, 1997 to 2009 - November 26
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, September 2010 - November 25
--- Consumer Price Index, October 2010 - November 25

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

November 26, 2010
Study: Temporary employment in the downturn, 1997 to 2009
1997 to 2009
In 2009, 1.8 million Canadians worked in some type of temporary job. Temporary work accounted for 12.5% of paid employment, a slight decrease from its peak of 13.2% in 2005. After growing rapidly from 1997 to 2005, the temporary employment rate slowed in 2006. The number of temporary jobs declined a year before the downturn in total employment. On average, these temporary jobs pay lower wages and provide fewer benefits than permanent positions. In addition, they are non-unionized and part time more often.

The study:

Temporary employment in the downturn
*
Highlights
* Full article:
HTML
PDF
(159K, 13 pages)

Source:
November 2010 issue of
Perspectives on Labour and Income - product main page*
This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of labour and income data. Topics include youth in the labour market, pensions and retirement, work arrangements, education and training, and trends in family income.
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues

---

November 25, 2010
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, September 2010
Between September 2009 and September 2010, average weekly earnings of non-farm payroll employees rose 4.3% to $864.13. This was the second consecutive month with year-over-year growth over 4.0%.
- includes two tables:
* Average weekly earnings (including overtime) for all employees
* Number of employees

Related report:

Employment, Earnings and Hours - product main page*
This publication presents a timely picture of employment, earnings and hours.
The tabulations focus on monthly labour market information and some historical data series.
NOTE:
Online data on payroll employment, earnings and hours for the current month is usually posted to the site a month behind this report.
* On the product main page,click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:

* Labour
* Employment and unemployment
* Hours of work and work arrangements
* Industries
* Wages, salaries and other earnings

---

November 23, 2010
Consumer Price Index, October 2010
Consumer prices rose 2.4% in the 12 months to October, following a 1.9% increase in September. On a seasonally adjusted monthly basis, consumer prices rose 0.7% in October.
- includes links to three tables:
* Consumer Price Index and major components, Canada
* Consumer Price Index by province, and for Whitehorse, Yellowknife and Iqaluit
* Consumer Price Index and major components

Related report:

The Consumer Price Index*
This monthly release of the The Consumer Price Index (CPI) for Canada, the provinces, Whitehorse and Yellowknife, provides a descriptive summary of retail price movements, inflation rates and the factors underlying them. The CPI also contains the following tabular information: latest price index movements for the eight major components; price index changes on one and 12-month bases for an extensive number of components and groups; historical monthly information; and price indices reclassified according to categories of goods and services.
* Click the link above, then "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

[ earlier editions of this report ]

Guide to the Consumer Price Index (1998)

Related subjects:
* Prices and price indexes
* Consumer price indexes

------------------------------------------------------

The Daily Archives
- select a month and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

------------------------------------------------------

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

18. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - November 27

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
:

November 27, 2010

What's new online:
[This section archives documents that
have been featured on the CRRU homepage..]

Reduced poverty = Better health for all
24 Nov 10
- Campaign 2000's annual Report Card on child and family poverty in Canada finds child poverty rate is 9.1%; warns that rate will likely rise before economic recovery is complete. Funding a universal system of ECEC for all families called a key part of a strategy to combat child poverty.

Our emerging plan for an integrated system of early care and learning in BC
24 Nov 10
- Coalition of Child Care Advocates BC and Early Childhood Educators of BC release their strategy for ECEC in British Columbia and share feedback gained from community briefings.

HungerCount 2010: A comprehensive report on food bank use in Canada and recommendations for change
24 Nov 10
- Report from Food Banks Canada finds food bank use reached record levels in 2010. Development of a quality ECEC system cited as part of a comprehensive hunger strategy.

Status of the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Report of the Secretary-General
24 Nov 10
- Status report to the United Nations General Assembly gives special focus to implementing children's rights in early childhood.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news
[This section features interesting and noteworthy
news about ECEC and related issues in Canada and internationally.]

· One in seven B.C kids lives in poverty, child advocacy coalition says
[CA-BC] 24 Nov 10

· Canada has a long way to go to improve child poverty rates
[CA] 24 Nov 10

· 1 in 10 Canadian children living in poverty
[CA] 24 Nov 10

· NDP calls for action to address on-campus childcare crisis
[CA-SK] 23 Nov 10

· Opposition to reject childcare changes
[AU] 23 Nov 10

· Toronto parents angered by closing of city-run daycare
[CA-ON] 22 Nov 10

· Ottawa needs plan to fight poverty
[CA] 17 Nov 10

· Work and pensions secretary faces backlash over reforms
[UK] 12 Nov 10

more CC IN THE NEWS »

-------------

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

19. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

November 24:
Access to Health Care for Low-Income Families
No Child Left Behind and School Transfers
Young Men in Poverty - Canada
Child Poverty - Canada
US Joblessness and Unemployment
State Prescription Drug Plan - Montana
Family Structure and Marriage

November 22:
State Budgets and Medicaid
Poverty Alleviation in Latin America
Poverty and Diabetes (in Canada)

NOTE: These were the only two poverty dispatches during the week of Nov. 22-26

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

20. Sickness, Disability and Work: Breaking the Barriers - A Synthesis of Findings across OECD Countries - November 24
(
Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development)

Sickness, Disability and Work: Breaking the Barriers
- A Synthesis of Findings across OECD Countries

November 24, 2010
Abstract
Complete report:
HTML version (Table of contents + links to PDF files for each chapter)
[ Version française ]
This report, the last in the OECD series Sickness, Disability and Work: Breaking the Barriers, highlights the roles of institutions and policies and concludes that higher expectations and better incentives for the main actors – workers, employers, doctors, public agencies and service providers – are crucial. Based on a review of good and bad practices across OECD countries, this report suggests a series of major reforms are needed to promote employment of people with health problems.

The report examines a number of critical policy choices between: tightening inflows and raising outflows from disability benefit, and promoting job retention and new hiring of people with health problems. It questions the need for distinguishing unemployment and disability as two distinct contingencies, emphasises the need for a better evidence base, and underlines the challenges for policy implementation.

[ Earlier reports from the
OECD Sickness, Disability and Work project
]

Source:
Directorate for Employment, Labour and Social Affairs
[ Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development - OECD ]

- Go to the Disability Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/disbkmrk.htm

21. Microfinance: Little loans, big trouble - November 12
(Globe and Mail)

Microfinance: Little loans, big trouble
By Tavia Grant
November 12, 2010
Microfinance was supposed to mean economic empowerment for the poorest of the poor, many of them female villagers living in India's southeastern state of Andhra Pradesh. Instead, the sector has spiralled into crisis in recent weeks, where the state is blaming 57 recent suicides on aggressive loan collectors. A debate is raging between those like [microfinance pioneer and 2006 Nobel Peace Prize recipient] Dr. Muhammad Yunus, who say the sector should remain non-profit with its focus fixed firmly on the very poorest of the poor (those living on less than $1 a day), and entrepreneurs who favour a faster-expanding, for-profit approach backed by investors who want to do good – and see returns. As the recent chaos shows, the road to hell can be paved with good intentions
[ 71 comments ]
Source:
Globe and Mail

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

22. Australian Policy Online - selected recent content - November 28

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia.
[ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week (see below)
appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page.

---

Week ending November 28, 2010
Most viewed this week on APO:

1. POLITICS - Coalition still favourite for the poll
2. Communications Policy and Research Forum 2009
3. Green housing, digital storytelling and Sudanese Australians - new project funding awarded to the Institute for Social Research
4. Forced and servile marriage
5. Post-school education and labour force participation in Canada and Australia

[You'll find links to the above studies on the APO home page.]

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social Inclusion * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

Week ending November 28, 2010
Most viewed this week in Social Policy / Poverty:

1. Green housing, digital storytelling and Sudanese Australians - new project funding awarded to the Institute for Social Research
2. Forced and servile marriage
3. Post-school education and labour force participation in Canada and Australia
4. Early post-school outcomes of Indigenous youth: the role of literacy and numeracy
5. Social media and young adults

[You'll find these links on the APO Social Policy page.]

--------------

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

23. CRINMAIL
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
:

Latest issue of CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter):

24 November 2010, CRINMAIL issue 1202
In this issue:
* Top story
--- New recommendations on child victims in the EU
* Latest news and reports
--- LGBTI rights in Africa
--- Female Genital Mutilation
--- Enforced Disappearance
--- Business and human rights consultation
--- Children's rights in Africa and Asia Pacific
--- Internships
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Laws * Issues
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

------------------------------------------

Links to Issues of CRINMAIL
- links to hundreds of weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.
NOTE: see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm for the table of contents for, and links to, several months' worth of issues of CRINMAIL.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm
yond her

 


 


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement


Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com


****************************************

The Funniest Words in English

****************************************

Abibliophobia : The fear of running out of reading material.
Absquatulate : To leave or abscond with something.
Allegator : Some who alleges.
Anencephalous : Lacking a brain.
Argle-bargle : A loud row or quarrel.
Batrachomyomachy : Making a mountain out of a molehill.
Billingsgate : Loud, raucous profanity.
Bloviate : To speak pompously or brag.
Blunderbuss : A gun with a flared muzzle or disorganized activity.
Borborygm : A rumbling of the stomach.
Boustrophedon : A back and forth pattern.
Bowyang : A strap that holds the pants legs in place.
Brouhaha : An uproar.
Bumbershoot : An umbrella.
Callipygian : Having an attractive rear end or nice buns.
Canoodle : To hug and kiss.
Cantankerous : Testy, grumpy.
Catercornered : Diagonal(ly).
Cockalorum : A small, haughty man.
Cockamamie : Absurd, outlandish.
Codswallop : Nonsense, balderdash.
Collop : A slice of meat or fold of flab.
Collywobbles : Butterflies in the stomach.
Comeuppance : Just reward, just deserts.
Crapulence : Discomfort from eating or drinking too much.
Crudivore : An eater of raw food.
Discombobulate : To confuse.
Donnybrook : An melee, a riot.
Doozy : Something really great.
Dudgeon : A bad mood, a huff.
Ecdysiast : An exotic dancer, a stripper.
Eructation : A burp, belch.
Fard : Face-paint, makeup.
Fartlek : An athletic training regime.
Fatuous : Unconsciously foolish.
Filibuster : Refusal to give up the floor in a debate to prevent a vote.
Firkin : A quarter barrel or small cask.
Flibbertigibbet : Nonsense, balderdash.
Flummox : To exasperate.
Folderol : Nonsense.
Formication : The sense of ants crawling on your skin.
Fuddy-duddy : An old-fashioned, mild-mannered person.
Furbelow : A fringe or ruffle.
Furphy : A portable water-container.
Gaberlunzie : A wandering beggar.


To be continued...

Source:
Excerpt from "The 100 Funniest Words in English"
http://tinyurl.com/cen2kt


-----------------------

And, in closing...

-----------------------


Rick's Rant - Senate Defeats Bill with no Debate (YouTube video)
(Rick Mercer Report)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yV8zEjgZ8VE


The Wilderness Downtown (HTML 5 - Cool!)
http://www.thewildernessdowntown.com/


New York City Marathon Timelapse
http://www.fazed.org/video/view/?id=911


360-degree video
Click and drag your mouse in the video:
http://tinyurl.com/24h24kz


Best of the Internet
http://www.jimmyr.com/