Canadian Social Research Newsletter
April 29, 2012

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

This week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,552 subscribers.

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Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...
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IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:

Canadian content

1. Two belt tightening families: Which one looks most like government? (John Stapleton - Open Policy) - April 28
2. The Fiscal Monitor - February 2012 (Finance Canada) - April 27
3. Quebec student fight gains international attention
(Stefani Forster,
The Canadian Press) - April 26
4. BILL C-38, 2012 : An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget (First Reading) - The official demise of the National Council of Welfare: not with a bang but a whimper... - April 26
5. A policy plan to hide poverty, inequality : Ottawa is shutting down public debate on issues it doesn’t care about (By Stephanie Baker Collins in The Hamilton Spectator)
- April 26
6. Death by a Thousand Cuts : On the slow demise of Aboriginal civil society by government design (The Mark) - April 25
7.
[Alberta Premier] Redford's vow to end poverty portends major shift in social services (By Karen Kleiss, Edmonton Journal) - April 25
8. The Problem with Food Banks : Hungry people must be fed (Colleen Kimmett in The Tyee) - April 25
9. From the Vancouver Observer:
--- "Why polar bears and not elephants?" and more from Canada's hyperbolic Tory senators
- April 25
--- “Charitable” Fraser Institute accepted $500K in foreign funding from Koch oil billionaires - April 25
--- Kochs in Canada: Fraser Institute co-founder confirms 'years and years' of U.S. oil billionaires' funding
- April 26

10. Youth in Care Canada : the National Youth In Care Network
11. [Ontario] New Family Law Series (Community Legal Education Ontario) - April 23
12. End of the line for the Women’s Health Contribution Program (Canadian Women's Health Network) - April 23
13. Federal Disability Report : Seniors with Disabilities in Canada 2011 (Human Resources and Skills Development Canada) - April 2012
14. Alberta Election 2012 : Progressive Conservatives steamroll past Wildrose Party - April 23
15. [British Columbia] Your Welfare Rights : A Guide to BC Employment and Income Assistance (Legal Services Society ) - April 2012
16. Hopes fade for humane welfare system in Ontario (By Carol Goar, Toronto Star) - April 22
17. [CBC] The Slow Erosion of Our Last Cross-Country Connection (By Andy Barrie in The Network) - April 19

18.
What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, February 2012 - April 26
--- Survey of Household Spending, 2010 - April 26

19. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

20. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
21. Poverty In America: Defining The New Poor (food aid is the new welfare?) (NPR - formerly National Public Radio) - April 22
22. [International] Inaugural Global Food Policy Report Synthesizes Food Policy Actions and Events in 2011 and Provides Outlook for 2012 (International Food Policy Research Institute) - April 23
23. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles
[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

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Go to the home page of the
Canadian Social Research Links website:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/index.htm



Ottawa Senators off to the golf course.

April 27, 2012 : End of the line for this year.
Thanks for an exciting season, Sens - not bad for a rebuilding year!

.

1. Two belt tightening families: Which one looks most like government? - April 28
(John Stapleton - Open Policy)

Two belt tightening families: Which one looks most like government?
http://openpolicyontario.com/two-belt-tightening-families-which-one-looks-most-like-government/
April 28, 2012
By John Stapleton

John's blog compares two fictitious families' approaches to belt-tightening during tough economic times. Then he draws an analogy between each of those two families and government responses to the need for fiscal restraint. During an economic downturn, the prudent family (and government) give up large new discretionary purchases like big screen TVs (and F-35 jet fighters) and reduce spending on non-essential items, like downsizing the family car (and no more $16 orange juice at The Savoy), but keep paying down their mortgage and consumer debt and setting aside some savings for education and retirement. The second family chooses to maintain its flat-screen-TV-and-vacations-and-gas-guzzling-vehicles lifestyle and cuts back instead on contributions to the children’s education fund and to the parents’ retirement savings, perhaps even selling the family home and renting an apartment.

Excerpt:
"Interestingly, our right-of-centre governments act like family number two. They sell off or privatize assets owned collectively by the people (the equivalent of selling the family home and renting). They preside over increased tuition fees (the same as cancelling the education fund) and reduce the reach of income security programs (like the family cashing-in their RRSP). They make retiring a more precarious proposition (by allowing retirement protections to erode). (...) Progressive governments in the past tended to act more like belt-tightening family number one. They raised revenues, canceled the baubles, ensured that collectively owned resources stayed in Canadian hands, prioritized education and tended to have a better fiscal hand on government. So even if some people want governments to tighten their belts just like hard working families, they just might not belt- tighten like the family you thought!"

Source:
Open Policy - John Stapleton's website
http://openpolicyontario.com/

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

2. The Fiscal Monitor - February 2012 - April 27
(Finance Canada)

Release of the Fiscal Monitor for February 2012
http://www.fin.gc.ca/n12/12-051-eng.asp
April 27, 2012
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, today released The Fiscal Monitor for February 2012.

Highlights:

February 2012 : Budgetary Surplus of $1.5 Billion
There was a budgetary surplus of $1.5 billion in February 2012, compared to a deficit of $0.6 billion in February 2011. Revenues increased by $1.1 billion, or 5.2 per cent, reflecting increases in most revenue streams. Program expenses were down $0.7 billion, or 3.6 per cent, primarily reflecting a decrease in operating expenses. Public debt charges decreased by $0.3 billion.

April 2011 to February 2012 : Budgetary deficit of $14.5 Billion
For the first 11 months of the 2011–12 fiscal year, the budgetary deficit stood at $14.5 billion, compared to a deficit of $28.3 billion reported in the same period of
2010–11.

Related Document:

The Fiscal Monitor - February 2012
http://www.fin.gc.ca/fiscmon-revfin/2012-02-eng.asp

[ earlier editions of The Fiscal Monitor - going back to 1996:
http://www.fin.gc.ca/pub/fm-rf-index-eng.asp ]

Source:
Finance Canada
http://www.fin.gc.ca/fin-eng.asp

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

3. Quebec student fight gains international attention- April 26
(
Stefani Forster,
The Canadian Press)

Quebec student fight gains international attention
http://goo.gl/mfxk6
April 26, 2012
By Stefani Forster
What began as a provincial policy spat over tuition hikes in Quebec has transformed, in just over a year, into a movement of broader student unrest now receiving some international attention. In the last few days, Quebec's student protests have received coverage in French news outlets like Le Monde and Agence France-Presse, in Australia, in New Zealand, and in the U.S., including on CNN.
(...)
The annual tuition for a private university in the U.S. is over $30,000 a year, with collective student debt poised to reach $1 trillion — which is even more than all the credit-card debt in that country. So why should Quebecers be complaining about a comparably measly $1,625 hike? Protesters say it's because they want their education system to move in the other direction — away from the U.S. model and closer to a system like Sweden's, where post-secondary education is free.

The opposition has grown steadily, ever since the Quebec government announced its $325-a-year, five-year increases in the March 2011 budget. While the move would still leave Quebec with some of the lowest tuition rates in the country, protesters say they're fighting for principles. Activists overseas are also joining in on the discussion about Quebec's tuition hikes, framing it as part of a larger historic fight.

Source:
The Canadian Press

http://www.thecanadianpress.com/

---

From Nick Falvo in
Progressive Economics Forum:

http://www.progressive-economics.ca/

Quebec Students: “Faire Leur Juste Part”
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/2012/04/28/quebec-students-faire-leure-juste-part/
By Nick Falvo.
April 28, 2012
Simon Tremblay-Pepin, an emerging social policy scholar, has recently blogged here (in French : http://goo.gl/mTxLK ) about Quebec tuition fees. He points out that, when one adjusts for inflation, Quebec tuition fees are headed into uncharted territory. Indeed, contrary to some recent spin from the Charest government, Tremblay-Pepin makes two important observations:
1. When one takes an average of Quebec tuition fees over the past45 years (using constant dollars), current Quebec tuition fees are significantly higher than the 45-year average.
2. The tuition-fee increases being proposed by the Charest government would bring Quebec’s tuition fees to their highest levels ever.
The above observations call into question what the Charest government actually means when it asks today’s generation of Quebec students to “pay their fair share.” Or, as they say in French, “faire leur juste part.”

---

Discussing Quebec Student Protests on Ottawa Talk Radio
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/2012/04/26/discussing-quebec-student-protests-on-talk-radio/
By Nick Falvo
April 26, 2012
Last Friday, I blogged here [see the "Rex Murphy" link below] about the Quebec student protests.
Subsequently, I was invited to appear on 580 CFRA News Talk Radio, with hosts Rob Snow and Lowell Green.
[By Gilles:]
Click the link above for Nick's summary of the points that he raised during the interview.
Click the link below to listen to the full 24-minute audio clip:
http://proxy.autopod.ca/podcasts/chum/38/6766/LB.12.04.26.mp3

---

Rex Murphy’s Naive Take on the Quebec Student Protests
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/2012/04/20/rex-murphys-naive-take-on-the-quebec-student-protests/
By Nick Falvo
April 20, 2012

---

Source:
Progressive Economics Forum:
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/

---

NOTE: For extensive coverage of the student strike against the tuition fee hike, go to the rabble.ca forum:
http://rabble.ca/babble/qu%C3%A9bec/student-strike-against-tuition-fees-hike
The link takes you to the first of three pages of a forum dedicated to the student protest.
Each of the three pages contains 100 links to articles and photos related to the student protest.
At the bottom of each of the first two pages, you're given a link to the next page.
[Kinda clunky interface, IMHO, but very comprehensive and compelling.]
The last posting on the third page is just a few days old.
Source:
rabble.ca
http://rabble.ca/

---

- Go to the Canadian Universities and Colleges Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/univbkmrk.htm

4. BILL C-38, 2012 : An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget (First Reading) - April 26
(The official demise of the National Council of Welfare: Not with a bang but a whimper...)

The official demise of the National Council of Welfare:
Not with a bang but a whimper...

When I learned that the 2012-2013 federal budget had announced the end of the National Council of Welfare [ http://www.ncw.gc.ca/h.4m.2@-eng.jsp ] at the end of March 2013, I felt, like many others in the Canadian progressive social research community, that we'd lost a friend and an ally in the quest for evidence-based social policy in Canada.

The Bill that will kill
the National Council of Welfare:

BILL C-38, 2012
An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget
tabled in Parliament on March 29, 2012 and other measures

http://www.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?Language=E&Mode=1&DocId=5524772
First Reading April 26, 2012
Excerpt from the Summary (at the beginning of the file):

"Division 51 of Part 4 amends the Department of Human Resources and Skills Development Act to add powers, duties and functions that are substantially the same as those conferred by the Department of Social Development Act. It repeals the Department of Social Development Act and, in doing so, eliminates the National Council of Welfare."

Source:
Parliament of Canada

http://www.parl.gc.ca/Default.aspx?Language=E

Comment (by Gilles):
If you find the reference in the above excerpt to both the Department of Human Resources and Skills Development Act and the Department of Social Development Act a bit confusing, welcome to the club. That's because the same Department changed names and mandates several times from the mid-1990s to 2012. Here's a link to a brief history of the name changes in this department that was known for decades (until 1993) as the Department of National Health and Welfare:
Back to the Future
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/hrsdc.htm#general_info

I knew that the Council had special status as an advisory body because its mandate was enshrined in the departmental statute of the day, meaning it had its own section in the National Department of Health and Welfare Act. Why does that confer special status, you ask? Because a statute must be tabled, debated and voted upon in the Parliament of Canada before it can be amended or repealed. Oh well --- at least the repeal of the statute would be debated in the House of Commons, I thought, and that debate would be recorded in the parliamentary record. Not so. The repeal of the Department of Social Development Act and the demise of the National Council of Welfare are buried in Division 51 of Part 4 of Bill C-38 (see the link immediately below). Because Bill C-38 covers so many multi-billion-dollar items, it's highly unlikely that anyone in the Opposition would take the allocated debate time to raise the issue of the Council, a mere million-dollar annual line expenditure.
Farewell, National Council of Welfare.
Social progressives everywhere grieve your passing.
[By Gilles]

---

Related links:

Federal budget 2012: Ottawa axes National Council on Welfare
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1154445
Laurie Monsebraaten
March 30 2012
Source:
Toronto Star

http://www.thestar.com/

---

National Council of Welfare
http://www.ncw.gc.ca/h.4m.2@-eng.jsp

---

NOTE : For links to over a dozen articles and op-eds in the media about the end of the line for the NCW, go to
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ncw.htm

---

Recent release from the
National Council of Welfare
:

Profile of a Federal Fiscal Measure:
A Descriptive Study of the Working Income Tax Benefit (WITB)
http://www.ncw.gc.ca/l.3bd.2t.1.3ls@-eng.jsp?lid=480&fbc=Y
April 13, 2012 (Release Date)
This statistical profile presents an overview of the Working Income Tax Benefit (WITB) elements and recipients in 2008. Using basic customized data information on WITB recipients, provided by the Canada Revenue Agency, it examines who received the WITB in 2008 broken down by those household types used in our Welfare Incomes series and broken down by WITB configurations, since calculations in Quebec, British Columbia and Nunavut differ from the federal model.

English
HTML version
:
http://www.ncw.gc.ca/l.3bd.2t.1ilshtml@-eng.jsp?lid=480&fid=1
PDF version (64K, 8 pages):
http://www.ncw.gc.ca/servlet/wlfrpub?lang=eng&curjsp=l.3bd.2t.1.3ls@-eng.jsp&curactn=dwnld&lid=480&fid=1

Version française:

Profil d'une mesure fiscale fédérale : Étude descriptive de la prestation fiscale pour le revenu de travail (PFRT)
HTML:

http://www.ncw.gc.ca/l.3bd.2t.1ilshtml@-eng.jsp?lid=480&fid=2
PDF (68K, 8 pages):
http://www.ncw.gc.ca/servlet/wlfrpub?lang=eng&curjsp=l.3bd.2t.1.3ls@-eng.jsp&curactn=dwnld&lid=480&fid=2

Table of Contents:

What is the WITB?
• Highlights
Who received the Working Income Tax Benefit?
• Family types
• Recipients of the Working Income Tax Benefit and of social assistance
• Geographic variation
• Average Working Income Tax Benefit payment by type of family and model
• The maximum WITB payment
• Reporting earnings
• Median earnings versus base and maximum amounts for WITB eligibility
• Maximum income level for eligibility compared to poverty measures

Source:
National Council of Welfare
(NCW)
http://www.ncw.gc.ca/

Also from the NCW:

January 30, 2012
* A Snapshot of Racialized Poverty in Canada
http://www.ncw.gc.ca/l.3bd.2t.1ils@-eng.jsp?lid=379
This special edition of Poverty Profile presents a statistical profile of racialized people living in poverty in Canada. Using data from the 2006 Census, it examines a variety of demographic and socio-economic characteristics such as age, language, immigrant status, education, employment and income. It also compares data from this group to non-racialized persons living in poverty.

* A Snapshot of Racialized Poverty in Canada - Statistical Tables
http://www.ncw.gc.ca/l.3bd.2t.1ils@-eng.jsp?lid=391
Data tables show breakdowns for selected variables for Canada, Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver.

---

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

5. A policy plan to hide poverty, inequality : Ottawa is shutting down public debate on issues it doesn’t care about - April 26
(By Stephanie Baker Collins in The Hamilton Spectator
)

A policy plan to hide poverty, inequality:
Ottawa is shutting down public debate on issues it doesn’t care about
http://www.thespec.com/opinion/columns/article/712043
April 26, 2012
By Stephanie Baker Collins
While the public bemoans raucous question periods in Parliament and hyperpartisan debate, a federal government plan for much more lasting damage to public debate is unfolding in Canada. This plan is silencing the voices of those who speak against poverty, inequality and human rights violations and eliminating the information they use. It is steadily eroding our ability to even see these problems by eliminating the data sources that enable us to understand ourselves as a society.
* The first piece of this plan is to abolish information that might inform the debate and document poverty and inequality.
(...)
* The second piece of the federal government plan is to cut funding to groups who might speak out and use such data to illuminate poverty and inequality among us or to speak to the human rights implications of government legislation.
(...)
The third part of the plan is the cultivation of a political climate that is disdainful of public debate and of those who seek to stimulate it.

[Stephanie Baker Collins is an associate professor at McMaster University School of Social Work and a member of McMaster Community Poverty Initiative]

Source:
The Hamilton Spectator

http://www.thespec.com/

---

- Go to the Harper Government™ Record Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/harper_government.htm

6. Death by a Thousand Cuts : On the slow demise of Aboriginal civil society by government design - April 25
(Martin Papillon and Michael Orsini in The Mark)

Death by a Thousand Cuts:
On the slow demise of Aboriginal civil society by government design

http://www.themarknews.com/articles/8446-death-by-a-thousand-cuts
April 25, 2012
By Martin Papillon and Michael Orsini
[Associate Professors, School of Political Studies, University of Ottawa.]
Hardly a week passes without the news of yet another Aboriginal organization losing its federal funding, and being forced to shut down as a result.
The hit list thus far includes the First Nations Statistical Institute, the National Aboriginal Health Organization and the National Centre for First Nations Governance. The health promotion programming and research capacity of some key organizations, such as the Assembly of First Nations, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami and the Native Women’s Association of Canada, have also been scaled back following federal cuts, the exact details of which have not been made public.
Which group might be next is anyone’s guess.

Source:
The Mark
http://www.themarknews.com/

Related link from the CBC,
notably from the January 2012 First Nations Summit in Ottawa:

First Nations get broad promises on Indian Act, development
Government commits to eliminate barriers to self-government
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2012/01/24/pol-crown-first-nations-tuesday.html
January 24, 2012
TIP: In the centre column of the page whose link appears above, you'll find links to 15 more articles and videos about the Crown-First Nations gathering, a.k.a. Stephen Harper's First Nations Photo-Op.

---

- Go to the First Nations Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/1stbkmrk.htm

- Go to the Harper Government™ Record Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/harper_government.htm

7. [Alberta Premier] Redford's vow to end poverty portends major shift in social services April 25
(By Karen Kleiss, Edmonton Journal)

Alberta

Redford's vow to end poverty portends major shift in social services
http://goo.gl/ZTxcA
April 25, 2012
By Karen Kleiss
EDMONTON — Albertans can expect a fundamental reshaping of Alberta's social services sector if Premier Alison Redford wants to make good on her bold election promise to end poverty in 10 years, advocates say.
Other provinces with similar poverty reduction strategies have passed new laws, introduced new programs and changed the way they measure success. Some boosted the minimum wage, improved early childhood interventions, or indexed welfare cheques to inflation. Some have spent billions. And they have seen success. Newfoundland and Labrador saw its poverty rate drop five per cent over five years ending in 2009, Quebec saw a 2.5-per-cent drop over the same period. During the 2008 recession, Ontario lifted 19,000 children and families out of poverty using a poverty reduction strategy.

Source:
Edmonton Journal
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/

- Go to the Provincial and Territorial Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty.htm

- Go to the Alberta Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/abkmrk.htm

8. The Problem with Food Banks : Hungry people must be fed - April 25
(Colleen Kimmett in The Tyee)

The Problem with Food Banks : Hungry people must be fed.
But critics say framing food as charity takes the root issues off government's plate.
http://thetyee.ca/News/2012/04/25/Problem-With-Food-Banks/
April 25, 2012
By Colleen Kimmett
It's true that Canada signed and ratified the UN Declaration of Human Rights in 1967 -- and other international agreements following -- that guarantee the right to food. But it's not entrenched in our constitution, our domestic law. The right to food is particularly problematic in the Canadian context, because social rights, like welfare for example, are provincial responsibilities."It's the old problem of Canadian federalism," says Graham Riches, professor emeritus at UBC's School of Social Work. "It becomes messy in terms of whose government is really responsible for this." Graham was one of the first academics looking at food banks from a social justice perspective. In 1986 he published Food Banks and the Welfare Crisis, linking the proliferation of food banks throughout the 1980s to the recession of that era, followed by the rise of neo-liberalism and the erosion of the social welfare system.

Source:
The Tyee
http://thetyee.ca/

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm

9. From the Vancouver Observer:
--- "Why polar bears and not elephants?" and more from Canada's hyperbolic Tory senators -
April 25

--- “Charitable” Fraser Institute accepted $500K in foreign funding from Koch oil billionaires - April 25

--- Kochs in Canada: Fraser Institute co-founder confirms 'years and years' of U.S. oil billionaires' funding - April 26

From the
Vancouver Observer:

"Why polar bears and not elephants?" and more from Canada's hyperbolic Tory senators
http://goo.gl/Pf8yg
April 25, 2012
By Alexis Stoymenoff
A debate continuing this week in the Senate over foreign funding of environmental charities has so far brought out some shocking—and creative—rhetoric from both sides of the floor. Over the past couple of months, Conservative Senators have drawn heavy criticism and scrutiny upon some of the most respected environmental groups and charitable foundations in the country, including Tides Canada, the David Suzuki Foundation and the Dogwood Initiative.

Though not all Conservatives are in agreement on the inquiry and its motivations [ http://goo.gl/adf7i ], some Senators have come out with aggressive arguments that demonstrate the restrictive political environment these charities are now working within. To help illustrate the battle being fought in Ottawa, this article offers selected key points from previous Senate transcripts.

---

“Charitable” Fraser Institute accepted $500k in foreign funding from Koch oil billionaires.
In four years alone, U.S. Tea Party architects the Koch brothers poured half a million dollars
into Canadian right-wing think tank, the Fraser Institute.
http://goo.gl/YZ7QC
April 25, 2012
By Alexis Stoymenoff
As the Conservative assault continues against Canadian environmental charities, the Vancouver Observer has learned that since 2007, foreign oil billionaires the Koch brothers have donated over half a million dollars to the “charitable” right-wing Fraser Institute. (...) The grants were purportedly for "research support" and "educational programs".
(...)
The Fraser Institute, described by rabble.ca as “Canada’s most intensely political organization”, is a registered non-profit focused on economic and public policy research. The group’s work is often seen as controversial (which they boast about on the website), and is generally in support of conservative, small-government, free-market values. While the federal government and pro-oil lobbyists have taken aim at environmental charities for allegedly violating the Canadian Revenue Agency’s legal limits for “political activity”, the Fraser Institute and its charitable status remain unquestioned. And as the Koch Foundation’s tax data shows, they’ve received a significant amount of “foreign funding” to help influence Canadian policy—which is precisely what environmental groups have been accused of doing.

The Fraser Institute claims to be “non-partisan and non-political”, and denies that it undertakes lobbying activities. However, critics cite examples of its blatantly political endeavors—like publicly calling on the government to change election spending laws, or pushing provinces to adopt “right-to-work” legislation.

---

Kochs in Canada: Fraser Institute co-founder confirms 'years and years' of U.S. oil billionaires' funding
http://goo.gl/uSta6
April 26, 2012
By David P. Ball
(...)
Koch Industries is responsible for 25 per cent of Canadian oil sands imports, or roughly 250,000 barrels a year, to the United States. With heated rhetoric in recent months about US funding for Canadian environmental groups – such as the David Suzuki Foundation and the Sierra Club of Canada – nearly 16 per cent of the Fraser Institute's own funding comes from “sources outside Canada,” according to the group's 2010 Canada Revenue Agency return. Those foreign donations – totalling more than $1.7 million in 2010 – are significantly higher than both David Suzuki Foundation's and the Sierra Club of Canada's.

---

Source:
Vancouver Observer
http://www.vancouverobserver.com/

---

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (II) in Canada page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research2.htm

10. Youth in Care Canada : the National Youth In Care Network

Youth in Care Canada:
the National Youth In Care Network
http://www.youthincare.ca/
The National Youth In Care Network is a national charitable organization driven by youth and alumni of care across Canada. The NYICN exists to voice the opinions and concerns of youth in and from care and promote the improvement of services for this group.
- includes the following:
* news (what's new, archive)
* our voices (sharing for change - multimedia stories - talk back archive)
* our work (ken dryden scholarship - support - leadership & training - research & advocacy - system capacity
* our resources (resources - purchase resources)
* our people (youth in & alumni from care - membership - board of directors & staff - youth in care networks
* join us
* about us
* contact us

---

- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

11. [Ontario] New Family Law Series - April 23
(Community Legal Education Ontario)

New from CLEO:
(Community Legal Education Ontario / Éducation juridique communautaire Ontario)

New CLEO Family Law Series
http://yourlegalrights.on.ca/news/84315
April 23, 2012
CLEO is pleased to announce the release of our new Family Law Series. CLEO's new family law publications (small PDF files) offer clear explanations of key topics in custody, access, parenting plans, child and spousal support, and property division.

Separation and Divorce: Child Custody, Access, and Parenting Plans
http://www.cleo.on.ca/english/pub/onpub/PDF/family/custodyaccess.pdf
Discusses different custody and access arrangements, how to get help to work out a parenting plan, and how judges and arbitrators make these decisions if the parents cannot agree.

Separation and Divorce: Child Support
http://www.cleo.on.ca/english/pub/onpub/PDF/family/childsupport.pdf
Discusses how to calculate the amount of child support to be paid and how to enforce payment, with information about parents who are on social assistance.

Separation and Divorce: Spousal Support
http://www.cleo.on.ca/english/pub/onpub/PDF/family/spousalsupport.pdf
Discusses the factors that affect whether spousal support must be paid, the amount to be paid, and for how long, and how to enforce payment, with information about spouses who are on social assistance.

Separation and Divorce or Death of a Spouse: Property Division
http://www.cleo.on.ca/english/pub/onpub/PDF/family/propertydiv.pdf
Explains the basic rules for property division between separating married spouses, including special rules about the matrimonial home and what happens to property if one spouse dies, with information about the different situation of common-law spouses

Source:
Your Legal Rights
http://yourlegalrights.on.ca/
A project of CLEO, Your Legal Rights is a website of free legal information for people in Ontario. This site has free, practical, and easy-to-find legal information produced by hundreds of organizations across Ontario.

The Your Legal Rights site contains the following features:

Resources:
http://yourlegalrights.on.ca/legal-topics-a-z
Legal information covering a wide range of legal topics, in a variety of formats, and available in dozens of languages

Common Questions:
http://yourlegalrights.on.ca/common-questions-browse
Questions and answers to everyday legal problems

Find Services:
http://yourlegalrights.on.ca/find-services
Interactive map of key legal and social services across Ontario

Training:
http://yourlegalrights.on.ca/training
Public legal education training webinars for service providers

News & Events:
http://yourlegalrights.on.ca/news-events
The latest headlines and community events about the law and access to justice

---

Your Legal Rights is a project of CLEO (Community Legal Education Ontario / Éducation juridique communautaire Ontario):
http://www.cleo.on.ca/

Your Legal Rights is funded by the Law Foundation of Ontario:
http://www.lawfoundation.on.ca/

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm

12. End of the line for the Women’s Health Contribution Program - April 23
(Canadian Women's Health Network)

Latest cuts: Another federal ministry announces program closure
- the end of the Women’s Health Contribution Program

(<$3M/yr.)
http://www.cwhn.ca/en/node/44620
April 23, 2012
Press release
One more women’s program falls victim to federal government budget cuts; 16-year program provided essential evidence and information on women’s health; group argues for need to consider how women are harmed by cuts to programs and services.

Six federally funded organizations devoted to research and communication in women’s health learned this week that their funding will end March 31, 2013.

The Women’s Health Contribution Program is critical to funding innovative social policy research, building community partnerships and providing important mentorship opportunities for students in women’s health. Within a year, the affected organizations will be forced to either close their doors permanently or attempt to find funding elsewhere.

The Women’s Health Contribution Program (WHCP) supports:
- Le Réseau québécois d’action pour la santé des femmes
- the Canadian Women’s Health Network
- the Atlantic Centre of Excellence for Women’s Health
- the British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women’s Health
- the Prairie Women’s Health Centre of Excellence
- the National Network on Environments and Women’s Health, located across the country from Vancouver to Halifax.

Source:
Canadian Women's Health Network
http://www.cwhn.ca/en/
The Canadian Women’s Health Network (CWHN) was created in 1993 as a voluntary national organization to improve the health and lives of girls and women in Canada and the world by collecting, producing, distributing and sharing knowledge, ideas, education, information, resources, strategies and inspirations.
[ About CWHN : http://www.cwhn.ca/en/about ]

---

From
Health Canada:

Women’s Health Contribution Program
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hl-vs/gender-genre/contribution/index-eng.php
The Women's Health Contribution Program supports community-academic partnerships in the development and dissemination of policy research and information for women's health. The Program is managed by Health Canada's Bureau of Women's Health and Gender Analysis.
The Program contributes approximately $2.95 million annually to eligible recipients.
Source:
Health Canada
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/index-eng.php

---

- Go to the Health Links (Canada/International) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/health.htm

- Go to the Canadian Government Sites about Women's Social Issues page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/women.htm

- Go to the Harper Government™ Record Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/harper_government.htm

13. Federal Disability Report : Seniors with Disabilities in Canada 2011 - April 2012
(Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
)

Federal Disability Report:
Seniors with Disabilities in Canada 2011
(PDF - 1MB, 86 pages)
http://www12.hrsdc.gc.ca/servlet/sgpp-pmps-pub?lang=eng&curjsp=p.5bd.2t.1.3ls@-eng.jsp&curactn=dwnld&pid=4723&did=1
(URL updated April 2013)
2011
The Report has five sections that look at important aspects of the lives of seniors with disabilities.
• Section 1 defines seniors with disabilities, exploring the types and number of disabilities they have and their severity.
• Section 2 considers the health of seniors with disabilities.
• Section 3 explores care for seniors with disabilities.
• Section 4 looks at participation among seniors with disabilities, exploring aids and devices that help them, and examining employment, retirement, transportation and volunteering.
• Section 5 presents facts on the income of seniors with disabilities and explores additional expenses that they have because of their disabilities.
---
Each section above concludes with a spotlight on a Government of Canada program that supports seniors with disabilities.
---
* Appendix A: Federal disability spending for the 2010–2011 fiscal year; Inclusion and supports
* Appendix B: Federal disability spending for the 2010–2011 fiscal year; Income supports
* Appendix C: Federal disability spending for the 2010–2011 fiscal year; Health and well-being
* Appendix D: Federal disability spending for the 2010–2011 fiscal year; Tax measures

Source:
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/home.shtml

---

- Go to the Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/hrsdc.htm

- Go to the Disability Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/disbkmrk.htm

14. Alberta Election 2012 : Progressive Conservatives steamroll past Wildrose Party - April 23

Alberta Election 2012 results and coverage - April 23, 2012

Official results:
http://results.elections.ab.ca/wtResultsPGE.htm
The Progressive Conservative Party won with 44% of the popular vote.

Source:
Elections Alberta
[Chief Electoral Office]
http://www.elections.ab.ca/

---

Edmonton Journal:
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/alberta-politics/index.html

Complete coverage

---

Calgary Sun:
http://www.calgarysun.com/battleforalberta
Complete coverage

---

Toronto Star:

Alberta election: PCs steamroll past Wildrose Party
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1166726

Source:
Toronto Star

http://www.thestar.com/

---

Globe and Mail:

Redford's vision prevails as Alberta PCs hold their majority
http://goo.gl/ceyzy

* Fear of Wildrose drove some voters to Alberta PCs
http://goo.gl/6TZsZ

* Alberta PCs will need to do some soul-searching, despite election win
http://goo.gl/m9sT2

* Albertans voted for change, not upheaval
http://goo.gl/6ykoW

Source:
Globe and Mail

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

--------------------------------------------

Alberta Election 2012 Results and coverage - April 23, 2012
http://www.electionalmanac.com/ea/alberta/
Complete coverage of the 2012 Alberta election, including election results, public opinion polls, ridings and candidates, election news, electoral history, links, and more...
Source:
Election Almanac (formerly nodice.ca)

---

For links to Alberta Election 2012 information, go to the
Political Parties and Elections Links in Canada (Provinces and Territories) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/politics_prov_terr.htm

15. [British Columbia] Your Welfare Rights : A Guide to BC Employment and Income Assistance - April 2012
(Legal Services Society )

New from the
Legal Services Society (LSS)

http://www.legalaid.bc.ca/

Your Welfare Rights : A Guide to
BC Employment and Income Assistance
(PDF - 3.4MB, 180 pages)
Twenty-Second edition, 2012
http://resources.lss.bc.ca/pdfs/pubs/Your-Welfare-Rights-eng.pdf
Explains who is eligible for welfare, how to apply for welfare, what benefits are available, your responsibilities while on welfare, how to appeal a decision about your benefits, and how to get more information or help.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

16. Hopes fade for humane welfare system in Ontario - April 22
(By Carol Goar, Toronto Star)

Hopes fade for humane welfare system in Ontario
http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorialopinion/article/1166017
April 22, 2012
By Carol Goar
Their last hope is Frances Lankin. And they’re no longer sure whether she’s a friend or a foe. Two months from now Lankin and Munir Sheik, co-chairs of Ontario’s social assistance review will release their blueprint. Their aim is to turn the province’s threadbare, demeaning welfare system into a modern income security system.

Initially, the 880,000 people who depend on social assistance — which includes welfare and disability support — regarded Lankin, former president of the United Way of Greater Toronto, as their champion in the corridors of power. She knew they couldn’t live on the province’s meagre allowance. She knew they needed affordable housing and child care. She knew the system stripped them of their privacy and their dignity.

But in recent months, doubts have set in. The commission’s discussion paper in February was vague and unsettling. Last month’s provincial budget was ominous. And the rumours they’re hearing scare them.

Comments (17)
http://goo.gl/zGcXd

Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

---

- Go to the Ontario Social Assistance Review Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/on_sa_review.htm

17. [CBC] The Slow Erosion of Our Last Cross-Country Connection - April 19
(By Andy Barrie in The Network)

[CBC] The Slow Erosion of Our Last Cross-Country Connection
http://goo.gl/Nw0Lb
April 19, 2012
By Andy Barrie (former host of Metro Morning)
(...) looking at eighteen OECD countries’ government spending on public broadcasting, we see, as expected, the U.S. at the very bottom, spending a miserable four bucks per capita (all figures 2009). Next to them, Canada’s $34 per capita seems absolutely munificent (and that’s before the latest round of cuts) – until you compare it to some of our other OECD partners.
Compare Canada’s spending to Japan’s $62 per capita; France’s $78, Finland’s $107, Denmark’s $136; all the way up to the Norwegians, at $164 per capita.

27 comments about this article:
http://goo.gl/Nw0Lb

Source:
The Network
http://thenetwork.thestar.com/
"The CBC & Public Broadcasting : A National Conversation"

Convened by the Toronto Star:
http://www.thestar.com/

---

Related link:

Reimagine CBC
http://reimaginecbc.ca/

---

- Go to the Harper Government™ Record Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/harper_government.htm

18. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, February 2012 - April 26
---
Survey of Household Spending, 2010 - April 26

What's new from The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

------------------

April 26, 2012
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, February 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120426/dq120426a-eng.htm
In February, average weekly earnings of non-farm payroll employees were $886.45, up 0.2% from the previous month. On a year-over-year basis, earnings rose 1.8%.
- includes two tables:
* Average weekly earnings (including overtime) for all employees
* Number of employees

Source:
Employment, Earnings and Hours - main product page*
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=72 -002-X&lang=eng
This publication presents a timely picture of employment, earnings and hours.
The tabulations focus on monthly labour market information and some historical data series.
NOTE: Online data on payroll employment, earnings and hours for the current month is usually posted to the site a month behind this report.
---
* On the main product page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.
---

Related subjects:

* Labour
http://goo.gl/FsMeZ

* Employment and unemployment
http://goo.gl/mMHwY

* Hours of work and work arrangements
http://goo.gl/DGFGo

* Industries
http://goo.gl/idqT8

* Wages, salaries and other earnings
http://goo.gl/EK2Qr

April 25, 2012
Survey of Household Spending, 2010
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120425/dq120425a-eng.htm
Canadian households spent an average of $53,016 on all types of goods and services in 2010. Of this total, shelter accounted for 28.3% of spending, transportation for 20.7%, and food, 14.0%.
- includes two tables:
* Budget shares of major spending categories by income quintile, 2010
*Average spending on goods and services and shares of spending of major categories by province, 2010

Available without charge in CANSIM:
T3tables 203-0021 to 203-0029:
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=&pattern=203-0021..203-0029&p2=31

User Guide for the Survey of Household Spending, 2010
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/62f0026m/62f0026m2012001-eng.htm

Related summary tables
http://goo.gl/ed2oj
* Average household expenditure, by province and territory
* Average household expenditures, by household type
* Average household food expenditure, by province and territory
* Dwelling characteristics and household equipment, by province and territory

Source:
Household Expenditures Research Paper Series

http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=62F0026MWE&lang=eng
Click "View" to see the latest issue of this paper online; click "Chronological index" for earlier versions.

Related subjects:

* Families, households and housing
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=40000&id=40000&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

* Household characteristics
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=40000&id=2918&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

* Housing and dwelling characteristics
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=40000&id=2921&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

* Income, pensions, spending and wealth
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3868&id=3868&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

* Household spending and savings
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3868&id=2180&lang=eng&type=DAILYART


The Daily Archives
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/DAILY/daily.cgi?s=last
- select a month and year from the drop-down menus and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

------------------
Related link:
Gilles' Statistics Canada Link Archive
(3,000+ links to selected StatCan social studies going back to 2008)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/statcan_link_archive.htm

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

19. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU):
http://www.childcarecanada.org

April 21, 2012

What's new online this week:

1. Research, policy & practice
- materials include: scholarly research, policy studies and briefs, government and NGO reports

Early childhood education and care: Key lessons from research for policy makers
25 Apr 2012 | Europe
http://goo.gl/zFjo0
Independent report submitted to the European Commission by the Network of Experts in Social Sciences of Education and Training, "summarizes existing knowledge from research and highlights policy lessons and measures that are shown to contribute to successful ECEC policy development and implementation".

Pedagogy – a holistic, personal approach to work with children and young people, across services
25 Apr 2012 | Europe
http://goo.gl/NxeDl
Briefing paper from the Thomas Coram Research Unit in England "points to ways in which [social] pedagogy, as a model, fits policy concerns for children, and the development of training and services, in England".

Inclusive workforce models for rural and remote areas
24 Apr 2012 | Europe
http://goo.gl/pn2tA
Report explores "models of good practice in a remote region of Norway" and identifies "coordination, cooperation and integration" as main factors contributing to the region's exemplary ECEC services.

Canadian physical activity guidelines for the early years 0-4
24 Apr 2012 | Canada
http://goo.gl/SXPgx
New from the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology, guidelines state that "infants (aged less than 1 year) should be physically active several times daily" and toddlers and preschoolers "should accumulate at least 180 minutes of physical activity at any intensity spread throughout the day".

The state of the world's children 2012: Children in an urban world
24 Apr 2012 | International
http://goo.gl/W2pyI
Annual report from UNICEF examines the realities of urban life for children and their families. Comments that "in urban areas blighted by poverty, ill health and poor nutrition, early childhood programming is often notable by its absence".

MORE research, policy & practice
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/research-policy-practice

2. Child care in the news:
- archive of news articles about early childhood education and child care (ECEC) in Canada and abroad.

Ontario budget: Child care and anti-poverty advocates cheer Liberal-NDP deal
25 Apr 2012 | Ontario
http://goo.gl/oezC1

Childcare needs of urban poor ignored: Experts
25 Apr 2012 | Asia
http://goo.gl/tLurQ

Guidance on well-being for under-fives out for consultation
http://goo.gl/r8CMa
24 Apr 2012 | Europe

Ontario Budget: McGuinty agrees to Horwath’s tax-the-rich scheme
24 Apr 2012 | Ontario
http://goo.gl/0LrO9

Federal budget 2012: Details show how Canadian PM Stephen Harper changing government
24 Apr 2012 | Canada
http://goo.gl/QZ91Q

MORE child care in the news
http://childcarecanada.org/documents/child-care-news

------

NOTE: For links to earlier (weekly) issues of this weekly alert going back to June 2009,
check out the CRRU Links Archive on this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/crru_links_archive.htm

------

Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
http://www.childcarecanada.org/res/enews/index.html
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere
http://www.childcarecanada.org/links/index.html

CRRU Publications
http://www.childcarecanada.org/pubs/
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications

ISSUE files
http://www.childcarecanada.org/resources/issue-files
- theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
http://www.childcarecanada.org
CRRU is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

20. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.. The Dispatch is distributed by the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. News articles from online newspapers are posted here in a number of general categories, and are tagged with more specific keywords relevant to each article.

Tags
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/tags/
Clicking on a word or expression in the list of tags will call up all relevant news items from past Dispatches under that tag. The list contains a tag for each U.S. state so you can view jurisdiction-specific news, and tags for a huge list of topics, including :
* Basic needs * Canada * Caseloads * Cash assistance * Cellular phones * Census * Charities * Child care * Child hunger * Child poverty * Child support * Child welfare * Child well-being * Chronic homelessness * Cohabitation * Cost of living * Crime * Crimes against the homeless * Debt * Deep poverty * Disability * Early childhood education * Earned income tax credit * Electronic benefit transfers * Eligibility * Food insecurity * Food programs * Foster care* Fuel poverty * Health care costs * Health insurance coverage * Homeless children * Homeless families * Homeless veterans * Housing First * Housing subsidies * Immigrant workers * Income * Income inequality * Jobless benefits * Juvenile justice * Legal aid * Low-income housing * Low-wage work * Medicaid * Microfinance * Minimum wage * Newly poor * No Child Left Behind * Ontario * Paid family leave * Payday lending * Persistent poverty * Poverty measurement * Poverty rate * Prisons * Privatization * Public Housing * Rural poverty * Safety net * SCHIP * Section 8 (Housing) * Seniors * Single parents * SNAP/Food Stamps * Supplemental Security Income * Taxes * Teen pregnancy * Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) * Unemployment rate * Uninsured * Urban poverty * Utilities * Welfare reform * Welfare-to-work * Women Infants and Children (WIC) * Work requirements * Youth employment * many more tags...

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

April 27:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/04/27/
Charlotte Observer Series on Nonprofit Hospitals
Medicaid Expansion - Colorado
Wisconsin Poverty Report
Unemployment Rate - Spain

April 26:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/04/26/
Poverty Measurement in the US
Infant Mortality Rates - Milwaukee, WI
Low-Income Earners and Banking

April 25:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/04/25/
Wisconsin Poverty Report
College Financial Aid
Job Losses and Unemployment - Wisconsin

April 24:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/04/24/
Child Welfare and Foster Care - Oregon, Washington DC
Columbia Daily Tribune Series on Poverty

April 23:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2012/04/23/
Medicaid and Dental Care
Low-Income Students and Special Education Placement - Massachusetts
Affordable Housing - Colorado, Texas

---------------------------------

Earlier Poverty Dispatches (back to July 2006):
1. Go to the Poverty Dispatch home page:
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/
2. Click on a date in the calendar (top right-hand corner of the page) to see the links for that date.
Change the month by clicking the link at the bottom of the calendar.
OR
3. Click on a category or a tag (right-hand margin) to access all relevant links.
[ e.g., 588 links under the category "Poverty" - http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/categories/poverty/ ]
OR
4. Scroll down the home page to the Archives section, where you can view the full content of the dispatches by month back to July 2006 (although *some* media links tend to go 404 after awhile)...
NOTE: I highly recommend this excellent U.S. media resource!
The only shortcoming I encountered was the lack of a table of contents for each daily dispatch, which forces visitors to click each date in the calendar to see the contents of the daily dispatch for that day. So I've created my own archive (the link below), starting in mid-December of 2011, that is a table of contents of each dispatch as per the latest dispatches above, that lets you scan contents without opening each damn dispatch:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/povdispatch_archive.htm

---

NOTE : You can subscribe to this email list or RSS feed
by clicking "Subscribe" in the right-hand margin on any page of the Poverty Dispatch website

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)

http://www.irp.wisc.edu

University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://www.wisc.edu/

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

21. Poverty In America: Defining The New Poor (food aid is the new welfare?) - April 22
(
NPR - formerly National Public Radio)

Poverty In America: Defining The New Poor
http://www.npr.org/2012/04/22/151166529/poverty-in-america-defining-the-new-poor
April 22, 2012
Welfare changes in the 1990s helped slash cash benefit rolls, yet the use of food stamps is soaring today. About 15 percent of Americans use food stamps. The program has become what some call the new welfare. (...) More Americans depend on food assistance now than at any other time in modern history: 1 in 6 people, or almost 50 million Americans. (...) Food stamps have now replaced cash assistance as the most common form of welfare in America. Ten times more Americans receive food aid than those who get cash welfare.
Source:
NPR (formerly National Public Radio)
http://www.npr.org/

---

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

22. Inaugural Global Food Policy Report Synthesizes Food Policy Actions and Events in 2011 and Provides Outlook for 2012 - April 23
(International Food Policy Research Institute)

New from the
International Food Policy Research Institute:

Inaugural Global Food Policy Report Synthesizes
Food Policy Actions and Events in 2011 and Provides Outlook for 2012

http://goo.gl/Z5qWN
Press Release
April 23, 2012
Washington D.C.— As policymakers gather for the upcoming G8 and G20 meetings, and as decisionmakers, international organizations, and civil society meet for Rio+20, major food policy developments from 2011 can provide lessons and guidance for 2012 and the future. Today the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) launches the inaugural Global Food Policy Report, the first in a new annual series. The Report provides a comprehensive overview of major policy changes at the global, regional, national, and local levels, as well as their significance for food and nutrition security.

Complete report:

2011 Global Food Policy Report
HTML version
:
Scroll down the page for a table of contents and links to download the report [PDF] by chapter):
http://www.ifpri.org/publication/2011-global-food-policy-report
PDF version (7.4MB, 126 pages)
http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/oc72.pdf

Aperçu de l'étude en français (PDF - 956Ko, 23 pages)
http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/oc72afr.pdf
[Le texte complet n'est pas disponible en français.]

Source:
2011 Global Food Policy Report
http://www.ifpri.org/gfpr/2011

Source:
International Food Policy Research Institute
(Washington, DC)
http://www.ifpri.org/
The International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) seeks sustainable solutions for ending hunger and poverty. IFPRI is one of 15 centers supported by the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR), an alliance of 64 governments, private foundations, and international and regional organizations.
[ Source : http://www.ifpri.org/ourwork/about ]

---

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm

23. CRINMAIL (Newsletter of the Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):
http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

The latest information on children's rights around the world:
CRINMAIL
http://www.crin.org/email/
CRIN publishes several email lists on children's rights issues in English, French, Spanish and Arabic. We also issue thematic editions on armed conflict, violence against children and strategic litigation. You can subscribe to any of these email lists and unsubscribe at any time.

CRINMAIL - Children's Rights Newsletter (weekly)
Latest issue:

25 April 2012 - CRINMAIL Issue 1273
http://www.crin.org/email/crinmail_detail_popup.asp?crinmailID=4199
In this issue:
CRC Committee elections announced!
Latest news and reports
- Inhuman sentencing for drawing
- No women or children
- Clampdown still in force
- Harmful traditional practices
- Business and children's rights
- Hearing children out
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Issues * Law
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

-----------------------------------------------

CRINMAIL Archive (earlier issues):

Option 1: (WITH table of contents)
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/CRINMAIL_archive.htm
- includes a table of contents for each issue, as above, back to 2009-2010:

Option 2: (WITHOUT table of contents)
http://goo.gl/C0JNx
- On the CRINMAIL website --- does *not* include the table of contents for each issue (so you must click on each link to see its contents), but it goes back much further (pre-2006). Follow this link to see hundreds of earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

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NOTE:
The CRINMAIL Children's Rights Newsletter is only ONE of several weekly newsletters produced and distributed by CRIN.
See the complete list of newsletters:
http://www.crin.org/email/

Source:
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN):

http://www.crin.org/
CRIN envisions a world in which every child enjoys all of the human rights promised by the United Nations, regional organisations, and national governments alike. (...) Our inspiration is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which we use to bring children's rights to the top of the international agenda. We launch advocacy campaigns, lead international children's rights coalitions, and strive to make existing human rights enforcement mechanisms accessible for all. More than 2,100 organisations in 150 countries rely on CRIN's publications, research and information.

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- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
http://www.cupe.ca/
Thanks, CUPE!

------------------------

If you wish to receive this weekly newsletter by email, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

Privacy Policy:

The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly newsletter.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com

 


Prince Philip Foot-in-Mouth Disease
Ninety gaffes in ninety years

* "Deaf? If you're near there, no wonder you are deaf." Said to a group of deaf children standing near a Caribbean steel drum band in 2000.

* "If you stay here much longer, you will go home with slitty eyes." To 21-year-old British student Simon Kerby during a visit to China in 1986.

* "You managed not to get eaten then?" To a British student who had trekked in Papua New Guinea, during an official visit in 1998.

* "You can't have been here that long – you haven't got a pot belly." To a British tourist during a tour of Budapest in Hungary. 1993.

* "How do you keep the natives off the booze long enough to pass the test?" Asked of a Scottish driving instructor in 1995.

* "We don't come here for our health. We can think of other ways of enjoying ourselves." During a trip to Canada in 1976.

* "You ARE a woman, aren't you?" To a woman in Kenya in 1984, after accepting a gift.

* "The problem with London is the tourists. They cause the congestion. If we could just stop the tourism, we could stop the congestion." At the opening of City Hall in 2002.

* "Young people are the same as they always were. They are just as ignorant." At the 50th anniversary of the Duke of Edinburgh Awards scheme.

* "Aren't most of you descended from pirates?" In the Cayman Islands, 1994.

* "You bloody silly fool!" To an elderly car park attendant who made the mistake of not recognising him at Cambridge University in 1997.

* "Oh! You are the people ruining the rivers and the environment." To three young employees of a Scottish fish farm at Holyrood Palace in 1999.

* "The French don't know how to cook breakfast." After a breakfast of bacon, eggs, smoked salmon, kedgeree, croissants and pain au chocolat – from Gallic chef Regis Crépy – in 2002.

* "It doesn't look like much work goes on at this University." Overheard at Bristol University's engineering facility. It had been closed so that he and the Queen could officially open it in 2005.

* "I wish he'd turn the microphone off!" The Prince expresses his opinion of Elton John's performance at the 73rd Royal Variety Show, 2001.

* "Do you still throw spears at each other?" Prince Philip shocks Aboriginal leader William Brin at the Aboriginal Cultural Park in Queensland, 2002.

* "Where's the Southern Comfort?" On being presented with a hamper of southern goods by the American ambassador in London in 1999.

* "Were you here in the bad old days? ... That's why you can't read and write then!" To parents during a visit to Fir Vale Comprehensive School in Sheffield, which had suffered poor academic reputation.

* "Ah you're the one who wrote the letter. So you can write then? Ha, ha! Well done." Meeting 14-year old George Barlow, whose invited to the Queen to visit Romford, Essex, in 2003.

* "You could do with losing a little bit of weight." To hopeful astronaut, 13-year-old Andrew Adams.

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The rest of the princely gaffes can be found here:
http://goo.gl/e6V7J

Source:
The Independent (U.K.)
http://www.independent.co.uk/

 

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And, in closing...

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Homophobic? Maybe You’re Gay
By Richard Ryan and William Ryan
April 27, 2012
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/29/opinion/sunday/homophobic-maybe-youre-gay.html

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World`s fattest Cat ! Meow, the 40-POUND Moggy
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jbslo9RMMBQ

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If you use Google Docs and/or free online cloud storage, you'll love Google Drive!
https://drive.google.com/

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Having a bad day?
Do you like dogs?

If yes to either or both questions, take a two-and-a-half minute break and watch this upbeat video:
(You'll thank me for it.)
http://www.wimp.com/dogvideo/

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What Teachers Make (video, duration 3:01):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fuBmSbiVXo0
Taylor Mali's timeless inspirational words for teachers.

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Jazz for cows (video, duration 2:04)
http://www.jest.com/embed/5722/cows-enjoy-dixieland-jazz-concert