Canadian Social Research Newsletter
May 29, 2011

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,420 subscribers.

************************************************************************

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...



IN THIS ISSUE OF THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER:


Canadian content

1.
Penalized for working? Ontario Disability Support Program clients lose 50 cents on every dollar earned (Centre for Addiction and Mental Health) - May 24
2. Open Policy Course in Public Policy for Advocates and Activists (John Stapleton)

3. New from Finance Canada:
--- Release of the Fiscal Monitor for March 2011 - May 27
--- Minister of Finance will deliver the next phase of Canada's Economic Action Plan -
May 25
4. Canada ranked worst of G7 nations in fighting bribery, corruption --- but Canadians are a happy lot. Go figure - May 24
5. Homeless in Yellowknife: An Emerging Social Challenge (By Nick Falvo in The Homeless Hub) - May 2011
6. MissingKids.ca (Canadian Centre for Child Protection) - May 2011
7. Recessions : Canada, the U.K. and the U.S. (Michael Mendelson, Caledon Institute of Social Policy) - May 2011

8.What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Public sector employment, First quarter 2011 - May 27
---
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, March 2011 - May 26
--- Study: Measuring voluntary interhousehold transfers, 2008 - May 25
--- Work absences in 2010
- May 25
9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

International content

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
11. Global Peace Index 2011
(Institute for Economics and Peace) - May 25
12. [Australia] Family assistance: what the changes really mean - May 20
13. Basic Income News (guaranteed annual income) - May 2011
14. CRINMAIL (weekly children's rights newsletter)

Have a great week!

Gilles

[ gilseg@rogers.com ]

[ Go to Canadian Social Research Links Home Page ]

1. Penalized for working? Ontario Disability Support Program clients lose 50 cents on every dollar earned - May 24
(Centre for Addiction and Mental Health)

Ontario Disability Support Program

Penalized for working? Disabled [on ODSP] lose 50 cents on every dollar earned
May 23, 2011
By Laurie Monsebraaten
(...) Earning rules and administrative practices are one of the reasons why those who rely on Ontario’s welfare system for the disabled are 11 times more likely to be unemployed than the average Ontarian, says a new report by advocates for the mentally ill. While 49 per cent of Ontarians with disabilities are employed, just 11 per cent on the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) are working, says the report, to be released Tuesday.

The report What Stops Us From Working? calls on Queen’s Park to allow those receiving ODSP to earn up to $300 a month with no clawbacks for one year and to be able to reconcile earnings annually rather than monthly. The government should also “help make work pay” for this group by streamlining ODSP earnings rules with other social programs such as subsidized housing and child care and by expanding ODSP employment supports, says the report, obtained by the Star.

[ Comments (136) ]

Source:
Toronto Star

Complete report:

What stops us from working?
New ways to make work pay, by fixing the treatment
of earnings under the Ontario Disability Support Program
(PDF - 1.2MB, 32 pages)
By John Stapleton and Stephanie Procyk
May 2011

Source:
This paper is a collaboration among three organizations:

The Dream Team is a group of psychiatric consumer/survivors who advocate for more supportive housing in Ontario for people with mental health issues. Dream Team members demonstrate and promote the life-altering benefits of supportive housing, by telling their own stories, conducting and presenting research, and standing up for human rights.

Houselink Community Homes is a non-profit, charitable agency based in Toronto. It provides supportive housing to people living with mental illness. Houselink makes it possible for people living with mental illness to build meaningful lives on their own terms.

The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health is Canada's largest mental health and addiction teaching hospital. CAMH combines clinical care, research, education, policy development, and health promotion to help transform the lives of people affected by mental illness and addiction.

---

More coverage
in the Toronto Star
:

Good jobs a lifeline for people with mental illness
May 28, 2011
By Dr. Kwame McKenzie
I count myself lucky. When I arrived in Canada four years ago, I had a job and it helped me find community, colleagues and friends. Work helped me connect with Toronto. Most of my clients are not so lucky. Living with the stigma and symptoms of a severe mental health problem is challenging enough. But they have to add to that the social isolation that comes with being jobless. Many people with schizophrenia and other serious mental illnesses do not work, and many have been told they cannot work. Yet an interesting thing happens when they do find employment — their health improves. Study after study has confirmed that a good job is good for their health. Their quality of life goes way up. Their use of health services goes way down. (...) If you have a mental health problem, you are on ODSP and you may lose so many benefits that it is simply not worth your while financially to work. You actually lose money by going to work. That is enough to put most people off. This is a shame because a job is more than the money — it is a link to the rest of the community and it is good for your health.
The Dream Team, Houselink Community Homes and CAMH have been working together on recommendations that take a different approach. ODSP could balance its administrative imperatives with a determined focus on supporting people to work. This would make a significant difference in the lives of the people I treat.

[ Author Dr. Kwame McKenzie is a senior scientist within the Social Equity and Health Research section at CAMH. ]

Ease the path to work
May 23, 2011
Ontario’s disability support program is supposed to keep people from falling into destitution because of their disability and help find jobs for those who can work. At just $1,053 a month for a single person the rate is so low that it fails utterly in its first goal. And, once someone receives that cheque, hundreds of punitive rules kick in that undermine the program’s second goal as well. As the Star’s Laurie Monsebraaten reports, Ontarians on disability support who have tried to improve their financial circumstance (and reduce their reliance on taxpayers) by doing some work have found themselves even poorer than before. This makes no sense. Provincial officials — from Premier Dalton McGuinty down to the worker behind the glass window at a disability support office — must know that.

Related link:

Open Policy Ontario is the social policy consultancy of John Stapleton.

---

- Go to the Disability Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/disbkmrk.htm

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

2. Open Policy Course in Public Policy for Advocates and Activists
(John Stapleton)

Open Policy Course in Public Policy for Advocates and Activists
- Twenty-five sessions + reading list + links for further study
Source:
Open Policy Ontario John Stapleton's website

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

3. New from Finance Canada:
--- Release of the Fiscal Monitor for March 2011 - May 27
--- Minister of Finance will deliver the next phase of Canada's Economic Action Plan -
May 25

From Finance Canada:

Release of the Fiscal Monitor for March 2011
May 27, 2011
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, today released The Fiscal Monitor for March 2011.

Highlights:

March 2011:
Budgetary Deficit of $6.2 Billion (compared to a deficit of $6.4 billion in March 2010)

April 2010 to March 2011:
Budgetary deficit of $34.4 Billion (compared to a deficit of $47.0 billion for April 2009 to March 2010).

Related document:

The Fiscal Monitor: March 2011

[ earlier editions of The Fiscal Monitor - going back to 1996 ]

---

May 25, 2011
Minister of Finance will deliver the next phase of Canada's Economic Action Plan
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, today announced that the Next Phase of Canada’s Economic Action Plan: A Low-Tax Plan for Jobs and Growth will be delivered in Parliament on June 6. (...) Minister Flaherty said the Government will stay the course with its prudent, low-tax plan for Canadian families, which will:
* Keep taxes low.
* Make targeted investments to support jobs and growth.
* Maintain growing transfer payments for crucial services like health care and education.
* Control government spending and eliminate the deficit

Source:
Finance Canada

Related link:

Canada's Economic Action Plan - links to the complete collection of (7) Action Plan reports dating back to March 2009
- this link takes you to a section of the Federal Government Department links of this website.

---

- Go to the 2011 Canadian Government Budgets Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/budgets_2011.htm

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

4. Canada ranked worst of G7 nations in fighting bribery, corruption - but Canadians are a happy lot. Go figure. - May 24

New from the
Globe and Mail:

Canada ranked worst of G7 nations in fighting bribery, corruption
By Julian Sher
May 24, 2011
Canada has again been scolded on the international stage for its “lack of progress” in fighting bribery and corruption by a watchdog agency that ranks it among the worst of nearly 40 countries. Transparency International, a group that monitors global corruption, put Canada in the lowest category of countries with “little or no enforcement” when it comes to applying bribery standards set out by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development.

[ 669 comments ]

Related link:

Transparency International I calls on OECD leaders to reinvigorate fight against corruption
New report shows progress on enforcement of OECD Anti-Bribery Convention has stalled
News Release
Berlin, 24 May 2011
A new report from Transparency International (TI), the anti-corruption organisation, shows no improvement in the enforcement of the OECD Anti-Bribery Convention in the past year and warns that this could signal a dangerous loss of momentum in the fight against corruption. (...)

The TI Progress Report on Enforcement of the OECD Convention (PDF - 2.2MB, 94 pages), covering 37 countries, shows that there are still only seven countries with active enforcement, nine with moderate enforcement, and 21 with little or no enforcement.

Also in the Globe, on the same day:

Canadians can’t complain: Better Life Index
By Renata D'Aliesio
May 24, 2011
All in all, Canadians are a pretty comfortable and happy lot. The country ranks at or near the top in many of 11 well-being indicators in a new quality of life index, unveiled Tuesday by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. Only Australia topped Canada.

[ 195 comments ]

Source:
Globe and Mail

---

Related links from the
Organization for Economic

Co-operation and Development
:

Compendium of OECD Well-Being Indicators
This Compendium represents one of the first attempts to respond to the demand for comparative information on the conditions of people.s lives in developed market economies. Previous contributions in this field have focused on the conditions of poorer countries and on a more narrow range of dimensions (e.g. Human Development Index). This Compendium extends these efforts on both fronts.
It is a preview of the type of measures that will be included in the "How's life?" report to be released in October 2011.
The OECD plans to issue similar reports in the future on a recurrent basis, and to enrich the set of dimensions and indicators in the light of experience gained and of progress made in implementing better measures.

Download the Compendium in PDF format:

In one single file (1.5 MB)

Or by chapter:
Reader's guide
I. Introduction
II. Material Living Conditions
III. Quality of Life

OECD Better Life Index
This Index allows you to compare well-being across countries, based on 11 topics the OECD has identified as essential, in the areas of material living conditions and quality of life. The list of topics comprises the following:
* Topics *
Housing * Income * Jobs * Community * Education * Environment * Governance * Health * Life Satisfaction * Safety * Work-Life Balance
Source:
Better Life Initiative (small PDF file)

So how's life in Canada, eh?
* Money cannot buy happiness, but it is an important means to achieving higher living standards. In Canada, the average household earned 27 015 USD in 2008, more than the OECD average.
* Nearly 72% of people aged 15 to 64 in Canada have a paid job. People in Canada work 1699 hours a year, less than most in the OECD. 71% of mothers are employed after their children begin school, suggesting that women are able to successfully balance family and career.
* 87% of adults aged 25 to 64 have earned the equivalent of a high-school diploma, much higher than the OECD average.
* The average Canadian student scored 524 out of 600 in reading ability, higher than the OECD average.
* Life expectancy at birth in Canada is 80.7 years, more than one year above the OECD average.
* 78% of people in Canada said they were satisfied with their life, much higher than the OECD average of 59%.

Source:
Organization for Economic

Co-operation and Development

---

- Go to the Government Social Research Links in Other Countries page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internat.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

5. Homeless in Yellowknife: An Emerging Social Challenge - May 2011
(By Nick Falvo in The Homeless Hub)

Homeless in Yellowknife: An Emerging Social Challenge
By Nick Falvo
There is a considerable amount of visible homelessness in Yellowknife (NWT), yet very little third-party analysis of the situation. This report begins by briefly discussing who is homeless in Yellowknife and then outlines program responses, including emergency shelters and various models of housing. An overview will then be provided of major funding initiatives from the federal and territorial governments, as well as various forms of homelessness assistance provided by the City of Yellowknife. The report concludes by making policy recommendations with respect to the need for increased accountability, shelter standards, more housing options for the homeless, and a public health response to alcohol and drug use.

Download the Full Report (PDF - 447K, 27 pages)
* Executive Summary (PDF - 339K, 4 pages)
* Plain Language Summary (PDF - 326K, 3 pages)

Source:
The Homeless Hub
The Homeless Hub was created to address the need for a single place to find homelessness information from across Canada. Launched in 2007, the Homeless Hub is a web-based research library and information center representing an innovative step forward in the use of technology to enhance knowledge mobilization and networking.

Related link:

Top 10 Things I Learned About Research
While Preparing a Report on Homelessness in Yellowknife

By Nick Falvo
May 25, 2011

[Author Nick Falvo is a PhD Candidate at Carleton University’s School of Public Policy and Administration. He also teaches a course on affordable housing and homelessness at Carleton's School of Social Work.]

---

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

- Go to the Northwest Territories Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ntbkmrk.htm

6. MissingKids.ca - May 2011
(Canadian Centre for Child Protection)

MissingKids.ca
We offer families support in finding their missing child and provide educational materials to help prevent children from going missing
[Phone: 1-866-KID-TIPS (543-8477)]

[ Version française:
EnfantsPortesDisparus.ca
]

MissingKids.ca has four primary functions:
* To assist in the location of missing children
* To provide educational materials to help prevent children from going missing
* To be an information and resource centre on missing children
* To coordinate efforts and assist stakeholders in the delivery of missing children services
Source:
Canadian Centre for Child Protection

[ Version française :
Centre canadien de protection de l'enfance ]

The Canadian Centre for Child Protection is a charitable organization dedicated to the personal safety of all children. Our goal is to reduce child victimization by providing programs and services to Canadians. We do this through public awareness activities, our personal safety education program (Kids in the Know), our national tipline to report online sexual abuse of children (Cybertip.ca), and our program to help organizations prevent child sexual abuse (Commit to Kids).
* Kids in the Know
* Cybertip.ca
* Commit to Kids

---

- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

7. Recessions : Canada, the U.K. and the U.S. - May 2011
(Michael Mendelson, Caledon Institute of Social Policy)

The UK in 2011 is not Canada in 1996 (PDF - 419K, 9 pages)
May 10, 2011
By Michael Mendelson
Excerpt from the Conclusion:
The lesson from Canada is not about how to cut the deficit: it is about when to cut the deficit. Nor was it cuts that created economic growth: rather it was economic growth that created the room for cuts. The effects of fiscal contraction in Canada were more than offset by the strongly growing economy with its foundation in exports to the US. Employment in Canada rose continuously during the period of fiscal contraction, due to the strength of the export-dominated market sector, enhanced by monetary policy...
Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy

Related link:
(found in the bibliography of the
above article by Michael Mendelson)

The impact of recessions in the United States on Canada
March 2009
Excerpt from the Conclusion:
Recessions in Canada and the US are often, but not always, closely synchronised. Moreover, there is a large disparity in the magnitude of the downturns since the severity of a recession in Canada is usually determined by the course of domestic demand, not exports. Of course, domestic spending is influenced by global trends, especially the impact of commodity prices on business investment. The record drop of our terms of trade late in 2008 suggests that the global recession will play a determinant role in domestic spending.
Source:
Canadian Economic Observer (March 2009) (Feature article)
[ Canadian Economic Observer - main product page ]
[ Statistics Canada ]

---

- Go to the Social Research Organizations (I) in Canada page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/research.htm

8. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
---
Public sector employment, First quarter 2011 - May 27
---
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, March 2011 - May 26
---
Study: Measuring voluntary interhousehold transfers, 2008 - May 25
--- Work absences in 2010
- May 25

What's new from
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]:

May 27, 2011
Public sector employment, First quarter 2011
Public sector employment on a seasonally adjusted basis was 3.6 million in the first quarter, up 0.3% from the fourth quarter of 2010. The increase was concentrated mainly in health and social services institutions (+0.5%). Employment has been growing steadily in this sector since the first quarter of 2005. Employment also rose in local general government (+0.4%). Employment in federal general government fell 0.2% in the first quarter.

Related subjects:
* Government
* Employment and remuneration


May 26, 2011
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, March 2011
From February to March 2011, average weekly earnings of non-farm payroll employees increased 0.5% to $876.53. On a year-over-year basis, average weekly earnings were 4.1% higher compared with March 2010.

Source:
Employment, Earnings and Hours - product main page*
This publication presents a timely picture of employment, earnings and hours.
The tabulations focus on monthly labour market information and some historical data series.
NOTE:
Online data on payroll employment, earnings and hours for the current month is usually posted to the site a month or later after this report first appears in The Daily.
---
* On the product main page,click "View" to see the
latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:

* Labour
* Employment and unemployment
* Industries
* Wages, salaries and other earnings


May 25, 2011
Study: Measuring voluntary interhousehold transfers, 2008
In 2008, Canadian households received $8.5 billion in voluntary interhousehold transfers from other households. This is twice the dollar amount of court-ordered alimony and child support payments received by Canadian households. It is also comparable in size to major government social programs, like social assistance and child tax benefits. Interhousehold transfers are a flow of economic resources between households. In some cases, people in one household monetarily support people in other households. These would include parents who support students away at school, immigrants sending money to family members in their home countries, or someone helping out a friend who has fallen on hard times.

Measuring voluntary interhousehold transfers in Canada
May 2011

* Highlights

* Full article:
--- HTML
--- PDF
(70K, 12 pages)

Related subjects:
* Families, households and housing
* Household characteristics
* Income, pensions, spending and wealth
* Household assets, debts and wealth
* Household spending and savings
* Household, family and personal income
* Low income and inequality

Source:
May 2011 issue of
Perspectives on Labour and Income - product main page*
This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of labour and income data. Topics include youth in the labour market, pensions and retirement, work arrangements, education and training, and trends in family income.
[ * On the product main page,click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

Also in the May 2011 issue:

Work absences in 2010
May 2011
This overview presents data on absences from work for personal reasons (illness or disability and personal or family responsibilities) by various demographic and labour market characteristics, using data from the Labour Force Survey. Only full-time employees have been considered in this analysis.

* Full article:
--- HTML
--- PDF
(155K, 11 pages)

-----------------------------

The Daily Archives
- select a month and year from the drop-down menus and click on a date for that day's Daily

-----------------------------

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

---

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit

What's new from the
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
:

-------

No new links since May 19, 2011

See:

* Research, policy and practice
* Child care in the news

------

Subscribe to the CRRU email notices and updates
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care
sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

---

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest issues of Poverty Dispatch:

May 27:
Internet Access and Income - Canada
Poverty Measurement - India

May 26:
State Medicaid Programs
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Enrollment
School Funding - New Jersey

May 25:
State Medicaid Programs
Columbus Dispatch Series on Employment for the Disabled
State Minimum Wage - Maine

May 24:
Kids Count Report - New Jersey
Abortion Rates and Poverty
Rhode Island Medicaid Waiver

---------------------------------------

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu subject=subscribe

---

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

---

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

11. Global Peace Index 2011 - May 25
(Institute for Economics and Peace)

2011 Global Peace Index:
World less peaceful for third straight year;
Arab Spring heralds biggest ever change in rankings
(PDF - 139K, 3 pages)
News Release
LONDON, May 25, 2011 – The threat of terrorist attacks and the likelihood of violent demonstrations were the two leading factors making the world less peaceful in 2011, according to the latest Global Peace Index (GPI), released today. This is the third consecutive year that the GPI, produced by the Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP), has shown a decline in the levels of world peace. The economic cost of this to the global
economy was $8.12 trillion in the past year. The GPI is the world’s leading measure of global peacefulness. It gauges ongoing domestic and international conflict, safety and security in society, and militarisation in 153 countries by taking into account 23 separate indicators.

Global Peace Index 2011
The Global Peace Index (GPI) , produced by the Institute for Economics and Peace, is the world’s leading measure of global peacefulness. It gauges ongoing domestic and international conflict, safety and security in society, and militarisation in 153 countries by taking into account 23 separate indicators.

2011 Methodology, Results and Findings (PDF - 407K, 47 pages)
Key Findings in the 2011 report:
* The world is less peaceful for the third straight year
* Due to an increased threat of terrorist attacks in 29 nations
* A greater likelihood of violent demonstrations in 33 countries
* Arab Spring unrest heralds biggest ever change in rankings, Libya tumbles 83 spots
* Iceland bounces back from economic woes to top ranking
* Somalia displaces Iraq as world’s least peaceful nation
* Violence cost the global economy more than $8.12 trillion in 2010
* US peacefulness shows minimal change
* Canada is the eighth most peaceful country in the world, up from 14th place last year

2011 Discussion paper:
New Dimensions of Peace –
Society, Economy, and the Media
(PDF - 3.3MB, 66 pages)
Explore the latest research & analysis from the Institute for Economics and Peace.
"This study estimates that if the U.S. had similar levels of peacefulness to Canada, the conservative economic benefit on the U.S. economy would be $361 billion per annum." (Excerpt, page 5)

2011 Fact Sheet (PDF - 41K, 2 pages)

United States Peace Index
April 6, 2011
The U.S. Peace Index created by the Institute for Economics and Peace reveals that Maine is the most peaceful U.S. state. The report also estimates there is potential for $361 billion in savings and additional economic activity by increasing peacefulness in America to the same level as Canada.

Source:
Institute for Economics and Peace
The Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP) is an international research institute dedicated to building a greater understanding of the interrelationships between business, peace and economics with particular emphasis on the economic benefits of peace.

Related link:

Vision of Humanity
Vision of Humanity is a strong proponent of the need to further study, advocate and act on peace. It groups together a number of interrelated initiatives focused on global peace which enjoy the support of a wide range of philanthropists, business people, politicians, religious leaders and intellectuals. It brings a strategic approach to raising the world’s attention and awareness around the importance of peace to humanity’s survival in the 21st century.

---

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

12. [Australia] Family assistance: what the changes really mean - May 20

Australia

Family assistance: what the changes really mean
By Daniel Nethery
20 May 2011
The federal budget changes to family benefits will create a better-targeted system that more adequately covers the cost of raising children.
Source:
Inside Story - Current affairs and culture

Related links from
the Government of Australian:

Australian Benefits, Payments and Services
- links to a broad range of financial assistance programs.

Budget of Australia 2011-12:
Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs

Details of the 2011-12 Australian Budget regarding family benefits, disability benefits, children's benefits, etc.
Source:
Budget Paper No. 2 - Expense Measures
[ Commonwealth of Australia 2011-12 Budget - May 10, 2011 ]


Source:
Government of Australia

---

- Go to the Government Social Research Links in Other Countries page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internat.htm

13. Basic Income News (guaranteed annual income) - May 2011

NEW! Basic Income Earth Network (BIEN)
and affiliates launch Basic Income News
[A Basic Income is an income unconditionally granted to all on an individual basis, without means test or work requirement.
So Basic Income = Guaranteed Annual Income.]
May 25, 2011

Basic Income Earth Network (BIEN) and the U.S. Basic Income Guarantee Network (USBIG) announce the launch of a new website entirely devoted to basic income news.

Basic Income News is the online incarnation of the BIEN NewsFlash (see the link below) and affiliated publications, such as the USBIG Newsletter. The BIEN NewsFlash and its predecessor, the BIEN Newsletter, have been in publication since 1986. The USBIG Newsletter has been going since the year 2000. It is the creation of the U.S. Basic Income Guarantee Network (the USBIG Network), BIEN’s affiliate in the United States.

Basic Income News will have frequently updated news stories about Basic Income around the world, provided initially by BIEN and USBIG. We hope soon that many more of BIEN’s affiliates will contribute as well. If you have news about Basic Income that you think should be published in Basic Income News, please contact the editors at <desk@binews.org>.

Related links:

BIEN NEWSFLASH 64, May 2011 (PDF - 147K, 17 pages)
Table of contents:
1. NEW! BIEN and affiliates launch Basic Income News: http://binews.org/
2. BIEN Congress 2012 will be held in Munich, Germany
3. New Issue of Basic Income Studies
4. Basic income book series: call for proposals
5. Events
Seoul, Delhi, Namur, Berlin, Lincoln
6. Glimpses of national debates
- EUROPEAN UNION: EU-Parliament in favour of adequate minimum income
- FRANCE: Former Prime Minister launches basic income campaign
- GREECE: Basic Pension Introduced
- IRAQ: Muqtada al-Sadr Endorses Alaskan Policy
- ITALY: Activist Movement for basic income
- KUWAIT: A Temporary, Partial basic income for Citizens Only
- LATIN AMERICA: Head of UN Commission Says Several Latin America Countries Could Implement basic income
- UNITED STATES: American Political Science Association Task Force Will Discuss BIG
- SWITZERLAND: A referendum on basic income?
7. Publications
8. New Links
9. About the Basic Income Earth Network
---
BIEN's NewsFlash is mailed electronically every two months to over 1,500 subscribers throughout the world.
Requests for free subscription should be sent to bien@basicincome.org

---

New blogs at USBIG
May 19, 2011
The USBIG Network has added the following two blogs to its website. Both have news and opinion on those topics going back to 2000, and both will continue to be updated periodically. Both allow for reader comments and feedback.

* The Alaska Dividend Blog
The Alaska Dividend, properly called the Permanent Fund Dividend (PFD), is the closest thing to a basic income guarantee that exists in the world today. It is a small, yearly dividend, financed indirectly from oil revenues, paid by the state government to every citizen who lives in Alaska-including all men, women, and children. This blog has news and commentary about the Alaska Dividend as a small basic income that can provide a model to be copied elsewhere.

* The Basic Income Guarantee Blog
In this blog, Karl Widerquist writes about the Basic Income Guarantee and contemporary U.S. and world politics

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BIEN Canada - Towards Income Security for All Canadians
(new website URL)
BIEN Canada is the Canadian affiliate of the Basic Income Earth Network. BIEN Canada was founded at the 2008 international BIEN Congress to promote dialogue, public education and networking about basic income in Canada. BIEN Canada is composed of individuals and organizations interested in promoting dialogue around basic income.
[ BIEN Canada Resources - incl. links to Basic Income websites, videos, aticles, papers, etc.]

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BONUS!

Oldie Goldie (1985):

Royal Commission on the Economic Union and Development Prospects for Canada, 1985
Chair: Donald S. MacDonald
- includes links to PDF files for Volumes One, Two and Three along with a short table of contents (PDF - 48K)
[ Version française ]

In 1985, the Royal Commission on the Economic Union and Development Prospects for Canada (the "MacDonald Commission") recommended, among other fixes, a free-trade agreement between Canada and the U.S. and a universal income security program.
- Read the excerpt below, and click the link for more detailed information.

Volume Three, Part 2 (PDF - 7.1MB, 163 pages)
1985
Excerpt (page 173) :
The centre-piece for Commissioners' proposals ... is establishment of a Universal Income Security Program (UISP), which would entail a universally available income supplement, subject to reduction at a relatively low "tax-back" rate. Such a scheme, delivered either through the federal tax system or by means of direct transfers, appears to fall within federal jurisdiction. The present federal responsibility for Family Allowances, Unemployment Insurance and Old Age Security clearly establishes a broad federal mandate for income security, of which the UISP is a logical development. Moreover, we believe that individual provinces acting alone would not be capable of bringing such a program into operation. To create the UISP, however, would involve a major change in federal-provincial relations, a change which Commissioners think would be healthy for the federal system. (more...)

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- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

14. CRINMAIL
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the
Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
:

CRINMAIL - children's rights newsletter

25 May 2011, CRINMAIL issue 1226
In this issue:
EDITORIAL: Child Domestic Workers - The dawn of a new Convention? (part 2)
CRC Day of General Discussion 2011
NEW advocacy calendar!
Latest news and reports
- Call for tougher membership criteria: Human Rights Council
- State violence: Syria
- Debate on child custody: Japan
- Let the child decide: United States
- Child abuse: Israel, Holy See, Tunisia
- The right of discharge: United Kingdom
Upcoming events
Employment
Also includes:
* World news * Reports * Events * Laws * Issues
* Advocacy * Challenging breaches * Take action * Campaigns * Toolkits

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Links to Issues of CRINMAIL (from CRIN)
- links to earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

See http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm
for the table of contents for, and links to, several months' worth of issues of CRINMAIL.
NOTE : The CRIN "Links to Issues of CRINMAIL" (second link up) does not include the table of contents for each issue.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

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- Go to the Children's Rights Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm

 


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:

gilseg@rogers.com

 

Me, Myself, or I?

(Sub-title : Don't make me send
Marg Warrior Princess  to smite you.!)

In conversation and in writing, please, please, please, stop using "myself" instead of  "me".
E.g.:
"You may contact my executive assistant or myself for more information."
It's WRONG, and it makes you sound -  well, dumb.

Here's a simple rule : Never, ever, use  "myself" in a sentence unless it's preceded by "I".
E.g.: "I cut myself shaving this morning."

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And, while I'm on the subject or personal pronouns, here's another pet peeve:  inverting subject and object cases
E.g.:
"The clerk gave a free sample to my friend and I."
"My buddy and me went to the outdoor show this past weekend."
Both of these examples are incorrect.

Here's the trick to this getting this one right:
Delete the other person in the example, and you're left with:
"The clerk gave a free sample to ... I."
"... me went to the outdoor show this past weekend."
If it doesn't sound right, it probably isn't.

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Here's another take on it, from Dr. Grammar:
http://www.drgrammar.org/frequently-asked-questions#34

In the old days when people studied traditional grammar, we could simply say, "The first person singular pronoun is I when it's a subject and me when it's an object,' but now few people know what that means. The misuse of I and myself for me is caused by nervousness about me. [. . .] But the notion that there is something wrong with me leads people to overcorrect and avoid it where it is perfectly appropriate. People will say, 'The document had to be signed by both Susan and I' when the correct statement would be, 'The document had to be signed by both Susan and me.'

Trying even harder to avoid the lowly me, many people will substitute myself as in 'The suspect uttered epithets at Officer O'Leary and myself.' Myself is no better than I as an object. Myself is not a sort of all-purpose intensive form of me or I . Usemyself only when you have used I earlier in the same sentence: 'I am not particularly fond of goat cheese myself'" (Brians,Common Errors in English Usage).

If you've read this far, you might enjoy Dr. Grammar's website:
http://www.drgrammar.org/



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And, in closing...

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Did You Know?
http://didyouknow.org/


Seven Styles Of Tuvan Throat Singing
http://tinyurl.com/3nck8tj


The ridiculous complexity of United Kingdom vs. Great Britain
http://tinyurl.com/48fv734


Fifteen Thousand Useful Phrases
http://www.globusz.com/ebooks/UsefulPhrases/00000010.htm


ODDEE - A blog on oddities
http://www.oddee.com/


Bowfishing for Asian carp in the Illinois river
http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=ddc_1238542203