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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
October 29, 2006

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 1715 subscribers.
Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes and a disclaimer.

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian Content

1. British Columbia : Premier Campbell says new measures coming in February '07 BC Budget will help people with mental illness and addictions, welfare recipients and the homeless - October 8
2. Time to Raise Welfare Rates in British Columbia - Kesselman (Vancouver Sun) - October 27
3. Does rising GDP mean more happiness? (CBC News Viewpoint) - October 26
4. Take Back Your Time Day - October 24
5. November 2006 Report of the Auditor General of Canada to the House of Commons due November 28 (incl. a chapter on Old Age Security)

6. Seniors in Canada: 2006 Report Card (National Advisory Council on Aging)
- October 26
7. Report of the Expert Panel for the Children's Fitness Tax Credit (Department of Finance Canada) - October 26
8. Income Assistance for Post-Secondary Education - Nova Scotia (Department of Community Services) - October 26
9. Release of The Fiscal Monitor for August 2006 (Department of Finance Canada) - October 24
10. What's New from Statistics Canada:
--- Population Projections for Canada, Provinces and Territories, 2005-2031 - October 26
--- Food consumption, 2005 - October 25
--- Employment Insurance, August 2006 - October 24

11. Social Inclusion Health Indicators: A Framework for Addressing the Social Determinants of Health (Inclusive Cities Canada) - October 2006
12. British Columbia Ministry of Community Services:
--- BC Seniors' Guide (2006 edition)
--- BC Women's Services Directory
13.
What's New from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (University of Toronto) - October 27

International Content

14. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
15. Economic Success Clearinghouse (formerly the Welfare Information Network) - U.S.
16. Raise U.S. Minimum Wage, say 11 Nobel Prize winners and 650 economists (Economic Policy Institute) - October 11
17. Eighth Annual Report 2006: Strategy Document (U.K) (Department for Work and Pensions - London) - October 17
18. National Reports on Strategies for Social Protection and Social Inclusion 2006-2008 - European Union


Have a great week!

Gilles Séguin
Canadian Social Research Links

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net

E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com

1. British Columbia : Premier Campbell says new measures coming in February '07 BC Budget will
help people with mental illness and addictions, welfare recipients and the homeless - October 8

B.C. Premier vows to help the homeless, raise welfare
But speech draws fire from Opposition by not putting money on the table
October 28, 2006
VANCOUVER -- B.C. Premier Gordon Campbell made a firm commitment yesterday to bring in new measures to help people with mental illness and addictions, welfare recipients and the homeless. But he stopped far short of putting money on the table or even any flesh on his promises.
Source:
The Globe and Mail

B.C. to boost shelter allowance
October 28, 2006
VICTORIA -- Premier Gordon Campbell promised Friday that his government will boost the $325 monthly shelter allowance for the province's poorest residents, saying he cannot tolerate the rising numbers of homeless people forced onto the province's streets.
Source:
The Vancouver Sun

October 28, 2006
Four Month or More Delay in Welfare Shelter
NOTE: this article will move to a unique URL within the first few days of November.
If the article isn't at the above link when you click on it, go to the Strategic Thoughts Archive for September-October 2006 and select the article from the list by clicking on its title.

- includes a link to the Speech by Premier Campbell to the Union of B.C. Municipalities (October 27) where he vowed that he would increase the welfare shelter allowance; also includes links to other related resources, i.e., info about the new Rental Assistance Program for low-income families (excluding families receiving welfare) plus links to the current welfare shelter allowance levels and caseload statistics.

Source:
StrategicThoughts.com

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (C-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

2. Time to Raise Welfare Rates in British Columbia - Kesselman - October 27
(Vancouver Sun)

October 27, 2006
Time to raise welfare rates (BC)
SFU economist Jon Kesselman makes the links between rising homelessness and BC’s abysmal welfare rates in this commentary from the Vancouver Sun:
"A whole $6! Every day! Imagine that you wake up each morning with six dollars burning a hole in your pocket. Let’s see: How might you spend your money? Maybe contemplate breakfast, a midday meal and supper at nightfall? (...) Welfare benefits for employable single persons in B.C. are $185 per month (the daily $6) plus a $325 monthly housing allowance, for a grand total of $510. These figures have been unchanged since 1994 despite a rise in living costs of nearly 30 per cent; the benefits are just one-third of what Statistics Canada computes as the low-income cutoff. So should we be surprised to find B.C.’s city streets and lanes looking increasingly like scenes from a Dickens novel? (...) A campaign endorsed by many community groups, called “Raise the Rates” (www.raisetherates.org), may help to heighten public awareness."
Posted October 27 by:
Marc Lee
Relentlessly Progressive Economics
"Commentary on Canadian economics and public policy"

Raise the Rates (BC)
In 2002, the BC government introduced new welfare policies that significantly reduced income assistance and increased the barriers to getting assistance. These changes have led to suffering and hardship for those in need. Please join us in pressing the provincial government to reduce poverty by improving the welfare system and raising the minimum wage.
The campaign focuses on four principal areas: Welfare Rates | Barriers to Welfare | Employment | Minimum Wage. Follow the above link for more info on each of these issues.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Sites in British Columbia (C-W) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk3.htm

3. Does rising GDP mean more happiness? - October 26
(CBC News Viewpoint)

Beware of politicians who equate rising GDP with happiness
October 26, 2006
When gross domestic product was first thought up in the 1930s as a measure of an economy based on the value of all the goods and services produced, it was greeted as a wonder tool. Having stumbled through the Great Depression without any reliable signposts, politicians and policymakers were ecstatic to have a reliable gauge of what was happening in the economy. But even as the accolades poured in, one of its inventors, Stanley Kuznets, warned that his tool had limits.
"The welfare of a nation can scarcely be inferred from a measure of national income," he told the U.S. Congress. In the seven decades since, politicians have forgotten that warning.
Source:
CBC News Viewpoint

Related Links:

Centre for the Study of Living Standards (Ottawa)
Genuine Progress Index Pacific (Vancouver)
Canadian Index of Wellbeing
--- Atkinson Foundation (Toronto)
Genuine Progress Indicator Alberta ( from the Pembina Institute)
Genuine Progress Index Atlantic (Nova Scotia)
Genuine Progress Indicator - from Redefining Progress (California)

Links to other similar organizations (from GPI Atlantic)- 28 in all

- Go to the Poverty Measures - Canadian Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty.htm

4. Take Back Your Time Day - October 24

Take Back Your Time Day - October 24
Take Back Your Time is a major U.S./Canadian initiative to challenge the epidemic of overwork, over-scheduling and time famine that now threatens our health, our families and relationships, our communities and our environment. October 24th Is Take Back Your Time Day.
- incl. links to: Home | Join Our E-Mail List | Handbook | Contact | News & Events | Media About TBYT Day | Four Windows Of Time | Public Policy Agenda | Support Time Day

- Go to the Work-Life Balance Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/work_life_balance.htm

5. November 2006 Report of the Auditor General of Canada to the House of Commons due November 28
(includes a chapter on Old Age Security)

November 2006 Report of the Auditor General of Canada to the House of Commons
The Auditor General is expected to table her Report in the House of Commons on 28 November 2006.

Here's what you'll find in the 12 chapters contained in the Report:
(Click the link above for a brief description of each chapter; I've included the text for Chapter 6 on Old Age Security below for info...)

Chapter 1 — Expenditure Management System at the Government Centre.
Chapter 2 — Expenditure Management System in Departments.
Chapter 3 — Large Information Technology Projects.
Chapter 4 — Proper Conduct of Public Business—Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Agencies.
Chapter 5 — Relocating Members of the Canadian Forces, RCMP, and Federal Public Service.
Chapter 6 — Old Age Security—Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Service Canada.
The Old Age Security (OAS) program provides a basic income for its beneficiaries. Around 4 million people receive OAS benefits amounting to a total of about $28 billion per year—14 percent of the federal government's total yearly spending. Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Service Canada manage the program. The audit examined whether these organizations provide adequate access to program benefits, have reasonable assurance that correct benefits are paid to eligible beneficiaries, and record and collect overpayments in accordance with legislation and policy.

Chapter 7 — Federal Participation in the British Columbia Treaty Process—Indian and Northern Affairs Canada.
Chapter 8 — Allocating Funds to Regulatory Programs—Health Canada.
Chapter 9 — Pension and Insurance Administration—Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
Chapter 10 — Award and Management of a Health Benefits Contract—Public Works and Government Services Canada and Health Canada.
Chapter 11 — Protection of Public Assets—Office of the Correctional Investigator.
Chapter 12 — Role of Federally Appointed Board Members—Sustainable Development Technology Canada.

Source:
Office of the Auditor-General of Canada

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Seniors (Social Research) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/seniors.htm

6. Seniors in Canada: 2006 Report Card - October 26
(National Advisory Council on Aging)

Complacency in Caring for Seniors is not an Option
News Release
October 26, 2006 -- The National Advisory Council on Aging (NACA) is unveiling today the results of its Seniors in Canada: 2006 Report Card at the Canadian Association on Gerontology Meeting in Quebec City. The Report Card looked at how well Canadian seniors are doing in five key areas: health status, health care system, economic situation, living conditions and participation in society. The overall grade for the five questions under study is a 'B'.

Complete report:

Seniors in Canada 2006 Report Card
HTML version
PDF version
(544K,70 pages)

Source:
National Advisory Council on Aging

Related Links:

Seniors in Canada: 2006 Report Card:
Message from Tony Clement, Minister of Health

October 27
Today, the National Advisory Council on Aging (NACA) presented its report titled Seniors in Canada: 2006 Report Card. The report reviews data and trends, and describes progress made over the last five years related to key areas affecting seniors' health and well-being.
Source:
Division of Aging and Seniors
[ Public Health Agency of Canada ]

- Go to the Health Links (Canada/International) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/health.htm
- Go to the Seniors (Social Research) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/seniors.htm

7. Report of the Expert Panel for the Children's Fitness Tax Credit - October 26
(Department of Finance Canada)

Canada’s New Government Receives Report on Children’s Fitness Tax Credit
October 26, 2006
News Release
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, today received a report from a panel of health and physical fitness experts recommending which programs of physical activity should qualify for the Children’s Fitness Tax Credit proposed in Budget 2006.
Source:
Canada's New Government

Related Link:

Report of the Expert Panel
for the Children's Fitness Tax Credit
HTML version
PDF version
(801K, 49 pages)

- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

8. Income Assistance for Post-Secondary Education (Nova Scotia) - October 26
(Department of Community Services)

Income Assistance for Post-Secondary Education (Nova Scotia)
October 26, 2006
The Department of Community Services is creating opportunities for eligible income assistance recipients to get the education they need for a brighter future. Community Services Minister Judy Streatch announced today, Oct. 26, a new pilot program called Career Seek which will allow income assistance clients to attend university or a post-secondary education program of more than two years and still receive benefits from the income assistance program. (...) Individuals who have received income assistance for 12 months and have identified a post-secondary education as part of their employment plan, are eligible to apply for Career Seek. Over the next four years, 50 individuals each year will have an opportunity to participate in this program. The first participants could start their programs as early as January 2007.
Source:
Nova Scotia Department of Community Services

Related Link:

Critics slam school assistance program
October 26, 2006
A pilot program that will allow 50 people on social assistance to keep their money while attending university comes up short, critics charge.
"I would have thought this program would have been better thought out by the time we got here today," Liberal MLA Stephen MacNeil said Thursday as the program was announced. Community Services Minister Judy Streatch says Career Seek will help people on social assistance go to university or an educational program longer than two years. To qualify, applicants must have received assistance for a year and have chosen post-secondary education as part of their job plan. They also have to complete a career assessment to find the right courses to get a job. (...)Streatch says 200 people will take part in the program over the next four years, with the first participants starting class in January. The province has been cutting social assistance for people who want to go to university since 1999.
Source:
CBC.CA

- Go to the Nova Scotia Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/nsbkmrk.htm

9. Release of The Fiscal Monitor for August 2006 - October 24
(Department of Finance Canada)

What's New from Finance Canada:

October 24, 2006
Release of The Fiscal Monitor for August 2006
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, today released The Fiscal Monitor for August 2006.
Highlights:
August 2006: budgetary surplus of $6 million

April to August 2006: budgetary surplus of $6.7 billion
.

Related Link:

Fiscal Monitor - August 2006
The Fiscal Monitor 2006 - all months up to August
The Fiscal Monitor is a monthly publication that provides details on the federal government’s fiscal performance, including revenues, expenses, the budgetary balance and the financial source/requirement.

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

10. What's New from Statistics Canada:
---
Population Projections for Canada, Provinces and Territories, 2005-2031 - October 26
--- Food consumption, 2005 - October 25
--- Employment Insurance, August 2006 - October 24

What's New from The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

October 26, 2006
Canada's population by age and sex, as of July 1, 2006
Canada's population keeps getting older, as is the case for almost every other developed nation in the world. As of July 1, 2006, the median age of the population reached a record high of 38.8 years, compared to 38.5 a year before and 37.2 in 2001.

Related Link:
Population Projections for Canada, Provinces and Territories, 2005-2031 (PDF file - 1.6MB, 216 pages)
[ HTML version ]
December 2005
This report presents the results of six population projection scenarios by age group and sex up to 2031 for the provinces and territories and up to 2056 for Canada. Using the July 1, 2005 population estimate as the starting point, these projections are based on assumptions that take into account the most recent trends relating to components of population growth, particularly fertility, mortality, immigration, emigration and interprovincial migration.

October 25
Food consumption, 2005
On the whole, Canadians are turning to more fresh fruits and vegetables in their diet, and away from oils and fats, according to the latest snapshot of food consumption for 2005. On average, they consumed 39.4 kilograms of fresh fruit in 2005, compared with 37.6 kg a year earlier and 36.0 kg in 1995. On the other hand, consumption of processed fruits (canned, frozen or dry) fell modestly to 8.0 kg per person. (...) The level of energy consumed per person declined by 1.1% in 2005. Caloric consumption has been stable this decade after expanding fairly rapidly during the 1990s.

Related Link:
Food Statistics - 2005, vol. 5, no. 2 (PDF file - 462K, 37 pages)
October 2006
"This publication contains information on food consumption, food prices and nutrition, as well as data on the food industry, processing, employment, productivity and trade."

Earlier editions of Food Statistics - links to 11 editions back to 2001

October 24, 2006
Employment Insurance, August 2006 (preliminary)
An estimated 492,240 Canadians (seasonally adjusted) received regular Employment Insurance benefits in August, up 3.8% from July. The increase at the national level was primarily due to advances in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, and Ontario. These increases, however, may be related to a July timing issue. An unusually large number of July claimants had not received benefits in time for the mid-July reference week, due to the required two week waiting period. As a result, the number of July beneficiaries was low and inflated the month-to-month July to August change. The mid-month reference week is used for consistency with the Labour Force Survey.

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm
- Go to the Social Statistics Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm
- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Human Resources and Social Development Canada Links page - http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/hrsdc.ht

11. Social Inclusion Health Indicators: A Framework for Addressing the Social Determinants of Health - October 2006
(Inclusive Cities Canada)

Inclusive Cities Canada releases third policy and practice paper
October 23, 2006
Inclusive Cities Canada (ICC) releases its third policy and practice paper to advance social inclusion in cities and communities across Canada . The new paper by Philip O’Hara and two earlier papers build on the recommendations of the 2005 social inclusion audit reports.

Social Inclusion Health Indicators:
A Framework for Addressing the Social Determinants of Health
(PDF file - 202K, 28 pages)
By Philip O’Hara
October 2006
Drawing on the national ICC research and the results of the social inclusion inquiry in Edmonton , Mr. O’Hara’s paper explores the close link between the dimensions of social inclusion and social determinants of health. The paper suggests social inclusion health indicators for Edmonton that are based on the ICC research and our knowledge about the SDOH. Key outcomes and lead indicators will be identified for each of the ICC dimensions of social inclusion, which will point to recommendations for public policy and community practice.

The two papers released previously are:

- An ICC Recommendation Comes to Life: The Municipal Youth Cabinet’s Role in Inclusion by Kathryn Asher
- The Municipal Franchise and Social Inclusion in Toronto : Policy and Practice by Myer Siemiatycki
Go to the Inclusive Cities Canada Home page and click on "Publications & Perspectives" to read summaries of both of these papers and to download the complete papers.

For more information, contact:
Christa Freiler, ICC National Coordinator [ cfreiler@sympatico.ca ]
Phil O’Hara [ oharap@shaw.ca ]
John Kolkman, Edmonton Social Planning Council [ JohnKolkman@edmspc.com ]

Source:
Inclusive Cities Canada

- Go to the Municipalities Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/municipal.htm

12. British Columbia Ministry of Community Services
--- BC Seniors' Guide (2006 edition)
--- BC Women's Services Directory

Ministry of Community Services
"The Ministry of Community Services’ mandate is to promote sustainable, liveable communities that provide healthy and safe places for British Columbians. It works in partnership with other ministries, local and federal governments, the private sector, and not-for-profit organizations to develop policy and deliver programs and services regarding local government, seniors’, women’s and community issues." [Excerpt from Ministry Overview ]

- BC Seniors Home Page - incl. links to : Helping Seniors Live Well * BC Seniors' Guide * BC Seniors' Information Line * Premier's Council on Aging and Seniors' Issues * much more...
***
BC Seniors' Guide - 8th edition
(2006)
HTML - click on links in the left column: Health Services * Housing * Transportation * Finances * Lifestyles * Personal Security * Other Services * Directory
PDF (1.8MB, 120 pages)

- Women's Services - incl. links to : Stopping The Violence Counselling Programs - Children Who Witness Abuse Counselling - Transition Houses - Safe Homes - Second Stage Housing - Outreach and Multicultural Outreach Services
- On-line Directory of Services for Women (see next link below) - more...
***
Women's Services Directory - 100+ links organized under the following headings: Aboriginal Women - Women with Disabilities - Immigrant and Visible Minority - Women Women's Health - Parenting and Family Violence and Justice Services for Women - Work, Education and Economics - Other Related Sites

- Go to the BC Government Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bcbkmrk.htm

13. What's New from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit - October 27
(University of Toronto)

What's New - from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) - University of Toronto

27-Oct-06

---------------------------------------------------
What's New
---------------------------------------------------

Strong foundations: Early childhood care and education
27 Oct 06
- UNESCO's 2007 Education for All Global Monitoring Report.
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=92590

Early learning and child care and Education for All
27 Oct 06
- To mark the release of the 2007 Global Monitoring Report, this CRRU Issue File collects resources from EFA, as well as other useful UNESCO documents.
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=92584

Investing in children: Public commitment in twenty-one industrialized countries
27 Oct 06
- Article by Sheila Kamerman and Shirley Gatenio Gabel for the Social Service Review explores public spending on children and their families from 1980 through 2001.
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=92645

Reducing child & family poverty in a time of prosperity: The roles of tax benefits, public investments and the labour market
27 Oct 06
- Submission by Campaign 2000 to the Standing Committee on Finance Pre-Budget Consultation.
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=92631

The financial reality behind the federal child care spaces initiative: A mismatch of mythic proportions
27 Oct 06
- Brief from the Child Care Advocacy Association of Canada looks at what the federal spaces initiative will mean for provinces.
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=92646

More What's New Online
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_whatsnew.shtml

--------------------------------------------------
Child Care in the News
--------------------------------------------------

Canada doesn't practise what it preaches in early childhood care and education [CA]
26 Oct 06
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=92591

Spending on childcare ranked low [AU]
25 Oct 06
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=92626

Harper fails to grasp challenges of real women [CA]
21 Oct 06
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=92630

The building blocks of a global empire [AU]
20 Oct 06
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=92625

The social welfare state, beyond ideology
17 Oct 06
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_full.shtml?x=92431

More Child Care in the News
http://action.web.ca/home/crru/rsrcs_crru_inthenews.shtml

Related Links:

Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere
CRRU Publications
- briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) - University of Toronto

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm
- Go to the International Children, Families and Youth Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chn2.htm

14. Poverty Dispatch:
U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs

Poverty Dispatch - U.S.
- links to news items from the American press about poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.
NOTE: this is a link to the current issue --- its content changes twice a week.

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to two dispatches a week back to June 1 (2006) when the Dispatch acquired its own web page and archive.

Poverty Dispatch Digest Archive - weekly digest of dispatches from August 2005 to May 2006
For a few years prior to the creation of this new web page for the Dispatch, I was compiling a weekly digest of the e-mails and redistributing the digest to my mailing list with IRP's permission.
This is my own archive of weekly issues of the digest back to August 2005, and most of them have 50+ links per issue. I'll be deleting this archive from my site gradually, as the links to older articles expire.

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

15. Economic Success Clearinghouse - U.S.
(formerly the Welfare Information Network)

Economic Success Clearinghouse - U.S.
(formerly the Welfare Information Network)
Economic Success Clearinghouse connects you to resources about effective policies, programs and financing strategies that help low-income and working poor families.

Economic Success Clearinghouse resources include:

Welfare
- Cash assistance for low-income families with dependent children

Workforce development
- Services to help individuals connect to the job market, develop work-related skills, sustain employment, and advance in the labor market

Work supports
- Services, such as child care and food, housing, and transportation assistance, to help low-income families secure and retain employment

Income supplements
- Benefits, such as child support and tax credits, that boost the earnings of low-income workers

Asset development
- Supports designed to help low-income families build personal and financial resources, and achieve economic security

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm

16. Raise U.S. Minimum Wage, say 11 Nobel Prize winners and 650 economists - October 11
(Economic Policy Institute)

Economic Policy Institute (US) on Minimum Wage
In a joint statement issued on Wednesday, October 11, five Nobel Prize winners and over 650 other economists endorsed a statement urging a raise in the minimum wage. The statement asserts that a modest raise in the minimum wage (in the range of a $1.00 to $2.50 per hour), with future increases indexed to protect the workers’ purchasing power, “can significantly improve the lives of low-income workers and their families, without the adverse effects that critics have claimed.”
- incl. links to two EPI articles on minimum wages
Posted October 28 by:
Andrew Jackson
Relentlessly Progressive Economics
"Commentary on Canadian economics and public policy"

- Go to the Minimum Wage /Living Wage Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/minwage.htm

17. Eighth Annual Report 2006: Strategy Document (U.K) - October 17
(Department for Work and Pensions - London)

Hutton: ‘Second earners key to tackling child poverty’ - U.K.
Press Release
17 October 2006
The latest edition of the annual cross-Government report Opportunity for All is published today to mark the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. This year the document has a special focus on child poverty in the UK bringing together progress so far as well as indicating where the Government has more to do.

Complete report:

Opportunity for all: Eighth Annual Report 2006
Strategy document
(PDF file - 2.2MB, 172 pages) - U.K.
Presented to Parliament by the Secretary of State
for Work and Pensions by Command of Her Majesty
October 2006
- in addition to overview information on the full range of programs administered by the Department for Work and Pensions for their clientele (including welfare reform) and an 83-page document on indicators, this report includes a 30-page chapter focusing on child poverty and covering the following topics:
--- What is child poverty and who does it affect? - Measuring child poverty - How many children are poor? - Which children are in poverty? - The importance of reducing child poverty - Tackling child poverty - Increasing parental employment - Lone parent families - Couple families - Making work pay - Financial support for families with children - Child Tax Credit - Child support - Tackling material deprivation - Housing and homelessness - Financial inclusion - Improving life chances for poor children through public services - Early years and childcare -Sure Start - Education - Looked-after children - Disabled children - Parenting - Improving parents’ skills - Health - Teenage pregnancy - Transport - Families at risk, child crime, drugs and anti-social behaviour - Getting involved and extending opportunities - Working together - Meeting our ambition

Source:
Department for Work and Pensions (London)

- Go to the Government Social Research Links in Other Countries page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internat.htm

18. National Reports on Strategies for Social Protection and Social Inclusion 2006-2008
(European Union)

National Action Plans Against Poverty and Social Exclusion:
National Reports on Strategies for Social Protection and Social Inclusion 2006-2008

- incl. Austria - Belgium - Bulgaria - Cyprus - Czech Republic - Denmark - Estonia - France - Finland - Germany - Greece - Hungary - Ireland - Italy - Latvia - Lithuania - Luxembourg - Malta - Netherlands - Poland - Portugal - Romania - Slovakia - Slovenia - Sweden -United Kingdom
Source:
Reports
[ part of Social Inclusion ]
[ part of Employment and Social Affairs ]
[ part of Europa - Gateway to the European Union ]

- Go to the Government Social Research Links in Other Countries page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internat.htm



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I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research
Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:

gilseg@rogers.com


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Lord, Give me a sign
--- in fact, give me 25 of them!



On a maternity room door: Push. Push. Push.

On a Music Teacher's door: Out Chopin.

On a New York convalescent home: For the sick and tired of the Episcopal Church

On a plumber's truck: We repair what your husband fixed.

On a repair shop door: We can repair anything. (Please knock hard — bell out of order.)

On a restaurant: Try our fish just for the halibut.

On a Scientist's door: Gone Fission

On a taxidermist's window: We really know our stuff.

On a Tennessee highway: Take notice: when this sign is under water, this road is impassable.

On an electrician's truck: Let us remove your shorts.

On an established New Mexico dry cleaning store: Thirty-eight years on the same spot.

On an United Airlines emergency exit row instruction card: If you cannot read this card...

On another Butcher's window: Pleased to meat you.

On the door of a Computer Store: Out for a quick byte.

On the door of a Music Library: Bach in a min-u-et.

On the grounds of a private school in Connecticut: No trespassing without permission.

On the menu of a New Orleans restaurant: Blackened bluefish

On the wall of a Baltimore estate: Trespassers will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law. - Sisters of Mercy

Outside a country shop in West Virginia: We buy junk and sell antiques.

Outside a disco: Smarts is the most exclusive disco in town. Everyone welcome.

Outside a farm: Horse manure, pre-packed bags, $10. Or, do-it-yourself, $1.

Outside a Hotel: Help! We need inn-experienced people.

Outside a muffler shop: No appointment necessary. We heard you coming.

Outside a photographer’s studio: Out to lunch; if not back by five, out for dinner.

Outside a radiator repair shop: Best place in town to take a leak.

Source:
Somewhere out there in www.land

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Crass Casualty (My blog)
http://canadiansocialresearch.net/mywordpress/