Canadian Social Research Links logo 
Canadian Social Research Newsletter
November 29, 2009

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 2,148 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes, a disclaimer
and other stuff that has nothing whatsoever to do with social policy...

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian content

1.  2009 Report Cards on Child and Family Poverty in Canada and [selected] provinces (Campaign 2000) - November 24
2. Corporate 'welfare' hit $200B in 13 years: Report
(Fraser Institute) - November 28
3. Mincome Manitoba remembered... (Winnipeg Free Press) - November 28
4. Release of The Fiscal Monitor for September 2009 (Finance Canada) - November 27
5. A Stronger Foundation: Pension Reform and Old Age Security (Monica Townson for the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) - November 25
6. Study : Hope and a home for more than 1,300 street people across Canada (Mental Health Commission of Canada) - November 23

7. Health Care in Canada 2009 (Canadian Institute for Health Information) - October 29
8. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Canada's population estimates: Age and sex, July 1, 2009 - November 27
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, September 2009
- November 26
--- Access and Support to Education and Training Survey, 2008 - November 25
--- Employment Insurance, September 2009 - November 24
--- Study: Quality of employment in the Canadian immigrant labour market, 2008 - November 23
9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - November 29

International content

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs (Institute for Research on Poverty - U. of Wisconsin-Madison)
11. [U.S] Food stamp use soars as stigma fades (New York Times) - November 28
12. Australian Policy Online - recent content
13. CRINMAIL (children's rights newsletter) - November 2009

Have a great week!
Gilles

************************
Gilles Séguin

Canadian Social Research Links
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net


E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com

1. 2009 Report Cards on Child and Family Poverty in Canada and [selected] provinces - November 24
(Campaign 2000)

2009 Report Cards on Child and Family Poverty in Canada and [selected] provinces
November 24

Campaign 2000

On November 24, Campaign 2000 and seven of its provincial partners marked the 20th anniversary of the unanimous House of Commons’ all-party resolution to end child poverty in Canada with the release of special national and provincial report cards in various cities across the country. (...) Also on Nov. 24, the House of Commons passed a motion of the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities Committee (known as the HUMA Committee) "that the Government of Canada (...) develop an immediate plan to eliminate poverty in Canada for all." [ From Campaign 2000 ]

Below, you'll find links to the Campaign 2000 national and provincial reports, to the HUMA motion and to other related resources.

---

From Campaign 2000:

Poverty Reduction Key to Canada’s Economic Recovery
News Release
November 24, 2009
OTTAWA – Canada’s economic recovery hinges on federal leadership to pull recession victims out of the poor house and prevent Canadians from plunging into deeper poverty, hunger and homelessness, says Campaign 2000’s new report card on child and family poverty. Keep the Promise: Make Canada Poverty-Free looks at the nation’s most recent child and family after-tax poverty rate compared to 20 years ago, when Parliament unanimously resolved to end child poverty by 2000, and finds today’s after-tax rate is 9.5 per cent, a slight budge from 11.9 per cent in 1989.

Key findings:
* One in 10 children still live in poverty in Canada today. It’s worse for children living in First Nation’s communities: one in four grow up in poverty;
* There are more working poor: 40 per cent of low-income children live in families where at least one parent works full-time year round, up dramatically from 33 per cent in the 1990s;
* Child poverty is persistent across Canada: rates of child and family poverty (LICO before-tax) are in the double digits in most provinces.
* The gap between rich and poor has widened: On average, for every dollar the families in the poorest 10 per cent had, families in the richest 10 per cent had almost 12 times as much ($11.84) in 2007.

-----------------------------
The national report:
-----------------------------

Keep the Promise: Make Canada Poverty-Free (PDF - 488K, 12 pages)
* Oh Canada! Too Many Children in Poverty for Too Long
* Children Live In Poverty Across Canada
* Work Is Not Working for Families
* Some Children and Families are More Vulnerable to Poverty than Others
* The Unique Situation of Aboriginal Children and Families in Poverty
* Early Childhood Education and Care Services: A 20-Year Child Care Roller Coaster Ride
* The Growing Gap Between Rich and Poor
* Canada Lags behind Other Rich Nations
* Affordable Housing
* Post-Secondary Education: A Key Pathway out of Poverty
* Noteworthy Facts on Poverty in Canada
* Ending Child Poverty Will Benefit All of Us
* A Plan to Make Canada Poverty-Free
[TIP: You'll find almost two dozen links to related resources in the "Endnotes" section of the report on pp.10-11]

Version française:
Tenez vos promesses: faites du Canada un pays sans pauvreté
Rapport 2009 sur la pauvreté des enfants et des familles au Canada : 1989 - 2009
(PDF - 504Ko., 12 pages)

---------------------------------
The provincial reports:
---------------------------------

British Columbia

British Columbia Report Card on Child and Family Poverty (PDF - 886K, 23 pages)
November 2009
The BC Child Poverty Report Card includes nine fact sheets that analyze various aspects of child poverty in BC.:
1. BC Had the Worst Record – Six Years in a Row
2. Child Poverty Over the Years
3. Child Poverty by Family Type
4. Persistence of Poverty
5. Child Poverty and Working Parents
6. Families with Children on Welfare
7. Incomes of Families with Children
8. Child Poverty and the Importance of Government Help
9. What Needs to Happen
Melanie’s Story – The Human Face of Child Poverty
Appendix : Measures of Poverty
Source:
First Call: BC Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition

BC Child poverty rate still the worst in Canada:
when will the provincial government take action?
(PDF - 79K, 2 pages)
News Release
November 24, 2009
For six years in a row, British Columbia has had the highest child poverty rate in Canada tied only with Manitoba in 2007. Figures released today by First Call, the BC partner in Campaign 2000, show BC at a rate of 18.8 percent of children living in poverty in 2007. The Canadian average in that same year was 15 percent.

Sign the petition for a
BC Poverty Reduction Plan

Source:
BC Poverty Reduction

---

Alberta

We Must Do Better: Alberta Report on Recent Forums in the Province (PDF - 2.1MB, 20 pages)
November 2009
During 2009, nearly 400 people came together at seven forums around Alberta to share experiences and thoughts about economic poverty. The Edmonton Social Planning Council and Public Interest Alberta helped organize the forums around the 2008 “We Can Do Better” report.
[ Highlights (PDF file - 58K, 2 pages)]

We Can Do Better: Toward an Alberta Child & Family Poverty Reduction Strategy (PDF - 2.1MB, 20 pages)
November 2008
We Can Do Better outlines the most current statistics on child and family poverty in Alberta & offers solutions that would allow us to do better for our most vulnerable children and families.

It's Time to Make Alberta Poverty-Free:
Albertans Call on Governments to Work Together to
Establish a Poverty Elimination Strategy

Media Release
November 24, 2009
A provincial network of people and organizations is calling upon the provincial, federal and municipal governments to work together with community organizations and others to develop a plan to eliminate poverty in Alberta.
Source:
Public Interest Alberta
Edmonton Social Planning Council

---

Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan Report Card on Child and Family Poverty (PDF - 239K, 8 pages)
November 2009
* 35,000 Children in Poverty in Saskatchewan
* No Consistent Improvement Over Time
* Comparing Three Measures of Poverty
* Third Highest Provincial Child Poverty Rate
* 45% of Aboriginal Children in Low-Income Families
* More than One in Three Immigrant Children Poor
* 40% of Children in Female Lone-parent Families in Poverty
* Families Deeply in Poverty
* Saskatchewan Child Poverty Often Long Term
* One in Three Poor Children in Families with Full Employment
* Government Transfers Benefit Children
* Growing Gap Between Rich and Poor
* Child Poverty Rate High by International Standards
* Poverty Measures
Source:
Social Policy Research Unit
[ Faculty of Social Work ]
[ University of Regina ]

---

Manitoba

20 Years Lost: The Poverty Generation
Manitoba Report Card on Child and Family Poverty (PDF - 458K, 25 pages)
November 2009
All of the children living in poverty in Manitoba today were born since the members of the House of Commons passed the resolution to eliminate child poverty in 1989. (...) In Manitoba, 47,000 children live in poverty. That’s 18.8 per cent of all children, nearly one in five. Manitoba is once again the Child Poverty Capital of Canada, tied with British Columbia for having the highest number of citizens under the age of 18 living in poverty. That’s almost four percentage points above the national average.
Source:
Social Planning Council of Winnipeg

One is too many (PDF - 75K, 2 pages)
Media Release
November 24, 2009
Winnipeg Manitoba—a report released today by the Social Planning Council of Winnipeg (SPC) shows that Manitoba has regained the title of Child Poverty Capital of Canada, with nearly 1 in 5 children living in poverty.

---

Ontario

From Promise to Reality – Recession
Proofing Ontario Families
2009 Report Card on Child & Family Poverty in Ontario
(PDF - 234K, 8 pages)
November 2009
* Breaking the Cycle: Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy - Key commitments and progress as of November 2009
* Indicators of Child & Family Poverty: A 20 Year Retrospective
* Rate and Depth of Poverty
* Working Poor Families
* Children at Greater Risk of Poverty
* Children in Families on Social Assistance
* Food Bank Use by Children
* Access to Affordable Housing
* Access to Quality, Regulated Child Care
* Looking Ahead - The Need for Strong Leadership in Tough Times
* Next Steps in Poverty Reduction – What Ontario Needs to Do Now

Version française:
D’une promesse à la réalité – prémunir les familles ontariennes contre la récession

Rapport 2009 sur la pauvreté des enfants et des familles en Ontario
(PDF - 231Ko., 8 pages)
Novembre 2009

Source:
Campaign 2000

---

Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia Report Card on Child and Family Poverty 2009 (PDF - 214K, 23 pages)
November 2009
While Nova Scotia remains within the group of provinces with lower rates of child poverty, policymakers and elected representatives (those with the power to legislate the end of poverty) must act quickly and decisively to expand the progress achieved in recent years. Specific, targeted policies are needed to ensure that poverty rates and gaps are The Nova Scotia Child Poverty Report Card 2009 Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives–Nova Scotia 18 reduced for particular groups where there is greater risk of children and their families being exposed to poverty and the potential harm it carries. Most notably, income assistance rates need to be increased to a level that will provide families with children, who depend on welfare income, an annual income that will raise families out of poverty.

15,000 Nova Scotia children still in poverty
Press Release
November 23, 2009
HALIFAX, NS - Nova Scotia Child Poverty Report Cards have recorded changes in child poverty since 1999. Each annual card has tracked progress on the government of Canada’s 1989 promise to end child poverty. The report released today, by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, Nova Scotia, is the tenth card, and is being released on the 20th anniversary of Canada’s promise to eliminate poverty by the year 2000.

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) - Nova Scotia Office
[ CCPA National Office ]

---

New Brunswick

New Brunswick Report Card on Child and Family Poverty (PDF - 445K, 12 pages)
November 2009
In November 2009, New Brunswick joined the ranks of provinces that have adopted comprehensive poverty reduction strategies. Overcoming Poverty Together: The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan has set a target of reducing income poverty by 25% and deep income poverty by 50% by the year 2015.

Version française:
Rapport sur la pauvreté des enfants et des
familles au Nouveau Brunswick • 2009
(PDF - 456Ko., 12 pages)
Novembre 2009

Source:
Human Development Council - Saint John

------------------
Related links
------------------

From Rob Rainer,
Executive Director of
Canada Without Poverty
:
November 24, 2009

We are pleased to report some good news in the journey to more effectively combat poverty in Canada.
Today, the House of Commons passed the following motion as agreed to by the
House of Commons Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and
Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities ("HUMA")
:

"That, with November 24th, 2009 marking the 20th anniversary of the 1989 unanimous resolution of this House to eliminate poverty among Canadian children by the year 2000, and not having achieved that goal, be it resolved that the Government of Canada, taking into consideration the Committee’s work in this regard, and respecting provincial and territorial jurisdiction, develop an immediate plan to eliminate poverty in Canada for all."
Source:
Report 6 - Poverty Reduction in Canada
Adopted by the Committee on November 17, 2009;
Presented to the House on November 20, 2009;
Concurred in by the House on November 24, 2009.

---

With the motion now passed, there is Parliament’s commitment to a federal plan for the elimination of poverty. This is a major step towards accomplishing the first of the three goals of Dignity for All: The Campaign for a Poverty-free Canada. The challenge now is for parliamentarians and civil society – including those with the lived experience of poverty – to work together even more closely to determine the substance and timely delivery as well as the accountability mechanisms of the plan. And, to root the entire effort within a framework of Canada’s commitment to economic and social rights (food, housing, adequate standard of living etc.) such as enshrined within international human rights law to which Canada is signatory.

Today’s welcome motion came about thanks to the leading efforts of Laurel Rothman and her team at Campaign 2000, working with certain members of the HUMA Committee and other civil society groups. Kudos to Campaign 2000 and to the members of the HUMA Committee for today’s result!

Rob Rainer
Canada Without Poverty

---

Promises to end child poverty easier than progress
November 24, 2009
By Laurie Monsebraaten
Erica Vergara was born into a struggling immigrant family three months after federal MPs unanimously resolved to end child poverty by 2000. Today, on the 20th anniversary of that pledge, Vergara, 19, and her 3-year-old daughter Alizah, are the face of federal failure. They are among some 637,000 children – or almost one in 10 Canadian kids – living in poverty. That's down slightly from 11.9 per cent, or 792,000 children who were poor in 1989, says Campaign 2000, a national coalition that has been tracking the lack of progress on the federal promise for years. (...) National programs for child care, affordable housing and employment equity to help level the playing field for immigrants and people of colour who experience high rates of child poverty would make a huge difference for Vergara and other poor families raising children, says Campaign 2000's report. But ultimately, Canada needs a broader poverty reduction strategy.
Source:
Parent Central
[ Toronto Star ]

---

20th anniversary of Canada's broken promise to end child poverty
By Lynne Melcombe
November 24, 2009
Across Canada, individuals and groups are marking today as the 20-year anniversary of a unanimous vote in the House of Commons to end child poverty in Canada by the year 2000.
Source:
DigitalJournal.com

- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

2. Corporate 'welfare' hit $200B in 13 years: Report - November 28
(Fraser Institute)

Tab for business bailouts and subsidies between
1994 and 2007 exceeds $200 billion, or $15,000 per taxpayer

News Release
November 27, 2009
VANCOUVER, BC—Canadian governments provided businesses with more than $202 billion in bailouts, loans, and subsidies between 1994 and 2007, according to a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, one of Canada’s leading economic think tanks.

Corporate welfare breaks the $200 billion mark:
An update on 13 years of business subsidies in Canada
(PDF - 535K, 11 pages)
December 2009

Related link:

Corporate 'welfare' hit $200B in 13 years: Report
Bailouts, subsidies hurt taxpayers, says the Fraser Institute

By John Morrissy
November 28, 2009
Bailouts and subsidies to businesses by Canadian governments surpassed $200 billion between 1994 and 2007, adding up to $15,126 per taxpayer, according to a report Friday from the Fraser Institute.
Source:
Canwest News Service

- Go to the Banks and Business Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bookmrk3.htm

3. Mincome Manitoba remembered... - November 28
(Winnipeg Free Press)

Dauphin's great experiment: Mincome,
nearly forgotten child of the '70s, was a noble experiment

By Lindor Reynolds
November 28, 2009
DAUPHIN — Thirty-five years ago, this pretty town surrounded by farm land and far from big cities was the site of a revolutionary social experiment.
For five years, Mincome ensured there would be no poverty in Dauphin. Wages were topped up and the working poor given a boost. The experiment, a collaboration between Ed Schreyer's provincial NDP and the Liberal government of Pierre Trudeau, would cost millions before the plug was pulled. The program saw one-third of Dauphin's poorest families get monthly cheques. In 1971, at a federal-provincial conference held in Victoria, Manitoba expressed interest in being the testing ground for a guaranteed income project. The Schreyer government applied for funding. In June, 1974, Mincome was approved...
Source:
Winnipeg Free Press

- Go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm
- Go to the Manitoba Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/mbkmrk.htm

4. Release of The Fiscal Monitor for September 2009 - November 27
(Department of Finance Canada)

Release of The Fiscal Monitor for September 2009
November 27, 2009
The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, today released The Fiscal Monitor for September 2009.

Highlights:
September 2009: budgetary deficit of $5.0 billion
April to September 2009: budgetary deficit of $28.6 billion

Related document:

* The Fiscal Monitor for September 2009
[ earlier issues of The Fiscal Monitor ]

Source:
Department of Finance Canada

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Agriculture to Finance) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk.htm

5. A Stronger Foundation: Pension Reform and Old Age Security - November 25
(Monica Townson for the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

Old Age Security system needs strengthening: report
Press Release
November 25, 2009
OTTAWA—Canada’s Old Age Security system needs improvement in order to help ensure the economic security and dignity of Canadians in retirement, says a new report released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). The report, by pension expert and CCPA Research Associate Monica Townson, reviews OAS and its associated programs of the Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) and the Allowance and discusses measures that could be taken to strengthen this part of Canada’s pension system.

Complete report:

A Stronger Foundation: Pension Reform and Old Age Security (PDF - 146K, 7 pages)
November 2009

Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

- Go to the Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/hrsdc.htm
- Go to the Seniors (Social Research) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/seniors.htm

6. Study : Hope and a home for more than 1,300 street people across Canada - November 23
(Mental Health Commission of Canada)

Mental Health Commission of Canada Launches National Research Project to Find Sustainable Solutions for
People With Mental Health Issues Who Are Homeless : Study will investigate ‘Housing First’ approach
(PDF - 139K, 2 pages)
News Release
TORONTO, November 23, 2009 – The Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC) has implemented a ground-breaking national research project in five cities to find the best way to provide housing and services to people who are living with mental illness and homelessness. Using a ‘Housing First’ approach, the research project focuses on first providing people who are homeless with a place to live, and then the other assistance and services they require. The goal is to see if this approach is better than traditional ‘care as usual.’
Source:
Mental Health Commission of Canada
The Mental Health Commission of Canada is a non-profit organization created to focus national attention on mental health issues and to work to improve the health and social outcomes of people living with mental illness.

Related links:

Mentally ill get housing in study
565 Toronto homeless will enrol in research
November 23, 2009
The largest project in Canada's history to study the link between mental illness and homelessness kicks off Monday, offering hope – and a home – to more than 1,300 street people across the country. Housing first, rehabilitation will follow – that's the philosophy behind a national research project on homelessness and mental illness being launched by the new Mental Health Commission of Canada. (...) Altogether, 1,325 people will be given a place to live and social services during the study, which is to get $110 million in funding over the next five years. Participants are expected to contribute 30 per cent of their income, including welfare and disability payments. Canada has an estimated 300,000 homeless people. (...) The program is modelled after the successful Pathways to Housing Project, which was founded in New York City in 1992 and has since spread out to 40 cities worldwide.
Source:
The Toronto Star

Pathways to Housing - U.S.
Pathways to Housing was founded by Dr. Sam Tsemberis in 1992, and is widely credited as being the originator of the "Housing First" model of addressing homelessness among people with psychiatric disabilities. The Housing First model is simple: provide housing first, and then combine that housing with supportive treatment services in the areas of mental and physical health, substance abuse, education, and employment.

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

7. Health Care in Canada 2009 - October 29
(Canadian Institute for Health Information)

Health Care in Canada 2009
Date published: October 29, 2009
Health Care in Canada 2009: A Decade in Review is the tenth in a series of annual reports on Canada's health care system. Past issues of this report brought together statistics from a variety of sources to provide an overview of the Canadian health care system. With this anniversary edition we tell the story of the last decade in health care by focusing on key areas of change. Issues such as spending, policy, access and quality are examined in the context of where the health system was 10 years ago, how things have changed since then and the issues on the horizon.

Click the link above to access the full report, individual sections, companion products the media release and contacts

Full Report (PDF - 7MB, 120 pages)
Highlights (PDF - 86K, 2 pages)
Media Release (HTML) - October 29, 2009

Table of contents - download by chapter
* Introduction
* Chapter 1: Forces that Shaped Health Care in Canada
* Chapter 2: The Health of Canadians
* Chapter 3: Follow the Money
* Chapter 4: Access to Care
* Chapter 5: Quality, Safety and Outcomes
* Chapter 6: Taking Health Information Further
* Conclusion

Source:
Canadian Institute
for Health Information

- Go to the Health Links (Canada/International) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/health.htm

8. What's New in The Daily [Statistics Canada]:
--- Canada's population estimates: Age and sex, July 1, 2009 - November 27
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, September 2009
- November 26
--- Access and Support to Education and Training Survey, 2008 - November 25
--- Employment Insurance, September 2009 - November 24
--- Study: Quality of employment in the Canadian immigrant labour market, 2008 - November 23

Selected content from
The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

November 27, 2009
Canada's population estimates: Age and sex, July 1, 2009
Canada's population continues to get older. As of July 1, 2009, the median age of Canada's population was 39.5 years, up 0.2 years from the same date last year.
Fertility rates persistently below the generation replacement level, and an increasing life expectancy are the main factors explaining the ageing process of the Canadian population.
- includes two tables:
* Population estimates, age distribution and median age as of July 1, 2009
* Population estimates by sex and age group as of July 1, 2009, Canada

Related subjects
o Population and demography

---

November 26, 2009
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, September 2009
Non-farm payroll employment increased by 15,900 in September (+0.1%). Of the 305 industries surveyed, 170 or 55.7%, posted gains. This was the largest number of industries adding to their payrolls since July 2008.

[ Related link: Employment, Earnings and Hours - click "View" to see the latest issue]

Related subjects:
o Labour
o Employment and unemployment
o Hours of work and work arrangements
o Industries
o Wages, salaries and other earnings
o Non-wage benefits

---

November 25, 2009
Access and Support to Education and Training Survey, 2008
Growing numbers of Canadians, particularly middle-aged and older Canadians, participated in job-related education or training in 2008 compared with five years earlier. Family responsibilities, needing to work and conflicts with work schedules were cited as the most common reasons for not pursuing further education or training. In addition, more Canadian families are saving for postsecondary education.

Related link:

Lifelong Learning Among Canadians Aged 18 to 64 Years:
First Results from the 2008 Access and Support to Education and Training Survey

By Tamara Knighton, Filsan Hujaleh, Joe Iacampo and Gugsa Werkneh
November 2009

Related subjects:
o Education, training and learning
o Adult education and training
o Education finance

---

November 24, 2009
Employment Insurance, September 2009
The number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits rose by 54,300 (+7.1%) in September, following two months of declines. The largest increases in September occurred in Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia.
- incl. the following tables (at the bottom of the page):
*Employment Insurance: Statistics by province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by age group, sex, province and territory
* Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by census metropolitan areas

See also:
* Tables by subject: Employment insurance, social assistance and other transfers
* Employment Insurance Statistics Maps

Related subjects
o Labour
o Employment insurance, social assistance and other transfers
o Non-wage benefits

---

November 23, 2009
Study: Quality of employment in the Canadian immigrant labour market, 2008
In 2008, there were key differences in many indicators of quality of employment between immigrants and non-immigrants. On average, immigrant wages were lower, while rates of involuntary part-time work, temporary employment and over-qualification were higher. For immigrants who landed in Canada more than 10 years ago, however, the indicators of quality of employment more closely resembled those of the Canadian born.

Related report:

The 2008 Canadian Immigrant Labour Market: Analysis of Quality of Employment
By Jason Gilmore

---

Check The Daily Archives
- select a month and click on a date for that day's Daily

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

9. What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (Toronto) - November 29

What's new from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)

November 29, 2009

Keep the promise: Make Canada poverty-free
25 Nov 09
- New report cards from Campaign 2000 on the child and family after-tax poverty rate in Canada compared to 20 years ago.

40th parliament, 2nd session
25 Nov 09
- Questions and responses on child poverty at the House of Commons Tuesday November 24, 2009.

Not there yet: Canada's implementation of the General Measures of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child
25 Nov 09
- Joint publication from UNICEF Canada and UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre looking at Canada's progress in implementing the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Realising the rights of young children: progress and challenges
25 Nov 09
- Periodical from the Bernard van Leer Foundation exploring how various aspects of children's rights are being realized for young children.

Convention on the Rights of the Child: Third and fourth reports of Canada
25 Nov 09
- Reports submitted to the UN on November 20, 2009 outlining the status of Canadian children and measures adopted by governments to implement the UN CRC.

The state of the world's children: special edition
25 Nov 09
- Special report from UNICEF dedicated to child rights looking at the CRC's impact over the past 20 years, challenges for the next 20 years and an agenda for action.

more WHAT'S NEW ONLINE »

child care in the news

· 637,000 children in poverty
[CA] 25 Nov 09

· Re: Ending child poverty
[CA] 25 Nov 09

· Report says B.C. has highest child poverty rate in Canada for six years straight
[CA-BC] 24 Nov 09

· How to end child poverty: Tax the rich
[CA] 23 Nov 09

· Ending child poverty: A promise unfulfilled
[CA] 22 Nov 09

· Child-care advocate in Australia
[CA-NS] 22 Nov 09

· Forum addresses need for national child-care program
[CA] 19 Nov 09

more CC IN THE NEWS »

---

Subscribe to the CRRU email announcements list
Sign up to receive email notices of updates and new postings on the CRRU website which will inform you of policy developments in early childhood care and education, new research and resources for policy, newly released CRRU publications, and upcoming events of interest to the child care and broader community.

Links to child care sites in Canada and elsewhere

CRRU Publications - briefing notes, factsheets, occasional papers and other publications
ISSUE files - theme pages, each filled with contextual information and links to further info

Source:
Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU)
The Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CRRU) is a policy and research oriented facility that focuses on early childhood education and child care (ECEC) and family policy in Canada and internationally.

- Go to the Non-Governmental Early Learning and Child Care Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ecd2.htm

10. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Latest content from the Poverty Dispatch:

November 25:
Unemployment Insurance Fund - California
Unemployed Workers and Increasing Need for Assistance
Jobless Benefit Appeals - North Carolina
Young Black Men and Unemployment
Child Poverty - Canada
Drug Testing and TANF - Arizona
Welfare Reform - Australia
States and Food Stamp Administration
Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP)

November 24:
Food Assistance Programs
State Budget Cuts - Tennessee

November 23:
Child Care Subsidies - Hawaii
Homelessness and Housing - Bangor, ME
Housing First Initiative - Canada
Prison Nurseries - Ohio

---

To subscribe to this email list, send an email to:
povdispatch-request@ssc.wisc.edu?subject=subscribe

---

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to dispatches back to June 2006

Search Poverty Dispatches

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

- Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

11. [U.S] Food stamp use soars as stigma fades - November 28
(New York Times)

Across U.S., Food Stamp Use Soars and Stigma Fades
A Growing Need for a Program Once Scorned

By Jason DeParle and Robert Gebeloff
November 28, 2009
MARTINSVILLE, Ohio — With food stamp use at record highs and climbing every month, a program once scorned as a failed welfare scheme now helps feed one in eight Americans and one in four children. It has grown so rapidly in places so diverse that it is becoming nearly as ordinary as the groceries it buys. More than 36 million people use inconspicuous plastic cards for staples like milk, bread and cheese, swiping them at counters in blighted cities and in suburbs pocked with foreclosure signs.

The Safety Net
With millions of jobs lost and major industries on the ropes, America's array of government aid - including unemployment insurance, food stamps and cash welfare - is being tested as never before. This series examines how the safety net is holding up under the worst economic crisis in decades.

Food Stamp Usage Across the Country - (interactive U.S. map)
The number of food stamp recipients has climbed by about 10 million over the past two years, resulting in a program that now feeds 1 in 8 Americans and nearly 1 in 4 children.

More NY Times articles
about the U.S. Food stamp program

Source:
New York Times

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

12. Australian Policy Online - recent content

Australian Policy Online (APO)
APO is a news service and library specialising in Australian public policy reports and articles from academic research centres, think tanks, government and non-government organisations. The site features opinion and commentary pieces, video, audio and web resources focussed on the policy issues facing Australia. [ About APO ]
NOTE : includes links to the latest APO research; the five most popular downloads of the week
appear in a dark box in the top right-hand corner of each page, and the downloads vary depending on the topic you select.

---

New Research : Social Policy | Poverty
- topics include:
* Community * Cultural diversity * Families & households * Gender & sexuality * Immigration & refugees * Population * Poverty * Religion & faith * Social problems * Welfare * Youth

- Go to the Social Research Links in Other Countries (Non-Government) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/internatngo.htm

13. CRINMAIL - November 2009
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)

Latest issues of CRINMAIL:

26 November 2009 - CRINMAIL 1129
* ALTERNATIVE CARE: Guidelines for the Alternative Care of Children [publication]
* GLOBAL: Two new reports on alternative care
* CHILD RIGHTS: Harmonising national legislation with international human rights instruments [publication]
* PHILIPPINES: Govt enacts law against child pornography [news]
* EARLY CHILDHOOD: Two new reports on early childhood
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

24 November 2009 - CRINMAIL 1128
* ECOWAS: Landmark court decision on right to education [news]
* CRC20: Draft recommendations from Committee on the Rights of the Child event [publication]
* CRC: Somalia plans to ratify Convention [news]
* UNICEF: The State of the World’s Children Special Edition: Celebrating 20 Years of the CRC [publication]
* EDUCATION: Portal for Human Rights Schools [publication]
* HEALTH: Promoting children's rights in healthcare [publication]
* EMPLOYMENT: Street Child Africa
**NEWS IN BRIEF**

---

Earlier issues of CRINMAIL
- links to 200+ earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the launch of the EURONET Website.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm





Disclaimer/Privacy Statement


Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news
...or send me an email message.
You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:
gilseg@rogers.com



*****************************************************

Things cats/dogs should remember...

*****************************************************


A dozen things cats should remember:


Screaming at the can of food will not make it open by itself.

If I vomit on the carpet after overeating yet again I must stand up and walk away without the slightest hint of a care. (thanks to Vic)

If I put a live mouse in my food bowl, I should not expect it to stay there until I get hungry.

No matter how dangly and attractive they are, my human's earrings are not cat toys.

If I play 'dead cat on the stairs' while people are trying to bring in groceries or laundry, one of these days it will really come true.

My human is perfectly capable of cooking bacon and eggs without my help.

The cat food is already dead. I do not need to kill it by swatting bits of it all over the floor.

I am a carnivore. Potted plants are not meat.

I will never be able to walk on the ceiling, and staring up the wall and screaming at it will not bring it any closer.

The large dog in the back yard has lived there for six years. I will not freak out every time I see it.

If I must offer a present to my human's overnight guests, my toy mouse is much more socially acceptable than a live cockroach, even if it isn't as tasty.

Even though I hear voices in my head, I do not have to answer them.

Source:
http://www.funny2.com/cats.htm




***************************************************



A dozen things dogs should remember:


The garbage collector is NOT stealing our stuff.

I shouldn't suddenly stand straight up when I'm lying under the coffee table.

I will not roll my toys behind the fridge.

I must shake the rainwater out of my fur BEFORE entering the house.

I will not eat the cats' food, before or after they eat it.

I will stop trying to find the few remaining pieces of clean carpet in the house when I am about to throw up.

I will not lick my human's face after eating animal poop.

Kitty box crunchies are not food.

The diaper pail is not a cookie jar.

I will not chew crayons or pens, especially not the red ones, or my people will think I am hemorrhaging.

When in the car, I will not insist on having the window rolled down when it's raining outside.

We do not have a doorbell. I will not bark each time I hear one on TV.

Source:
http://www.funny2.com/dogs.htm



----------------------------

And, in closing...

----------------------------

DigitalJournal.com
DigitalJournal.com is an alternative news network for people who want to read news, contribute to reporting, debate and discuss news and events from around the world. Made up of professional journalists, citizen journalists, bloggers, passionate writers and regular Joes and Janes, DigitalJournal.com covers news and issues of the day. Contributors in 140 countries around the world are known as "Digital Journalists" and they work 24-7 to offer news from multiple perspectives, while special attention is placed on quality and accuracy. [About Us ]
- Go to the Reference Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/reference.htm

---

From the Bank of Canada:

*** Inflation Calculator
The Inflation Calculator uses monthly consumer price index (CPI) data from 1914 to the present to show changes in the cost of a fixed "basket" of consumer purchases. These include food, shelter, furniture, clothing, transportation, and recreation.

*** Investment Calculator
The Investment Calculator shows the effects of inflation on investments and savings. This tool allows you to see what a current investment will be worth in the future based on different assumptions on the annual interest rate and the annual rate of inflation. You can also enter a dollar amount to see how much you would have to invest today to reach a specific target value in the future, based on different rates of interest and inflation

- Go to the Banks and Business Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bookmrk3.htm

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Greg Rutter's Definitive List of The 99 Things
You Should Have Already Experienced On The Internet
Unless You're a Loser or Old or Something
http://www.youshouldhaveseenthis.com/


---

Spanglish Serenata
http://tinyurl.com/6x84u5

---

Where the H*LL is Matt?
http://www.wherethehellismatt.com/

---

A Day in the Life (video)
By Jeff Beck
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3uwvBizKAwc