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Canadian Social Research Newsletter
December 30, 2007

Welcome to the weekly Canadian Social Research Newsletter,
a listing of the new links added to the Canadian Social Research Links website in the past week.

The e-mail version of this week's issue of the newsletter is going out to 1842 subscribers.

Scroll to the bottom of this newsletter to see some notes and a disclaimer.

********************************
Belated Christmas wishes to those who celebrated last week.

There was no newsletter last week, nor much work on the website,  because of a cold that  knocked the stuffing out of me for the past ten days.
I was told [by a female acquaintance, as I recall...] that this is called a "Man-cold" - same as the female kind, but it sounds ten times worse (oh, how the poor man suffers..)

The info below is somewhat dated because it was posted before The  Manly Bug hit me.
Next week, we resume a normal schedule...

Happy New Year!
Gilles
********************************

IN THIS ISSUE:

Canadian Content

1. The Three Cities within Toronto: “a city of disparities” (Centre For Urban and Community Studies, University of Toronto) - December 20
2. Empty Spaces on Pantry Shelves: Food Insecurity in a Nation of Wealth and more
(Vanier Institute of the Family) - December 21

3. Ottawa's Kindness Meters : So Wrong on So Many Levels (Susan Scruton) - December 17
4. Closure of the Canadian Health Network - March 2008
5. What's New from Statistics Canada:
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, October 2007 - December 21
--- Canada's population estimates, third quarter 2007 - December 19
--- Study: Work stress and job performance - December 19
--- Study: Returning to work after childbirth, 1983 to 2004 - December 19
--- Consumer Price Index, November 2007 - December 18
--- Study: Long-term productivity growth in manufacturing in Canada and the United States, 1961 to 2003 - December 18
--- Employment Insurance, October 2007
- December 18
--- Leading indicators, November 2007 - December 18

International Content

6. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
7.
CRINMAIL 943/944 - 20/27 December 2007 (Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

Have a great week!

Gilles Séguin
Canadian Social Research Links

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net

E-mail:
gilseg@rogers.com

1. The Three Cities within Toronto: “a city of disparities” - December 20
(
Centre For Urban and Community Studies, University of Toronto)

The Three Cities within Toronto: “a city of disparities” (PDF file - 96K, 3 pages)
Media Release
December 20, 2007
TORONTO – The City of Toronto is becoming increasingly divided by income and socio-economic status, says a new report issued today by the Centre for Urban and Community Studies (CUCS) at the University of Toronto. No longer a “city of neighbourhoods,” the study calls modern-day Toronto a “city of disparities.” In fact, Toronto is now so polarized it could be described as three geographically distinct cities made up of 20 percent affluent neighbourhoods, 36 percent poor neighbourhoods, and 43 percent middle-income earner neighbourhoods and that 43 percent is in decline.

Report:

The Three Cities within Toronto:
Income polarization among Toronto’s neighbourhoods, 1970–2000
(PDF file - 880K, 12 pages)
by J. David Hulchanski

Related Table, maps and figures
* Characteristics of the Three Cities, grouped on the basis of 30-year average income trends, 1970 to 2000
* Change in Average Individual Income, City of Toronto, 1970 to 2000
* Average Individual Income, City of Toronto, 1970
* Average Individual Income, City of Toronto, 2000
* Toronto Neighbourhoods with a Persistent Change in Income, 1980 to 2000
* Change in Neighbourhood Income Distribution in the City of Toronto 1970 to 2000
* Change in Neighbourhood Income Distribution in Toronto’s Outer Suburbs (the “905 region”) 1970 to 2000

Source:
Centre For Urban and Community Studies, University of Toronto

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (A-C) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk2.htm

2. Empty Spaces on Pantry Shelves: Food Insecurity in a Nation of Wealth - December 21
(Vanier Institute of the Family)

New on the Vanier Institute of the Family web site:

Empty Spaces on Pantry Shelves: Food Insecurity in a Nation of Wealth
December 21, 2007

Transition Magazine : Families & Food
Winter 2007-2008, vol. 37-4
[includes Canadian Families Deserve Food Security [PDF file - 110K, 4 pages]]
by David Northcott
[David Northcott is executive coordinator of Winnipeg Harvest and a Board member of The Vanier Institute of the Family.]

Public Lecture:
A Place in time, Families, Family Matters & Why They Matter

October 18, 2007
by Robert Glossop, Ph.D.

Source:
Vanier Institute of the Family (VIF)
"...our vision: to make families as important to the life of Canadian society as they are to the lives of individual Canadians."

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm
- Go to the Children, Families and Youth Links (NGO) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnngo.htm

3. Ottawa's Kindness Meters : So Wrong on So Many Levels - December 17
(Susan Scruton)

Spare change, sir? Feed the meter, Ottawa mayor says
December 3, 2007
Mayor Larry O'Brien is encouraging generous Ottawa residents not to reach for their wallets as they pass the scruffy panhandlers who beg for spare change on the city's cold sidewalks. Instead, the public should save their loonies and toonies for special coin banks or "kindness meters" similar to parking meters that will be installed in the Byward Market this week
Source:
CBC

<Warning : leftie rant! >

This is wrong for so many reasons that I didn't know where to begin my rant, so I decided to spotlight yesterday's blog entry by my friend, Susan Scruton. It's a very thoughtful, articulate and compelling rebuttal of the concept of "kindness meters". Here's a summary of the reasons why the Ottawa Mayor's plan is full of baloney:
* They’re insulting to poor people.
* They attempt to dehumanize compassion.
*
They could lead to an increase in crime by people with addictions.
*
They introduce a layer of bureaucracy into the equation.
*
There is no guarantee that the panhandlers most directly in need, like mentally ill people, will receive any help.
* They put social service agencies in direct competition with their clients for our spare change.
*
How elitist of the Kindness Meters to only take loonies and toonies!
*
The concept is based on hypocrisy and stinginess.
"
This is the same mayor who compared homeless people to pigeons and said if we stopped feeding them, they’d go away. We know where he stands on this issue. When he tries to fake compassion he just looks like the rich, stingy hypocrite he is."

Read the complete "Kindness Meters" blog entry (December 17)
by Zoom
... and feel free to share the link to this blog with the Office of the Mayor of Ottawa: Larry.OBrien@ottawa.ca

Good for you, Zoom!
Shame on you, Larry.
Maybe instead of allocating the money collected to social agencies, Kindness Meters could be used to help fund Larry's compassion transplant .

</end leftie rant>

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

4. Closure of the Canadian Health Network - March 2008

Closure of the Canadian Health Network
The federal government has announced that it will be closing the Canadian Health Network (CHN), a website that provides reliable health information to Canadians, at the end of March 2008. A campaign advocating for the continuation of the program has been recently launched and a petition is available for signing at http://www.thepetitionsite.com/1/saveCHN. For information about the impending closure of the CHN and the advocacy campaign, go to http://www.ohpe.ca.

Visit the Canadian Health Network at:
http://www.canadian-health-network.ca

Source:
The EnableLinker (free monthly electronic newsletter filled with disability news and events)
[ EnableLink : The Canadian Abilities Foundation ]

5. What's New from Statistics Canada:
--- Payroll employment, earnings and hours, October 2007 - December 21
---
Canada's population estimates, third quarter 2007 - December 19
--- Study: Work stress and job performance - December 19
--- Study: Returning to work after childbirth, 1983 to 2004 - December 19
--- Consumer Price Index, November 2007 - December 18
--- Study: Long-term productivity growth in manufacturing in Canada and the United States, 1961 to 2003 - December 18
--- Employment Insurance, October 2007
- December 18
--- Leading indicators, November 2007 - December 18

What's New from The Daily [Statistics Canada]:

December 21, 2007
Payroll employment, earnings and hours, October 2007 (preliminary)
In October, the average weekly earnings of payroll employees (seasonally adjusted) climbed $4.04 (+0.5%) from September to $776.48. The year-to-date growth, calculated as the average of the first 10 months of 2007 compared with that of the same 10 months in 2006, was 3.1%. In Canada's largest industrial sectors, year-to-date earnings growth as of October was 0.4% in retail trade, 3.5% in manufacturing, and 3.5% in health care and social assistance.

December 19, 2007
Canada's population estimates, third quarter 2007
Canada's population has exceeded the 33-million mark, according to preliminary demographic estimates, which also show that Saskatchewan has more than 1 million people for the first time since 2001.

Study: Work stress and job performance
December 19
Work-related stress has a direct bearing on the current and long-term productivity of Canadian workers in terms of reduced work activities, disability days and absenteeism, according to a new study. The study, published today in Perspectives on Labour and Income, used data from the 2002 Canadian Community Health Survey and various cycles of the National Population Health Survey to examine work stress and its impact on workers.

Study: Returning to work after childbirth, 1983 to 2004
December 19
More Canadian women have gone back to work after giving birth to a child during the past two decades, and fewer have quit their jobs, according to a new study. However, both long- and short-term employment rates of mothers were consistently lower than those of other working women between 1984 and 2004. The study, published today in the online edition of Perspectives on Labour and Income, examined the impact of childbirth on employment and earnings, using data from the Longitudinal Workers File, a random sample of all Canadian workers. The findings show that changes in maternity leave have a virtually immediate effect on women's labour market behaviour.

December 18, 2007
Consumer Price Index, November 2007
Fuelled by higher gasoline prices and mortgage interest cost, consumer prices increased 2.5% between November 2006 and November 2007. This represents a slight acceleration from the 12-month change of 2.4% posted in October. However, the Bank of Canada's core index increased only 1.6%, posting its slowest 12-month increase since April 2006.

December 18, 2007
Study: Long-term productivity growth in manufacturing in Canada and the United States, 1961 to 2003
Labour productivity in the manufacturing sector of both Canada and the United States increased at the same average pace between 1961 and 2003. But the sources of this growth differed in the two countries, according to a new study.

December 18, 2007
Employment Insurance, October 2007 (preliminary)
An estimated 454,230 Canadians (seasonally adjusted) received regular Employment Insurance benefits in October, 1,400 fewer than in September. Nine provinces have recorded declines for three consecutive months. Compared with October 2006, the number of Canadians receiving regular benefits has declined 7.6%. Provincially, the largest year-over-year declines occurred in Alberta (-15.1%), Saskatchewan (-14.3%) and Manitoba (-14.3%).

December 18, 2007
Leading indicators, November 2007
The composite leading index was unchanged for a second straight month in November, after October was revised down from a preliminary estimate of 0.1% growth. These were the first months without growth since July 2001. Ongoing weakness in export demand for manufactured goods was reinforced by a drop in the stock market in mid-November. Consumers remained the major source of growth, reflecting strong labour market conditions.

- Go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm

6. Poverty Dispatch: U.S. media coverage of social issues and programs
(
Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Poverty Dispatch (U.S). ===> the content of this link changes twice a week
- links to news items from the American press about poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Search Poverty Dispatches

IRP compiles and distributes Poverty Dispatches, links to Web-based news items dealing with poverty, welfare reform, and related topics twice a week. Each Dispatch lists links to current news in popular print media. Persons wishing to receive Poverty Dispatches by e-mail should send a request to rsnell@ssc.wisc.edu.

Past Poverty Dispatches - back to June 2006

Poverty Dispatch Digest Archive - archive of weekly digests* of dispatches from August 2005 to May 2006
(*For a few years prior to the creation of this new web page for the Dispatch, I was compiling a weekly digest of the e-mails and redistributing the digest to my mailing list with IRP's permission.
This is my own archive of weekly issues of the digest back to August 2005, and most of them have 50+ links per issue. I'll be deleting this archive from my site gradually, as the links to older articles expire.)

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (A-J) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us2.htm
- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

7. CRINMAIL 943, 944 (20, 27 December 2007)
(Child Rights Information Network - CRIN)

From the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)

27 December 2007 - CRINMAIL 944
*
2007 Child Rights Round-Up
* Looking Forward: The big issues for 2008
** Quiz: End of Year Special! **

Selected content:

A big year for child rights was crowned last month with the follow-up to the UN Special Session on Children in New York. Many participants agreed that the success of the event, which was spread over several days, hinged on the participation of children and NGOs. Although many were cheered and inspired by the enthusiasm and dedication of the children, some also lamented the disproportionate amount of time given to State delegates during the plenary session and one of the roundtable discussions. You can read all about the event in our special CRINMAIL, which documents the Children’s Forum, roundtable and interactive discussions, the meeting of children’s Ombudspersons, and two of the side events.

European Union leaders signed the first treaty to include children’s rights. The Lisbon Treaty will come into force only after ratification by all 27 Member States. Read more about it here. Staying in the same part of the world, the Council of Europe Convention against Trafficking in Human Beings (CETS n° 197) will enter into force on 1 February 2008, after Cyprus became the tenth country to ratify it. Terry Davis, the Secretary General of the Council of Europe, said: “The Convention is deliberately hard on traffickers and makes a clear difference for the victims of this crime. These victims will be offered comprehensive assistance and protection of their human rights. More on the Convention.

It has been a big year for CRIN too, with a website makeover and the launch of our new legal database among the main gains. You can now find out about regional mechanisms and what they do for child rights, work your way around the UN system and find out which child rights laws apply in your country. We launched two Reviews (formerly called the Newsletter) on the subjects of Emergencies and the 18th anniversary of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights will turn 60 on 10 December 2008!

---------------------------------------------------------------

20 December 2007 - CRINMAIL 943
* HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL: Deadline for second round of UPR submissions [news]
* VENEZUELA: Second Latin American country to ban corporal punishment [news]
* BULGARIA: Lessons learned from Save the Children programmes [publication]
* PARTICIPATION: Minimum Standards for Consulting with Children [publication]
* INDIA: Children as Catalysts for Change [event]
* EMPLOYMENT - Goutte d’Eau (2) - Save the Children UK - SOS Kinderdorf International - DCIK [job postings]
**NEWS IN BRIEF**
**QUIZ**

Earlier issues of CRINMAIL
- links to 200+ earlier weekly issues, many of which are special editions focusing on special themes, such as the 45th Session of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Source:
CRINMAIL(incl. subscription info)
[ Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) ]

- Go to the Children's Rights Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chnrights.htm


Disclaimer/Privacy Statement

Both Canadian Social Research Links (the site) and this Canadian Social Research Newsletter belong solely to me, Gilles Séguin.

I am solely accountable for the choice of links presented therein and for the occasional editorial comment - it's my time, my home computer, my experience, my biases, my Rogers Internet account and my web hosting service.

I administer the mailing list and distribute the weekly newsletter using software on the web server of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE).
Thanks, CUPE!

If you wish to subscribe to the e-mail version of newsletter, go to the Canadian Social Research Newsletter Online Subscription page:
http://lists.cupe.ca/mailman/listinfo/csrl-news

You can unsubscribe by going to the same page or by sending me an e-mail message [ gilseg@rogers.com ]

------------------------

The e-mail version of this newsletter is available only in plain text (no graphics, no hyperlinks, no fancy bolding or italics, etc.) to avoid security problems with government departments, universities and other networks with firewalls. The text-only version is also friendlier for people using older or lower-end technology.

Privacy Policy:
The Canadian Social Research Newsletter mailing list is not used for any purpose except to distribute each weekly issue.
I promise not share any information on this list, nor to send you any junk mail.

Links presented in the Canadian Social Research Newsletter point to different views about social policy and social programs.
There are some that I don't agree with, so don't get on my case, eh...

To access earlier online HTML issues of the Canadian Social Research Newsletter, go to the Newsletter page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/news.htm

Please feel free to distribute this newsletter as widely as you wish, but please remember to mention Canadian Social Research Links when you do.

Cheers!
Gilles

E-MAIL:

gilseg@rogers.com


**************************************

Dubya Speaks (sort of...)
**************************************

The Stupidest Things President George W. Bush Has Ever Said:
(NOTE: click the source link at the bottom of this list for links to the audio clips containing these gems.)

10) "Families is where our nation finds hope, where wings take dream." —LaCrosse, Wis., Oct. 18, 2000

9) "I know how hard it is for you to put food on your family." —Greater Nashua, N.H., Jan. 27, 2000

8) "I hear there's rumors on the Internets that we're going to have a draft." —second presidential debate, St. Louis, Mo., Oct. 8, 2004

7) "I know the human being and fish can coexist peacefully." —Saginaw, Mich., Sept. 29, 2000

6) "You work three jobs? … Uniquely American, isn't it? I mean, that is fantastic that you're doing that." —to a divorced mother of three, Omaha, Nebraska, Feb. 4, 2005

5) "Too many good docs are getting out of the business. Too many OB-GYNs aren't able to practice their love with women all across this country." —Poplar Bluff, Mo., Sept. 6, 2004

4) "They misunderestimated me." —Bentonville, Ark., Nov. 6, 2000

3) "Rarely is the questioned asked: Is our children learning?" —Florence, S.C., Jan. 11, 2000

2) "Our enemies are innovative and resourceful, and so are we. They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we." —Washington, D.C., Aug. 5, 2004

1) "There's an old saying in Tennessee — I know it's in Texas, probably in Tennessee — that says, fool me once, shame on — shame on you. Fool me twice — you can't get fooled again." —Nashville, Tenn., Sept. 17, 2002

Source:
http://politicalhumor.about.com/cs/georgewbush/a/top10bushisms.htm


More Bushisms (back to 2000):
http://politicalhumor.about.com/library/blbushisms.htm

--------------------------------------------

In closing...

Ultimate List of Free Essential Software
http://moneytipcentral.com/ultimate-list-of-free-essential-software

50 Top 10 Lists of 2007
http://www.time.com/time/specials/2007/top10/0,30576,1686204,00.html

New Year's resolutions: beating the odds
http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20071221/ny_resolutions_071221/20071228/

Crashie.com
http://www.crashie.com/
This page has one purpose, and that is to crash Internet Explorer.
And to explain why IE is a crappy, vulnerable browser.
OK, *two* purposes.

Suggestion: switch to a less crappy, vulnerable browser, like Firefox.
Why?
http://www.reenactor.net/main_htmls/why_ie_sux.html
http://toastytech.com/evil/onlyie.html