Canadian Social Research Links

Selected Canadian Social
Research Organizations (II)

Sites de recherche sociale au Canada

Groupes de
recherche sociale au Canada
(II)

Updated January 30, 2016
Page révisée le 30 janvier 2016

[ Go to Canadian Social Research Links Home Page ]


NOTE : "Social Research Organizations" has been split in two to keep file sizes reasonable - there's no special significance to the placement of an organization on these pages

On this page, you'll find information about :
C.D. Howe Institute - Canada West Foundation - Council for Canadian Unity (Centre for Research and Information on Canada) - Federation of Canadian Municipalities - Fraser Institute - Montreal Economic Institute - Institute for Research on Public Policy - Institute on Governance - Intergovernmental Committee on Urban and Regional Research - International Development Research Centre - policity.ca - policy.ca - Policy Research Initiative - Social Research and Demonstration Corporation - Frontier Centre for Public Policy

See also Selected Canadian Social Research Organizations I - there, you'll find info about and links to : Social and Enterprise Development Innovations (SEDI) - Caledon Institute of Social Policy - National Council of Welfare - Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - Canadian Council on Social Development - Canadian Institute for Advanced Research - Canadian Policy Research Networks - Canadian Research Institute for Social Policy - Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) - and a few others
Related pages on this site : Non-Governmental Organizations - Ontario NGOs and Municipalities - Other Countries - Union Pages


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NEW

NOTE : The essay below appeared in the IRPP's Policy Horizons Essay in April 2015

Canada’s welfare state needs transformation, not more tinkering
http://irpp.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/2015-04-09-news-release.pdf
News Release
April 9, 2015
Montreal – As changing demographics, globalization and rising income inequality bring the future of social policy to the forefront of public debate, a new essay in the IRPP’s Policy Horizons series argues that an entirely new framework is needed to replace Canada’s outdated welfare state. Social policy expert Peter Hicks warns that fine-tuning the existing system will not be enough to fix the architecture of Canada’s social programs. While he does not disagree with recent calls to enhance access to child care, pensions and pharmacare, Hicks argues we are missing the basic point – Canada’s social policy framework must be modernized to meet new realities.

The Enabling Society
By Peter Hicks
IRPP Policy Horizons Essay
April 9, 2015
Summary : http://irpp.org/research-studies/policy-horizons-essay-2015/
Complete essay : (PDF - 477KB, 48 pages) : http://irpp.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/policy-horizons-2015.pdf
Excerpt:
"Hicks ... proposes a fundamental restructuring of Canada’s income security system. Specifically, he recommends reconfiguring the system around three pillars:
* providing a relatively modest guaranteed annual income to prevent people from falling through the cracks;
* refocusing social insurance programs (such as employment insurance) on the core mandate of providing income replacement during periods of unemployment or disability; and
* creating a new system of lifetime accounts that will allow people to take greater control of planning and managing their learning, work, caregiving and leisure."

Source:
Policy Horizons
Institute for Research on Public Policy (IRPP)

http://irpp.org/


From the Fraser Institute:
http://www.fraserinstitute.org/

An Introduction to the State of Poverty in Canada
Published January 25, 2016
https://www.fraserinstitute.org/studies/an-introduction-to-the-state-of-poverty-in-canada

Executive Summary (PDF - 2 pages)
https://www.fraserinstitute.org/sites/default/files/an-introduction-to-the-state-of-poverty-in-canada-exec-summary.pdf

Full Report (PDF - 327KB, 43 pages)
https://www.fraserinstitute.org/sites/default/files/an-introduction-to-the-state-of-poverty-in-canada.pdf

View the Infographic (JPG file)
https://www.fraserinstitute.org/file/introduction-to-the-state-of-poverty-infographicjpg

More on this topic
from the Fraser Institute:

https://www.fraserinstitute.org/studies/an-introduction-to-the-state-of-poverty-in-canada
Click the link above to access the following articles and reports:
*** Income Mobility: The Rich and Poor in Canada - by Herbert Grubel
*** Generosity in Canada and the United States: The 2015 Generosity Index - by Charles Lammam, Hugh MacIntyre, Feixue Ren
*** Our continuing obsession with inequality, by Christopher A. Sarlo
*** To tackle poverty, we must first distinguish between temporary and persistent spells, by Charles Lammam, Hugh MacIntyre

------

Poverty can be 'persistent' or temporary: Fraser Institute report
Fraser Institute says “only” 1.5% of Canadians are stuck in poverty permanently
http://www.torontosun.com/2016/01/25/poverty-can-be-persistent-or-temporary-fraser-institute-report
Toronto Sun
January 25, 2016

How politicians can get at the real poverty problem
http://business.financialpost.com/fp-comment/how-politicians-can-get-at-the-real-poverty-problem
Financial Post
January 25, 2016

Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in British Columbia
http://www.fraserinstitute.org/research-news/display.aspx?id=22135
By Jason Clemens et al.
January 20, 2015
With heightened interest in how wages and non-wage benefits in the government sector compare with those in the private sector, this study estimates wage differentials between the government and private sector in British Columbia. It also evaluates four available non-wage benefits in an attempt to quantify compensation differences between the two sectors.
- includes an executive summary and an infographic showing how much better off government employees are than people working in the private sector in many respects.

Complete study:

Comparing Government and
Private Sector Compensation in British Columbia
(PDF - 1.2MB, 39 pages)
http://goo.gl/wlScN4
The study is divided into three sections. The first reviews past research comparing the compensation of public and private sector workers. The second presents and explains the wage comparisons between the private and public sectors (broadly defined) in British Columbia. It also presents a summary of the methodology employed to compare and calculate differences in wages between the two sectors. Finally, the third section compares available non-wage benefits such as pension coverage, the age of retirement, job security, and absenteeism, to ascertain the likelihood that there is also a premium for non-wage benefits in the government compared to the private sector.

Source:
Fraser Institute
http://www.fraserinstitute.org/
The Fraser Institute's vision is a free and prosperous world where individuals benefit from greater choice, competitive markets, and personal responsibility.
[Especially the personal responsibility part - Gilles.]

----------------------------------

Related link
from PressProgress:

Fraser Institute wonders if a good job with good pay and a good pension is "fair"?
http://www.pressprogress.ca/en/post/fraser-institute-wonders-if-good-job-good-pay-and-good-pension-fair
January 23, 2015
Is a job offering a good wage, good benefits and a pension at retirement a bad thing? Many would say that sounds like a sound strategy to fuel the middle class and protect purchasing power in retirement. But one free-market think tank questions whether that's "fair." A new report from the Fraser Institute probes that question by comparing public and private sector compensation in British Columbia in 2013.

"Is it fair that a private-sector worker working a similar job as a public-sector worker is getting paid less in terms of total compensation?" asked Charles Lammam, the Fraser Institute's associate director of tax and fiscal policy, and one of the authors of the report.

---
Comment by Gilles:
HEAR, HEAR!

[So just how *did* The Fraser Institute avoid being audited by the Canada Revenue Agency again??]
---

Source:
PressProgress
http://www.pressprogress.ca/
PressProgress advances progressive solutions and challenges conservative ideas with hard-hitting news and analysis.
PressProgress is a project of the Broadbent Institute [ http://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/ ].

Counting down the 14 silliest Fraser Institute moments of 2014
http://www.pressprogress.ca/en/post/counting-down-14-silliest-fraser-institute-moments-2014
January 5, 2015
Gilles' favourites:
#4. UN agency slams Fraser Institute's methodology... Again.
#8. Fraser Marks Earth Day by publishing its dumbest report yet
# 10. Guy at the Fraser Institute is pretty sure he just debunked climate change science
#14. Fraser claims it's not right-wing and doesn't even "know what right-wing means!"

Source:
PressProgress
http://www.pressprogress.ca/

---

Related link:

Fraser Institute
http://www.fraserinstitute.org/

---


And another related link,
a Gilles favourite:

The Fraser Institute produces junk?
Crap?
Sez who?

http://goo.gl/urE7cV

---

From
The Fraser Institute:

Idea of guaranteed annual income appealing but implausible for Canada
http://www.fraserinstitute.org/research-news/news/display.aspx?id=22084
News Release
January 6, 2015
VANCOUVER—Despite the conceptual appeal of a guaranteed annual income, the idea isn’t likely to become reality in Canada, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

Complete report:

The Practical Challenges of Creating
a Guaranteed Annual Income in Canada (PDF - 2.2MB, 88 pages)
http://www.fraserinstitute.org/uploadedFiles/fraser-ca/Content/research-news/research/publications/practical-challenges-of-creating-a-guaranteed-annual-income-in-canada.pdf
By Charles Lammam and Hugh MacIntyre
January 2015

Source:
Fraser Institute
http://www.fraserinstitute.org/

---

Related link from
Huffington Post Canada:

Guaranteed Annual Income's Obstacles
'Insurmountable,' Fraser Institute Report Argues

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/01/06/gauranteed-annual-income-canada-fraser_n_6423646.html
January 6, 2015
The idea of a minimum annual income for every Canadian could provide a more efficient alternative social safety net, but reform is an unlikely and unrealistic option, according to a new report from a conservative think tank. The Fraser Institute report “The Practical Challenges of Creating a Guaranteed Annual Income in Canada," released Tuesday, said the country could benefit from administrative savings and efficiencies by moving off the current multi-program, multi-jurisdictional social welfare system to a single unconditional cash transfer under the guaranteed income system.

Source:
Huffington Post Canada
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/

---

Related links
from The Tyee:

Two Views of a Guaranteed Annual Income : Segal vs Fraser
A retired Tory senator says it's the best way to alleviate poverty. The Fraser Institute: Not so much.
http://www.thetyee.ca/News/2015/01/06/Guaranteed-Annual-Income/
By David P. Ball
January 6 , 2015
For many, New Year's resolutions might involve hitting the gym, volunteering, or spending more time with family. For recently retired Conservative Senator Hugh Segal, one goal he's tried for 45 years to attain is a guaranteed annual income for lower-income Canadians. This New Year is no different.
(...)
The idea (...) is to provide an automatic top-up to people's income if they fall below a particular basic-needs threshold. Advocates say it would replace and improve on the current provincial welfare approach -- which often claws back payments if recipients find even part-time employment.
(...)
With a federal election on the horizon sometime this year, Segal hopes another campaign cycle doesn't pass without poverty on the agenda.

Source:
TheTyee.ca

http://www.thetyee.ca/

Also in The Tyee:

Living for All: Ideas to End Poverty
http://thetyee.ca/Series/2012/05/15/Ideas-To-End-Poverty/
By Katie Hyslop
This three-part Tyee Solutions Society series explores the pros and cons of three of the most widely advocated proposals to put an end to poverty: the living wage, a guaranteed annual income, and government wage subsidies

---

- For a collection of 350+ links to GAI related content,
go to the Guaranteed Annual Income Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/gai.htm

Right-wing Fraser Institute now claims it is not right-wing
http://www.pressprogress.ca/en/post/right-wing-fraser-institute-now-claims-it-not-right-wing
September 8, 2014
Everything you thought you knew is wrong. Up is down. Down is up. And now the right-wing Fraser Institute says it has no ideology except Truth itself. That's right. The think tank says it shouldn't be characterized as conservative because its work is "not value-based, it's driven by data." Fraser Institute president Niels Veldhuis made the comment in response to queries from the Toronto Star about whether the charity was under audit by the Canada Revenue Agency.

Veldhuis declined to say, even as the Harper government finds itself under increasing pressure to explain why dozens of charities with a track record of being critical of conservative policies find themselves the targets of political-activity audits by the CRA. One of the groups, the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, is being audited in part because the research and education material on its website appears to be "biased" and "one-sided," CRA records show.

So let's focus on what Veldhuis did say about values, data and the institute, whose tagline is full of coded words to let the world (hello Koch brothers!) know where it always comes down on the issues: "A free and prosperous world through choice, markets and responsibility." To help underline the point, click the link above for four Fraser Institute graphics posted on its Facebook page (and cross-referenced with a sampling of research findings) that illustrate how data-driven its work really is.

In a nutshell:
* Regulations are bad. Always.
* Taxes are bad. Really bad.
* Freedom is good. Really good. Always really, really good.
* Polluters of the world unite! You have nothing to lose but your chains!

In other words...

Up is now down.
Down is now up.
And the Fraser Institute conducts value-free, data-driven research.

Got it?

Source:
PressProgress
http://www.pressprogress.ca/
Advancing progressive solutions for Canada with hard-hitting news and analysis, PressProgress cuts through the day's political spin with facts and an informed point of view. From punchy blog posts to a daily web roundup to spread news and views, PressProgress is a must-read to spur positive change.

PressProgress is a project of the
Broadbent Institute:

[ http://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/ ]

---

- Go to the Voluntary Sector / Charity Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/voluntary.htm

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From the
Fraser Institute:

Each Canadian taxpayer owes $243,476 as total government liabilities reach $4.1 trillion
http://www.fraserinstitute.org/research-news/news/display.aspx?id=21020
News Release
April 1, 2014
VANCOUVER, B.C.—Government liabilities include much more than direct debt, and when all federal, provincial, and local government liabilities are combined, each Canadian taxpayer owes $243,476, notes a new study by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

The study:

Canadian Government Debt 2014:
A Guide to the Indebtedness of Canada and the Provinces (3.3MB, 61 pages)
http://www.fraserinstitute.org/uploadedFiles/fraser-ca/Content/research-news/research/publications/canadian-government-debt-2014.pdf
By Milagros Palacios, Hugh MacIntyre, and Charles Lammam
April 2014

Source:
Fraser Institute
http://www.fraserinstitute.org/
"Our vision is a free and prosperous world where individuals benefit from greater choice, competitive markets, and personal responsibility."

-------------------------------

Later that same day, from PressProgress:

Canada Pension Plan Investment Board to Fraser Institute: you're wrong about public pension
http://www.pressprogress.ca/en/post/cpp-investment-board-fraser-institute-youre-wrong-about-public-pension
April 1, 2014
The Canada Pension Plan Investment Board isn't mincing words. The crown corporation established in 1997 to invest the funds of the CPP says the Fraser Institute is just plain wrong about the health of the nationally administered pension plan. Or, more specifically, shows a "fundamental lack of understanding regarding the CPP."

The right-wing think tank based in Vancouver recently released a report, claiming that if you add up all the liabilities of every Canadian government — federal, provincial, and local — every taxpayer would owe $243,476 (of the $4.1 trillion total) in direct debt and unfunded liabilities.

The Fraser Institute's report cites an unfunded liability existing at the CPP of $792.3 billion, and goes on to suggest future generations of Canadian taxpayers will feel either have to pay higher taxes or receive lower benefits.

Not so fast, says the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board...

Source:
PressProgress
http://www.pressprogress.ca/
Advancing progressive solutions for Canada with hard-hitting news and analysis, PressProgress cuts through the day's political spin with facts and an informed point of view. From punchy blog posts to a daily web roundup to spread news and views, PressProgress is a must-read to spur positive change.

PressProgress is a project of the
Broadbent Institute:

[ http://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/ ].

---

Related link:

CPP Investment Board
http://www.cppib.com/en/home.html
Our mandate is to invest in the best interests of Canada Pension Plan contributors and beneficiaries and to maximize investment returns without undue risk of loss.

---

Bonus mystery link:
http://goo.gl/urE7cV
The Fraser Institute produces junk.
Crap.
Who knew?

UN agency flags faulty Fraser Institute Index
http://www.pressprogress.ca/en/post/un-agency-slams-fraser-institute-index
April 2, 2014
A United Nations agency is slamming a flawed set of indicators produced by the Vancouver-based Fraser Institute [ https://www.fraserinstitute.org/ ] and used by the International Monetary Fund [ http://www.imf.org/ ] to advance a faulty conclusion that less labour market regulation may help reduce unemployment.

The Geneva-based International Labour Office (ILO) [ http://www.ilo.org/ ] , governed on a tripartite basis by governments, employers and labour, is reporting [see ILO report link below] "serious flaws" in four recent IMF papers, based on their use the data from the Fraser Institute's "index of labour market flexibility" and "in the way they are used."
(...)
We eagerly await a more balanced approach from the Fraser Institute.

Source:
PressProgress

http://www.pressprogress.ca/
Advancing progressive solutions for Canada with hard-hitting news and analysis, PressProgress cuts through the day's political spin with facts and an informed point of view. From punchy blog posts to a daily web roundup to spread news and views, PressProgress is a must-read to spur positive change.

We are a project of the Broadbent Institute
[ http://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/ ].

-----------------------------------------

From the
International Labour Office (Geneva):

The ILO report:

Deregulating labour markets:
How robust is the analysis of recent IMF working papers?
(PDF - 472K, 28 pages)
http://goo.gl/l5GNLr
By Mariya Aleksynska

Source:
International Labour Office
(Geneva)
http://www.ilo.org/
The main aims of the ILO are to promote rights at work, encourage decent employment opportunities, enhance social protection and strengthen dialogue on work-related issues. The unique tripartite structure of the ILO gives an equal voice to workers, employers and governments to ensure that the views of the social partners are closely reflected in labour standards and in shaping policies and programmes.

---

Also from (or rather about)
the Fraser Institute:

The Fraser Institute and the Koch Brothers

By Gilles:
Remember a few years back, when the Harper Government™ launched an all-out assault on environmental groups (NGOs) allegedly financed by "foreign-backed radicals"? [ http://goo.gl/b5yd2p ] I don't recall any similar vendetta against the Fraser Institute for presenting itself as a "charitable organization", despite the fact that the Fraser has accepted a half-million dollars over a four-year period from the Koch brothers [see link below], American oil barons who stand to gain $100 billion dollars from the Keystone XL pipeline deal.

Diff'rent strokes for diff'rent folks.

---

From the
Vancouver Observer
:
http://www.vancouverobserver.com/

Koch foundation donated again to "charitable organization" Fraser Institute in 2011, U.S. tax records show
http://www.vancouverobserver.com/politics/koch-foundation-donated-150000-fraser-institute-2011-us-tax-records-show
By Jenny Uechi
October 31, 2013
The Charles G. Koch Foundation has donated $150,000 to the Vancouver-based right-wing think tank Fraser Institute in 2011, according to U.S. tax records. The funding was for a report, which now seems to be a key part of a larger Koch campaign promoting "economic freedom".
This is the fourth year of funding for The Fraser Institute by the Koch Foundation. [During those four years,] Fraser received total $625,500 [according to U.S. tax records] from the Koch Foundation.
(...)
The Koch brothers are hard-right libertarians who co-founded the Tea Party to promote an agenda of reducing government and lowering taxes. They have donated over $100 million to conservative causes and climate change denial, and have invested in Canada's oil sands for over 50 years.
(...)
...the Fraser Institute has been a proponent of oil sands development and the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, both carrying enormous benefits to the Koch brothers, who stand to gain an estimated $100 billion from the Keystone XL pipeline.
[bolding added]

---

“Charitable” Fraser Institute accepted $500k in foreign funding from Koch oil billionaires
http://www.vancouverobserver.com/politics/2012/04/25/%E2%80%9Ccharitable%E2%80%9D-fraser-institute-accepted-500k-foreign-funding-oil-billionaires
April 25, 2012
In four years alone... the Koch brothers poured half a million dollars into Canadian right-wing think tank, the Fraser Institute.
(...) While the federal government and pro-oil lobbyists have taken aim at environmental charities for allegedly violating the Canadian Revenue Agency’s legal limits for “political activity”, the Fraser Institute and its charitable status remain unquestioned.

---

The Fraser Institute: 100% political and still a registered charity!
Explain, please...

By David Climenhaga
February , 2012
http://rabble.ca/blogs/bloggers/djclimenhaga/2012/02/fraser-institute-100-political-and-still-registered-charity-expl
Other than Canadian political parties themselves, the Fraser Institute must be Canada's most intensely political organization.
Notwithstanding its pious mission statement -- "to measure, study, and communicate the impact of competitive markets and government interventions on the welfare of individuals" -- essentially 100 per cent of the Fraser Institute's activities are 100-per-cent political.
(...)
... as Nova Scotia Finance Minister Graham Steele put it: "The Fraser Institute produces junk.
It is not a serious institution. It is a political organization."
Source:
rabble.ca
http://rabble.ca/

An Oldie Mouldie from the Georgia Straight:
Stephen Harper and The Fraser
July 6, 2006

Harperstein
http://www.straight.com/article/harperstein-0
By Donald Gutstein
July 6, 2006
Stephen Harper was a 15-year-old student in Etobicoke's Richview Collegiate just west of Toronto when MacMillan Bloedel chairman Jack Clyne and other corporate leaders chipped in a total of $75,000 to start the Fraser Institute in 1974.
(...)
Three decades later, in October 2004, the Fraser Institute held its 30th-anniversary gala celebration --- 30 years during which business and conservative foundations pumped more than $100 million into Fraser activities; 30 years during which Stephen Harper rose from high school to University of Calgary student to Reform party policy chief to head of the National Citizens Coalition and to leader of the official Opposition.
(...)
Credit the Fraser Institute? Harper probably thinks so. (...) Like the Fraser, he is dedicated to the ideas of Friedrich Hayek, leader of the Austrian School of economics. Margaret Thatcher was an outspoken Hayek devotee. Hayek urged reducing government intervention in people's social and economic lives to a bare minimum. No social programs, no environmental or consumer regulation. In Hayek's world, government officials do not serve the public. Instead, they are self-serving empire builders. As Ronald Reagan said, “government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem.” 

Source:
Georgia Straight

http://www.straight.com/

From the
Fraser Institute:

The State of Ontario's Indebtedness (PDF - 1.4MB, 66 pages)
http://www.fraserinstitute.org/uploadedFiles/fraser-ca/Content/research-news/research/publications/state-of-ontarios-indebtedness.pdf
January 31, 2013
Jason Clemens and Niels Veldhuis
The essays collected for this publication are designed to provide readers and particularly those in Ontario a better sense of where the province’s debt stands today, the expectations for the future, and warnings about the likely costs of inaction. Part of the motivation for this publication was the lack of genuine response to the much-heralded report of the Commission on the Reform of Ontario’s Public Services, or what became known as the Drummond Report, named after the chair of the commission, Donald Drummond. Simply put, the conclusions of the Drummond Report should have been a wake-up call for the Ontario Government regarding the immediate need for reform of the province’s spending. Instead, the government has chosen to try to simply slow the rate of growth in spending over the next few years without any serious reform.

Source:
The Fraser Institute

http://www.fraserinstitute.org/
The Fraser Institute motto:
"A free and prosperous world through choice, markets and responsibility"

----------------------------------------------------------

Reality check from the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives:

Repeat After Me: Ontario is not Greece
http://behindthenumbers.ca/2013/01/31/repeat-after-me-ontario-is-not-greece/
January 31, 2013
By Trish Hennessy
The Fraser Institute has a new report warning Ontario could become the next Greece or California because of the size of its debt. Of course we know Ontario is not Greece or California, and such comparisons are disingenuous. But it is possible that Ontario could find itself in a similar mess if it follows the Fraser Institute’s standard issue prescription for government financial management: more public spending cuts, more public sector layoffs, and more tax cuts.
(...)
Repeat after me: Ontario is not Greece, nor should it make the same mistakes as Greece. It’s time to move on. It’s time to define our own agenda, a post-austerity agenda, and truly put Ontario on the path to economic recovery.

Source:
Behind the Numbers

http://behindthenumbers.ca/

This blog is a feature of the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

---

But wait!!
How do you really feel about the Fraser Institute??

The Fraser Institute Produces Junk: Graham Steele (Nova Scotia Finance Minister)
By Alex Boutilier
September 13, 2011
After delivering an update on Nova Scotia's 2011-2012 budget forecast, Finance Minister Graham Steele was asked what he thinks about a new report from the Fraser Institute that ranked Premier Darrell Dexter first among sitting Canadian premiers in terms of fiscal restraint.
(...)
"The Fraser Institute produces junk."
Source:
Vancouver Observer

---

- Go to the Ontario Municipal and Non-Governmental Sites (D-W) page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/onbkmrk3.htm

From the
Vancouver Observer:

"Why polar bears and not elephants?" and more from Canada's hyperbolic Tory senators
http://goo.gl/Pf8yg
April 25, 2012
By Alexis Stoymenoff
A debate continuing this week in the Senate over foreign funding of environmental charities has so far brought out some shocking—and creative—rhetoric from both sides of the floor. Over the past couple of months, Conservative Senators have drawn heavy criticism and scrutiny upon some of the most respected environmental groups and charitable foundations in the country, including Tides Canada, the David Suzuki Foundation and the Dogwood Initiative.

Though not all Conservatives are in agreement on the inquiry and its motivations [ http://goo.gl/adf7i ], some Senators have come out with aggressive arguments that demonstrate the restrictive political environment these charities are now working within. To help illustrate the battle being fought in Ottawa, this article offers selected key points from previous Senate transcripts.

---

“Charitable” Fraser Institute accepted $500k in foreign funding from Koch oil billionaires.
In four years alone, U.S. Tea Party architects the Koch brothers poured half a million dollars
into Canadian right-wing think tank, the Fraser Institute.
http://goo.gl/YZ7QC
April 25, 2012
By Alexis Stoymenoff
As the Conservative assault continues against Canadian environmental charities, the Vancouver Observer has learned that since 2007, foreign oil billionaires the Koch brothers have donated over half a million dollars to the “charitable” right-wing Fraser Institute. (...) The grants were purportedly for "research support" and "educational programs".
(...)
The Fraser Institute, described by rabble.ca as “Canada’s most intensely political organization”, is a registered non-profit focused on economic and public policy research. The group’s work is often seen as controversial (which they boast about on the website), and is generally in support of conservative, small-government, free-market values. While the federal government and pro-oil lobbyists have taken aim at environmental charities for allegedly violating the Canadian Revenue Agency’s legal limits for “political activity”, the Fraser Institute and its charitable status remain unquestioned. And as the Koch Foundation’s tax data shows, they’ve received a significant amount of “foreign funding” to help influence Canadian policy—which is precisely what environmental groups have been accused of doing.

The Fraser Institute claims to be “non-partisan and non-political”, and denies that it undertakes lobbying activities. However, critics cite examples of its blatantly political endeavors—like publicly calling on the government to change election spending laws, or pushing provinces to adopt “right-to-work” legislation.

NEW


NOTE : The links below will take you further down on this page to a description of and link to each organization and, in most cases, selected site content.
(Please wait for this page to load completely if the links below don't seem to work at first)
C.D. Howe Institute.Canada West Foundation
.Social Research and Demonstration Corporation.
 Council for Canadian Unity (Centre for Research and Information on Canada). Federation of Canadian Municipalities
. Fraser Institute - incl. Tax Freedom Day.
 Institute for Research on Public Policy. Institute on Governance
.Intergovernmental Committee on Urban and Regional Research.
International Development Research Centre.
  policy.caPolicy Research Initiative
Montreal Economic Institute    

Canadian Policy Library
"...a social, economic and foreign policy resource - updated daily with the latest jobs, research, and events. Policy Library members reach an audience of hundred of thousands of policy makers, politicians, academics and students."
Source:

Policy Library
- International
- incl. World ¦ US ¦ Canada ¦ UK ¦ Germany ¦ Australia

Also from the Policy Library:
Welfare and Social Security Policy



Think-tanks changing their minds

Many top Canadian policy-makers are moving on.
Maybe it's time for a bit more edge or relevance, reports CAMPBELL CLARK
August 20, 2005
OTTAWA -- A generation of influential Canadian policy-makers are moving on. They're not politicians or bureaucrats, but the heads of think-tanks, the deep thinkers sought out for fresh ideas by government leaders. It is part of a widespread rollover that is leaving Canada's think-tank sector at a crossroads. Even some of the current crop say the field may be strong but it could use something more -- a bit more edge, a little worldliness, or a touch more relevance -- to fill a market of ideas undersupplied by a sterile political debate.(...) The think-tank positions certainly have influence. Brian Guest, a former senior aide to Paul Martin who left the prime minister's office to co-found the Canadian Centre for Policy Ingenuity, which deals with the issues of cities and the environment, said his interest in think-tanks was sparked because he had to keep up with Mr. Martin's demands for arguments about their papers or perspective from someone such as Ms. Maxwell."
Source:
The Globe and Mail

Canadian Centre for Policy Ingenuity (CCPI)
"The CCPI is a non-profit organization that solves significant social, economic and environmental problems by applying systems thinking to policy development and activation."
- someone from CCPI contacted me by e-mail to ask me to post a link to this site --- although there's not really much content on the site yet except for the full text of the (above) Globe article, which I found interesting enough to share.
[- an "About this Site" page would be very nice...]



Fraser Institute - "Competitive Market Solutions for Public Policy Problems"
The Fraser Institute was founded in 1974 to redirect public attention to the role markets can play in providing for the economic and social well-being of Canadians. Our vision is a free and prosperous world where individuals benefit from greater choice, competitive markets, and personal responsibility. Our mission is to measure, study, and communicate the impact of competitive markets and government interventions on the welfare of individuals.

This site is very rich in Canadian conservative content.
Here are a few samples of what you'll find on the Fraser Institute's site,
along with some different perspectives from groups that reflect *my* philosophy more than the Fraser Institute does.

NOTE: When I did a linkcheck in September 2009, most of the Fraser Institute's links were broken.
I've fixed some of the key links, but I've removed some of the dead links. If you wish to access a link that's broken, Select and Copy the title of the page you wish to see, then paste the page title from your clipboard into the Fraser website search engine on their home page. I was able to find those key links fairly easily, so give it a shot.

Sample content from the Fraser Institute website:

Kochs in Canada: Fraser Institute co-founder confirms 'years and years' of U.S. oil billionaires' funding
http://goo.gl/uSta6
April 26, 2012
By David P. Ball
(...)
Koch Industries is responsible for 25 per cent of Canadian oil sands imports, or roughly 250,000 barrels a year, to the United States. With heated rhetoric in recent months about US funding for Canadian environmental groups – such as the David Suzuki Foundation and the Sierra Club of Canada – nearly 16 per cent of the Fraser Institute's own funding comes from “sources outside Canada,” according to the group's 2010 Canada Revenue Agency return. Those foreign donations – totalling more than $1.7 million in 2010 – are significantly higher than both David Suzuki Foundation's and the Sierra Club of Canada's.

Source:
Vancouver Observer
http://www.vancouverobserver.com/

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Immigration and the Canadian Welfare State
May 17, 2011
By Patrick Grady and Herbert Grubel
Abstract:
This publication provides an estimate of the fiscal burden created by recent immigration into Canada and proposes reforms to existing immigrant selection policies to eliminate the burden. It uses a 2006 Census database to estimate the average incomes and taxes paid on these by immigrants who arrived in Canada over the period from 1987 to 2004. It also estimates other taxes they paid and the value of government services they absorbed. (...) To curtail this growing fiscal burden from immigration, the study proposes that temporary work visas be granted to applicants who have a valid offer for employment from employers, in occupations and at pay levels specified by the federal government and determined in cooperation with private-sector employers. Immediate dependents may accompany successful applicants. The temporary visas are renewable and lead to landed immigrant status if certain specified employment criteria are met.

Complete report:

Immigration and the Canadian Welfare State (PDF - 4.2MB, 62 pages)
"We propose changes in Canada’s immigrant selection process that are not anti-immigrant, but are instead aimed at replacing the present failed system with one that uses market forces to select immigrants and thus to determine the level of annual inflows."

---

COMMENTARY (by Gilles):

If you start a conversation with a statement like, "Well, I'm no xenophobic ideologue, but...", chances are that you are a xenophobic ideologue. The authors "propose changes in Canada’s immigrant selection process that are not anti-immigrant..." - to which I would add "...well, perhaps not anti-ALL-immigrants --- just anti-poor immigrants." Welcome to the Era of The Harper Government ™.

---

I didn't know whether to laugh or cry when I found the source reference below.

"The 2006 Census public use microdata file on individuals contains 844,476 records, representing 2.7% of the Canadian population. These records
were drawn from a sample of one-fifth of the Canadian population (sample data from questionnaire 2B)"

Questionnaire 2B is the long form Census questionnaire.
That's the one that the Harper Government ™ replaced with a voluntary survey that, according to the experts, won't be worth the $30 million cost.
Welcome to the Era of The Harper Government ™.


The Fraser Institute Produces Junk: Graham Steele
(Nova Scotia Finance Minister)
By Alex Boutilier
September 13, 2011
After delivering an update on Nova Scotia's 2011-2012 budget forecast, Finance Minister Graham Steele was asked what he thinks about a new report from the Fraser Institute that ranked Premier Darrell Dexter first among sitting Canadian premiers in terms of fiscal restraint.
(...)
The Fraser Institute produces junk. It is not a serious institution, it is a political organization. And it is no accident that their focus is on the Ontario election (Premier Dalton McGuinty came second last). They're trying to make themselves relevant to the Ontario election. It is no accident that the three premiers they rank at the bottom (PEI's Robert Ghiz, McGuinty, and Quebec Premier Jean Charest) are three non-Conservative premiers who are up for re-election right now. So the next time the Fraser Institute issues something that has Nova Scotia at the bottom, remember that when they put us at the top, my answer is still: the Fraser Institute produces junk. It does not deserve any serious consideration.
[Speaking directly to the interviewer:]
Remember that the next time you ask me about something else the Fraser Institute produces, that even when I could say 'yes, this is validation of what we're saying.' It's ... it's crap.
Source:
Metro News Halifax

HEAR, HEAR.

---

- Go to the Census 2011 questionnaire links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/2011_census_questionnaire.htm

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Think Tanks and the Propaganda Machine
December 5, 2010
(...) Name any issue that social justice organizations, community and church groups and unions have fought for over the years and [Big Business] wants the opposite. But Big Business can’t just come right out and press openly for these things so instead they set up a mouthpiece – the Fraser Institute – and get right wing academics (e.g., Christopher Sarlo) to publish papers that support the Big Business viewpoint. And suddenly…there you have it…Peter Mansbridge quotes them on the National.
Source:
Operation Maple - Take Back Canada!
Operation Maple is a social media project developed and produced by a team of people who want to communicate the message that the people we elect to represent us do not have our best interests at heart. They put big corporations ahead of regular Canadians...

Fraser Institute
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Related link:

Fraser Institute - Home page
The Fraser Institute is an independent non-partisan* research and educational organization based in Canada.
"(...) The Fraser Institute is a registered non-profit organization. We depend entirely on donations from people who understand the importance of impartial research and who support greater choice, less government intervention, and more personal responsibility."
[ * Yeah. And monkeys might fly out my butt. ]

Birds of a feather?

See the Fraser Institute's Other info sources page for links to 20 institutes around the world with a similar focus to that of the The Fraser Institute --- "A free and prosperous world through choice, market and responsibility". It's the Fraser Institute motto, the short form of which should be "Survival of the Fittest".

And while we're on the subject...

The Fraser Institute - from SourceWatch
Wikipedia-style article, unfortunately somewhat dated, but still offers insights into the connections between the Fraser Institute and its corporate masters.
-
includes links to similar articles about other front groups shilling for corporate interests in Canada, such as the Atlantic Institute for Market Studies and the Frontier Institute for Public Policy.
Source:
SourceWatch
The Center for Media and Democracy (CMD)* publishes this collaborative, specialized encyclopedia of the people, organizations, and issues shaping the public agenda. SourceWatch profiles the activities of front groups, PR spinners, industry-friendly experts, industry-funded organizations, and think tanks trying to manipulate public opinion on behalf of corporations or government. We also highlight key public policies they are trying to affect and provide ways to get involved.

[ * Center for Media and Democracy (CMD)
The Center for Media and Democracy is an independent, non-profit, non-partisan media and consumer watchdog group that focuses on a number of areas, including Investigating and countering P.R. campaigns and spin by corporations, industries, and government agencies about issues and products that affect our health, liberty, economic opportunities, environment, and the vitality of the democratic process. [ About CMD ]

Who's funding the [U.S.] Conservative Movement?
Conservative Transparency : The money behind the movement
The People - The Funders - The Recipients
Source:
Media Matters Action Network

----------------------

Tax Freedom Day in Canada

Canadians Celebrate Tax Freedom Day on June 6
June 5, 2009
On Tax Freedom Day, the average Canadian family has earned enough money to pay the taxes imposed on it by the three levels of government: federal, provincial, and local. In 2009, Canadians celebrate Tax Freedom Day on June 6, which means that Canadians will work until June 5 to pay the total tax bill imposed on them by all levels of government. Tax Freedom Day in 2009 arrives three days earlier than in 2008, when it fell on June 9.

Complete study:

Canadians Celebrate Tax
Freedom Day on June 6
(PDF - 97K, 10 pages)
The Canadian tax system is complex and no single number can give us a complete idea of who pays how much. That said, Tax Freedom Day is the most comprehensive and easily understood indicator of the
overall tax bill of the average Canadian family.

Source:
The Fraser Institute
"A free and prosperous world through
choice, markets and responsibility"

Related link:

June 6, 2009
Flaherty Welcomes Earlier Tax Freedom Day
OTTAWA – June 6, 2009 – The Honourable Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, was pleased to welcome Tax Freedom Day today, as it occurs three days earlier in 2009 than in 2008. Calculated each year by the Fraser Institute, Tax Freedom Day marks the day to which the average Canadian had to work to pay their total tax bill. In 2009, the Fraser Institute has calculated that Tax Freedom Day is today—June 6th. In 2008, Tax Freedom Day fell on June 9th.
Source:
Finance Canada

---------------------------

Counterpoint:

Tax freedom? What a lot of rubbish.
Only the Fraser Institute could see it as a bad thing
that we spend less of our income on basics like food and shelter than we used to
By Andrew Potter
May 28, 2009
Tax freedom? What a lot of rubbish.What is it about springtime that makes anti-government types go light-headed?
(...) Listening to the relentlessly shrill right-wing rhetoric, you’d forget that any Canadians ever derived a single benefit from their tax dollars. (...) Only the Fraser Institute could see it as a bad thing that we spend less of our incomes on basics like food and shelter than we used to. (...) Indeed, with its mix of dopey populism and economic illiteracy, the anti-government right finds itself uncomfortably close to the anti-market left. Both are peddling economic half-truths and outright fallacies in the service of their competing but ultimately mirror-image ideologies. The main difference of course is that while the left is generally expected to be economically illiterate, the right is supposed to know better. Their brand is economics, you might say. That is why, when it comes to the rhetorical strategies of Canada’s libertarian movement, it is hard to avoid concluding that the deception is deliberate.
Source:
Macleans Magazine

Tax Freedom Day: A Cause for Celebration or Consternation?
By Sheena Starky, Economics Division
September 18, 2006
HTML version
PDF version
(108K, 13 pages)
"(...) critics question the usefulness of the Tax Freedom Day indicator since it considers only the tax burden without regard to the benefits received in exchange."
- includes links to online related resources
Source:
Virtual Library
[ Parliament of Canada ]

Tax Freedom Day: A Flawed, Incoherent, and Pernicious Concept (PDF file - 216 K, 27 pages)
June 2005
By Neil Brooks
"(...)In the guise of helping Canadians to understand their tax system, the Institute presents information that is deeply flawed and misleading — information that in fact seriously limits the public’s ability to understand and participate meaningfully in the shaping of tax policy." (Excerpt, p.6)
Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

Earth to Flaherty:
What part of "deeply flawed and misleading"don't you get?

---------------------------

Tax Freedom Day - from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Tax Freedom Day is the first day of the year in which a nation as a whole has theoretically earned enough income to fund its annual tax burden. It is annually calculated in the United States by the Tax Foundation—a Washington, D.C.-based tax research organization. Every dollar that is officially considered income by the government is counted, and every payment to the government that is officially considered a tax is counted. Taxes at all levels of government—local, state and federal—are included.(...) Many other organizations in countries throughout the world now produce their own "Tax Freedom Day" analysis. According to the Tax Foundation, Tax Freedom Day reports are currently being published in eight countries. Due to the different ways that nations collect and categorize public finance data, however, Tax Freedom Days are not comparable from one country to another.

-----------------------------

'Corporate welfare bums' cost Canadians $182-billion: report
By Eric Beauchesne
December 10, 2008
OTTAWA -- Canadians have handed out more than $182-billion -- or $13,639 per taxpayer -- in business subsidies, bailouts and loans over the past dozen years, a right-wing think tank says in an attack on what a former NDP leader coined as "corporate welfare bums." The report from the Fraser Institute, however, comes as an entire industry is holding out its had for billions more in financial aid from taxpayers as the economy slumps into recession.
Source:
The National Post

Complete report
from The Fraser Institute:

Corporate welfare: Now a $182 billion addiction
A fiscal update on business subsidies in Canada
(PDF - 104K, 8 pages)
December 2008
When the Fraser Institute published the first study on corporate welfare one year ago, the tally between April 1, 1994 and March 30, 2004 amounted to $144 billion. That was the amount Canadian governments distributed to businesses in the form of subsidies from federal, provincial, and municipal treasuries (i.e., taxpayers) over the 10-year period. One year later, and with two more years of data available, that figure has climbed to over $182 billion for the 12 years between 1994 and 2006.

Canadian tab for corporate welfare exceeds $180 billion; no evidence that subsidies provide net benefits
News Release
December 10, 2008
VANCOUVER, BC—While politicians in Ottawa argue over how much additional money the government should give business in the name of economic stimulation, a new report from independent research organization the Fraser Institute shows that Canadians already provided more than $182 billion in corporate welfare to businesses between 1994 and 2006.

Source:
The Fraser Institute
"A free and prosperous world through
choice, markets and responsibility"
[ Sourcewatch calls The Fraser Institute
"a libertarian think tank based in Vancouver."
]

--------------------------


The Fraser Institute and the Flat Earth Society

By Larry Brown, National Secretary-Treasurer
Ottawa (3 Sept. 2009)
Pointing out that the Fraser Institute has released a perverse study ignoring established facts in order to make its case is a bit like pointing out that the sun rises in the east. It’s kind of self-evident. But the institute's latest bit of silliness is over the top even for the notoriously fact-averse Fraserites. In a report released in late August [ Labour Relations Laws in Canada and the United States, 2009 Edition ] comparing labour laws in Canada and the U.S., the institute argues that our labour laws are too “tilted in favour of unions”. This “imbalance” is a problem because, it claims, “empirical evidence from around the world indicates that jurisdictions with more flexible labour markets enjoy better labour market performance.” Empirical evidence? It’s possible. There actually is a Flat Earth Society claiming to prove that the earth is flat. And some people still claim to have seen Elvis alive. But most people expect proof of a theory to be based on a bit more substance.
Source:
National Union of Public and General Employees (NUPGE)

A Cautionary Tale:

Here's an excerpt from the conclusion of the above article:
"(...) Of course, the Fraser Institute has received millions of dollars from the Donner Canadian Foundation and the Max Bell Foundation. These groups are known for their devotion to right-wing ideological causes in Canada, such as anti-union laws, for-profit health care, private schools and the private delivery of social services. The Fraser Institute also routinely collects money from big oil and gas companies, such as EnCana and Sabre Energy, and big pharmaceutical companies, such as Pfizer. One could suggest that the Fraser Institute, therefore, is only doing what its sponsors want, irrespective of the facts. That might suggest that this report was deliberately slanted to reflect the views of its right-wing corporate sponsors and once more attack laws that protect employees. But let’s be fair to the Fraser Institute. If you believe the world is flat you aren’t going to venture out to the edge for fear of falling off."
---
According to the Fraser Institute website's Who We Are page, "[T]he Fraser Institute is a registered non-profit organization. We depend entirely on donations from people who understand the importance of impartial research and who support greater choice, less government intervention, and more personal responsibility."

After I finished giving my head a shake about Fraser's status as a registered non-profit organization, I had to smile (y'know, the jaundiced smile...) when I read the words "impartial research". How can research be touted as impartial, I wondered, when it's funded by the big corporations that stand to benefit most from 'supportive' research? [Never mind - it's a rhetorical question...]
Ya gotta dance wit de one dat brung ya, eh...

The reference to Big Pharma and Pfizer in the above NUPGE excerpt reminded me of a surprising (to me, at least...) CBC report back in the mid-nineties stating that the Fraser Institute was endorsing not only the legalization of marijuana in Canada, but also its regulation and taxation, based on a June 2004 study entitled Marijuana Growth in British Columbia, funded by the Fraser Institute.
[ See also Fraser Institute study calls for legal pot (June 2004) - CBC ]
After reading the Fraser study, though, I concluded that it was perfectly logical for the Fraser Institute (Motto: "A free and prosperous world through choice, markets and responsibility") to favour an option that reduced government control over people's lives. Because that's what Fraser and their kindred libertarian spirits (Donner, Max Bell, etc.) are all about --- getting government out of people's faces and reducing taxes.

When I saw the reference to Pfizer in the NUPGE article, I was curious what Fraser was saying about the legalization of pot these days. Supporters of legalized pot have long maintained that the biggest barrier to legalization is the sustained pressure on government by several industries that are concerned about the impact on their sector if hemp in all its forms (including marijuana) is made legal. Given the increasing volume of evidence and testimonials about the medicinal advantages of marijuana over traditional medicine for treatment of certain conditions and illnesses, it stands to reason that big drug companies like Pfizer would have the required motivation to lobby government against any form of decriminalization of pot. Indeed, when I went to the Fraser Institute's home page while writing this and did a search for "marijuana", the most recent content on the subject from Fraser is the 2004 study that advocated legalization. According to the CBC story, Fraser issued a second press release the same day, to emphasize that the recommendation to legalize pot were from the author, not the Institute. Gee, I wonder how long it took the folks at Pfizer to contact Fraser to demand the second release to distance themselves from the views of the author...

Suffice to say that 2004 (the year of the pot study and recommendations) appears to be the last time Fraser dared say anything substantive about marijuana on their site. Funny thing about that.
(Now I need a Valium, a coffee and a smoke.)

[Aside: The issue of decriminalization of marijuana is one of those 800-lb gorillas - like abortion, universal day care and the death penalty - that cut across political party lines and that can polarize a roomful of social advocates OR a meeting of the Canadian Taxpayers' Federation.]

So what's the "cautionary" part of all of this?
1. Be wary of websites that describe themselves or their work as "impartial".
2. Be wary of sites that strive for a free and prosperous world through choice, markets and responsibility.

 

The Fraser Institute: Manitoba Rated as Canada's
Most Generous Province but Data Shows Americans Are Far More Generous

Press Release
December 8, 2008
VANCOUVER -- Manitoba continues to be Canada's most generous province, according to the Fraser Institute's annual generosity index. The report, Generosity in Canada and the United States: The 2008 Generosity Index, shows that Manitoba has the highest percentage of tax-filers among all provinces donating to registered charities (28.1 per cent). The total amount donated is also the highest in Canada at 1.14 per cent of total income earned in the province.

Complete report:

Generosity in Canada and the United States: The 2008 Generosity Index (PDF - 90K, 10 pages)
"(...) The highest-scoring Canadian province is Manitoba (3.9 out of 10.0), but its performance ranks only 37th overall out of 64 North American jurisdictions.

Canadians celebrate Tax Freedom Day on June 14th in 2008, four days earlier than 2007
June 13, 2008
VANCOUVER, BC— Tax Freedom Day, the day Canadians have paid off the total tax bill imposed on them by government and can finally start working for themselves, arrives on June 14th, four days earlier than in 2007, according to The Fraser Institute’s annual Tax Freedom Day calculations.

Canadians Celebrate Tax Freedom Day on June 14
Executive summary
Complete report
(PDF - 100K, 9 pages)

Kindred spirits and similar initiatives:

The Tax Foundation (U.S.)
Adam Smith Institute (U.K.)

Related links:

Taxes and human purpose
December 9, 2005
By Neil Brooks
"(...) In support of their vision of the future, business interests and right-wing political parties keep warning us about the terrible legacy we are leaving our children in the form of a national debt and a bloated public sector. In fact, the much worse legacy we are in danger of leaving our children if we decrease taxes and continue to diminish the role of government in our collective lives is a fractured and divided society, without a sense of itself or its collective responsibility, and in which the economic elite is ever more able to defend itself politically. This would be a truly unjust and truly irresponsible legacy to leave our children."

Tax Freedom Day: A Cause for Celebration or Consternation?
By Sheena Starky, Economics Division
September 18, 2006
HTML version
PDF version
(108K, 13 pages)
"(...) critics question the usefulness of the Tax Freedom Day indicator since it considers only the tax burden without regard to the benefits received in exchange."
- includes links to online related resources
Source:
Virtual Library
[ Parliament of Canada ]

"Tax Freedom Day" Google.ca Web Search
"Tax Freedom Day" Google.ca News Search
Source:
Google.ca

----------------------------------------------------------------

Total government debt exceeds $2.4 trillion; $150,211 for each Canadian taxpayer
News Release
May 20, 2008
VANCOUVER, BC— Each Canadian taxpayer owes $150,211 in federal, provincial, and local liabilities, according to a new study released today by independent research organization the Fraser Institute.

Complete report:

Canadian Government Debt 2008: A Guide
to the Indebtedness of Canada and the Provinces
(PDF - 536K, 43 pages)
May 2008

Counterpoint from a voice of reason*:

Tales from the Mouth of the Fraser: Unfounded Liabilities
Debt Monster's Gonna Getcha!!
By Marc Lee*, Progressive Economics Forum Blog
"(...) Total liabilities are estimated over 100 years. (...) What’s missing from their scary picture? The uncounted income we will have in the future. Even if one accepts that their calculations are useful on the expenditure side, they are meaningless without the context of projected future income. And we should expect income to grow – in absolute dollars, and in per capita real terms."
Source:
Progressive Economics Forum
The Progressive Economics Forum aims to promote the development of a progressive economics community in Canada. The PEF brings together over 125 progressive economists, working in universities, the labour movement, and activist research organizations.

* Blogger Marc Lee's is one of several "voices of reason" from the Progressive Economics Forum (PEF). I heartily recommend a visit to the PEF website and blog for a strictly non-corporate interpretation of Canada's economic and social policies. I particularly enjoy it when PEF economists offer reality checks as common-sense counterpoints to the slanted studies of the Fraser Institute...
Good on you, Marc and PEF!!

----------------------------------------------------------------

Government subsidies and handouts to business cost each Canadian taxpayer $1,295
News Release
November 21, 2007
VANCOUVER, BC—Canadians provided business with $19 billion in subsidies in 2004, the equivalent of $1,295 from each Canadian taxpayer, according to a new report released today by independent research organization The Fraser Institute. The 2004 figure was almost double the $10.3 billion governments doled out in business subsidies in 1995. Taxpayer-funded subsidies to business totalled almost $144 billion between 1995 and 2004 (the most recent year for which data is available), the equivalent of $11,030 per tax payer (all figures adjusted for inflation to 2007 dollars).

Complete report:

Corporate Welfare:
A $144 billion addiction
(PDF file - 488K, 62 pages)

----------------------------------------------------------------

November 2007

Number of Canadians depending on government for income has fallen; Ottawa must avoid urge to increase spending and expand bureaucracy
News Release
November 15, 2007
VANCOUVER, BC—The total number of Canadians receiving all or part of their income from some level of government has declined since 1992 when governments were forced to reign in spending and cut costs, according to a new study released today by independent research organization The Fraser Institute.

Complete report:

Government Lovers: Paid by
Canadian Governments and Taxpayers
(PDF file - 293K, 25 pages)
November 2007
This study presents information about the size of government in Canada by accounting for the number of Canadians who are paid by governments as civil servants and beneficiaries of social insurance programs. It supplements the annual Tax Freedom Day studies published by The Fraser Institute to track the size of Canadian governments and the fiscal burdens they impose on Canadians.

----------------------------------------------------------------

Average Canadian family spending more money
on taxes than on food, clothing and household combined
News Release
April 16, 2007
Vancouver, BC - The average Canadian family spends more money on taxes than on necessities of life such as food, clothing, and housing, according to a study from The Fraser Institute, an independent research organization with offices across Canada. The Canadian Consumer Tax Index, 2007, shows that even though the income of the average Canadian family has increased significantly since 1961, their total tax bill has increased at a much higher rate. In 1961, the average Canadian family earned an income of $5,000 and paid $1,675 in total taxes -- 33.5 per cent of its income. In 2006, the average Canadian family earned an income of $63,001 and paid total taxes equaling $28,311 -- 44.9 per cent of its income.

Canadian Consumer Tax Index, 2007
"The Canadian Tax system is complex and there is no single number that can give us a complete idea of who pays how much. That said, The Fraser Institute annually calculates the most comprehensive and easily understood indicator of the overall tax bill of the average Canadian family: Tax Freedom Day. This Alert examines what has happened to the tax bill of the average Canadian family over the past 45 years. To determine the changes, an index of the tax bill of the average Canada family, the Canadian Consumer Tax Index, is constructed for the period 1961-2006."

Counterpoint:

The Fraser Institute updates this index annually, based on its Tax Freedom Day information. There's no analysis of this year's index available online yet because it was just released on April 16, but Neil Brooks, a professor at York's Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto who teaches tax law and policy, looked at last year's numbers and came to a very different conclusion.

"Brooks takes on the Fraser Institute's accounting in a paper for the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA), a think-tank that plows the other side of the political field.(...) As a portion of our total economy, taxes consume only slightly more today than they did in 1975, according to statistics kept by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development. So, revolt if you want, but remember, in government as in all consumer goods, there is a large element of getting what you pay for."
Source:
Y-File - (York University's Daily Bulletin)
April 21, 2006

In the words of Neil Brooks:

Taxes are good for a nation’s health and well-being—study
Press Release
December 6, 2006

The Social Benefits and Economic Costs of Taxation:
A Comparison of High- and Low-Tax Countries
- PDF file - 512K, 55 pages
By Neil Brooks and Thaddeus Hwong
December 6, 2006

Taxes and human purpose
By Neil Brooks
Editorial
December 9, 2005

And I agree wholeheartedly.
You do get the kind of country you pay for.
Remember the old car oil filter commercial: "You can pay me now, or you can pay me later."
It's later now.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Manning and Harris Call for Downsizing of Government;
Reduced Taxes and Spending Key to Economic Freedom

News Release
The Fraser Institute
November 20, 2006
Toronto, ON - As Ottawa readies its economic update for release this week, now is the ideal time to move forward on reducing spending, cutting taxes and eliminating provincial trade barriers, Preston Manning and Mike Harris say in a new policy paper released today, Building Prosperity in a Canada Strong and Free. “The government plays too large a role in the Canadian economy and that’s hindering our growth. We call on Canadian governments to cut government’s share of the economy to 33 per cent from its current 39 per cent over the next five years. That alone will save Canadian taxpayers almost $400 billion over five years and spur increased prosperity,” Manning said.

Complete report:

Building Prosperity in a Canada Strong and Free (PDF file - 871K, 110 pages)
November 2006
By Mike Harris & Preston Manning

Related Links:

Tories not right wing enough according to Harris, Manning
November 20, 2006
OTTAWA - If Preston Manning and Mike Harris had their way, the Harper Conservatives would be more conservative. The Reform party founder and the former Ontario premier are calling on the federal government to implement massive tax reforms, cut the size of government, strip away regulations governing businesses and individuals and rein in spending. Among other things, Ottawa should slash the corporate tax rate in half and eliminate the cap on Registered Retirement Savings Plan contributions, says a paper by Manning and Harris, to be released today by the right-wing Fraser Institute.
Source:
Canada.com

Canadian Government Debt 2006:
A Guide to the Indebtedness of Canada and the Provinces
"Canadian government debt stands $2.7 billion with each taxpayer owing $171,000. (...) Largely due to increases in program obligations, in 2003/2004 federal, provincial, and local liabilities added up to $171,032 for each Canadian taxpayer or $85,525 for each Canadian citizen."
Source:
Fraser Institute

Related Link from the
Canadian Union of Public Employees:

A six step plan for the Fraser Institute
November 14, 2006
The Fraser Institute just released its report on Canadian Government Debt 2006, designed to create public alarm about rising levels of government debt and push for severe cuts to health and social spending. The report, which claims that each Canadian taxpayer owes $171,032 in federal, provincial and local liabilities, is a typical Fraser Institute cocktail of alarmist "facts", sober sounding language, misleading analysis, opaque calculations, quarter truths, significant omissions and wildly overreaching policy lessons.
Source:
Canadian Union of Public Employees

NOTE: With due respect for a great effort, CUPE's six steps for Fraser amount to wishful thinking --- they include a public disclosure by the think tank about the funding it receives from the drug and insurance industries, a recognition of its penchant for distorting the truth in its reports and a demonstration of "a modicum of integrity and honesty" in its reports, and - well, you see what I mean about wishful thinking. Click on the six-step plan link above to read the text of the entire plan...

Canadians Celebrate Tax Freedom Day on June 26th
News Release
June 24, 2005
"Vancouver, BC - This year, Canadians start working for themselves on June 26th. According to The Fraser Institute’s annual Tax Freedom Day calculations, Canadians worked until June 25th to pay the total tax bill imposed on them by all levels of government."
By Jason Clemens, Director of Fiscal Studies, and Niels Veldhuis, Senior Research Economist

We Beg to Differ.

From the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA):

Don’t believe the hype: What’s really behind the Fraser Institute’s “Tax Freedom Day”
News Release
June 16, 2005
"OTTAWA—Each summer the Fraser Institute announces the arrival of 'tax freedom day': the day when Canadians allegedly stop 'working for the government' and start 'working for themselves.' A study by Neil Brooks, released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, takes a closer look at Tax Freedom Day and finds that to arrive at this politically loaded and heavily-reported date the Fraser Institute’s calculations understate the income of Canadians, overstate their taxes and misuse the concept of averages."

Tax Freedom Day: A Flawed, Incoherent, and Pernicious Concept (PDF file - 216 K, 27 pages)
By Neil Brooks
"(...)In the guise of helping Canadians to understand their tax system, the Institute presents information that is deeply flawed and misleading — information that in fact seriously limits the public’s ability to understand and participate meaningfully in the shaping of tax policy." (Excerpt, p.6)

More from Neil Brooks on Tax Freedom Day - from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

--------------------------------------------------------------
NOTE: The Tax Freedom Day concept is not a concoction of the Fraser Institute --- follow the Google.ca web and news search results links below to see similar themes from The Tax Foundation in the U.S. and the Adam Smith Institute in the U.K.

"Tax Freedom Day" Google.ca Web Search
"Tax Freedom Day" Google.ca News Search
Source:
Google.ca

--------------------------------------------------------------

Tax Freedom Day: A Cause for Celebration or Consternation?
By Sheena Starky, Economics Division
September 18, 2006
HTML version
PDF version
(108K, 13 pages)
"Each year, typically in June, Canadian media recognize the arrival of Tax Freedom Day, the day on which Canadian families with two or more individuals are purported to have earned sufficient income to pay their total tax bill to all levels of government for the entire year, and , therefore, to be able to "start working for themselves." Critics claim that the notion of Tax Freedom Day is misleading and is calculated using a flawed methodology.
(...) While the idea of Tax Freedom Day is intuitively appealing and media-friendly, the concept does not enjoy unanimous support in Canada or in other countries where similar reports on Tax Freedom Day exist. (...) More fundamentally, critics question the usefulness of the Tax Freedom Day indicator since it considers only the tax burden without regard to the benefits received in exchange."
- includes links to nine related resources
Source:
Virtual Library
[ Parliament of Canada ]

---

New Study Warns Against Expansive Welfare Policies in Ontario
News Release
December 7, 2004
"Toronto, ON - A new study, Welfare Reform in Ontario: A Report Card released today by The Fraser Institute, gives Ontario praise for its previous welfare reforms but warns that these policies may be under threat. 'Ontario has been a leader in Canadian welfare reform by focusing on employment and diverting potential welfare recipients to alternatives,'said Sylvia LeRoy, policy analyst at the Institute and co-author of the study. 'However, last week, the Ontario Government received a report by Liberal MPP Deb Matthews [see below] which recommended abandoning many of those reforms and returning to policies that were in place pre-1995. Such policies had disastrous effects, including the doubling of welfare use between 1985 and 1995, increasing from 5.2 percent of the population in 1985 to 12.4 percent in 1995 and a substantial increase in welfare spending', she continued."

Complete Fraser Institute report:

Welfare Reform in Ontario: A Report Card (PDF file - 524K, 53 pages)
December 2004
- examination of welfare policies in Ontario since 1985, "evaluating the welfare reforms initiated under the newly elected provincial government in June 1995. These will be compared with reforms of welfare policies in the United States, which have proven abundantly successful in reducing dependency, increasing employment and earnings of welfare leavers, and lowering poverty rates, as well as with reforms of welfare policies undertaken by other Canadian jurisdictions.
- the evaluation of Ontario's welfare reforms is based upon "six principles that research has found to play a prominent role in effective welfare reform" - these principles are: Ending the entitlement to welfare - Diversion - Immediate work requirements and sanctions - Employment focus - “Making work pay” - Competition for the administration of welfare and for program delivery.

Source:
The Fraser Institute

Related Link:

Review of Employment Assistance Programs in Ontario Works &
Ontario Disability Support Program
(PDF file - 167K, 48 pages)
December 2004
Deb Matthews
Source:
Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services

Counterpoint:
----------------------

It's important to expose oneself to opposing views on issues as delicate as welfare reform and social justice --- it makes for healthy debate and broader perspectives. That's why, from time to time, I link to reports from organizations that have a different interpretation than mine of society's ills and how to cure them. The Fraser Institute, a Vancouver conservative think tank / lobby group, is one such organization whose site I visit occasionally.
Sometimes, though, the left-leaner in me finds it difficult to post links on my site to reports such as this one (the Ontario welfare reform report card) as if it were the Gospel Truth, without including a rebuttal or a counterpoint.

Welfare Reform in Ontario: A Report Card rates Ontario's reforms against the Fraser Institute's five "principles of effective welfare reform", all of which are focused on ending or severely curtailing welfare entitlement, on ensuring that work is always more attractive than welfare, and on putting both the administration and delivery of welfare up for competitive bidding from the non-profit and private sectors. All of these principles are consistent with the Fraser Institute's view that American welfare reforms are a model for Canada. Not surprisingly, there is not one principle that refers to adequacy of income and employment supports, nor to health or social indicators.

Two observations and a few recommended readings for folks who read the Fraser report (and perhaps even for those who wrote it):

1. Canadian and American welfare systems are different from one another, a fact that Fraser wilfully and consistently ignores in its reports. Unlike the Canadian welfare system, the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) program excludes both single people and childless couples, who must apply to the national Food Stamp program and to residual programs where they live (if there are any such programs, which is not always the case), as well as people with disabilities (who must apply under the separate American Social Security program. In Canada, singles and childless couples make up close to 60% of the total welfare caseload and households headed people with disabilities account for about a third of the total caseload. These are just a few of the more significant reasons why Canadian welfare shouldn't be compared with American programs under TANF.

A Short Review of the Fraser Institute Report Card: Welfare Reform in Ontario
December 2004
By John Stapleton

2. Welfare time limits are successful? - one of the Fraser Institute's principles of effective welfare reform is "Ending the entitlement to welfare". The Fraser report speaks of the success of the American welfare time limits and, to a lesser extent, the BC welfare time limits. In the case of the American time limit policy, it's still too early to determine the long-term impact of the time limits on welfare recidivism and labour market attachment (see the link to the Welfare information Network studies below), and in the case of British Columbia, perhaps someone should tell the Fraser Institute that the two-years-out-of-five welfare entitlement policy was effectively disabled back in February of 2004. On second thought, perhaps the authors should check this editorial from the Fraser Institute:

BC’s U-Turn on Welfare Reform Spells Disaster
Editorial (Vancouver Sun, February 16, 2004)
By Jason Clemens, Sylvia LeRoy and Niels Veldhuis

"In a disastrous U-turn on welfare reform, the BC Government de-legitimized what was one of Canada’s most important social welfare reforms to date; a limit that capped the amount of time employable adults could collect welfare to 2 out of every 5 years. Late on Friday afternoon, February 6th, the BC Liberals announced a series of new exemptions to the time limits, including one that exempts anyone abiding by their work plan. The policy change effectively nullifies the time limit rule and speaks more to the government’s immediate political concerns than any genuine concern for those still struggling to make the transition from a life of welfare dependence to one of self-sufficiency."

Welfare Time Limits in British Columbia - a Canadian Social Research Links page
80+ links to welfare time limit info from BC and the U.S

Welfare Time Limits
- 60+ links from the Welfare Information Network (U.S.)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Are Welfare Rates Too Low? (PDF file - 741K, 32 pages)
[See p. 26]
The amount that society gives to the poor in the form of last-resort
social assistance programs is fundamentally a political choice.
by Chris Sarlo
Source:
Fraser Forum - July 2004

Every so often I visit the Fraser Institute's website to see the latest bumph from the fiscal and social conservative faction of Canadian society. When I perused the table of contents of the Institute's latest issue of the Fraser Forum (the "source" link above), I found this article by Chris Sarlo, poster boy for the Fraser Institute's ongoing campaign for the wider use of absolute poverty measures in Canada (vs. the StatCan Low Income Cutoffs).

The premise of this article is that in Canada, "aside from the single employable category, recipients’ income is reasonably close to the poverty line in most cases."
My reaction: perhaps true, but only if you're using the calorie-from-starvation budget numbers of the Fraser Institute...

The National Council of Welfare's 2002 edition of Welfare Incomes is the source of some of the figures in the table that's part of the Fraser Institute article.
The source of the figures in the table is cited as "National Council of Welfare, 2002; and calculations by the author."

In fact, only the first column in the Sarlo article is from the Council, and it's from Welfare Incomes 2002. Here's a link to the Welfare Incomes 2002 fact sheet where you can find the estimated income figures used in the Fraser article:
http://cnb-ncw.gc.ca/en/publications/pub-119.html
When I compared the figures from both sources, I realized that the Fraser article had substituted its own "Basic Poverty Needs Line" for the Council's use of the StatCan Low Income Cutoff.

Mr. Sarlo and the Fraser Institute have the right to use their absolute income levels instead of the Low Income Cutoffs - their levels do, after all, show that everyone on welfare is near the poverty line except employable singles (thus reinforcing their view).

What I find objectionable is Sarlo's use of the absolute numbers without documenting this more precisely in the source of his table. In the entire text that accompanies the table, there is no definition of "Basic Poverty Needs Line" - in fact, the author prefers to use the short form "poverty line", as if repeating it often enough will lull people into equating the numbers in his article with the other poverty line we keep hearing about, LICO. I suspect that some people who read the Fraser article will be wondering why we need to raise welfare rates when all clients except singles are already receiving welfare rates that appear to be close to or even higher than the poverty line.
It's because Fraser switched the numbers.

They're not using the same poverty line.
And they didn't tell us.
Shame.

Fraser Forum February 2004
- articles include : The Art of Fish Management - Some Basic Insurance Concepts - The Cost of Canada's Employment Insurance System - Why We Need a Return to Experience Rating in EI - Revealing Research on Auto Insurance - The Problem with Public Health Insurance - Poverty Among Seniors in Canada - The 2004 Budget Performance Index - Exploring Potential, Results from the 2003 - 2004 Fraser Institute Annual Survey of Mining Companies - Ontario's Labour Reforms Ill Advised - New Health Reform Policy in Slovakia Reminds Canada of a Lesson it has Yet to Learn

Poverty Among Seniors in Canada (PDF file - 94K, 2 pages)
by Chris Sarlo
"The claim that almost one in five seniors in Canada is currently impoverished has as much credibility as the latest sighting of Elvis."

Complete Fraser Forum (PDF file - 542K, 28 pages)
For those with high speed connections, this PDF file contains the complete Fraser Forum (rather than broken down into the links above).

A Rising Tide Lifts All Boats (PDF file - 100K, 2 pages)
by Niels Veldhuis and Jason Clemens
"Does economic growth benefit those with the lowest incomes? Research seems to show that it does."

The National Homelessness Initiative (PDF file - 99KB)
by Chris Sarlo
"What specific successes has the National Homelessness Initiative achieved in its first three years to warrant its renewal?"

Source:
Reasons for Economic Optimism
January 2004 Fraser Forum

(Table of Contents page)
- click on the link above to access other articles in this issue of the Fraser Forum, on the Canadian standard of living compared with other advanced countries, education in Alberta, electoral reform in BC, Alberta and Ontario as models for tax reductions elsewhere in Canada, media literacy and the installation of left-wing politics into the school curriculum, after the Albert Advantage, Paul Martin's Expenditure Review Committee, and more...
Complete January 2004 Fraser Forum (PDF file - 634K, 32 pages)

The Relativity of LICO (PDF file - 82K, 2 pages)
by Chris Sarlo
"A relative line, such as LICO, may be useful as a marker of what income is required to keep from falling behind the mainstream, but is not useful at all as a measure of what income people need to avoid being 'straitened.'"
Source:
November 2003 Fraser Forum
NOTE: In the November Fraser Forum, you'll also find links to the following articles:
- Ontario's Best Education Premier (Poll says Ontarians disagree with Liberal plan to roll back education credits)
- Could Alberta's Provincial Police Return by 2012?
- A Council of the Federation (PDF file - 94K, 2 pages)
- Dismal Consequences from Canada's Regional Programs
- How Feasible is an Alberta Pension Plan?
- The Potential and the Penalty for Real Health Care Reform
- Constituting Democracy in Alberta:A Centennial Proposal
- Some Comments on Economic Freedom in Bangladesh
- The Case for Privatizing BC's Forests
- False Failures
- Revisiting Reference Pricing in BC's Pharmacare
- Florida's Proof: Testing the Effects of Competition
Click on the November link above to access links to each article, or on the link below to download the entire issue.
Complete Fraser Forum (PDF file - 489KB, 30 pages)

Welfare Reform Saves Lives (PDF file - 78K, 3 pages)
by Sylvia LeRoy, Todd Gabel
"Welfare reform helps save people trapped in dependency and poverty"
Source:
October 2003 Fraser Forum

The Market Basket Measure of Poverty (PDF file - 93K, 2 pages)
by Chris Sarlo
"The "market basket measure" of poverty may be a victory for the basic needs approach this author developed, but celebrations are premature."
Source:
Fraser Forum - April 2003


Saskatchewan Welfare Reform Lacks a New Vision for Social Assistance
News Release
Fraser Institute
January 16, 2003
"Saskatchewan has failed to fundamentally reform welfare and must implement major changes to reduce caseloads, increase the employment and earnings of welfare recipients, and decrease provincial spending on social services, says a new study, Welfare in Saskatchewan: A Critical Evaluation, released today by The Fraser Institute."
NOTE: The news release contains the authors' seven recommendations for reforming the delivery of social services in Saskatchewan.
For the record, I agree with and support recommendation number six - and only recommendation number six (improvement of earnings exemption provisions).

Welfare in Saskatchewan: A Critical Evaluation
Chris Schafer and Jason Clemens
Fraser Institute
November 2002
Executive Summary -
Complete report
(PDF file - 298K, 50 pages)

Ain't democracy grand?

Even though I disagree fundamentally with the Fraser Institute's view on the "success" of welfare reforms in Saskatchewan, I feel it's important to share this information about how one faction of Canadian society feels about welfare reforms and social programs in general.

The authors state that "[S]askatchewan politicians have chosen not to more fundamentally reform the welfare system, as other Canadian jurisdictions have", referring specifically to the deep welfare cuts in Alberta (1993), Ontario (1995) and BC (2002), provinces that they offer as models for Canadian welfare reform. Ironically, the National Council of Welfare (NCW) applauded the Saskatchewan government back in 1997 for exactly the same reason in Another Look at Welfare Reform : "Compared with some other provinces, Saskatchewan had done better for its welfare recipients by doing nothing." I wrote those words myself, in my role as principal researcher for the NCW's welfare reform report, and I'm sure that even the harshest social critics of the government of Saskatchewan wouldn't argue that point about welfare in their province in the mid-to-late 1990s.


From the
National Council of Welfare (NCW):

---
*
NOTE : The National Council of Welfare closed its doors and shut down its website at the end of September 2012.
For more information, see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ncw.htm

The links to the three reports below are functional because the files are copied to my web server.
---

Over the years, the Council has produced many reports on poverty and welfare, but there are three that stand out in my mind as milestone reports on the history of welfare in Canada, at least since the 1980s.

1. 1987
Welfare in Canada: The Tangled Safety Net
(PDF - 2.7MB, 131 pages)
November 1987
Tangled Safety Net examines the following issues in Canadian social assistance network of programs:
* Complex rules * Needs-testing * Rates of assistance * Enforcement * Appeals * Recommendations
This report is the first comprehensive national analysis of social assistance programs operated by the provincial, territorial and municipal governments. These programs function as the safety net for Canadians and are better known by their everyday name ‘welfare’.

Version française :
Le bien-être social au Canada : Un filet de sécurité troué (PDF - 3Mo., 138 pages)
Novembre 1987
[ NOTA : Si vous trouvez un lien vers ce fichier en français, veuillez communiquer avec moi pour le partager.
Merci! gilseg@rogers.com ]

____________

2. 1992
Welfare Reform
(PDF - 2.8MB, 61 pages)
Summer 1992
This report is an update of the 1987 Tangled Safety Net, but it presents information by jurisdiction rather than by issue - covers all provinces and territories.

Version française:
Réforme du bien-être social (PDF - 3,5Mo., 63 pages)

____________

3. 1997
Another Look at Welfare Reform
(PDF - 6.75MB, 134 pages)
Autumn 1997
- an in-depth analysis of changes in Canadian welfare programs in the 1990s. The report focuses on the provincial and territorial reforms that preceded the repeal of the Canada Assistance Plan and those that followed the implementation of the Canada Health and Social Transfer in April 1996.
[Proactive disclosure : I did the research for, and wrote the provincial-territorial section of, this report while I was on a one-year secondment to the Council. Gilles ]

Version française:
Un autre regard sur la réforme du bien-être social (PDF - 8Mo., 148 pages)

---

Companion document to
Another Look:

Overview of Provincial (and Territorial)
Welfare Reforms in the 1990s

October 1998
Fifteen pages of research notes used in the production of Another Look at Welfare Reform.
HINT: There's a WEALTH of information on provincial-territorial welfare reforms in these pages that didn't make it to the final report!

-------------------------------------------------

Source:
National Council of Welfare
Established in 1969, the Council is an advisory group to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (originally the Minister of Health and Welfare Canada). The mandate of the Council is to advise the Minister regarding any matter relating to social development that the Minister may refer to the Council for its consideration or that the Council considers appropriate.

October 6 (2012)
The National Council of Welfare closed its doors and shut down its website at the end of September 2012.
For more information, see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ncw.htm

I suspect that the difference in perspective is that the NCW represents the interests of disadvantaged Canadians while the Fraser Institute speaks for the rich and the corporations
Read about both organizations:

National Council of Welfare ("...advises the Minister [of Human Resources Development Canada] on the needs and problems of low-income Canadians and on social and related programs and policies which affect their welfare...")
Funding for the NCW : the federal government.

About the Fraser Institute - "Founded in 1974 at a time when many Canadians believed that government should be the principal source of growth and development in the economy, the Institute has helped bring about a considerable shift in public opinion in recognition of the importance of market competition."
Funding for the Institute: "The majority of the Institute’s revenues are derived from the donations of its members, and from research foundations."
(from the Institute's 2001 annual report - PDF file - 860K, 32 pages)

November 2002 Fraser Forum - Taming Media Myths
"Fraser Forum is a monthly review of public policy in Canada, with articles covering taxation, education, health care policy, and wide range of other topics. Forum writers are economists, Institute research analysts, and selected authors, including those from other public policy think tanks."

Here are just a few of the 16 titles in this month's Fraser Forum; click on the link above to access all articles in this issue.

November Questions and Answers (PDF file - 133K, 3 pages)
- public sector employment figures : number of employees in 1991 and 2001 in eight different areas of the public sector for all of Canada + total number of public sector employees and average wage information by province/territory for 1991 and 2001

Judges versus the Media (PDF file - 97K, B)
by Sylvia LeRoy
"Media attention to judicial decisions has increased many-fold since the introduction of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms."

The Media & Globalization Myths (PDF file - 105K, 3 pages)
"Even the Prime Minister isn't immune to the mythology that income disparities between rich and poor nations are widening."

Poverty and the Federal Government (PDF file - 115K, 2 pages)
by Chris Sarlo
"My own measure [of poverty] is one of so called “absolute poverty” and attempts to reveal serious material deprivation (hunger, inadequate housing, deprived living conditions)—not a lack of social comforts."

Related Links:
By coincidence, I was doing some cleanup of broken links this weekend, and I came across these two short pieces from a few years ago by David Ross, former Director of the Canadian Council on Social Development. Read the Sarlo article above, then read the counterpoint by David Ross.

Rethinking Child Poverty - David Ross,summer 1999
Child Poverty in Canada: Recasting the Issue - David Ross, April 1998
"According to the Fraser [Institute] analysis, child poverty is really only a problem among those who live in families where incomes are so low that the parents cannot even afford adequate food and shelter (...)
let me remind them that Canada is not a Third World country."
Source : Canadian Council on Social Development


October 2002 Fraser Forum - "Do Judges Make Good Policy?"
"Fraser Forum is a monthly review of public policy in Canada, with articles covering taxation, education, health care policy, and wide range of other topics. Forum writers are economists, Institute research analysts, and selected authors, including those from other public policy think tanks."
Here are a few of the titles in this month's Fraser Forum (click on the link above to see all articles in this issue)
Activist Judges Attack Common Sense Revolution (PDF file - 92K, 3 pages)
-"Activist judges have used the Charter of Rights to roll back cost-cutting policy initiatives in health, welfare, and labour relations."
- "judicial attack" against the Mike Harris legacy - incl. references to the Falkiner ("spouse-in-the-house")case

The UN's Right to Welfare (PDF file - 103K, 2 pages)
- "A right-to-welfare court challenge in Quebec could affect us all."
- Ref. to the Gosselin case ("...the real legacy of this case will be that litigants may turn to documentary evidence from international human rights instruments, nowhere legislated in domestic law, to push for ever greater economic benefits and state resources. Why work when you can sue?")

Labour-saving Devices in Poor Households (PDF file - 86K, 2 pages)
"Are those defined as poor far behind the rest of society in the use and enjoyment of labour-saving devices?"

[Gilles' comment: Petty. I knew before reading the article that author Chris Sarlo would equate ownership of one kitchen labour-saving device or another with affluence - or at least non-poverty. Petty.]

Other articles in the October Forum cover topics such as the Nisga'a Treaty, the Court Challenges Program, Kyoto, drug benefit programs, government spending, democratic reform (constitutional constraints), market forces and Canada's highways, measuring the size of government and more.
Source : Fraser Institute - "Competitive Market Solutions for Public Policy Problems"


BC Welfare Reform Receives a “B” : Province Leaps to Forefront of Intelligent Welfare Reform and Sets New Standard for Canadian Welfare
The Fraser Institute
October 21, 2002
"BC’s recently announced welfare reforms have catapulted it beyond any Canadian jurisdiction and into the realm of reform-minded US states such as Wisconsin
, says a new report, Welfare Reform in British Columbia: A Report Card, released today by the Fraser Institute."
News Release and Summary
Welfare Reform in British Columbia: A Report Card
(PDF file - 208K, 30 pages)
Source:
Fraser Institute - "Competitive Market Solutions for Public Policy Problems"

The Fraser Institute was founded in 1974 to redirect public attention to the role markets can play in providing for the economic and social well-being of Canadians.
-----------------------------------
Wow - it's not often that the conservative Fraser Institute is on the same wavelength as the British Columbia social advocacy community, but there ya go, folks.
Here's what authors Chris Schafer and Jason Clemens say about incentives to work:
"The government should move to immediately re-instate earnings exemptions as they existed prior to the change. Furthermore, the government should consider enhancing the opportunities to “make work pay” by extending earnings exemptions further."
"Hear, hear!" say the social advocates --- but then, the Fraser report also gives the BC government high marks for being the first Canadian jurisdiction to set a time limit to welfare eligibility [max. two years out of every five years] regardless of personal circumstances or the economic situation --- definitely not a popular feature with those who work with and speak for the most disadvantaged in BC...
-----------------------------------
Re. Wisconsin:
Wisconsin Studies (W-2)
- The Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP) of the University of Wisconsin has a section of its Welfare Reform website that includes links to over a dozen studies on the outcomes and impacts of welfare reform in Wisconsin. Pick one or two, read them and decide for yourself how successful Wisconsin's reforms have been...
Source : Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
----------------------------------
Caveat :
"The welfare caseload composition of Canadian provincial welfare rolls and US state welfare rolls varies on a number of different levels. While female single- parent families comprise the bulk of US welfare caseloads, in Canada that figure is approximately 29 percent (CCSD, 1998). In addition, Canadian caseloads also consist of disabled persons, whereas in the US disabled persons fall under alternative support programs not categorized as “welfare.” - Footnote #4, page 25

There are indeed a number of differences between the current Canadian and American social safety nets - too many to cover in a newsletter, and certainly enough that the Fraser Institute should have considered posting the disclaimer/caveat just a bit more prominently.
For example...
- poor single people and childless couples in the U.S. can't even apply for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), and states decide individually whether or not to grant residual welfare to applicants without dependants
- 35 percent of the total U.S. caseload is "child-only cases", i.e., kids outside the parental home (in Canada, the vast majority of these kids are covered by child protection)
- Canadian welfare is broader than TANF plus the Food Stamp Program plus Medicaid...
- and so on.
 

Related Links (welfare in Canada and the U.S.):

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program (TANF) : Fourth Annual Report to Congress
April 2002
Source :
Department of Health and Human Services

Canadian equivalent to the 4th annual TANF report to Congress :
None. There is no requirement within the framework of the Canada Health and Social Transfer for a report by government to Parliament on the administration of the welfare portion of the CHST (or any other portion, for that matter) by provincial and territorial governments. Pity...

Other Canadian (national) welfare information resources:
Canadian Social Research Links Key Government Welfare Links Page
National Council of Welfare
Canadian Council on Social Development
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

Canada Spends the Most on Health Care Among OECD Countries
but Ranks Low on Key Health Indicators

News Release (August 19, 2002)
"Canada spends more on health care than any other industrialized country providing universal access yet winds up near the bottom of the heap in quality of service says a new study, How Good is Canadian Health Care: An International Comparison of Health Care Systems."
Executive Summary ( PDF file - 540K, 6 pages)
Report - links to the executive summary and six sections of the report

Related Links:
The Fraser Institute loves bad health care news
Corporate lapdog Michael Walker strikes again

September 19, 2002
"Vancouver - Corporate Canada's faithful lapdog is back again. Michael Walker of the Fraser Institute has published yet another study knocking public medicare and praising corporate health care as an alternative. His "new" annual study of hospital waiting times across Canada says things are getting steadily worse for Canadians cueing up for treatment."
(...)
"...the Fraser Institute, whose sole reason for existence is to blacken the name of all things public and whitewash everything corporate"
Source : National Union of Public and General Employees

Saskatchewan blasts biased Fraser Institute study
September 20, 2002
"Regina - Saskatchewan is disputing hospital waiting-list figures compiled by the Fraser Institute, the right-wing, corporate-funded "research" outfit by Michael Walker in Vancouver. A new report by the public-sector-bashing institute says Saskatchewan has the longest surgical waiting list in the country — more than twice the national average. Dr. Peter Glynn, the chair of Saskatchewan's Surgical Care Network takes exception to the numbers released by the Fraser Institute. His group was set up to oversee waiting lists for surgery. He says the actual waiting time for most surgeries is less than half of what is cited in the Fraser Institute study."
Source : National Union of Public and General Employees

Canada ranks 17th on Index of Human Progress -- Most of the World Sees Large Gains
July 24, 2002
"Canada ranks a weak 17th on the Fraser Institute's Index of Human Progress released today, compared to its 3rd place ranking on the United Nations' often-quoted Human Development Index."

Related Link:
Human Development Report 2002 - Deepening Democracy in a Fragmented World
July 24, 2002
UN Human Development Report Website

July 2002 Fraser Forum - "Tax Freedom Day"
"Fraser Forum is a monthly review of public policy in Canada, with articles covering taxation, education, health care policy, and wide range of other topics. Forum writers are economists, Institute research analysts, and selected authors, including those from other public policy think tanks."
Here are some of the titles in this month's Fraser Forum (click on the link above to see all 16 articles in this issue)
- Canadians Celebrate Tax Freedom Day on June 28 (PDF file - 450K, 6 pages) - "Over time, Tax Freedom Day arrives earlier. But progress is very slow."
- Rising Capital Flows and Falling Corporate Tax Rates ("High tax rates are difficult to sustain in the new globalized economy.")
- The Corporate Capital Tax: Canada's Most Damaging Tax ("...by far the most destructive and growth-inhibiting tax imposed by Canadian governments.")
- Is Child Poverty Declining? (PDF file - 58K, 2 pages) - "The federal Human Resources Minister has credited the National Child Benefit with reducing child poverty. Her claim should not be taken seriously."
- Don't Tamper with Welfare Success (PDF file - 93K, 2 pages) - "There is a move afoot in the US to roll back the initial 1996 reforms that were so successful in ending welfare as Amerians knew it."
- Tug-of-War: The Security vs. Sovereignty Dilemma
- Medical Research and Media Hype
- Just Say No to Agricultural Subsidies: Ten Reasons to Dump Farm Aid
- More Guns, Less Crime? What Canada can Learn from Gun Control Around the World
- Freedom and Security not Mutually Exclusive
- Government on the Grill
Source : Fraser Institute - "Competitive Market Solutions for Public Policy Problems"

Nobel Laureates Call on G8 to Focus on Economic Freedom
June 25, 2002
"Calgary, AB - If the G8 is serious about fighting global poverty and terrorism, it needs to focus on promoting economic freedom, say Nobel Laureates in economic sciences Milton Friedman and Gary Becker"

Economic Freedom of the World: 2002 Annual Report
June 2002
"This 6th global economic freedom report, by James Gwartney and Robert Lawson, ranks 123 nations on 37 variables with data back to 1970. Economic freedom is based on personal choice, voluntary exchange, freedom to compete, and protection of the person and property. This requires the rule of law, property rights, limited government intervention, freedom to trade, and sound money."
- incl. links to eight PDF files : Introduction and notes - Economic Freedom of the World - Index of Patent Rights - International Tax Competition - Country Data Tables (Albania to Zimbabwe)

The Benefits of Globalization - May 2002 Fraser Forum*
Fifteen articles expounding the fiscal conservative views of the Fraser Institute on a variety of topics related to globalization, including : Trade Openness, Sound Policies, and Prosperity - A Child's Burden: Reducing Child Labour by Increasing Trade - Markets Should be Free to Roam the World - Economic Freedom Behind the Scenes - Regulation Without Borders - Private Clinics are Breaking Down Two-tiered Health Care - Private Property Rights Key to Forestry Impasse - Assets and Property - Tails, You Keep Your Job; Heads, You Lose It - and more.
"Fraser Forum is a monthly review of public policy in Canada, with articles covering taxation, education, health care policy, and wide range of other topics. Forum writers are economists, Institute research analysts, and selected authors, including those from other public policy think tanks."
*NOTE : On this page, you'll also find links to the following issues of the Fraser Forum : April 2002 (Environmental Questions for the 21st Century) - March 2002 (Creating a North America Frontier) - February 2002 (Government in the Medicine Cabinet)

Fraser Institute proposes an alternative to the United Nations' Human Development Index
Media Release
24 October 2001
Canada ranks sixteenth on the Fraser Institute's Measuring Development: An Index of Human Progress, released today. This new publication provides a more complete view of the recent history and current state of development throughout the world than does the United Nations' often-quoted Human Development Index.
The Fraser Institute's Index of Human Progress ranks the United States first, Switzerland second, Luxembourg third, Denmark fourth, and Japan fifth. Canada ranked sixteenth in 1999 out of 128 countries.
- Measuring Development: An Index of Human Progress
(PDF file - 521K, 63 pages)

Related Link :
United Nations Human Development Report 2001


Surveying US and Canadian Welfare Reform (PDF file - 838K, 68 pages)
August 2001

Executive Summary
Introduction
1. Historical development of welfare in the United States
2. PRWORA—the end of welfare as Americans knew it
3. American states—experimentation and innovation
4. The results of PRWORA and state welfare reforms
5. Welfare in Canada
6. Provincial welfare reforms
7. Recommendations for Canada
Glossary
References


Measuring Poverty in Canada - New study says poverty in Canada continues to be overstated
Fraser Institute Critical Issues Bulletin
July 23, 2001
Media Release

Measuring Poverty in Canada - Executive summary and links to the complete report (in three separate PDF files)
2001
1. Measuring Poverty in Canada - Part 1(PDF - 236KB)
2. Measuring Poverty in Canada - Part 2
(PDF - 982KB)
3. Measuring Poverty in Canada - Part 3
(PDF - 284KB)


The Adequacy of Welfare Benefits in Canada
by Joel Emes and Andrei Kreptul
April 1999
- Compares welfare benefits in 1998 by province with Christopher Sarlo's Basic Needs Lines. Includes information on earnings exemptions and special assistance, plus Pre-Tax Wage Equivalence charts explaining how much a working person would have to earn to end up with the same annual "net income" as an income assistance (IA) recipient.
Executive Summary
Complete Report (PDF file - 427K, 30 pages)

Canadian Living Standards 1998 Report by Christopher A. Sarlo
Executive Summary
Complete Report
(PDF file, 732K, 62 pages)


Canadians Celebrate Tax Freedom Day on June 29
June 26, 2001
Canadians finally start working for themselves on June 29. According to The Fraser Institute's annual Tax Freedom Day calculations, announced today. Canadians worked until June 28 to pay the total tax bill imposed on them by all levels of government. This represents a five day improvement over last year when Tax Freedom Day fell on July 4.

But see also :

The Tax Freedom Daze
June 2001
Every year, the ultra-conservative Fraser Institute pronounces Tax Freedom Day--the day when Canadians (finally) stop "working for the government" and start "working for themselves". Tax Freedom Day is, without a doubt, a clever and media-savvy ploy. That people actually derive benefits from government services in exchange for the taxes they pay is conveniently swept under the ideological carpet. Instead, the Fraser Institute suggests that up to a certain date, the government takes all of your income, burying it in some distant mineshaft never again to see the light of day, and thus stripping away your ability to be truly free.
Source : Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives


Fraser Forum Online
The site redesign appears to have done a real number on the Fraser Forum. The old site had a single link where visitors could select monthly Forum issues back to 1991 - over a thousand articles. With the new site, you either select a recent issue from the right-hand side of the Fraser home page or use the search engine for older issues. I haven't figured out how far back they go in the new site. I wasn't impressed with the Advanced Search feature. Damn those database sites.


C.D. Howe Institute

"The C.D. Howe Institute is Canada’s leading independent, nonpartisan, nonprofit economic policy research institution. Its individual and corporate members are drawn from business, universities and the
professions."

<begin "nonpartisan" rant>
I have to laugh (not the genuine ha-ha laughter, but the jaundiced one) when I see the expression "nonpartisan" in the description of the Institute (from the C.D. Institute blurb in the report). They're about as non-partisan as their West Coast brothers-in-arms, the Fraser Institute. They didn't fool Wikipedia, though --- here's their take on the Institute: "The C.D. Howe Institute is a Canadian economic and social think tank based in downtown Toronto, Ontario. It is non-profit, officially non-partisan, and a registered charity with the Canada Revenue Agency. However, it is funded mainly by large corporations, and generally advocates market-oriented economic policies such as tax cuts.(bolding added)" [Source]
I like the way Wikipedia adds the word "officially" as a nuance to the Institute's own description of itself as nonpartisan...
</end "nonpartisan" rant>

- Publications List - close to 100 C.D. Howe Institute reports (in PDF format) going back to 1996. Subjects include the Social Union, the CHST, the National Child Benefit and Employment Insurance, to name but a few...

Selected site content:

Poverty Rate Among Single-Parent Families Cut
by Half over Decade: C.D. Howe Institute
(PDF - 60K, 2 pages)
Communiqué
June 24, 2010
The poverty rate among the two million Canadians living in lone-parent families has fallen by more than half over a decade, according to a C.D. Howe Institute study released today. In Reducing Lone-Parent Poverty: A Canadian Success Story, Professor John Richards, the Roger Phillips Scholar in Social Policy, finds this decline largely reflects smart social program reforms that led to a dramatic increase in employment income among these families.

The complete study:

Reducing Lone-Parent Poverty:
A Canadian Success Story
(PDF - 538K, 20 pages)
By John Richards
"From 1996 to 2007, the poverty rate among the two million Canadians living in lone-parent families fell by more than half – from nearly 50 percent to just over 20 percent. What did Ottawa and the provinces do right? And what comes next?
(...) In mid-1990s, most provinces adopted 'tough love' initiatives that rendered welfare access more difficult for those classified as employable, a category including most single parents. Accompanying the 'tough love' were 'soft love' initiatives..."

Source:
C.D. Howe Institute
The C.D. Howe Institute is a leading independent, economic and social policy research institution. The Institute’s individual and corporate members are drawn from business, universities and the professions across the country.

---------------------------------

Counterpoint:

Lone Parent Success Story Not Because of Tough Love
By Armine Yalnizyan
June 24, 2010
"John Richards tells us 'tough love' was the right public policy stance for governments to take in the mid 1990s. (...) Richards tells us that the tightening of access to welfare and the imposition of workfare was the kick-in-the-butt that lone parents needed to move themselves out of poverty...."

Armine thinks otherwise.
And she backs up her views with facts.
Click the link above to read the rest of her comment about John Richards' study.
(I personally think the Richards study is just a little bit paternalistic, misogynistic and discriminatory. But that's just me, eh...)

Armine concludes her blog entry: "As the Age of Austerity approacheth, let us hope that reports like this help define the limits of tough love, and provide incentives to gear up the many poverty reduction strategies in Canada. It is both achievable and affordable to reduce poverty for every group in Canada. Now that would be a success story worth writing about."
[ Hear, hear! Gilles ]

Source:
Relentlessly Progressive Economics Blog
[ The Progressive Economics Forum ]

---------------------------------

Dramatic Decline in Welfare Dependency in Canada,
Several Factors Responsible: C.D. Howe Institute
(PDF - 40K, 3 pages)

Communiqué
June 19, 2008
Canada has experienced a dramatic decline in welfare dependency since the early 1990s, according to new study by the C.D. Howe Institute, which notes that Canada’s Social Assistance (SA) dependency rate fell by approximately half from the early 1990s to 2005, taking the country’s rising population into account. In The Welfare Enigma: Explaining the Dramatic Decline in Canadians’Use of Social Assistance, 1993-2005, authors Ross Finnie and Ian Irvine provide a nationwide analysis of the factors responsible for the truly remarkable decline, and draw implications for policymakers.

Complete study:

The Welfare Enigma: Explaining the Dramatic
Decline in Canadians’ Use of Social Assistance, 1993–2005
(PDF - 548K, 32 pages)
Commentary
June 2008
"(...) Keeping people off welfare in the first instance, rather than attempting to get them off once on, is likely the most effective means of affecting caseloads and reducing longer-run welfare dependency."
Source:
C.D. Howe Institute
The C.D. Howe Institute is Canada’s leading independent, nonpartisan, nonprofit economic policy research institution. Its individual and corporate members are drawn from business, universities and the professions.

Related links:

Jobs, government cutbacks cut Canadian welfare rolls in half: report
OTTAWA — More available jobs, with a kick from stingy government policies, has contributed to a dramatic decrease in the number of Canadians receiving welfare cheques, says a new study by the C.D. Howe Institute.
Source:
Google News

Solving the welfare enigma
By Ross Finnie and Ian Irvine
Source:
National Post

COMMENT:
It appears that every eleven years or so, the C.D. Howe Institute, minions of the business, university and professional elite, trot out another earth-shattering study about how reducing access to welfare results in fewer people on welfare. Well, Whoop-De-Doo. That's about as informative an observation as "It's better to be rich and healthy than poor and sick."

Here's the earlier C.D. Howe study:

Alberta welfare reforms
a model for other provinces, says C.D. Howe Institute study
(PDF file - 668K, 38 pages)
April 1997
Kenneth J. Boessenkool, Prime Minister Steve's occasional confidant and advisor, produced this study praising the 1993-1996 Alberta welfare reforms, for other provinces to emulate.

Falling Poverty Rates, Rising Employment among Poor
Reflect Social Policy Success: C.D. Howe Institute
(PDF file - 34K, 2 pages)
Communiqué
October 18, 2007
Anti-poverty initiatives over the last decade in Canada have been successful, mainly by increasing employment among the poor, according to a new study released by the C.D. Howe Institute. In Reducing Poverty: What has Worked, and What Should Come Next, author John Richards finds that policies that target employment for the poor, along with improved labor market conditions, have been key to reducing poverty in Canada.

Complete report:

Reducing Poverty:
What has Worked, and What Should Come Next
(PDF file - 590K, 32 pages)
C.D. Howe Institute Commentary by John Richards
October 2007

Related link:

John Richards on “Tough Love” and Poverty
Commentary by Andrew Jackson on John Richards'
Reducing Poverty: What has Worked, and What Should Come Next
November 28, 2007
"(...) His [Richards'] basic argument here is that “tough love” welfare “reform” in the sense of deep cuts to welfare rates and increased social worker policing of recipients to impose work incentives, especially in Alberta and Ontario, “worked” in that it reduced welfare recipiency and poverty rates and increased employment. He is much less enthusiastic about “soft love” earnings supplements for the working poor because they result in high marginal tax rates for those just above the poverty line. The basic message here is that the punitive cuts of Harris in Ontario and Klein in Alberta were effective in reducing poverty by driving welfare recipients into work." (...) What John emphatically does not do is compare poverty rates between cyclically equivalent years, ie 2005 compared to the late 1980s. As detailed in the just-released Campaign 2000 report card for 2007, that time comparison is much less flattering to recent policy, and shows little or no progress on the child poverty front. In summary, the so-called “tough love” approach of Klein and Harris may have reduced welfare rates but it deepened poverty for those who remanied on welfare, and - in the context of an improved job market - shifted many from the ranks of the welfare poor to the working poor and near poor. That’s hardly cause for great celebration..."

More Comments on John Richards, “Tough Love” and Poverty
- incl. comments (on Andrew Jackson's commentary concerning John Richards' commentary)
by John Myles (University of Toronto) and John Stapleton (Modernizing Income Security for Working Age Adults Task Force, Toronto)

Source:
Relentlessly Progressive Economics
[A Blog of the Progressive Economics Forum]

Tough love gets results, lifting more Canadians out of poverty
October 19, 2007
Tough love works. True, the disconcerting images of poverty in Canada -- shabby panhandlers who camp out on upscale sidewalks, and the urban wasteland that is the Downtown Eastside -- might be more in your face than ever. But, hidden from view in homes that look a little better than they used to, the lot of most lower-income Canadians has been steadily improving for a decade or more.
Source:
Vancouver Sun

Riposte from John Stapleton*:

"The negative mention of MISWAA recommendations in Richards' paper is interesting insofar as he intimates that the recommended changes are not required in a robust economy that creates low income jobs that low income adults can easily access. One of MISWAA's central principles was that of fairness. We were not ultimately looking at what civil society and governments can get away with in a good economy - we wanted to ensure that the right programs and policies were in place for the inevitability of tougher times at the trough of economic cycles while ensuring that all members of society are able to benefit from our economy, regardless of the times."
----------------------------------
*John Stapleton was Research Director of the
Task Force on Modernizing Income Security for Working Age Adults (MISWAA)
[The C.D. Howe commentary disses the recommendations found in the final report of the Task Force (PDF file - 282K, 68 pages).]

The debate over Canada's poverty line
November 12, 2007
By Armina Ligaya
Canada is one of the wealthiest countries in the world. Yet even as the nation is in the midst of an economic boom, there are still those who struggle to buy life's necessities. Past and current governments have implemented a myriad of strategies to help the country's most vulnerable. They range from boosting social assistance to, at the more punitive extreme, restricting employment insurance. Debate continues over what's the best approach to eradicate poverty, assuming that is in fact a reachable goal.
Source:
CBC News Online

The Paradox of the Social Union Framework Agreement (PDF file - 58K, 11 pages)
Backgrounder
March 2002
"The agreement is worth preserving for a further three years with the aim of strengthening its provincial principles. If it ends up providing cover for major unilateral federal spending in provincial areas, however, the agreement should be scrapped."

The Dynamics of Poverty in Canada: What We Know, What We Can Do
(PDF file, 193K, 59 pages)
Ross Finnie
Sept. 28, 2000
- explores the dynamics of Canadians’ poverty experiences from 1992 to 1996 using the recently developed Longitudinal Administrative Database. By following individuals over time, the database allowed analysis of movements into and out of poverty, including those related to changes in family status.

Perceptions of Poverty: Correcting Misconceptions about the Low-Income Cutoff (PDF, 6 pages)
Backgrounder
April 2000

The Canadian Standard of Living: Is There a Way Up?
(PDF file, 525K)
Pierre Fortin
1999 Benefactors Lecture
C.D. Howe Institute Commentary
October 19, 1999

The Dark Side of Targeting: Retirement Saving for Low-Income Canadians (PDF file,173K)
Richard Shillington
September 1999
Back to Work: Learning from the Alberta Welfare Experiment (PDF file, 668K)
"Alberta welfare reforms a model for other provinces, says C.D. Howe Institute study"
April 1997
Improving the National Child Benefit: Matching Deeds with Intentions
May 1999
Growing Child Benefits, Growing Tax Rates
February 1999
The Social Union Agreement: Too Flawed to Last
February 1999
More Than the Sum of Our Parts: Improving the Mechanisms of Canada’s Social Union
January 1999


Canada West Foundation
"The Canada West Foundation (CWF) is a [Calgary-based] non-partisan, non-profit research organization active in economic and public policy studies. Founded in December of 1970, Canada West grew out of the "One Prairie Province" Conference held in Lethbridge, Alberta earlier that year. The consensus developed at the conference was that research on western Canadian concerns should be continued and expanded. This led to the formation of the Canada West Council, which then developed the mandate for the Canada West Foundation."

Regional Approaches to Services in the West: Health, Social Services and Education
February 2002
- "provides an overview of the different approaches being used in the four western provinces for health, social services and education. The main provincial similarities and differences are also compared. Finally, due to their increasing political, economic and social importance, the large western cities are briefly considered within the context of regional approaches to provincial services."

Enhanced Urban Aboriginal Programming in Western Canada
January 2002
"Almost as many Aboriginal people live in urban areas of Canada as do not, and in every city in Canada, Aboriginal people are a visible presence – particularly in western Canada. To inform ongoing decision-making and public debate, a better understanding of the policy program landscapes for urban Aboriginal people is needed."

- Click on Publications on the main page to download full copies (PDF format) of many CWF reports, including the following :
(only the first report below is hyperlinked - use the above link to get to the rest)

Where Are They Now?: Assessing the Impact of Welfare Reform on Former Recipients (1993-1996) - Press Release + link to PDF version - September 1997
Welfare Reform in Alberta: A Survey of Former Recipients
The Safety Net and Seniors in Alberta
Social Services for Persons With Disabilities in Alberta
Restructuring of Social Services: The Impact on Women in Alberta
Alberta's Children: Issues, Programs and Restructuring
Making Ends Meet: Income Support in Alberta
Issues and Options for Change: Social Services for the 21st Century
Income Support in Canada: A Statistical Profile



Institute On Governance (IOG)
"The Institute On Governance is a non-profit organization with charitable status founded in 1990 to promote effective governance. From our perspective, governance comprises the traditions, institutions and processes that determine how power is exercised, how citizens are given a voice, and how decisions are made on issues of public concern."
The IOG site is worth a visit if you're interested in any of the following issues:
Citizen Participation - Aboriginal Governance - Building Policy Capacity - Accountability and Performance Measurement - Information and Communications Technology and Governance - Youth And Governance
The site contains a wealth of information and many online publications, for example...
Publications:  Aboriginal Governance - links to over three dozen PDF reports

policity.com (The Institute On Governance)
"policity was created [by the Institute on Governance and FreeBalance] in the spring of 1999 as a site dedicated to governance issues and practices. Its mission is to illuminate and support the processes by which citizens can be engaged in issues of community concern and in the formulation and implementation of public policy."
August 2002:
"This web site was developed as part of the Institute On Governance's past work on Citizen Participation. While it is no longer being updated, we continue to host sections of the site as a public service to fellow practioners.
"



Institute for Research on Public Policy (IRPP)
"The mission of the IRPP is to improve public policy in Canada by promoting and contributing to a policy process that is more broadly based, informed and effective."

Sample reports from IRPP:

From the September 2008 issue of Policy Options (free online magazine):

The theme of this issue of Policy Options is "Canada's Working Poor"

Selected content from this issue:
(click the link above to access the complete contents of this issue)

* The working poor: Canada and the world (PDF - 316K, 6 pages)
By Jody Heymann, Magda Barrera and Alison Earle

* Is welfare a dirty word? Canadian public opinion on social assistance policies (PDF - 198K, 4 pages)
By Allison Harell, Stuart Soroka and Adam Mahon

*[French only] Le Québec, à l'avant-garde de la lutte contre la pauvreté au Canada (PDF - 261K, 5 pages)
Par Marie-Renée Roy, Guy Fréchet et Frédéric Savard

* Canada's legacy of inaction on early childhood education and child care (PDF - 345K, 6 pages)
By Martha Friendly

* Improving policies for the working poor: lessons from the UK experience(PDF - 199K, 3 pages)
By Jane Waldfogel

* How (un)healthy are poor working-age Canadians? (PDF - 182K, 4 pages)
By Myriam Fortin

*[French only] Soulager la pauvreté (PDF - 202K, 1 page)
par Alain Noël

---------------------------------------

Policy options (free online magazine)
"Policy Options is Canada's premier public policy magazine. Its goal is to encourage an informed debate on the important public policy issues of today, and of tomorrow. In each edition, short articles on the immediate issues that dominate the headlines are combined with in-depth analyses of longer-term issues that are certain to emerge on the policy horizon. Policy Options is published ten times per year."

Below, you'll find links to just two of the dozen-plus articles from a sample issue of Policy Options. Other articles in the same (April 2008) issue covered topics including the 2008 federal budget, NAFTA, the Castonguay Report on health care in Quebec, Canada's Afghan mission and much more. Click the link above to access all past issues of Policy Options.

Guaranteed annual income:
why Milton Friedman and Bob Stanfield were right
(PDF - 172K, 6 pages)
By Hugh Segal
April 2008
[Abstract] In this article, former IRPP president Hugh Segal considers the merits of a guaranteed annual income or a negative income tax, an idea whose time may never come, but which always generates a good debate. It?s a concept where thinkers on the left and right have found some common ground, from conservative economists such as Milton Friedman in the United States, to Red Tories such as Robert Stanfield in Canada. "If it is done right," Segal argues, "instituting a basic floor income could diminish federal-provincial and labour-management tensions" and could even, "over time, reduce the net burden of state spending while increasing aid to, and the privacy and dignity, of those who fall behind."

"This just in: surpluses across the board" (PDF - 163K, 3 pages)
By Thomas J. Courchene
April 2008
[Abstract] The achievement of budgetary surpluses in Ottawa and in all provinces and territories simultaneously was 60 years in the making. This brief commentary on budgetary federalism adapts the informative charts in Budget 2008 and traces the fiscal/budgetary fortunes of the two levels of government over the past two decades. The near collapse of provincial finances in the wake of the 1995 budget has now been offset by a huge influx of federal cash transfers (Canada Health Transfer, Canada Social Transfer and equalization) and by resource revenues. When combined with federal tax cuts, the result is that the excess of provincial over federal revenues has never been larger.

Links to earlier issues of Policy options:
- this is the link to the April '08 issue of the magazine;
the links to the earlier issues appear in the right-hand margin of that page.

Links to all IRPP publications

The Canadian Immigration System: An Overview (PDF file - 283K, 21 pages)
March 2007
Workshop on German and European Migration and Immigration Policy from
a Transatlantic Perspective : Challenge for the 21st Century
By Geneviève Bouchard
- Powerpoint presentation, includes historical info, current situation, stats, policy challenges, potential solutions
Source:
Institute for Research on Public Policy

The Use of Family Friendly Workplace Practices in Canada (PDF file - 526K, 42 pages)
September 2006
The increase in two earner households has changed the structure of the labour market, presenting employees, government and firms with new challenges. These changes have spurred an increasing interest in
new workplace practices and policies that may respond to the requirements of the New Economy. Research in the area covers a variety of fields in social sciences and has mainly focused on the availability of benefits to workers with families. However, a natural question that has only received passing attention is to what extent these benefits are being used by families.
News Release (PDF file - 35K, 2 pages)

Toward Squaring the Circle: Work-Life Balance
and the Implications for Individuals, Firms and Public Policy
(144K, 28 pages)
June 2006
Contents:
* Introduction
* Defining and Framing Work-Life Balance
*Demographic and Labour Market Trends
* Work Hours, Constraints on Choice and the Life Cycle
* Work-Life Balance in the Context of Labour Policy
* Conclusion

Working for Working Parents:
The Evolution of Maternity and Parental Benefits in Canada
(PDF file - 218K, 42 pages)
May 2006
Table of Contents:
* Introduction
* Setting the Stage: The Changing Labour Market and Social Context for Families with Young Children, 1973-2002
* A Short History of Maternity and Parental Benefits Policy in Canada
* Sample Benefit Calculations for Five Historical Periods and the Quebec Program
* Statistical Evidence on Benefit Receipt
* What Are the Goals of the Federal Program and How Well Are They Being Achieved?
* Where to From Here? Discussion and Recommendations

Early Childhood Development and Child Care: What Do We Know?
Conference
March 27, 2006 (Vancouver)
- co-organized by the Human Early Learning Partnership of the University of British Columbia
Conference program (PDF file - 55K, 1 page)
Presentations:
NOTE: "The presentations below are the original versions as presented by the authors at the conference, and are not to be cited or quoted without the author's permission."

* Understanding Recent Research on Quebec’s Childcare Programme (PDF file - 124K, 24 pages)
by Kevin Milligan
* Child Care Services: A Major Missing Piece of the Family Benefit Package (PDF file - 992K, 23 pages)
by Paul Kershaw
* How can the latest research contribute to early learning and child care policy? What do we know – and what do we think? (PDF file - 163K, 31 pages)
by Martha Friendly
* At the Crossroads:Child Care Policy and Funding in BC and Canada (PDF file - 188K, 12 pages)
by Lynell Anderson

-------------------------------------------------

Fiscal Dispute among Governments in Canada Is Damaging to the Cause of Health Care Reform
"On January 27, the IRPP and the Institute of Intergovernmental Relations released Money, Politics and Health Care: Reconstructing the Federal-Provincial Partnership, edited by Harvey Lazar and France St-Hilaire. The contributors to the volume maintain that continual federal-provincial squabbling over health care funding has hampered the process of reform needed to ensure the quality and sustainability of health care for future generations. Moreover, this inability to address the real problems in the system has in itself become detrimental to the proper functioning of the federation."
News Release (small PDF file)
January 27, 2004
Report:
Money, Politics and Health Care: Reconstructing the Federal-Provincial Partnership
Order a copy of this book
Chapter on vertical fiscal imbalance (PDF file - 625K, 54 pages)

-------------------------------------------------

Paul Martin's Briefing Book - from the Institute for Research on Public Policy (IRPP)
The December 2003 issue of Policy Options from IRPP includes (among other content) 17 articles with advice to the incoming Prime Minister on a range of issues from air quality to U.S.-Canada relations, written by a number of social policy experts from the Left and the Right.

Here are two sample articles:

Will the Prime Minister Displace the Finance Minister?
Paul Martin's Social Policy for a "New Era"
(PDF file - 206K, 5 pages)
December 2003
Jane Jenson
"Many of the social policy changes that the new prime minister will have to overcome are of his own making : the emphasis on labour market participation and on children, a preference to use the tax system as the delivery mechanism, which limits the government's role to providing income transfers and has largely constrained its influence over policy, and a poisoned intergovernmental atmosphere."

Aboriginal Policy - Time to Rethink? (PDF file - 187K, 5 pages)
John Richards
"...despite some progress and large sums of money, Aboriginals' socio-economic status remains desperately worrying, 'the most serious social scar on Canadian society', and the exaggerated stress on 'otherness' at the heart of the current policy is partly responsible for the slow pace of progress."

Source:
Policy Options (December 2003)

-------------------------------------------------

Windows of opportunity: social reform under Lester B. Pearson(PDF file - 568K, 12 pages)
by Jim Coutts
"...in only five years of two minority governments Pearson enacted the Canada-Quebec Pension Plan, The Canada Assistance Plan, the Guaranteed Income Supplement and Medicare, all keystones of the modern social security system."
Source:
Policy Options: November 2003 Issue
[Theme: Corporate Governance]
NOTE: in this issue of Policy Options, you'll also find links to over a dozen articles on the following topics:
- A call for a culture of values, not just rules - from the corner office to the boardroom
- From carrots to sticks: restoring investor confidence in Canada
- A road too far - compliance at the expense of performance?
- The importance of good governance for confidence in Canadian capital markets
- Une saine gouvernance pour préserver nos avoirs collectives
- The new private-sector ombudsmen
- From the blame game to accountability in health care
- Multinational governance and worker rights in the global village
- Loving the market or supporting business
- Socrates does Canadian electrical policy
- Symbolism vs. economics: the loonie vs. the greenback
- National missile defence: it is rocket science
- À propos du financement des universités et des droits de scolarité au Québec
- Performing the news - not the facts, but the story
- Ranking prime ministers of the last 50 years: IRPP's Web visitors speak
- Book Excerpt: Understanding Canadian Defence
- Book Review: Geoffrey Kelley reviews Understanding Canadian Defence by Desmond Morton
- Will Martin touch our new economic Constitution?
[ Institute for Research on Public Policy ]

Council of the Federation Series
October 15, 2003
"As part of a joint initiative with the Institute for Research on Public Policy in Montreal, the Institute of Intergovernmental Relations is launching a series of twelve commentaries on the Council of the Federation. The series title is “Constructive and Co - operative Federalism? A Series of Commentaries on the Council of the Federation”. The papers, prepared by leading federalism and public policy experts across Canada, can be downloaded in PDF format."

2003 Special Series on the Council of the Federation - on this page, you'll find links to all reports released to date in this series, including:
- Getting Things Done in the Federation: Do We Need New Rules for an Old Game?
- The End of a Model? Quebec and the Council of the Federation Alain Noël
- Counsel for Canadian Federalism: Aboriginal Governments and the Council of the Federation
- Some Personal Reflections on the Council of the Federation Bob Rae
- A Convention on the Canadian Economic and Social Systems
- Council of the Federation Founding Agreement Provincial and Territorial Premiers
- Intergovernmental Councils in Federations
- The Council of the Federation: From a Defensive to a Partnership Approach
- Expanding the Partnership: The Proposed Council of the Federation and the Challenge of Glocalization
- Managing Interdependencies in the Canadian Federation: Lessons from the Social Union Framework Agreement
- The Council of the Federation: Conflict and Complementarity with Canada’s Democratic Reform Agenda
- Quebec and Interprovincial Discussion and Consultation
- The Health Council of Canada Proposal in light of the Council of the Federation
- Council of the Federation: An Idea Whose Time has Come

Source:
Canadian Network of Federalism Studies
Institute of Intergovernmental Relations [IIR] (Queen's University)
Institute for Research on Public Policy (IRPP)

Related Links:
Go to the Canadian Social Research Links Council of the Federation page - http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/council_fed.htm

IRPP Study: Child Tax Benefit Ineffective in Addressing Child Poverty
June 10, 2003
"An exhaustive examination of Canada’s family policy concludes that recent federal and provincial government initiatives are misguided and have not efficiently addressed the problems of child poverty. 'The Child Tax Benefit is a dead end'assert Pierre Lefebvre and Philip Merrigan in 'Assessing Family Policy in Canada: A New Deal for Families and Children,' released today by the Institute for Research on Public Policy."
News Release (small PDF file)
Summary (small PDF file)
Complete Study
(PDF file - 395K, 100 pages)

Policy Options"Canada's premier public policy magazine"
This link offers short summaries of the articles in the current issue, ordering information and links to back issues. You can access the complete text of all articles in every issue of  Policy Options in PDF format back to 1997 by clicking Back Issues (near the top of the Policy Options page), then on a particular year and month

Sample content from a few recent issues:

February 2003 Issue
Includes the following five analyses of the Romanow report:
- "Romanow-A Defence of Public Health Care, But is There a Map for the Road Ahead?" by Antonia Maioni
- "Le défi de la santé dans un contexte électoral : redonner aux Québécois unsystème public de santé à la hauteur de leurs attentes" by Jean Charest
- "L' « épineuse » question d'André Burelle et le rapport Romanow" by John Richards
- "He Said, She Said: The Debate on Vertical Fiscal Imbalance and Federal Health-Care Funding" by France St-Hilaire and Harvey Lazar
- "Health Care as a Commodity" by Joseph Heath

Dec/2002 - Jan/2003 Issue (Policy Options)
Health Care: From Reinvesting to Reinventing (PDF file - 44K, 5 pages)
An interview with Michael Kirby

Dec/2002 - Jan/2003 Issue
The Democratic Deficit (PDF file - 35K, 3 pages)
Excerpts from a speech on parliamentary reform and public ethics given by Paul Martin, the former finance minister and leading contender for the Liberal leadership, at Osgoode Hall, York University (Toronto) October 21/2002
Health Care: From Reinvesting to Reinventing (PDF file - 44K, 5 pages)
An interview with Michael Kirby

January-February 2001 Issue
Table of Contents

- A guaranteed annual income: From Mincome to the millennium (PDF file) by Derek Hum and Wayne Simpson
Whatever happened to Mincome Manitoba?

December 2000 Issue
Index of 2000 Policy Options articles (PDF file - 6 pages, 34K)
-Almost 200 articles from all 12 issues of Policy Options released in 2000, organized alphabetically by author.

October 2000 - The Flat Tax
(For related links, go to the Canadian Social Research Links Flat Tax Links page)

April 2000 : ASSESSING THE SOCIAL UNION FRAMEWORK AGREEMENT
Includes links to articles on the Social Union Framework Agreement by six different authors
- also includes analysis of the 2000 federal budget from seven different sources, and more...

November 1998: THE SOCIAL UNION
19 articles on various aspects of the Social Union, from provincial/territorial perspectives to fiscal considerations. Contributors include Monique Jérôme-Forget, Thomas Courchene,  Keith Banting, John Richards and Roy Romanow, to name but a few. Follow the links to read abstracts and to download PDF copies of all articles
(For related links, go to the Canadian Social Research Links Unofficial Social Union Links page)

Empowering Reforms Needed for Parliament's Contribution to Budgetary Process
"May 14, 2002 - In a new Policy Matters paper released today by the Institute for Research on Public Policy (IRPP), Peter Dobell and Martin Ulrich analyse how Parliament carries out three roles in the annual budget process – representing citizen interests, empowering the government and scrutinizing the government’s performance."
Complete Study (PDF file - 66K, 24 pages)

Negative Economic Impact of Aging Exaggerated, Says New IRPP Study
"March 11, 2002 - Many assessments of the effects of an aging population on the standard of living of Canadians and our public finances are too pessimistic. Population aging can also have positive consequences, says Marcel Mérette, economics professor at the University of Ottawa, in a new study published today by the Institute for Research on Public Policy (IRPP)."
Complete Study (PDF file - 487K, 28 pages)

Shifting Sands: Exploring the Political Foundations of SUFA
Roger Gibbins (July 2001)
Complete Report (PDF file - 68K, 20 pages)

Flat Taxes, Dual Taxes, Smart Taxes: Making the Best Choices
(PDF file - 124 pages, 725K)
Jonathan Kesselman (November 2000)

Taxing Canadian Families: What’s Fair, What’s Not
July 18, 2000
Study (PDF file, 186K, 44 pages)


Montreal Economic Institute
The Montreal Economic Institute (MEI) is an independent, non-profit, non-partisan research and educational institute. It endeavours to promote an economic approach to the study of public policy issues. The MEI's mission is to propose original and innovative solutions for the crafting of efficient public policies, using successful reforms applied elsewhere as models.The MEI studies how markets function with the aim of identifying the mechanisms and institutions which foster the prosperity and long-term welfare of all the individuals which make up our society. The MEI is the product of a collaborative effort between Montreal-area entrepreneurs, academics and economists. The Institute does not accept any public funding. [ Excerpt from Who Are We ]

Selected site content:

Who Spends More: Left or Right? (PDF - 3.4MB, 4 pages)
http://www.iedm.org/files/note0413_en.pdf
By Michel Kelly-Gagnon and Vincent Geloso
April 2013
Economic Note showing the absence of correlation between the governing party's ideology and the evolution of public spending as a share of GDP.

Abstract
http://www.iedm.org/43572-who-spends-more-left-or-right
Public policy debates are often coloured by ideological preconceptions. For example, we expect political parties on "the left" to have a tendency to increase public spending when they are in power, and parties on "the right" to have a tendency to reduce it. This perception clearly stems from official statements that emphasize different goals. But what is the reality?

Source:
Montreal Economic Institute (MEI)
http://www.iedm.org/e

Version française du site :

Institut économique de Montréal
http://www.iedm.org/fr/e

Related link:

Canadian politics just got turned upside down [Who Spends More: Left or Right?]
http://brighterlife.ca/2013/03/27/canadian-politics-just-got-turned-upside-down/
By Kevin Press
March 27, 2013
Fundamental to our understanding of democratic politics across the developed world is that conservative parties stand for relatively low levels of government spending, while those on the left of the political spectrum are prone to higher spending. A new study, released yesterday by the Montreal Economic Institute (MEI), blows a hole through that conventional wisdom.
(...)
MEI’s study examined government spending in Canada, Quebec and the U.S., dating back to the Pierre Trudeau, Robert Bourassa and Richard Nixon administrations respectively. “In all three cases,” reads the report, “it is actually left-wing governments that most reduced the relative size of government.”

Source:
BrighterLife.ca

http://brighterlife.ca/
"Sharing ideas about money, health and family"

------------------------------------------

Four out of five people in Quebec say social assistance should be fully conditional
- Success elsewhere shows the way to social assistance reform

Media Release
Montreal, January 25, 2007
- With Quebec reigning as North American social assistance champion, behind only Newfoundland and the District of Columbia, economist Norma Kozhaya of the Montreal Economic Institute says social assistance could be reformed in a way that would reduce dependency and poverty among persons fit for work. This change could draw insight from measures applied successfully in parts of Canada and in many U.S. states.

Quebeckers’ opinion on social assistance payments (PDF file - 89K, 4 pages)
January 2007
According to a Léger Marketing poll released today, 80% of people in Quebec would agree to having social assistance taken away from recipients who are fit for work and who refuse to take part in job preparation programs such as studies, training or community work.

Social assistance: What North American reforms can teach us (PDF file - 250K, 4 pages)
January 2007
Economic Note on the social assistance reforms instituted in the United States and in some Canadian provinces
[ version française : Aide sociale: les leçons des réformes nord-américaines (fichier PDF - 258Ko, 4 pages)

Editorial Comment
Canadian and American welfare systems are different from one another, a fact that the Montreal Economic Institute and its ideological soulmate on the Canadian West Coast, the Fraser Institute, willfully and consistently ignore in their welfare reform reports. After reading this short report on how *swell* the American state governments (along with Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia) have been doing in reducing their welfare caseloads, I note that the most important bit of text is actually in a text box on page 2, i.e., "In the United States, financial assistance for adults without children and without work constraints does not exist at the federal level and is very limited at the state level."

Unlike the Canadian welfare system, state welfare programs under the federal Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) initiative exclude single people and childless couples, who must apply to the national Food Stamp program and to residual aid programs where they live (if there are any such programs, which is not always the case), as well as people with disabilities (who must apply under the separate American Social Security program). In Canada, singles and childless couples make up close to 60% of the total welfare caseload and households headed by people with disabilities account for about a third of the total caseload. These are just a few of the more significant reasons why Canadian welfare shouldn't be compared with American programs under TANF.

What North American reforms can teach us informs us that in 2002, British Columbia became the only jurisdiction in Canada to set time limits (24 mo. in any 60-month period) on social assistance eligibility for recipients who were fit for work. I guess the author of WNARCTU didn't get a chance to read more recent reports of her Fraser Institute pals --- in a February 2004 commentary, the Fraser Institute bemoaned BC's "backtracking" on its welfare reforms, effectively nullifying the time limit rule by exempting any client who was complying with his/her recovery/action/work plan. The absence of that bit of info in WNARCTU taints the analysis, no?

Bottom Line:
Canadian and American welfare systems are like apples and oranges.
They shouldn't be compared without situating each system in its appropriate context.



Social Research and Demonstration Corporation
SRDC’s two-part mission is to help policy-makers and practitioners identify social policies and programs that improve the well-being of all Canadians, with a special concern for the effects on the disadvantaged, and to raise the standards of evidence that are used in assessing social policies and programs

SRDC Publications - Links to SRDC reports on SSP and on the Earnings Supplement Project

For more information about specific SRDC Projects :

* Child Care Pilot Project
...a research project that will evaluate the impacts of a preschool program on the children’s linguistic and cultural development, and their readiness to learn

* learn$ave
...a national demonstration of matched savings accounts for poor families to encourage learning activities and micro-enterprise development

* Access to Post-secondary Education Pilot Projects
...pilot projects to determine the best way to increase access to post-secondary education in Canada in three Canadian provinces

* The Self-Sufficiency Project
...a test of temporary earnings supplements as a "make work pay" strategy to support the transition of lone parents from welfare to work

* The Earnings Supplement Project
...a recent type of a financial incentive in the form of temporary "earnings insurance" as a way of hastening the re-employment of Employment Insurance (EI) beneficiaries

Some sample reports...

Final evaluation report of the
Case Coordination Project in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside

February 2009
SRDC released its final evaluation report of the Case Coordination Project (CCP) in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, an area with high rates of poverty, substance abuse, poor housing, and unemployment. The project was designed to determine whether a comprehensive model delivering one-to-one support to long-term unemployed residents of the Downtown Eastside could help them return to employment and self-sufficiency. Components of the project and methods of delivery had to be flexible to meet the changing needs of participants. The final report presents the findings of the CPP, with details on participants’ employment, their outcomes from receiving Income Assistance, and their experiences with the project. The report also draws conclusions relating to project implementation and administration, as well as policy implications for similar projects.
Source:
Learning What Works (February 2009)
- the latest issue of SRDC's newsletter

Complete report:

The Downtown Eastside Case Coordination Project:
Moving Hard-to-Employ Individuals from Welfare to Opportunity
(PDF - 840K, 65 pages)
By Barbara Dobson Susanna Gurr
July 2008

NOTE: the February 2009 issue of Learning What Works
also includes articles (and links to related reports) about:

* The B.C. AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination) Early Implementation Report: Addressing academic barriers to PSE (AVID that aims to increase post-secondary enrolment among Grade 8 students with a B to C average).
* Community Employment Innovation Project (CEIP): A viable alternative for vulnerable communities and the unemployed
* Data from the Community Employment Innovation Project is available to interested researchers
* The Child Care Pilot Project is extended (testing a preschool daycare service designed to help children master the French language)
* SRDC to evaluate initiatives of the BC Healthy Living Alliance

All SRDC Publications - by theme
All SRDC Publications - alphabetical

Source:
Social Research and Demonstration Corporation (SRDC)
SRDC is a not-for-profit organization, a registered charity, and a pioneer in the use of social experiments in Canada. SRDC’s two-part mission is to help policy-makers and practitioners identify social policies and programs that improve the well-being of all Canadians, with a special concern for the effects on the disadvantaged, and to raise the standards of evidence that are used in assessing social policies and programs.

Learning What Works Newsletter - May 2008 issue
IN THIS ISSUE:
* New report shows communities can help improve local development and capacity
* Developing francophone children’s abilities: Child Care Pilot Project family workshops
* Transition to work for people facing multiple barriers
* Does increased contact with participants improve the ability of surveys to gather evidence?
* SRDC mourns the passing of Arthur Kroeger

[ Earlier issue of the newsletter : March 2008 ]

All SRDC Publications by theme

Early results show low-income Canadians can save for their education
News Release
January 25, 2008
A new report released by SRDC presents the 18-month results of the Individual Development Accounts project learn$ave. The program has so far yielded positive effects on saving and budgeting, as well as participants’ attitudes towards education.

Learning to Save, Saving to Learn: Early Impacts of the learn$ave Individual Development Accounts Project, a new report released by SRDC, presents the 18-month results of learn$ave, a project designed to demonstrate how Individual Development Accounts can encourage low-income adults to save in order to increase their human capital by participating in education or training, or starting a small business.

Download the full report (PDF file - 525K, 115 pages)
January 2008
Download the executive summary (PDF file - 1.9MB, 12 pages)

Find out more about learn$ave
The learn$ave project was conceived and implemented in 2000 by Social and Enterprise Development Innovations (SEDI), and is being funded by Human Resources and Social Development Canada. The evaluation of learn$ave is being conducted by SRDC.

Interim Results From Major Study Show That Community-Based Work Can Improve Skills and Social Capital back
November 16, 2007
Can community-based employment help the unemployed develop their transferable skills and social capital? A major Canadian study released today by the Social Research and Demonstration Corporation (SRDC) reveals promising results in that respect. "Improving skills, networks, and livelihoods through community-based work: Three-year impacts of the Community Employment Innovation Project" presents interim results from the Community Employment Innovation Project (CEIP), a program designed to encourage the longer-term employability of participants while supporting local community development in regions of continuing high unemployment.

Complete report:

Improving Skills, Networks, and Livelihoods through Community-Based Work:
Three-Year Impacts of the Community Employment Innovation Project
(PDF file - 750K, 181 pages)
October 2007

Executive Summary (PDF file - 985K, 16 pages)

SRDC Publications by theme

Source:
Community Employment Innovation Project
...a project evaluating the effects of community-based employment in the social economy in Cape Breton on the employability of EI and income assistance recipients and on the five participating communities themselves

Early Results From Major Study Show That Communities Can Create
Meaningful Jobs

November 28, 2006
Ottawa — Can communities create meaningful work that is an attractive alternative to Employment Insurance and welfare? A major Canadian study of a new, innovative program is showing this to be true. Today the Social Research and Demonstration Corporation (SRDC) is releasing a new report presenting early impacts from the Community Employment Innovation Project (CEIP), a study of a program designed to encourage the longer-term employability of participants while supporting local community development in areas of continuing high unemployment...

Testing a Community-Based Jobs Strategy for the Unemployed:
Early Impacts of the Community Employment Innovation Project
Complete report (PDF file - 1.4MB, 166 pages)
Executive Summary (PDF file - 836K, 14 pages)

NOTE: I've removed the links below because they were all broken. (The SRDC site has been updated)
However, I've left the text so you can copy a page title that interests you into the SRDC search engine on the home page of their website.
(Some of the older pages are no longer on the re-launched site.)

Learning What Works — Volume 5, Number 1 (PDF file - 1.7MB, 15 pages)
Spring 2005
Newsletter
Table of Contents:
- Asset-Building Strategies for the Poor: Is Policy Ahead of Research?
- Whither Welfare? (Excellent overview of recent welfare reforms in Canada and the U.S.!)
- One-on-One Help for Addressing the Employment Needs of Long-Term Unemployed IA Clients
- Why Experience-Rate the EI Program?
- School Readiness: Evidence From the Manitoba 2004 EDI Parent Survey
- Bulletin Board

A Literature Review of Experience-Rating Employment Insurance in Canada
Working Paper
by Shawn de Raaf, Anne Motte, and Carole Vincent
May 2005
"This working paper reviews both the theoretical and empirical literature on experience-rating unemployment insurance programs. In reviewing the existing research, the paper identifies a number of lessons learned to determine whether an experience-rated Employment Insurance (EI) program might, by modifying the behaviour of Canadian firms and workers, address the magnitude of subsidies some firms receive from the program year after year or lessen the extent to which claimants frequently rely on EI benefits."

Can Work Alter Welfare Recipients’ Beliefs? (PDF file - 236K, 32 pages)
The Self-Sufficiency Project
Peter Gottschalk (Boston College)
February 2005
SRDC Working Paper Series 05-01
NOTE: this is written in economese --- not for the faint-hearted!
(For example: "We find that exogenous increases in work induced by an experimental earnings supplement led to the predicted change in beliefs.")
Source:
The Self-Sufficiency Project

Understanding Employment Insurance Claim Patterns:
Final Report of the Earnings Supplement Project

March 2004
"This report brings to an end the Earnings Supplement Project (ESP), a long-term, multiphase project that was designed to study the reliance,1 especially the frequent reliance, on Employment Insurance (EI) benefits. In 1994 Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) funded ESP to determine whether a financial incentive could hasten the return to work of individuals who were receiving EI benefits."
Complete report (PDF file - 1.4MB, 77 pages)
Executive Summary (PDF file - 294K, 8 pages)

SRDC Publishes the First Report on the Community Employment Innovation Project:
The Community Employment Innovation Project: Design and Implementation
December 12, 2003
"This is the first report from the Community Employment Innovation Project (CEIP). CEIP is a long-term demonstration project taking place in Cape Breton that is designed to measure the effects, on individuals and on communities, of providing community-based employment opportunities to the long-term unemployed. This report presents the basic design of the project, its implementation in the field, and early observations of implementation issues."
Complete report:
The Community Employment Innovation Project:
Design and Implementation
(PDF file - 1.1MB, 232 pages)

Who benefits from unemployment insurance in Canada : Regions, industries or individual firms?
- The Earnings Supplement Project
(PDF file - 34 pages)
November 2003

SRDC Publishes the Final Report on the Self-Sufficiency Project:
Can Work Incentives Pay for Themselves? Final Report on the Self-Sufficiency Project for Welfare Applicants
October 7, 2003
This report presents the final findings from the Self-Sufficiency Project's Applicant study. It describes the impacts of an earnings supplement on the employment, earnings, income, and welfare receipt of new income assistance applicants through the six years since they were randomly assigned to the study.
Complete report (PDF file - 961K, 164 pages)

Learning What Works (SRDC newsletter) - (PDF file - 1439K, 13 pages)
Fall 2003 issue
- incl. the following articles: Can Work Incentives Pay for Themselves? - Why Should Seasonal Work Be Excluded From EI Coverage? - A Feasible Way to Deliver Supports to People With Disabilities - Final Call for Research Papers Using the Complete Data From the Self-Sufficiency Project - Bulletin Board.

Assessing the Impact of Non-response on the Treatment Effect in the Canadian Self-Sufficiency Project (PDF file - 274K, 44 pages)
October 2003
"... investigates whether there is a bias in the measurement of the Self-Sufficiency Project treatment effect because up to 20 per cent of the intended sample did not agree to take part."

Equilibrium Policy Experiments and the Evaluation of Social Programs (PDF file - 386K, 72 pages)
October 2003
"...
presents a model for evaluating equilibrium policy experiments, and illustrates the usefulness of this model as a tool for assessing the impact of social programs by using it to evaluate the Self-Sufficiency Project (SSP). SSP’s reports to date have been subject only to partial equilibrium experimental evaluations."

The Disability Supports Feasibility Study: Final Report (PDF file - 460K, 112 pages)
June 2003
"The Disability Supports Feasibility Study (DSFS) pilot project provided supports to unemployed people with disabilities to help them find work and keep working. Unlike many support programs, DSFS did not assess an individual’s need for a particular support. Instead, people with disabilities could purchase any support they wanted from a list of eligible supports (up to a monthly maximum expenditure). (...) The study concluded that it was feasible to operate a DSFS-type program offering disability and employment supports."

Learning What Works — Volume 3, Number 1 - Winter 2003 (PDF file - 220K, 15 pages)
- incl. What Happens When a Temporary Earnings Supplement Is Withdrawn? The effect of the “cliff” on SSP participants - Program Participants Say Thank You SSP! - Preparing for Tomorrow's Social Policy Agenda

Do Earnings Subsidies Affect Job Choice?
The Impact of SSP Supplement Payments on Wage Growth
(PDF file - 659K, 50 pages)
January 2003
"This working paper asks whether wage or earnings supplement programs encourage participants to move into jobs with greater wage growth or to change jobs more often in order to raise their wages, and provides an analytical model that identifies the key causal links between earnings subsidies and wage growth. The paper then applies this analytical model to data obtained from the Self-Sufficiency Project (SSP) to see if the SSP data is consistent with what would be predicted from the model."

Preparing for Tomorrow's Social Policy Agenda : New Priorities for Policy Research and Development
That Emerge From an Examination of the Economic Well-Being of the Working-Age Population
- (PDF file - 1000K, 176 pages)
by Peter Hicks
November 2002
"In this working paper, author Peter Hicks lays out how Canada’s working population will change in the next five years and offers a variety of directions policy-makers might take to manage those changes. The paper is intended to identify the topics that are likely to be on the policy agenda in this time frame and to propose policy development work that could begin now in order to prepare for such an agenda. While the paper is primarily about policies that support the economic well-being of working-age people in the medium-term time frame, a broad definition of social policy and longer view are discussed."

In the author's own words: "I attempt to identify the main pressures that are likely to drive social policy over the next 5 to 10 years (including different scenarios) and to examine the new policy responses that will likely be needed. The paper also looks back and tries to situate today's social policy agenda in the context of recent trends in economic well-being."

Impact of the Allowable Earnings Provision on EI Dependency: The Earnings Supplement Project
November 2002
by David Gray and Shawn de Raaf
"...provides an in-depth analysis of the way in which Employment Insurance (EI) claimants combine the receipt of EI benefits with work"

Learning What Works — newsletter (PDF file - 162K, 11 pages)
(Fall 2002)
- incl. Leaving Welfare for a Job - new research on the kinds of jobs SSP participants take after they leave welfare

Learning What Works : Evidence from SRDC's Social Experiments and Research (PDF file - 165K, 13 pages)
Newsletter
Spring 2002
- includes a five-page article entitled The Self-Sufficiency Project After 54 Months ("New Report Provides a Wealth of Policy Insight and Knowledge")

When Financial Incentives Pay for Themselves: Interim Findings From the Self-Sufficiency Project’s Applicant Study
(November 2001)
This report provides an update to the SPP applicant study, describing the effects of SSP on applicants’ employment, earnings, income, and use of income assistance 48 months after participants entered the study.
Full report (PDF file - 285K, 66 pages)

SRDC releases 36-month results from the Self-Sufficiency Project
Press Release
August 15, 2000
Program to Encourage Work for Long-Term Welfare Recipients Continues to Hold Promise

When Financial Incentives Encourage Work:
Complete 18-Month Findings from the Self-Sufficiency Project

Social Research and Demonstration Corporation
September 1998
- "When tied to a substantial work requirement, financial incentives can help address three often conflicting goals of welfare reform: to increase work effort, to reduce poverty, and to reduce welfare dependence. Financial incentives are not a quick fix, though, and can cost money in the short run, but the increased cost of financial incentives buys a substantial improvement in well-being."


Intergovernmental Committee on Urban and Regional Research (ICURR)
Canada's Local Government Information Centre
The Intergovernmental Committee on Urban and Regional Research (ICURR) provides a unique and comprehensive database and lending library on local government. Municipal and other public sector employees, planners, consultants and academics regularly use ICURR's extensive information resources. The research and publication program represents a vital element in the analysis of economic, environmental and planning issues confronting local governments throughout Canada.



Federation of Canadian Municipalities - Fédération des municipalités canadiennes
"...the national voice of municipal governments, dedicated to improving the quality of life in all communities by promoting strong, effective and accountable municipal government."

Related links:
- Go to the Municipalities Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/municipal.htm



Council for Canadian Unity
The Council for Canadian Unity was founded in 1964 with a mandate to "conduct research and studies for the purpose of educating and informing all persons generally in Canada in a better understanding of the legal and fiscal structures and the cultural and political nature of Canada, its provinces and its other civic and government bodies; and to promulgate the findings and results of such studies and research through public assemblies, literature and other means of communication throughout the whole of Canada."

The Centre for Research and Information on Canada (CRIC)
The Centre for Research and Information on Canada (CRIC), established in 1996, manages the Council for Canadian Unity (CCU) research and communications activities. It keeps volunteers abreast of Canadians' thinking by constantly tracking and analyzing public opinion about the federation.
Check out the Quick guide for links toa plethora of issues



policy.ca
policy.ca is a non-partisan resource for analysts, advocates, journalists and citizens.
Our mission is to gather, organize, and communicate information about a wide range of policy issues from a variety of perspectives in one location.
Covers the following policy areas : Defense - Education - Environment - Family Policy - Fiscal Policy - Foreign Affairs - Forest Policy - General Policy - Government Reform - Health Policy - Labour - Tax Policy - Social Policy


The Canadian Research Institute for Social Policy (CRISP) is a multi-disciplinary research organization based at the University of New Brunswick (UNB) in Fredericton. CRISP is dedicated to improving the effectiveness of social policy in Canada, to help Canadian communities provide better education and care for their children, and to contribute to capacity-building efforts in developing countries.



Policy Research Initiative (PRI)
"The Policy Research Initiative's core mandate is to advance research on emerging horizontal issues that are highly relevant to the federal government's medium-term policy agenda, and to ensure the effective transfer of this knowledge to policy-makers. The PRI mandate extends to two ancillary objectives: to contribute to the strengthening of the federal government's policy research capacity, and, to create an infrastructure that fosters collaboration on horizontal policy research."
- incl. links to: About The PRI - Research Projects - Capacity Building - Community Infrastructure - Publications - Events - Environment and Trade Symposium

Research Projects
The PRI is currently running five horizontal research projects:
[NOTE: each of the projects below has its own publications list; also, at the bottom of the brief description of each project, you'll find a link to more information, some of it quite detailed.]
Population Aging and Life-Course Flexibility
New Approaches for Addressing Poverty and Exclusion
Social Capital as a Public Policy Tool
North American Linkages
- incl. four inter-related research projects: International Regulatory Co-operation - Moving Toward a Customs Union - Cross-Border Regions - North American Labour Mobility
Sustainable Development

Sample content from the PRI site:

Horizons - April 2006 issue : Work and Life Balance (PDF file - 553K, 60 pages)
Volume 8 - Number 3
This issue of Horizons explores the topic of work-life balance and its related consequences. While a few of the articles address work-life balance directly, many also speak to some of the fundamental causes and outcomes of the time-stress numerous Canadians feel.
Table of contents:

*Work-Life Balance in an Aging Population * Time-Related Stress: Incidence and Risk Factors * Self-Employed Women’s Work-Life Imbalance: An Urgent Need for Policy Response * Gender Models for Family and Work * Informal Caregivers: Balancing Work and Life Responsibilities * Policy Implications of Delayed Reproduction and Low Fertility Rates * Equality of Opportunity and Inequality Across the Generations: Challenges Ahead * Changing Nature of the Family * Lifetime Labour Force Transitions

Source:
Policy Research Initiative

Related Links:
- go to the Work-Life Balance Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/work_life_balance.htm

Horizons - Social Economy
February 2006 Issue
Volume 8 Number 2
- incl. links to : Introduction - Feature Articles - Eyewitness Reports - Book Reviews - Data for Policy Research - Bookmarks - Population Aging and Life-Course Flexibility Project - PRI Horizons Team
HTML version - table of contents with links to individual sections
PDF version - complete issue - 659K, 74 pages

Sample content from this issue:
(use either of the two links above to access all of this content and more)

Social Economy: Entrepreneurial Spirit in Community Service
The Government of Canada and the Social Economy
The Social Economy in Canada: Concepts, Data and Measurement
The Social Purchasing Portal: A Tool to Blend Values
The Role of Government in Supporting the Social Economy
International Conference on Engaging Communities
Co-operative Membership and Globalization (Book review)
An Analysis of Social Capital and Health Using a Network Approach: Findings and Limitations
Aboriginal Policy Research Conference 2006 (Bookmark)
Population aging and life-course flexibility project of PRI
More --- click the link above for links to two dozen articles, reviews, etc.

Source:
Policy Research Initiative (PRI)
"The PRI, while conducting independent policy research projects, is attached to the Privy Council Office through the Plans and Consultation Branch. The PRI currently has five horizontal research projects: Population Aging and Life-course Flexibility * New Approaches for Addressing Poverty and Exclusion * Social Capital as a Public Policy Tool * North American Linkages * Sustainable Development (Freshwater Management)."

------------------------------------------------------

Encouraging Choice in Work and Retirement
Project Report
(1.1MB, 57 pages)
October 2005
"This report evaluates the extent of the economic risk to society posed by population aging and specifically the baby boom retirement. It emphasizes the need to maintain a healthy economy and fiscal prudence, while still respecting the opportunity and need for people to exercise choice in the best interests of their families, society, and themselves."

Source:
Population Aging and Life-course Flexibility
[ Policy Research Initiative - PRI ]

Research Projects
The PRI is currently running five horizontal research projects:
* Population Aging and Life-Course Flexibility
* New Approaches for Addressing Poverty and Exclusion
* Social Capital as a Public Policy Tool
* North American Linkages, and
* Sustainable Development
NOTE: on the Research Projects page, you can click on each of the project names to read a brief description of the project and, in the small box right next to the title, a link to PRI publications for that particular project.

Other recent PRI publications - PRI released a number of reports in September on the following topics:
Measurement of Social Capital - Briefing Notes on Sustainable Development - Social Capital as a Public Policy Tool Project Report - Social Capital: A Tool for Public Policy (Briefing Note)

Working Paper Series
"...ongoing analytical work developed in relation to the PRI's horizontal projects"
- covers nine working papers, including two on poverty and exclusion written by staff of Social Development Canada on poverty and exclusion
("
What Does It Mean to Be Poor and Working?" and "The Other Face of Working Poverty")
NOTE: all links on the working paper page point only to abstracts of the papers; in order to obtain an actual copy of a particular paper, there's a form that you must complete and send to PRI. Because of some red asterisks on that form, it looks like you're required to divulge personal information (name, org, job title) as well as your e-mail address. Then you wait (&*%$) until someone at PRI receives, reads and responds to your request, i.e., presumably by sending you a reply with a copy of the requested paper attached. If you want two or three of the working papers, prepare to repeat the process two or three times.
This sucks.

PRI Update Spring 2005 (PDF file - 126K, 12 pages)
April 2005
Update on PRI's five horizontal research projects:
- Population Aging and Life-Course Flexibility
- New Approaches for Addressing Poverty and Exclusion
- Social Capital as a Public Policy Tool
- North American Linkages
- Sustainable Development
Source:
Policy Research Initiative (PRI)

Policy Research Initiative Update - Autumn 2004 (PDF file - 1MB, 12 pages)
September 15, 2004
Core Research Projects:
- New Approaches for Addressing Poverty and Exclusion
- Social Capital as a Public Policy Tool
- Population Aging and Life-Course Flexibility
- Sustainable Development
- North American Linkages
Other Research Activities: Genomics - PRI-Social Science and Humanities Research Council Roundtable Series - Policy Research Conference: Exploring New Approaches to Social Policy (Dec/04) - Policy Research Data Group/Data Gaps Initiative - Policy Research Development Program
Source:
Policy Research Initiative

---------------------------------------------------------------

Views on Life-Course Flexibility and
Canada’s Aging Population
(PDF file - 532K, 51 pages)
July 2004
PRI Project
Population Aging and Life-Course Flexibility
Results of 10 focus groups held across Canada "to understand the preferences of Canadians regarding the timing of retirement, and the allocation of the time devoted to education, care giving, and leisure over the course of life."

Related Publications

Source:
Population Aging and Life-Course Flexibility
[ Policy Research Initiative ]


---------------------------------------------------------------


Not Strangers in These Parts : Urban Aboriginal Peoples (PDF file - 3MB, 281 pages)
December 2003
"Edited by Professors David Newhouse, Trent University, and Evelyn Peters, University of Saskatchewan, this volume is a collection of papers devoted to analyzing the realities of urban Aboriginal peoples in Canada. It is the first volume in a series of thematic publications of proceedings from the Aboriginal Policy Research Conference. Held in November 2002, the conference was co-hosted by Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) and the University of Western Ontario (UWO), with the participation of over a dozen federal departments and agencies as well as four national Aboriginal organizations. The conference was the largest of its kind ever held, with over 640 Aboriginal community leaders, academics, and policy-makers coming together to examine and discuss state of the art research on Aboriginal conditions in Canada."
Source:
Policy Research Initiative (PRI)

News Release (PRI)
October 2, 2003

Related Links:

Urban Aboriginal Strategy
"The Urban Aboriginal Strategy (UAS) was introduced in 1998 to address, in partnership with stakeholders, the serious socio-economic needs of urban Aboriginal people. The Strategy is designed to improve policy development and program coordination at the federal level and with other levels of government. The intent of the UAS is to reduce the level of disparity that urban Aboriginal people currently face by better tailoring government programs to the local needs and priorities of Aboriginal people living in cities."
Source:
Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians
[ Privy Council Office ]

Horizons - newsletter of the PRI
Check this page out for links to seven complete issues of the newsletter from back to July 2002, covering a range of themes like social sohesion, cities, aging, knowledge transfer, etc.

For each issue of Horizons, you'll find a link to the PDF file and a link to "Featured Sites" (sites that are mentioned or related to the articles in each issue)

Sample issue:

North American Linkages - June 2004
"This issue examines some of the challenges the Government of Canada is facing in its management of our multi-faceted relations with the United States. Like Ulysses, who had to navigate between Scylla and Charybdis on the return from Troy to Ithacus, Canada has to steer certain public policies between twin perils, pursuing a balance between the risk of being engulfed by its giant neighbour, as a possible result of ill-considered integration, and the risk of losing important economic benefits if it steers away from North American integration."
Featured authors : André Downs (Policy Research Initiative) - David Griller (SECOR Consulting) - Madanmohan Ghosh and Someshwar Rao (Industry Canada) - Shenjie Chen and John M. Curtis (International Trade Canada)

Exploring the Promise of Asset-Based Social Policies:
Reviewing Evidence from Research and Practice

Conference on Asset-Based Approaches
December 8-9, 2003
Gatineau (Aylmer), Québec
"This conference is part of an interdepartmental research project entitled New Approaches for Adressing Poverty and Exclusion. It will provide a unique opportunity for policymakers and experts to examine what we have learned so far from Canadian and international research, policy and practice on the strengths and limitations of asset-based approaches (saving programs for individual development, learning, housing, etc.). The goal will be to stimulate debate and reflection on the potential role of these approaches in our poverty prevention and reduction policies."
Program details

Frontier Centre for Public Policy (Winnipeg)
"The Frontier Centre for Public Policy is an independent public policy think tank whose mission is "to broaden the debate on our future through public policy research and education and to explore positive changes within our public institutions that support economic growth and opportunity."


International Development Research Centre
"IDRC is a Canadian public corporation that works in close collaboration with researchers from the developing world in their search for the means to build healthier, more equitable, and more prosperous societies."


See also Selected Canadian Social Research Organizations I
Go to  Non-Governmental Organizations
Go to Ontario NGOs and Municipalities
Go to Other Countries for international groups
Go to Union Pages

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