Canadian Social Research Links

- Canadian (and more) Social Statistics -

Sites de recherche sociale au Canada

- Statistiques sociales du Canada (et d'ailleurs) -

Updated July 17, 2016
Page révisée le 17 juillet 2016


[ Go to Canadian Social Research Links Home Page ]


Contents of this page:

Click on any of the links in this yellow box to jump to specific sections further down on this page...
[use your browser's Back button to return to this part of the page]

data.gc.ca - an open government initiative

Statistics Canada
===> The Mother of all government statistics sites in Canada.
Skip directly to a large selection of StatCan site content
Consumer Price Index
Leading indicators
The Daily
The Canada Year Book
Canada at a Glance

Population/demographic statistics
The 100 People Project ("If the world were 100 people...")
Census (2011-2006-2001-1996)
Long form Census
Women
Government Finance Statistics
.
Welfare dependency
Social Program spending
(incl. stats on welfare expenditures)
Poverty/income statistics
.
Farming income statistics
Income tax statistics and GST/HST statistics
- from the Canada Revenue Agency
Wealth and wealth inequality
Statistics on families
Expenditures on major transfer programs (five years' worth of expenditures on Old Age Security, child benefits, Canada/Quebec Pension Plan, social assistance, Workers compensation and much more)
Employment/unemployment statistics
Aboriginal Peoples
Indicators of Well-being in Canada

Canadian health statistics
Canadian education statistics
Food banks and food security
Canadian literacy statistics
Labour statistics from Statistics Canada
Homelessness/housing statistics
Old Age Security / Canada Pension Plan statistics
Provincial/territorial government statistical information sources

Crime/Justice statistics
--- incl. Can. legal aid
--- also incl. U.S. Legal Aid
Voluntary sector statistics from StatCan
Miscellaneous Canadian stats links

Historical statistics:

* Social Security Statistics, Canada and Provinces, 1978-79 to 2002-2003 (HRSDC)

* Historical Statistics of Canada (StatCan)


American statistical links

Welfare dependence in the U.S.

Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage

2012 [U.S.] Statistical Abstract

Aging databases (25 countries, incl. Canada)

European and other international statistical links

Comparative Welfare Entitlements Dataset (CWED)
September 2013
- includes Canada

UNdata - "A World of Information"
[United Nations]

------------------

How does Canada compare with other countries?
(Updated May 31, 2014)
- incl. a link to Numbeo, the world’s largest database of user contributed data about cities and countries worldwide.
- also includes a link to How Canada Performs 2011 : A Report Card
(from the Conference Board of Canada)

------------------

NOTE: For links to reports and statistics on low-income measures (LICO, LIM, MBM), see the Canadian Social Research Links  Poverty Measures page. See also Income and Wealth Inequality links.
[Both of these are Canadian Social Research Links pages.]

------------------

See also:

Finding Canadian statistics
900+ links to Canadian statistics on a wide range of topics from Aboriginal Peoples to Women
Source:
University of Toronto Data Library Service

---

The Joy of Stats (video, duration 59:06) - external link
http://ww3.tvo.org/video/172756/joy-stats
Hans Rosling can tell the story of the world in 200 countries over 200 years using 120,000 numbers - in just four minutes. Rosling's passion for using statistics to understand the world and his entertaining online lectures have made him a YouTube legend. In this mind-expanding roller coaster ride through the world of statistics, Rosling explores the history of statistics, how stats work mathematically, and how, using statistics, we can take the massive deluge of data of today's computer age and use it to see the world as it really is.


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StatCan Blog
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/blog-blogue/eng

The goal of the StatCan Blog is to pull back the curtain to explain some of the agency’s inner workings, and to show the links between quality statistics and the lives of Canadians.

NOTE: The rest of this page is in reverse chronological order, i.e., newer info and links are at the top.

July 14, 2016
Family income and income of individuals, related variables: Sub-provincial data, 2014
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/160714/dq160714b-eng.htm
Calgary had the highest median total family income (before tax) of all census metropolitan areas (CMAs) in Canada in 2014 at $104,530. Calgary was followed by Edmonton ($101,470) and Ottawa–Gatineau ($97,760), according to data derived from personal income tax returns. These CMAs have occupied the top three positions since 2009. At the national level, median total family income rose 1.1% from 2013 to 2014. Median total family income grew in all CMAs, except Ottawa–Gatineau (-0.9%), Saguenay (-0.7%) and Greater Sudbury (-0.4%). Sherbrooke and Thunder Bay were unchanged.


From

Richard Shillington:

Dear Friends/Colleagues:
I am once again offering my course: “Statistical Tools for Policy Analysis” sometime during the first few months of 2016.
I’m gauging interesting for presentations in Toronto and Ottawa. I’d also like to explore the possibility of offering the course in Calgary.
Please pass this on to individuals you think might be interested.

See the attached flyer (PDF) for more info:
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/41504159/Flyer_Jan_2016.pdf
Course Offering:
Statistical Tools for Policy Analysis
Including Data Analysis using Excel
...
Conducted by
Richard Shillington
Winter 2016
---

richard@shillington.ca <=== Send Richard an email message at this address if you're interested in signing up or just looking for more info.

From
Statistics Canada:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html

November 2, 2015
Canada's population estimates: Census families, July 1, 2015
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/151102/dq151102b-eng.htm

---

November 2, 2015
Canada's population estimates: Age, sex and marital status, July 1, 2015

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/151102/dq151102c-eng.htm

March 31, 2015
Canada at a Glance, 2015 Report

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/12-581-x/12-581-x2015000-eng.htm

(Use links in the left margin to navigate this resource.)
The 2015 edition of Canada at a Glance is now available. Canada at a Glance presents current statistics on Canadian demography, education, health and aging, justice, housing, income, labour market, household, economy, travel, finance, agriculture, foreign trade and the environment.

---

Media advisory: Statistics Canada releases corrected Labour Force Survey Data
http://www42.statcan.gc.ca/smr09/smr09_053-eng.htm
August 15, 2014
OTTAWA — Statistics Canada released today updated estimates for the July 2014 Labour Force Survey.
Today’s release replaces the information published August 8.

--

August 15, 2014
Labour Force Survey, July 2014 (corrected)
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/140815/dq140815a-eng.htm
Employment rose by 42,000 in July, the result of an increase in part-time work (+60,000). The unemployment rate declined 0.1 percentage points to 7.0%.

Labour Force Survey (LFS):
Detailed information for July 2014
http://www23.statcan.gc.ca/imdb/p2SV.pl?Function=getSurvey&SDDS=3701
Data release - August 8, 2014
The Labour Force Survey provides estimates of employment and unemployment which are among the most timely and important measures of performance of the Canadian economy.
* Questionnaire(s) and reporting guide(s)
* Description
* Data sources and methodology
* Data accuracy
* Documentation
* Data file

History of the Labour Force Survey (small PDF file, 3 pages)
http://www23.statcan.gc.ca/imdb-bmdi/document/3701_D7_T9_V1-eng.pdf

--------------------------------------------

From the Toronto Star:

StatsCan says 42,000 jobs — not 200 — were created in July
http://www.thestar.com/business/economy/2014/08/15/statscan_says_42000_jobs_not_200_were_created_in_july.html
By Dana Flavelle
August 15, 2014
Statistics Canada issued what it said were the correct job creation figures for July, fixing the error it made last Friday. Most of the jobs gains were in the service sector, and among youth. Ontario was a big winner, gaining 39,500 jobs (see the Ontario link below).

Source:
Toronto Star

http://www.thestar.com/

--------------------------------------------

From
CBC News:

Statistics Canada retracts July jobs report because of 'error':
Original release claimed 200 jobs were created in the month, new figure to be released Friday
http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/statistics-canada-retracts-july-jobs-report-because-of-error-1.2734470
August 12, 2014
Statistics Canada retracted its July employment report on Tuesday, four days after reporting that the Canadian economy created only 200 jobs during the month. "An error has been detected in the processing of the Aug. 8 Labour Force Survey release," the data agency said. "This error impacts only the July 2014 estimates."

Source:
CBC News:

[ http://www.cbc.ca/news/ ]

--------------------------------------------

From the
Globe and Mail:

Please excuse our margin of error: Statscan
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-debate/editorials/please-excuse-our-margin-of-error-statscan/article20083701/
August 17, 2014
Human error – is there any other kind? – has been blamed for the embarrassingly large discrepancy between Statistics Canada’s labour-force numbers published on Aug. 8 and the much-revised numbers on Friday.

Source:
Globe and Mail
[
http://www.theglobeandmail.com ]

--------------------------------------------

Ontario

Ontario Gains 39,500 Jobs in July
Province Focused on Growing the Economy, Building Ontario Up

http://news.ontario.ca/medt/en/2014/08/ontario-gains-39500-jobs-in-july.html
News Release
August 15, 2014
Ontario gained 39,500 net new jobs in July, 24,400 more than previously reported in the Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey. The province's youth (ages 15-24) employment increased by 15,200 net new jobs.

Source:
Ontario Government Newsroom

http://news.ontario.ca/newsroom/en

 

---


Data.gc.ca
http://data.gc.ca/
Data.gc.ca provides one-stop access to the Government of Canada’s searchable open data* and open information, together with open dialogue, as part of the federal government’s commitment to enhance transparency and accountability. We encourage the participation of all citizens to make data.gc.ca better.
---
* Open Data is a practice that makes data freely available by way of portals, metadata, and search tools for reuse by governments, citizens, voluntary organizations, academia, and the private sector in new and unanticipated ways.
---

The data published on data.gc.ca is made available by Government of Canada departments and Crown corporations. While each of these entities is responsible for managing their own data, the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat is responsible for the governance, including guidelines and policies, applicable to the data.

data.gc.ca is a public site and all data published here and on related Websites is public data that is not sensitive in nature (i.e. data which is NOT personal or confidential) and does not identify or provide ways to identify individuals.

How can we improve the data.gc.ca?
Give us your feedback:
http://data.gc.ca/eng/forms/contact-us

---

Canada's Action Plan on Open Government
http://data.gc.ca/eng/canadas-action-plan-open-government
Table of Contents:
* Introduction
* The Evolution of Canada's Open Government Strategy
* Canada's Action Plan on Open Government
* Our Commitments
* Foundational Commitments
* Activity Stream 1 – Open Information
* Activity Stream 2 – Open Data
* Activity Stream 3 – Open Dialogue
* Conclusion

Excerpt from the conclusion:
Canada is committed to Open Government and is ready to be an active participant in the Open Government Partnership*. We support the principles of the Open Government Partnership which we believe will propel innovation, economic opportunity and deeper democratic engagement worldwide.
---
* Open Government Partnership (OGP)
http://www.opengovpartnership.org/
OGP was launched in 2011 to provide an international platform for domestic reformers committed to making their governments more open, accountable, and responsive to citizens. Since then, OGP has grown from 8 countries to the 64 participating countries indicated on the map below. In all of these countries, government and civil society are working together to develop and implement ambitious open government reforms.
---

Canada and the OGP
http://www.opengovpartnership.org/country/canada
Within Canada, the Open Government Partnership provides us with a real opportunity to accelerate the transformation of our public service and of our government through a fundamental openness to working with Canadians coupled with the effective use of emerging technologies.

And another one gone
And another one gone,
Another one bites the dust.
[Source : Queen]

Statistics Canada's world-class data collection has been trimmed, again.
February 24, 2014
By Gilles:
As a result of the 2012 federal budget cuts, there are now 2,000+ fewer workers at StatCan [ http://goo.gl/1aI6i ] --- out of a workforce of about 5,000.
The 2012 budget cuts are leading directly to reductions in the amount of public information StatsCan collects and produces, and they could lead to data collection and processing services being contracted out (if they're not already doing it...)

The latest victim of the budget cuts is the collection of tables in the CANSIM database.
Here's a sample deleted table:
TERMINATED: Table 384-0009 Government transfer payments to persons, provincial economic accounts
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a05?searchTypeByValue=1&lang=eng&id=3840009&pattern=3840009
On this table, you'll find five years' worth (2005 to 2009) of national statistics PLUS archives going back to 1981 on federal and provincial government transfer payments to individuals and organizations for almost 20 programs, from Old Age Security to Employment Insurance (federal) and Workers' Compensation to Social Assistance (provincial/territorial).
TERMINATED.
WTF?

---

I went to the CANSIM home page [ http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/home-accueil?lang=eng ] looking for an announcement regarding what other CANSIM tables had bitten the dust and when. There was not one word on the home page about the CANSIM Crash Diet. If you'd like to know the full extent of the terminated tables for the complete collection, you'll have to drill down each of the 31 topics on the home page to see the specific tables. I checked only a few categories, but the number of deleted/terminated tables was depressing.
[ *Terminated* tables appear in a grey box at the end of each subsection. ]

A few examples:

For the category "Aboriginal peoples" : 4 tables terminated out of a total of 7
For the category "Children and youth" : 89 tables terminated out of a total of 130
For the category "Families, households and housing" : 67 tables terminated out of a total of 112
For the category "Government" : 62 tables terminated out of a total of 141
For the category "Income, pensions, spending and wealth" : 41 tables terminated out of a total of 167
For the category "Seniors" : 13 tables terminated out of a total of 30

---

One of StatCan's two stated objectives is "To provide statistical information and analysis about Canada’s economic and social structure to develop and evaluate public policies and programs and to improve public and private decision-making for the benefit of all Canadians." (The second objective is "To promote sound statistical standards and practices...").
Source:
ABOUT CANSIM
[ http://www.statcan.gc.ca/about-apercu/mandate-mandat-eng.htm

How much longer will StatCan be considered world class, I wonder...

---

And while we're lamenting the passing of rich online resources that the federal government has recently terminated, here are a few other reports that are now accessible only via an archiving site like Archive.org [ https://archive.org/ ] :

[R.I.P.] Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2008
http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2011/rhdcc-hrsdc/HS25-2-2008-eng.pdf
Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2008 is the fifth annual joint publication by federal, provincial and territorial governments. This report includes a description of, and statistics related to, the welfare system in each province and territory, information about federal-provincial-territorial jurisdictional and funding issues, a bit of historical info on the Canada Assistance Plan and the Canada Health and Social Transfer, etc.

[R.I.P.] Social Security Statistics, Canada and Provinces, 1978-79 to 2002-03
http://web.archive.org/web/20070814082442/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/page00.shtm
This report offers 25 years of longitudinal data on costs and numbers of beneficiaries for most programs - over 100 tables - covering a large number of programs --- here's a partial list : Child Tax Benefit, Family Allowances, the Child Tax Credit, Old Age Security/Guaranteed Income Supplement/Spouse's Allowance ("The Allowance"), Federal Training and Employment Programs, Federal Goods and Services Tax Credit, the Canada/Quebec Pension Plans, War Veterans' and Civilian War Allowances, Veterans' and Civilians' Disability Pensions, Unemployment/Employment Insurance, the Canada Assistance Plan, Workers' Compensation, Youth Allowances, Social Assistance and Social Services for Registered Indians --- and more...

Statistics Canada cuts long data short: another longitudinal survey is cancelled
http://milescorak.com/2012/06/18/statistics-canada-cuts-long-data-short-another-longitudinal-survey-is-cancelled/
June 18, 2012
The Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics died this morning. The notice was given quietly by Statistics Canada: “This is the last release of longitudinal data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics. Effective with next year’s release of 2011 data, only cross-sectional estimates will be available.” [ http://goo.gl/gm5cT ] A short, simple, and slightly obtuse, statement of a profound change for the user community and Canadians in general. (...) There is no doubt that Statistics Canada also recognizes the value of this survey, and others like it. But there are important challenges in managing the information derived from so-called “longitudinal surveys”, and Canadians might be wondering whether or not they are being sold short.
(...)
Statistics Canada is proposing to stop the longitudinal dimension of SLID, but to continue using parts of the questionnaire as a cross-sectional survey. As such it will retain the capacity to calculate poverty rates, but only retain a much more limited capacity to explain how long they are, what causes them to start or end, how many people experience income losses or gains.

Source:
Economics for public policy
Miles Corak writes on economics that matters
http://milescorak.com/

Related link:

In Memoriam: Perspectives on Labour and Income
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/2012/06/19/in-memoriam-perspectives-on-labour-and-income/
June 19, 2012
By Andrew Jackson
Another sad tombstone to the shrinkage of information for informed social and economic policy – Statscan has decided to discontinue “Perspectives on Labour and Income” in both print and online format. For as long as I can remember, Perspectives reliably provided a firm empirical base for policy debate on key labour market and income issues - everything from rising income and wealth inequality, to changes in the quality of jobs, to the relation between changes in households and labour markets, to the state of pensions.

The published studies were accessible, scrupulously impartial, and encouraged other researchers to dig deeper into the data. Often, these studies were based on data not readily available to others (such as tax based records) and they helped improve the quality of the underlying surveys. (...) At a time when we are losing key sources of data – a reliable long form census, longitudinal surveys, the workplace survey – the loss of a regular source of Statscan analysis is especially troubling.

Source:
Progressive Economics Forum
http://www.progressive-economics.ca/

Memo from Statistics Canada to researchers everywhere:
We have some Good News:

A data wonk's dream: Statscan to drop pay wall
http://goo.gl/cxmeo
By Tavia Grant
December 1, 2011
If Canada is to morph into a knowledge-based economy, its citizens need better access to reliable, unbiased information. With that in mind, Statistics Canada will make all of its standard data available for free on its website, starting next year. As of Feb. 1 (2012), all data known as Canadian Socio-Economic Information Management System (or CANSIM) will be posted freely on the agency’s website. Census and geography data will also become free.

...and we have some Bad News:

Cuts to hit Statistics Canada and Parks Canada
http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Cuts+Statistics+Canada+costly+error/6944756/story.html [dead link]
We have now halted the collection and analysis of our most informative longitudinal information on our labour force, on the workplace, on health and health care, and on child well-being. Add to this our universal census of the population.

From Statistics Canada:

February 1, 2012
CANSIM is now FREE.
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a01?lang=eng
CANSIM is Statistics Canadas key socioeconomic database. In CANSIM, the user can choose a specific table, geography(ies), characteristics (variables) and date range, then download the data. Users can create customized tables by adding or removing data; and manipulate data by asking for percent changes or year-to-date sums or averages.

Updated daily, CANSIM provides fast and easy access to a large range of the latest statistics available in Canada. CANSIM data are now available free of charge under the Statistics Canada Open Licence Agreement:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/reference/licence-eng.html

Browse CANSIM by subject:
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a01?lang=eng

Source:
Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html

Related link:

Statistics Canada to make all online data free
National Statistics Council, which opposed scrapping the long-form census, applauds the move

November, 25, 2011
By Carl Meyer
All of Statistics Canada’s standard online products, including the census, socioeconomic and geographic data, will be offered to the public for free starting February 2012, Embassy has learned. In 2010, the agency was rocked when the government dropped the mandatory long-form census, and its chief statistician resigned in protest. Immigration experts slammed the decision for jeopardizing the targeted delivery of services like languages training and job-search workshops. Now, the agency will not charge for the information it gathered during the 2011 census. Instead, as it releases the first set of census data this February, it will also announce that it will be free—as well as the rest of its online, readily-available data.

Source:
Embassy - Canada's Foreign Policy Newsweekly
http://embassymag.ca/

If It Were My Home.com
http://www.ifitweremyhome.com/
The lottery of birth is responsible for much of who we are. If you were not born in the country you were, what would your life be like?
Would you be the same person?


KEEP THE CENSUS LONG FORM QUESTIONNAIRE!

The Harper government recently announced that it would eliminate the 2011 Canada Census long form questionnaire and replace it with a voluntary survey. The long form was sent to 20% of households and is a critical source of information about diversity, employment, income, education and other characteristics of Canadians.
Click the link above to access 300+ links to related resources on a separate page of this site, including a petition to keep the long form and a Facebook group, along with dozens of links to media coverage and letters to the Prime Minister on this issue.

Eye-opening research stopped in its tracks: Goar
University of Toronto researcher David Hulchanski recounts how Ottawa destroyed his mapping device for urban poverty.

http://www.thestar.com/opinion/commentary/2014/10/07/eyeopening_research_stopped_in_its_tracks_goar.html
By Carol Goar
October 7, 2014
It took David Hulchanski five years to create the most sophisticated tool to track urban poverty ever devised. The work was painstaking. The result was startling and worrisome. It took Tony Clement five minutes — if that — to destroy Hulchanski’s mapping device.

“My research has been turned into a historical project,” the pioneering urban planner said disconsolately.
This is one of the first documented cases of the damage done by the Conservative government’s 2010 decision to scrap Canada’s mandatory, full-length census.

Source:
Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/

---

- Go to the Census 2011 questionnaire links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/2011_census_questionnaire.htm


Canadian Social Statistics

Statistics Canada
The first website to check for Canadian government statistics is Statistics Canada, which merits its own section on this page. The vast collection of information on the StatCan website includes detailed social program statistics in many areas, as well as more general stats on population, the economy, and --- well, you'll just have to visit the StatCan website to find out for yourself...

Statistics by Subject =====>>>

1. Aboriginal peoples
2. Agriculture
3. Business performance and ownership
4. Business, consumer and property services
5. Children and youth
6. Construction
7. Crime and justice
8. Culture and leisure
9. Economic accounts
10. Education, training and learning
11. Energy

12. Environment
13. Ethnic diversity and immigration
14. Families, households and housing
15. Government
16. Health
17. Income, pensions, spending and wealth
18. Information and communications technology
19. International trade
20. Labour
21. Languages
22. Manufacturing

23. Population and demography
24. Prices and price indexes
25. Retail and wholesale
26. Science and technology
27. Seniors
28. Society and community
29. Transportation
30. Travel and tourism

Media advisory: Statistics Canada details program adjustments to meet budgetary savings target
http://www42.statcan.gc.ca/smr09/smr09_039-eng.htm
June 27, 2012
OTTAWA — Statistics Canada released today a comprehensive list of programs identified for elimination or reduction to meet its savings target announced in Economic Action Plan 2012 of $33.9 million by 2014-15. To meet its commitments, Statistics Canada has focused resources where they are most needed.
(...)

Programs essential for fiscal and monetary policy, as well as data required for the administration of significant federal transfer payments, are not affected by these measures.

Full list of program adjustments:
http://www42.statcan.gc.ca/smr09/smr09_039a-eng.htm

Source:
Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html

The Daily
The Daily is Statistics Canada's official release bulletin, the Agency's first line of communication with the media and the public. The Daily issues news releases on current social and economic conditions and announces new products. It provides a comprehensive one-stop overview of new information available from Statistics Canada. The Daily is released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time each working day.

For a selection of links from The Daily, go to the Federal Government Department Links (Fisheries and Oceans to Veterans Affairs) page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/fedbkmrk2.htm


Statscan’s budget should be increased by $100-million

By Stephen Gordon
June 20, 2011
The federal government is going to spend the year doing a program review, with an eye to identifying places where spending can be cut. And it may well be that many of the services provided by the federal governments should be left to the private sector. But there is one agency where a thoughtful program review would recommend increasing funding: Statistics Canada.
(...)
A trip to the [U.S. Government] websites of the Bureau of Economic Analysis or the Bureau of Labor Statistics will get you a wealth of data at the price of a couple of mouse clicks. And over at the Census Bureau, fees only seem to be incurred by those whose projects require working at their offices in Washington. Things are different in Canada. If you go looking for data at the Statistics Canada website, you end up looking at a price list. (...)
One of the core competencies of any government is to provide public goods, and that includes publicly-produced databases. Access to those data should be free, and Statistics Canada’s budget should be increased by the $100-million it would cost to take down its paywall.
Source:
Globe and Mail

COMMENT (by Gilles):

Excellent suggestion!!
That's pretty much what many people and organizations have been demanding for at least the past decade.
See, for example, the website of my friend Tracey Lauriault:
datalibre.ca - "urging governments to make data about canada and canadians free and accessible to citizens"
The data is collected using Canadian tax-payer funds, and we believe use of the data should not be restricted to those who can afford the exorbitant fees.
[ datalibre.ca's OpenData Links & Resources - the BEST list on the open data movement! ]

Kudos to the Globe and Mail for even suggesting that StatCan should make all of its data available for free!
In the real world, though, Stephen Harper and His Majority can do whatever they bloody well want, knowing how easy it was for them to deep-six the long form Census questionnaire on ideological grounds. Steve and His Majority are firm in their belief that ideology trumps evidence-based research.
Looks like he's correct, at least for the next four years...


Canada Year Book 2012
December 24, 2012
The 2012 edition of the Canada Year Book was posted (in PDF and HTML formats) to the StatCan website on December 24, 2012.
Presented in almanac style, the 2012 Canada Year Book contains more than 500 pages of tables, charts and succinct analytical articles on every major area of Statistics Canada's expertise. The Canada Year Book is the premier reference on the social and economic life of Canada and its citizens.

HTML : http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-402-x/11-402-x2012000-eng.htm
[Includes the table of contents + links to an HTML file for each chapter]

PDF : http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-402-x/2012000/pdf-eng.htm
[Includes an HTML table of contents + links to a PDF file for each chapter]

Source:
Canada Year Book
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-402-x/index-eng.htm
First published in 1867, the Canada Year Book (CYB) charts key trends and indicators in the nation's economy, population, society and environment. The 31 almanac-style chapters contain charts, tables, maps and easy-to-read articles that feature the latest statistics from Canada's economic, political and social life. The Canada Year Book is the premier reference on the social and economic life of Canada and its citizens.


Chapters:
[Click the HTML or PDF link above
to access links to the individual chapters.]

* Aboriginal peoples
* Agriculture
* Business, consumer and property services
* Business performance and ownership
* Children and youth
* Construction
* Crime and justice
* Culture and leisure
* Economic accounts
* Education, training and learning
* Energy
* Environment
* Ethnic diversity and immigration
* Families, households and housing
* Geography


* Government
* Health
* Income, pensions, spending and wealth
* Information and communications technology
* International trade
* Labour
* Languages
* Manufacturing
* Population and demography
* Prices and price indexes
* Retail and wholesale
* Science and technology
* Seniors
* Society and community
* Transportation
* Travel and tourism

NOTE : In addition, the PDF version also includes a list of maps, charts and tables, a list of sources and an index


Related products:

Canada at a Glance, 2013
April 30, 2013
HTML version
- incl. links (in the left margin) to sections on:
* Population * Health * Education * Crime * Housing * Income, spending * Government * International comparisons * Labour * Economy * International trade * Energy * Manufacturing * Agriculture * Environment * Travel, transport
PDF version (7.3MB, 27 pages) - complete report in one file

Source:
Canada at a Glance - Product main page*
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=12-581-X&lang=eng
* Click View for the latest edition of the publication; click Chronological index for earlier editions (back to 2000).

Canada at a Glance presents current Canadian demographic, education, health and aging, justice, housing, income, labour market, household, economic, travel, financial, agricultural, foreign trade and environmental statistics. This booklet also includes important international comparisons, so that readers can see how Canada stacks up against its neighbours. Updated yearly, Canada at a Glance is a very useful reference for those who want quick access to current Canadian statistics.

[ Earlier editions of this report ]

Source:
Statistics Canada

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Summary tables
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tableaux/sum-som/index-eng.htm

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* Statistics by subject
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/index?lang=eng


Canada Year Book Historical Collection (1867 to 1967)
http://www65.statcan.gc.ca/acyb_r000-eng.htm
"..., a wealth of historical data in digitized format compiled from 100 years of the Agency's annual Canada Year Book (CYB).This new module, available free of charge on our website, covers the first century of Canadian history following Confederation in 1867, through to 1967, with historical text, tables, charts and maps. It is supplemented by interconnected learning resources for students and teachers.
- contains 100+ photos and nearly 50 maps dating back to 1868, as well as over 75 charts and 1,200 tables. Completing the picture are multimedia extras, such as newspaper clippings, video clips and posters. There are details on the lives and work of politicians, industrialists, scientists, agriculturalists and others who shaped the land, economy and society of Canada."

Browse the collection by year - 1867 to 1967
http://www65.statcan.gc.ca/acyb_r003-eng.htm

Browse the collection by topic
http://www65.statcan.gc.ca/acyb01/acyb01_0000-eng.htm
- Changing families and households - Lives of men and women - Occupations - Economic gains - The Great Depression - Communications - Ethnocultural diversity - Provinces and manufacturing - Immigration and emigration - Canada at war

Source:
Canada Year Book - Product main page*
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=11-402-x&lang=eng
Presented in almanac style, the Canada Year Book contains more than 500 pages of tables, charts and succinct analytical articles on every major area of Statistics Canada's expertise. The Canada Year Book is the premier reference on the social and economic life of Canada and its citizens.
[ * On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

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- Go to the Social Statistics Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/stats.htm


Main StatCan Census page links to Census pages for 2016 - 2011- 2006 - 2001- 1996

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2016 Census Program Content Consultation
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2016/consultation/index-eng.cfm
Planning the Census Program starts with consulting users.
Until November 16, 2012, Statistics Canada invites you to send us your views on the questionnaire content for 2016.

Consultation with data users and interested parties will allow Statistics Canada to:
* confirm information needs and identify data gaps
* establish data priorities
* understand how Census Program data are used.

2016 Census Program Content Consultation Guide
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2016/consultation/contentGuide-GuideContenu/index-eng.cfm
Introduction
What I need to know
Overview
Census Program information needs
Canadian context and Statistics Canada considerations
Key activities
Discussion points
Conclusion
Appendices

IRONY ALERT!
Here's the first sentence in the "Introduction" section of the above guide:
"Canadians require trustworthy statistics to meet an array of needs."
Gag me with a spoon.
How is Statistics Canada supposed to produce "trustworthy statistics" in the midst of deep cuts in StatCan staff, termination of important longitudinal studies and reports, gag orders to prevent staff from speaking against the effects of cutbacks, and elimination of the long-form Census questionnaire?

2011 Census home page

Selected Statistics Canada site content:

September 19, 2012
2011 Census of Population: Families, households, marital status, structural type of dwelling, collectives
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120919/dq120919a-eng.htm
Families and living arrangements of Canadians underwent further change and diversification during the past five years, according to data from the 2011 Census of Population.

Report:

Portrait of Families and Living Arrangements in Canada
HTML version :
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-312-x/98-312-x2011001-eng.cfm
PDF version (464K, 22 pages) : http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-312-x/98-312-x2011001-eng.pdf
The 2011 Census of Population counted 9,389,700 census families in Canada, up 5.5% from 8,896,840 families in 2006. Married couples remained the predominant family structure (67.0%) in 2011 but the share has decreased over time.

Related links:

New Census products and studies
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120919/pn120919-eng.htm
- links to dozens and dozens of special analyses of 2011 Census data

Fifty years of families in Canada: 1961 to 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/IPS/display?cat_num=98-312-X201100311702

Living arrangements of young adults aged 20 to 29
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/IPS/display?cat_num=98-312-X201100311704

Living arrangements of seniors
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/IPS/display?cat_num=98-312-X201100311705

Canadian households in 2011: Type and growth
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/IPS/display?cat_num=98-312-X201100311703

Families and Households Highlight Tables, 2011 Census
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/dp-pd/hlt-fst/fam/?Lang=E

Related subjects:

Families, households and housing
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=40000&id=40000&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

May 29, 2012
2011 Census: Age and sex
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120529/dq120529a-eng.htm
According to data from the 2011 Census of Population, seniors accounted for 14.8% of the population in 2011, up from 13.7% in 2006. However, the proportion of seniors in Canada remained among the lowest of the G8 countries.

Related report:

The Canadian Population in 2011: Age and Sex
HTML version:
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-311-x/98-311-x2011001-eng.cfm
PDF version (896K, 27 pages):
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-311-x/98-311-x2011001-eng.pdf

Table of contents:
Highlights
Part 1: National portrait
Part 2: Provinces and territories
Part 3: Portrait of metropolitan and non-metropolitan Canada
Part 4: Portrait of municipalities (census subdivisions)
Additional information

Selected highlights:

• The number of seniors aged 65 and over increased 14.1% between 2006 and 2011 to nearly 5 million. This rate of growth was higher than that of children aged 14 and under (0.5%) and people aged 15 to 64 (5.7%). • Seniors accounted for a record high of 14.8% of the population in Canada in 2011, up from 13.7% five years earlier.

• In 2011, the proportion of seniors in Canada was among the lowest of the G8 countries.

• The population of children aged 4 and under increased 11.0% between 2006 and 2011. This was the highest growth rate for this age group since the 1956 to 1961 period during the baby boom.

• In 2011, there were 5,825 centenarians in Canada, up 25.7% since 2006. This was the second most rapidly growing age group among all age groups after those aged 60 to 64.

• In 2011, the working-age population (those aged 15 to 64) represented 68.5% of the Canadian population. This proportion was higher than in any other G8 country, except Russia.

NOTE : You'll find all highlights on the first page of the HTML version of the report.

Related links (left side of the first page of the HTML version of the complete report):
* Data tables and figures
* Age pyramids
* Maps
* More information
* Centenarians in Canada
* Generations in Canada
* The census: A tool for planning at the local level
* Focus on Geography

Related new products and studies
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120529/pn120529-eng.htm
- incl. links to 20+ tables

Census - main page
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/index-eng.cfm

Related subjects:

* Population and demography
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3867&id=3867&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

* Population estimates and projections
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3867&id=3433&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

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Selected media coverage

From the
Toronto Star:
http://www.thestar.com/

* 2011 Census: Canada is getting older
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1201708
May 29, 2012

* Census 2011: Canada having a baby boomlet
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1202127
May 29, 2012

* 2011 Census: Provincial-territorial picture
Population change from 2001 to 2011

http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/1127913
NOTE : This Toronto Star map of Canada offers a quick way to compare population stats from Census 2011, 2006 and 2001 for each Canadian province and territory. Select a jurisdiction by clicking its name on the map or in the list in the left-hand margin of the page.

* Toronto Star : the 2011 Census
http://www.thestar.com/topic/census

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From the
National Post:
http://www.nationalpost.com/

* Census 2011: Canada is home to 5,825 people aged 100 or older
http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/05/29/census-2011-canada-has-more-than-5825-people-aged-100-or-older/
May 29, 2012

* Canada’s aging boomers are placing new strain on business, government
http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/05/29/canadas-aging-boomers-are-placing-new-strain-on-business-government/
May 29, 2012

News 2011 Canadian census highlights: Country aging rapidly as boomers hit retirement age,
Canada may not be getting safer as its population gets older
http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/05/29/canada-may-not-be-getting-safer-as-its-population-gets-older/
May 29, 2012

April 30, 2012
Overview of the Census, Census year 2011
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/ref/overview-apercu/index-eng.cfm
The Overview of the Census is a reference document covering each phase of the Census of Population and Census of Agriculture. It provides an overview of the 2011 Census from legislation governing the census to content determination, collection, processing, data quality assessment and data dissemination. It also traces the history of the census from the early days of New France to the present.
Table of contents:

1. Overview of the Census of Population

Introduction
Legislation
Communications
Consultation, testing and content approval
Field operations
Online questionnaire
Processing
Data quality assessment
Census geography
Dissemination

2. Overview of the Census of Agriculture

Taking an agriculture census
The Census of Agriculture cycle
Census of Agriculture products and services

Source:
Reference materials
Supporting documentation for census data
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/ref/index-eng.cfm

Source:
2011 Census

http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/index-eng.cfm

February 8, 2012
2011 Census: Population and dwelling counts
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120208/dq120208a-eng.htm
The population of Canada increased 5.9% between the 2006 and 2011 censuses, compared with a 5.4% increase during the previous five-year period. The increase in the growth rate was attributable to slightly higher fertility and to an increase in the number of non-permanent residents and immigrants. A full analysis is available in the report, The Canadian Population in 2011: Population Counts and Growth.

The report:

The Canadian Population in 2011: Population Counts and Growth
HTML version
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-310-x/98-310-x2011001-eng.cfm
PDF version
(992K, 26 pages)
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-310-x/98-310-x2011001-eng.pdf
Contents:
Highlights
Part 1: National portrait
Part 2: Provinces and territories
Part 3: Portrait of metropolitan and non-metropolitan Canada
Part 4: Portrait of municipalities (census subdivisions)
Additional information

Related products:

* Population growth in Canada: From 1851 to 2061
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-310-x/98-310-x2011003_1-eng.cfm

* Canada's rural population since 1851
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-310-x/98-310-x2011003_2-eng.cfm

* The census: A tool for planning at the local level
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-310-x/98-310-x2011003_3-eng.cfm

* Focus on Geography Series
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/fogs-spg/Index-eng.cfm

Source:
Analytical products
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/index-eng.cfm

Census of Canada - main page:
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/index-eng.cfm
- includes links to
the following Census 2011 information:
* By topic * Data products * Analytical products * Reference materials * Geography * Consultation* Custom services * Census of Agriculture
- also includes links to previous censuses (2006 - 2001 - 1996)

----------------------------

Selected new products and studies related to the 2011 Census:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120208/pn120208-eng.htm
February 8, 2012
NOTE : Click the link above to access all products below and more.

* GeoSearch
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=92-142-X&lang=eng

* GeoSuite, Census year 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/IPS/display?cat_num=92-150-X

* Thematic Maps, Census year 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/IPS/display?cat_num=92-173-X

* Illustrated Glossary, Census year 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/IPS/display?cat_num=92-195-X

* Census Dictionary, Census year 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/IPS/display?cat_num=98-301-X

* Overview of the Census, Census year 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/IPS/display?cat_num=98-302-X

* more...
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120208/pn120208-eng.htm

Source:
The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

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Related links:

Canada Census links: Toronto Star coverage
http://www.thestar.com/topic/census
- links to just under 100 Star articles pertaining to the Census going back to March 2007. Topics include Census 2006 and Census 2011, the elimination of the compulsory long census form and subsequent resignation of the Chief Statistician, etc.

2006 Census

2006 Census Quick Links:

2006 Community Profiles
These profiles present community-level information from the 2006 Census of Population. Users can search for an area of interest by typing its 'place name' in the box below or by clicking on a province or territory from the list below and selecting the area from a list."

Census Trends
This new product presents a series of summary data trends spanning three censuses: 2006, 2001 and 1996. The product is designed to facilitate the analysis and comparison of the changing demographic and socio-economic composition of selected geographic areas across Canada. The product will include approximately 85 key data indicators, released in two phases.

2006 Census Tract Profiles
Census tracts are small, relatively stable geographic areas that usually have a population of 2,500 to 8,000. They are identified using seven-character numeric 'names' (e.g., 0005.00) and are located in census metropolitan areas (CMAs) and larger census agglomerations (CAs)1. View a list of CMAs and CAs containing census tracts. Options are provided to help navigate to a census tract, visualize the census tract via a map and/or retrieve profile data for the census tract.

2006 Highlight Tables
* Population and dwelling counts * Age and sex * Families and households * Language, immigration and citizenship * Aboriginal peoples * Labour, language used at work, place of work, commuting to work, education * Ethnic origin and visible minorities * Income and earnings and shelter costs

2006 Census Dictionary
The 2006 Census Dictionary provides detailed information on every aspect of the Census of Population and Census of Agriculture along with an overview of each phase of the census, from content determination to data dissemination with focus on the changes from 2001.

2006 Aboriginal Population Profile
These profiles present community-level information from the 2006 Census of Population. Users can search for an area of interest by typing its 'place name' in the box below or by clicking on a province or territory from the list below and selecting the area from a list. Information to complete the profile will be available in June 2008.

GeoSearch2006
This interactive mapping application makes it easy to find many places in Canada, see them on a map, and get basic geographic and demographic data for those places.

Preview of Products and Services

Multimedia (requires Macromedia Flash Player)
- multimedia presentations grouped by topic:
* Population and dwelling counts
* Age and sex
* Families and households
* Statistics Canada's Living Census

Topic-based tabulations
List of topics:
1. Population and dwelling counts (Highlight tables)
2. Age and sex
3. Marital status
4. Families and households
5. Housing and shelter costs
6. Language
7. Mobility and migration
8. Immigration and citizenship
9. Aboriginal peoples
10. Labour
11. Education
12. Place of work and commuting to work
13. Ethnic origin and visible minorities
14. Income and earnings

Source:
2006 Census

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Globe and Mail In-Depth : Census 2006
- links to several dozen articles based on Statistics Canada's 2006 datasets, covering a wide range of themes, including :
* visible minorities * the wealth gap * income inequality * interracial relationships * Canada's aging work force * immigrants and education * baby boomers, retirement and the spectre of a labour shortage * ethnic origin and minorities * families and work * Canadians helping the seniors in their lives * public transit use * immigrants living and working in their mother tongue * Canada's changing work force * families * Population of Indian, Métis and Inuit tops one-million mark * population * Canada's tenuous French connection * more...
Source:
The Globe and Mail

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GeoSearch2006 Interactive Map of Canada
April 2008
This interactive mapping application makes it easy to find many places in Canada, see them on a map, and get basic geographic and demographic data for those places. To find a specific place of interest, users can click and zoom in on a map of Canada or they can search by place name, street name, street intersection or postal code. GeoSearch will display the appropriate map showing boundaries and other features. GeoSearch automatically displays population and dwelling counts for the selected places, and shows what kind of geographic area it is and its relationship to other geographic areas.
- incl. links to 2006 Census reference maps and community profile tables, and a thematic mapping option for selected census topics (for selected levels of geography).
(Excerpt from Product Main Page)

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Teacher's Guide to Data Discovery

Stats 101!
- follow the links in the left margin of the main page of this guide to learn how to choose the dataset, to understand data concepts and to analyse the data with or without computer software.

Canadian Economic Observer
This monthly periodical is Statistics Canada's flagship publication for economic statistics. Each issue contains a monthly summary of the economy, major economic events and a feature article. A statistical summary contains a wide range of tables and graphs on the principal economic indicators for Canada, the provinces and the major industrial nations.

Population characteristics

Tables by subject: Population and Demography

Canadian Social Trends
(Statistics Canada's publication on emerging social issues)

Online Issues of Canadian Social Trends - hundreds of articles going back to 1996
T
hemes:
Aboriginal People - Income, Expenditures and Housing - Aging, Seniors and Retirement - Justice - Caregiving and Disabilities - Leisure and Religion - Children and Youth - Marriage and Families - Cities, Neighbourhoods and Rural
Canada - Miscellaneous - Education, Training and Literacy - Technology - Employment - Time use - Health - Volunteering and Participation - Immigration, Diversity and Language

Statistics Canada Research Papers - Income Series - Includes Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics
Links to hundreds of studies and articles online, going back to 1993
Here are some sample reports:
- A Comparison of the Results of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) and the Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF)
- SLID Labour Interview Questionnaire
- Preliminary Interview Questionnaire
- SLID Questionnaire for Demographics and Contact
- A Comparison of the Results of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) and the Survey of Consumer Finances(SCF)
- To What Extent Are Canadians Exposed to Low Income?

NOTE: for links to Statistics Canada reports on low-income measures (LICO, LIM)  and income inequality, 
see the Canadian Social Research Links  Poverty Measures page
and the Inequality Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/inequality.htm

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Voluntary sector statistics from StatCan:

September 11, 2009
Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating, 2007

Related subjects
o Labour
o Unpaid work
o Society and community
o Social networks and civic participation
o Volunteering and donating

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Statistical Profile of Canadian Communities
Type in the name of a Canadian city or town, and the database will tell you the following information, based on the 1996 Census :
Population in 1996 - Population in 1991 - 1991 to 1996 population change (%) - Education - Income and Work - Land area (square km) - Families and Dwellings - Births and Deaths.
This site contains information from the 1996 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada on May 14, 1996. A statistical profile is presented for all Canadian communities (cities, towns, villages, Indian Reserves and Settlements, etc.) highlighting information on education, income and work, families and dwellings, as well as general population information. A mapping feature is available for viewing the location of a community within Canada

Community Profiles 2001

Related link:

Hidden gems: Community information database
The Community Information Database (CID), developed by the Rural Secretariat with the cooperation of provincial and territorial governments, is intended to be "a free internet-based resource developed to provide communities, researchers, and governments with access to consistent and reliable socio-economic and demographic data and information for all communities across Canada." And it delivers. Despite a clunky interface, and a steep learning curve that can’t be bypassed, in my experience, the CID provides a rich source of information about all communities, including urban ones, with data from the 1996, 2001, and 2006 Census. In fact, more than 500 pieces of data can be retrieved for all of Canada, by province, region, Census Metropolitan area, Census subdivision, or regional health district.
Site reviewed by:
Social Policy Cafe
(Havi Echenberg)


Free Internet publications from Statistics Canada:
- complete list
- list by subject (click on the plus sign ("+") beside a subject to expand that part of the list)
Links to over 1000 recent titles in over two dozen areas, including: Communications - Education - Environment - Government - Health - Justice - Labour - Personal finance and Household Finance - Population and Demography - Prices and Price indexes - Science and technology - Social conditions - Statistical methods.

 

From Statistics Canada:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html

January 23, 2013
Public postsecondary enrolments and graduates, 2010/2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/130123/dq130123a-eng.htm
Just over 1,955,300 students were enrolled in Canadian public postsecondary institutions during the academic year 2010/2011, a 2.7% increase from the previous year. Canadian students made up 91.5% of total enrolments and international students 8.5%. Enrolments increased in every province except New Brunswick and Saskatchewan, where they remained relatively stable.

Also From StatCan:
o Education, training and learning
o Fields of study
o Outcomes of education
o Students

Canadian Education Statistics Council
The Canadian Education Statistics Council (CESC), a partnership between the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada (CMEC) and Statistics Canada, provides valuable information and insight about education in Canada both to the Canadian public and to provincial and territorial governments.

---

For more general education statistics, go to the Education Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/education.htm

For links to post-secondary education stats and info,
go to the Canadian Universities and Colleges Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/univbkmrk.htm
.

-----------------

Statistics on Literacy

[U.S.]

Twenty-three Percent of America Is Illiterate
http://www.onlinecollegecourses.com/2013/02/13/23-of-america-is-illiterate/
February 13, 2013
Infographic showing that one in five Americans lacks the basic skills beyond a fourth-grade level.
[Figures are for 2003.]
- describes the three different types of literacy (prose - document - quantitative) and how many Americans mastered each literacy level

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How does that compare with Canadian literacy stats?

Canadian Literacy Facts & Research
http://abclifeliteracy.ca/facts-research
- includes links to a collection of facts, statistics and myths about adult, family and workplace literacy.

Source:
ABC Life Literacy Canada
http://abclifeliteracy.ca/

See also the
Canadian Literacy and Learning Network
http://www.literacy.ca/

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How about other countries?

See The Official Source of Literacy Data:
http://www.uis.unesco.org/literacy/Pages/default.aspx

Source:
UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS)

http://www.uis.unesco.org/
UIS is the primary source for cross-nationally comparable statistics on education, science and technology, culture, and communication for more than 200 countries and territories.

Government Finance Statistics

From Statistics Canada:

Economic accounts
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3764&id=3764&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Financial and wealth accounts
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3764&id=1596&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Government financial statistics
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3764&id=3766&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Government
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3055&id=3055&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Balance sheets
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3055&id=3058&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Revenue and expenditures
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3055&id=3059&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Consumer Price Index (CPI)

From Statistics Canada:

The Consumer Price Index - product main page*
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=62-001-X&lang=eng
This monthly release of the The Consumer Price Index (CPI) for Canada, the provinces, Whitehorse and Yellowknife, provides a descriptive summary of retail price movements, inflation rates and the factors underlying them. The CPI also contains the following tabular information: latest price index movements for the eight major components; price index changes on one and 12-month bases for an extensive number of components and groups; historical monthly information; and price indices reclassified according to categories of goods and services.
---
* On the product main page, click View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

[ Earlier editions of this report (back to 2001):
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=62-001-X&chropg=1&lang=eng ]

Guide to the Consumer Price Index (1998)
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=62-557-X&lang=eng

Related subjects:

* Prices and price indexes
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=3956&lang=eng&more=0

* Consumer price indexes
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=3956&id=2178&lang=eng&more=0

[ Related Documents - incl. links to 33 summary tables, 18 detailed tables from CANSIM and 41 publications]

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Source:
Statistics Canada

Leading Indicators

Related StatCan reports:
o Economic accounts
o Leading indicators

July 17, 2009
Leading indicators, June 2009
The composite leading index fell by 0.1% in June, after the rate of decline had slowed markedly from 1.0% in April to 0.1% in May. In June, 4 of 10 components rose, the same number as in May. Housing and the stock market continued to post the largest gains, while all the manufacturing components declined.

Related links:

Table 1 Leading indicators, January to June 2009
[ Latest issue of the Canadian Economic Observer ]

Population/demographic statistics

From
Statistics Canada
:

November 13, 2014
Canada's population estimates: Age, sex and marital status, July 1, 2014
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/141113/dq141113e-eng.htm
Canada's population estimates by marital status, legal marital status, age and sex, as of July 1, 2014, are now available.

See CANSIM table 051-0042:
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a26?lang=eng&retrLang=eng&id=0510042&paSer=&pattern=&stByVal=1&p1=1&p2=31&tabMode=dataTable&csid=
[ NOTE : This link will take you to the bottom of the table --- you must scroll to the top of the page for the table content. ]

---

September 26, 2014
Canada's population estimates: Age and sex, 2014
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/140926/dq140926b-eng.htm
On July 1, 2014, Canada's population was estimated at 35,540,400, up 386,100 or 1.1% over the last year (2013/2014). This increase was slightly lower than that of the previous year (+1.2% in 2012/2013) but similar to the average annual population increase for the last 30 years (+1.1%).

June 19, 2014
Canadian Demographics at a Glance
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/91-003-x/91-003-x2014001-eng.htm
Canadian Demographics at a glance is designed to gather a maximum of demographic information in a single document, giving users an easily and quickly accessible up-to-date picture of the Canadian population. It presents data on demographic growth, fertility, mortality, migratory movements, aging and ethno-cultural diversity of the population in the form of tables and graphs accompanied by a brief analytical commentary

Section one: Population growth and age structure
Section two: Components of population growth
Section three: Composition of the population
Section four: Regional portrait

---

February 26, 2014
Canada's population estimates: Subprovincial areas, July 1, 2013

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/140226/dq140226b-eng.htm
On July 1, 2013, 24,517,700 people, or over two-thirds (69.7%) of the Canadian population, were living in a census metropolitan area (CMA). Canada's three largest CMAs together (Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver) were home to more than one in three Canadians (35.2%).

---

Canada : Country Meter
http://countrymeters.info/en/Canada/

Country Meters Population Clocks for Every Country
(Real Time Statistics)

http://countrymeters.info/
Click on the name of a country in the list, and the next page will tell you its current population PLUS male-to-female ratio, births and deaths this year, net migrations, population growth and economic indicators (GDP and national debt).
Recommended resource!


From Statistics Canada:

Population and demography
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3867&id=3867&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Population estimates and projections
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3867&id=3433&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Main StatCan Census page links to Census pages for 2016 - 2011- 2006 - 2001- 1996:
http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/index-eng.cfm

Selected links from
Statistics Canada
:

(in reverse chronological order)

September 26, 2013
Canada's total population estimates, 2013
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/130926/dq130926a-eng.htm
On July 1, 2013, Canada's population was estimated at 35,158,300, up 404,000 (+1.2%) over the last year. Population growth was lower in the Atlantic provinces and negative in Nova Scotia (-0.5%), while generally higher in the Western provinces, especially in Alberta (+3.4%) and Saskatchewan (+1.9%).

---

September 26, 2013
Final estimates of 2011 Census coverage
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/130926/dq130926b-eng.htm

---

September 26, 2013
Canada's population estimates, second quarter 2013
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/130926/dq130926e-eng.htm
Demographic estimates by province and territory are now available for the second quarter.

Available in CANSIM tables:
Table 051-0005 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=051-0005&p2=31
Table 051-0006 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=051-0006&p2=31
Table 051-0017 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=051-0017&p2=31
Table 051-0020 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=051-0020&p2=31
Table 051-0037 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=051-0037&p2=31
Table 051-0045 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=051-0045&p2=31
Table 053-0001 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=053-0001&p2=31

July 9, 2013
Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada, 2008 to 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/130709/dq130709a-eng.htm
The Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada, Statistics Canada's analysis of the current demographic situation of the country, is now available. The report includes analysis of trends in population growth, age structure and marital status, and looks at each component of population growth: fertility, mortality and migration (interprovincial and international).

Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/91-209-x/91-209-x2013001-eng.htm
- includes stats on the following demographic indicators:
* Population growth, age and sex structure * Fertility * Mortality * Migration * Marital status * Population projections * Other products

Earlier editions of this report - back to 1994
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=91-209-X&chropg=1&lang=eng

Related Subjects:

Population and demography
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3867&id=3867&lang=eng&type=DAILYART
Population estimates and projections

http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3867&id=3433&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

-----------------------------------------------------------

March 26, 2013
Estimates of the number of census families, July 1, 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/130326/dq130326d-eng.htm
Estimates of the number of census families as of July 1, 2012, for Canada, the provinces and territories are now available. These estimates are distributed by family structure (husband-wife or lone-parent).

Available in CANSIM table 051-0055:
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=051-0055&p2=31

Related subjects:

Population and demography
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3867&id=3867&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Population estimates and projections
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3867&id=3433&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

-----------------------------------------------------------

January 9, 2013
Population estimates by census subdivision
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/130109/dq130109e-eng.htm
Population estimates by census subdivision for the reference year 2010 are available free of charge in electronic format upon request*. Revised data for the reference years 2007 to 2009 are also available. For more information, or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, contact us (toll-free 1-800-263-1136; infostats@statcan.gc.ca) or Media Relations (613-951-4636; mediahotline@statcan.gc.ca).

---
* (By Gilles) For the life of me, I can't understand WHY StatCan doesn't just post these stats to their site.
Yes, there *are* over 5,000 census subdivisions. So what? Online storage is cheap.
No, it's NOT fair to require interested parties to self-identify in order to obtain a copy of these tables!
---

Related subjects:

Population and demography
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3867&id=3867&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Population estimates and projections
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3867&id=3433&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

-----------------------------------------------------------

June 21, 2012
Canada's population estimates, first quarter 2012

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120621/dq120621f-eng.htm
Demographic estimates by province and territory for the first quarter are now available.

Canada's population estimates, January to March 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/91-002-x/91-002-x2012001-eng.htm
Table of contents:
Highlights
Analysis
Tables
Charts
Data quality, concepts and methodology
Appendices
User information
Related products
PDF version

Source:
Quarterly Demographic Estimates - product main page*
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=91-002-X&lang=eng
This publication presents quarterly estimates of population for Canada, provinces and territories as well as statistics on the following components of population change: births, deaths, immigration, emigration, returning emigration, net temporary emigration, net non-permanent residents and interprovincial migration, the latter by origin and destination.
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:

* Ethnic diversity and immigration
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=30000&lang=eng&more=0

* Immigrants and non-permanent residents
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=30000&id=30004&lang=eng&more=0

* Population and demography
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=3867&lang=eng&more=0

-----------------------------------------------------------

February 8, 2012
2011 Census: Population and dwelling counts
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120208/dq120208a-eng.htm
The population of Canada increased 5.9% between the 2006 and 2011 censuses, compared with a 5.4% increase during the previous five-year period. The increase in the growth rate was attributable to slightly higher fertility and to an increase in the number of non-permanent residents and immigrants. A full analysis is available in the report, The Canadian Population in 2011: Population Counts and Growth.

The report:

The Canadian Population in 2011: Population Counts and Growth
HTML version
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-310-x/98-310-x2011001-eng.cfm
PDF version
(992K, 26 pages)
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-310-x/98-310-x2011001-eng.pdf
Contents:
Highlights
Part 1: National portrait
Part 2: Provinces and territories
Part 3: Portrait of metropolitan and non-metropolitan Canada
Part 4: Portrait of municipalities (census subdivisions)
Additional information

Related products:

* Population growth in Canada: From 1851 to 2061
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-310-x/98-310-x2011003_1-eng.cfm

* Canada's rural population since 1851
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-310-x/98-310-x2011003_2-eng.cfm

* The census: A tool for planning at the local level
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-310-x/98-310-x2011003_3-eng.cfm

* Focus on Geography Series
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/fogs-spg/Index-eng.cfm

Source:
Analytical products
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/index-eng.cfm

Census of Canada - main page:
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/index-eng.cfm
- includes links to
the following Census 2011 information:
* By topic * Data products * Analytical products * Reference materials * Geography * Consultation* Custom services * Census of Agriculture
- also includes links to previous censuses (2006 - 2001 - 1996)

----------------------------

Selected new products and studies related to the 2011 Census:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120208/pn120208-eng.htm
February 8, 2012
NOTE : Click the link above to access all products below and more.

* GeoSearch
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=92-142-X&lang=eng

* GeoSuite, Census year 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/IPS/display?cat_num=92-150-X

* Thematic Maps, Census year 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/IPS/display?cat_num=92-173-X

* Illustrated Glossary, Census year 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/IPS/display?cat_num=92-195-X

* Census Dictionary, Census year 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/IPS/display?cat_num=98-301-X

* Overview of the Census, Census year 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/IPS/display?cat_num=98-302-X

* more...
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120208/pn120208-eng.htm

Source:
The Daily:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

Related links:

Canada Census links: Toronto Star coverage
http://www.thestar.com/topic/census
- links to just under 100 Star articles pertaining to the Census going back to March 2007. Topics include Census 2006 and Census 2011, the elimination of the compulsory long census form and subsequent resignation of the Chief Statistician, etc.

---

From the
Globe and Mail Economy Lab:

- Population of Canada projected to 2060
http://goo.gl/M4s9j
January 30, 2012
- by age group (0-19 --- 20-64 --- 65 and over - reaching age 65)
Source:
Globe and Mail
http://www.theglobeandmail.com

December 20, 2011
Quarterly Demographic Estimates, July to September 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/91-002-x/91-002-x2011003-eng.htm
Table of contents:
Highlights
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/91-002-x/2011003/aftertoc-aprestdm1-eng.htm
Analysis
Tables
Charts
Data quality, concepts and methodology
Appendices
User information
Related products
PDF version (388K, 82 pages):
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/91-002-x/91-002-x2011003-eng.pdf

Source:
Quarterly Demographic Estimates - product main page*
This publication presents quarterly estimates of population for Canada, provinces and territories as well as statistics on the following components of population change: births, deaths, immigration, emigration, returning emigration, net temporary emigration, net non-permanent residents and interprovincial migration, the latter by origin and destination.
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:

* Ethnic diversity and immigration
* Immigrants and non-permanent residents
* Population and demography

Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada - Product main page*
The Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada is an analysis of the demographic situation in Canada at the national, provincial and sub-provincial levels. The Report consists of two parts. The first one is devoted to a review of recent demographic trends occurring in Canada. Trends in population growth, aging, marriage and divorce, and the evolution of the various components of Canada's population growth - fertility, mortality, immigration and internal migrations - are presented, analyzed and discussed in order for the readers to be able to quickly understand the meaning and the impact of the numerous on-going changes. The second part of the Report features in-depth articles on current issues related to the Canadian population.
---
[ * On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest
issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

Population Projections for Canada, Provinces and Territories - Product main page*
This report presents the results of six population projection scenarios by age group and sex up to 2036 for the provinces and territories and up to 2061 for Canada. Using the July 1, 2009 population estimate as the starting point, these projections are based on assumptions that take into account the most recent trends relating to components of population growth, particularly fertility, mortality, immigration, emigration and interprovincial migration.
[ * On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest
issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

Annual Demographic Estimates: Canada, Provinces and Territories - product main page*
This publication presents annual estimates of the total population and annual estimates by age and sex for Canada, provinces and territories. It also presents estimates of the following components of population change: births, deaths, immigration, emigration, returning emigration, net temporary emigration, net non-permanent residents and inter-provincial migration, the latter by origin and destination. As in the case of population estimates, the components are also available for the total population and by age and sex.
[ * On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest
issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

Annual Demographic Estimates: Subprovincial Areas - product main page*
This publication presents annual estimates of population for census metropolitan areas, economic regions and census divisions of Canada as well as estimates of the following components of population change: births, deaths, immigration, emigration, returning emigration, net temporary emigration, net non-permanent residents and inter-provincial and intra-provincial migration.
[ * On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest
issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

Quarterly Demographic Estimates - product main page*
This publication presents quarterly estimates of population for Canada, provinces and territories as well as statistics on the following components of population change: births, deaths, immigration, emigration, returning emigration, net temporary emigration, net non-permanent residents and interprovincial migration, the latter by origin and destination.
[ * On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest
issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

Related subjects:

* Ethnic diversity and immigration
* Immigrants and non-permanent residents
* Population and demography
* Population estimates and projections
* Population aging

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Statistics Canada Census Page
- links to Census pages for : 2011 - 2006 - 2001 - 1996

* Language
* Immigration and citizenship
* Mobility and migration

* Thematic Maps
A thematic map shows the spatial distribution of one or more specific data themes for standard geographic areas. The map may be qualitative in nature (e.g., predominant farm types) or quantitative (e.g., percentage population change).

* GeoSearch 2006
This interactive mapping application makes it easy to find many places in Canada, see them on a map, and get basic geographic and demographic data for those places. Click and zoom in on a map of Canada or search by place name, street name, street intersection or postal code. GeoSearch will display the appropriate map showing boundaries and other features. GeoSearch automatically displays population and dwelling counts for the selected places, and shows what kind of geographic area it is and its relationship to other geographic areas.

2006 Community Profiles, Census year 2006 (update)
These profiles present community-level information from the 2006 Census of Population. Users can search for an area of interest by typing its 'place name' in the box below or by clicking on a province or territory from the list below and selecting the area from a list.

Census Trends, 2006 Census
Census Trends presents a series of summary data trends spanning the 2006, 2001 and 1996 censuses. The product is designed to facilitate the analysis and comparison of the changing demographic and socio-economic composition of selected geographic areas across Canada. Summary data trends include percentage distributions and percentage change.

----------------------------------------------

July 20, 2011
Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada, 2010
The Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada, Statistics Canada's analysis of the components affecting the nation's population, is now available as a dynamic, Internet-only publication beginning today.

Chapters released today (July 20/11) on population growth, age and sex structure, fertility, mortality and migration contain detailed analysis, tables and figures about the latest trends.

- incl. demographic patterns at the national, provincial and sub-provincial levels, trends in population growth and the evolution of the various components of Canada's population growth — fertility, mortality and migration (interprovincial and international) — as well as marriage and divorce.

Source:
Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada - Product main page*
The Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada is an analysis of the demographic situation in Canada at the national, provincial and sub-provincial levels. The Report consists of two parts. The first one is devoted to a review of recent demographic trends occurring in Canada. Trends in population growth, aging, marriage and divorce, and the evolution of the various components of Canada's population growth - fertility, mortality, immigration and internal migrations - are presented, analyzed and discussed in order for the readers to be able to quickly understand the meaning and the impact of the numerous on-going changes. The second part of the Report features in-depth articles on current issues related to the Canadian population.
---
* On the product main page, click View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:
* Population and demography

***********************************************************

AgeSource/AgeStats Worldwide
http://db.aarpinternational.org/database/
http://www.aarpinternational.org/database/
AgeSource Worldwide identifies several hundred information resources in some 25 countries which are significant either in size or in their unique coverage of particular aging-related issues. The resources include, among others, clearinghouses, libraries, databases, training materials, major reports, and Web metasites.
AgeStats Worldwide
provides access to statistical data that compare the situation of older adults across countries or regions around a variety of issues, such as demography, pensions, health and long-term care. The most recent data and projections as far ahead as 2050 are provided where available. You may search either or both databases at one time. Access is free-of-charge. AgeSource and AgeStats Worldwide have been created by AARP to facilitate the international exchange of policy and program-relevant information in aging.

Source:
AARP (formerly called the American Association of Retired Persons)
"AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan membership organization for people 50 and over. We provide information and resources; advocate on legislative, consumer, and legal issues; assist members to serve their communities; and offer a wide range of unique benefits,special products, and services for our members. These benefits include AARP Webplace at www.aarp.org, Modern Maturity and My Generation magazines, and the monthly AARP Bulletin. Active in every U.S. state and territory, AARP celebrates the attitude that age isn't just a number -- it's about how you live your life."

Links to AARP sites in all states

AARP Online U.S. Retirement Calculator


The 100 People Project

We're on a quest to find the 100 people that represent the 7 billion of us. By statistically representing the world population as 100 people, we hope to make complex issues more comprehensible and help the world's children get a stronger sense of the big picture. The project and report are an update of the May 1990 State of the Village Report by Donella Meadows (see the link to that report a bit further down on the page you're now reading)

The 100 People Project: An Introduction (video, duration 3:40)
http://vimeo.com/47242333

---

If the World were 100 PEOPLE:
http://www.100people.org/statistics_detailed_statistics.php?section=statistics
If the world was a village of 100 people,,,
--- 50 would be female, 50 would be male
--- 26 would be 0-14, 66 would be 15-64 and 8 would be 65 and older
--- 60 would be from Asia, 15 would be from Africa, 11 would be from Europe, 9 would be from Latin America & the Caribbean, and 5 would be from North America
Also includes breakdowns for the following categories:
* Religion * First Language * Overall Literacy * Literacy by Gender * Education * Urban/Rural * Drinking Water * Food * Infectious Disease * Poverty * Electricity * Technology *
Sanitation
NOTES:
1. Source information for each of the categories is available at the bottom of the page.
Example of source information:
Poverty:
*
http://www.prb.org/pdf11/2011population-data-sheet_eng.pdf
* http://www.un.org/News/briefings/docs/2005/kotharibrf050511.doc.htm
* http://www.globalissues.org/article/26/poverty-facts-and-stats
* http://econ.worldbank.org

Source:
100 People : A World Portrait
A World Education Toolbox

http://www.100people.org/
The 100 People Foundation helps students to better understand the complex issues facing our planet and the resources we share.
By framing the global population as 100 people, our media makes education more engaging and effective, and improves students' abilities to remember and relate to what they learn.

---

The Original 100 People report:

State of the Village Report
http://www.donellameadows.org/archives/state-of-the-village-report/
By Donella Meadows
May 31, 1990
TIP: Compare this 1990 report with the one above (which is undated, but circa 2012) to see how the composition of this village/world has changed

---

If you prefer the infographic version:

From UPWORTHY:
http://www.upworthy.com

The World as 100 People (Infographic)
http://www.upworthy.com/are-you-in-the-majority-of-everything-check-this-handy-chart
NOTE : Visual people like me (Gilles) have a certain affinity for infographics because they tend to make it easier to absorb information on various topics. Although I found the above graphic interesting, I found that I couldn't actually view the complete graphic --- the bottom section was below the bottom of my screen and there was no way to scroll down.
Go figure.
I use the latest versions of Google Chrome and Firefox to surf the net, but occasionally I have to fire up Internet Explorer when nothing else works. This was one of those cases for me. Generally speaking, when that happens, it means that the website (or page) is "optimized" for Internet Explorer --- "This site best viewed in Microsoft Internet Explorer", as they used to say. [Translation : Most people use IE (they don't), so we're not gonna bother with cross-browser compatibility; too much effort.]

 


Below, you'll find links to two of the top statistical sources I'd recommend for caseload and expenditure info about and historical Canadian social programs:
Historical Statistics of Canada and Social Security Statistics, Canada and Provinces.



Historical Statistics of Canada (2nd edition, 1983)
Jointly produced by the Social Science Federation of Canada and Statistics Canada

Historical Statistics of Canada contains links to over 1,000 statistical tables (downloadable in Excel format) on the social, economic and institutional conditions of Canada from the start of the Confederation in 1867 to the mid-1970s.
Go to the home page and browse the table of contents of this excellent historical resource. Tables are arranged in sections with an introduction explaining the content of each section, the principal sources of data for each table, and general explanatory notes regarding the statistics. This online statistical collection complements and expands on Human Resources Development Canada's Social Security Statistics, Canada and Provinces report.

For a complete list of topics covered, see the Alphabetical Index - everything's there from Accidents and Fatalities to Zinc Production.

Here's a sample section:

Section C: Social Security - by T. Russell Robinson, Health and Welfare Canada
Contains seven pages of historical information on the evolution of Canadian social programs, plus links to over 180 tables organized under the following headings: Federal Income Security Programs - Federal and Provincial Income Insurance Programs - Cost-shared Federal-Provincial Income Security Programs - Federal and Provincial Social Service Programs - Provincial-Municipal Income Security Programs - Government Expenditures on Social Security by Broad Program Areas. Unfortunately, the section on the Canada Assistance Plan provides stats only from 1970 to 1975, but you'll find other historical gems here, like federal transfers to the provinces and territories, 1947 to 1975, Unemployment insurance account, 1942 to 1976, Old Age Pensions recipients for Canada and by province, March 1928 to 1951, and much more...
If you're looking for historical Canadian social program stats, this is the place to start!




Social Security Statistics, Canada and Provinces
1978-79 to 2002-03

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/webarchives/20061209234003/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/page00.shtml
OR
http://web.archive.org/web/20070814082442/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/page00.shtml
OR:
http://goo.gl/B5rgvQ

NOTE: This report is no longer available on the website of Human Resources and Skills Development (HRSDC) or its successor, Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC). This report and many others were moved to the web archive collection at Library and Archives Canada (LAC).

[By Gilles, March 1, 2014]

-------------------------------------------

This report is a goldmine of statistical information (beneficiary data and expenditure data) on current and defunct Canadian federal social programs, and even some on provincial/territorial programs.

This report offers 25 years of longitudinal data on costs and numbers of beneficiaries for most programs - over 100 tables - covering a large number of programs --- here's a partial list:
- Child Tax Benefit, Family Allowances, the Child Tax Credit, Old Age Security/Guaranteed Income Supplement/Spouse's Allowance ("The Allowance"), Federal Training and Employment Programs, Federal Goods and Services Tax Credit, the Canada/Quebec Pension Plans, War Veterans' and Civilian War Allowances, Veterans' and Civilians' Disability Pensions, Unemployment/Employment Insurance, the Canada Assistance Plan, Workers' Compensation, Youth Allowances, Social Assistance and Social Services for Registered Indians --- and more...

---------------------------

NOTE : All links below are functional.
Click any link and you'll find the desired content on the website of Archive.org

Preface (short blurb only)
http://web.archive.org/web/20070814082442/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/page01.shtml

List of Tables
http://web.archive.org/web/20070814082442/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/page02.shtml
Read the Introductory notes at the top of the page and in Appendix A:
http://web.archive.org/web/20070814082442/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/page03.shtml
of this report for all methodological notes.
"...Tables in this report have been organized into two parts. Part I presents three Overview Tables which illustrate the trends in social security expenditures by all levels of government for Canada. Part II comprises Component Tables which provide data on beneficiaries and expenditures for individual programs."

Overview Tables:

Table 1:
Total Social Security Expenditures in Canada, 1978-79 to 2002-03

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/webarchives/20061210200240/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/table1a.shtml

Table 2: Social Security Expenditures by Welfare Program and Total Health and Education Expenditures, Canada, 1978-79 to 2002-03
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/webarchives/20061210200142/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/table2.shtml

Table 3
Expenditure Analyses of Social Security Programs, Canada, 1978-79 to 2002-03
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/webarchives/20061210200026/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/table3.shtml

A number of older tables were removed from this edition of the Social Security Statistics report, including some tables with info on Blind Persons' Allowances, Disabled Persons' Allowances and Unemployed Assistance.
Check older editions of this report for those older stats:
http://web.archive.org/web/20090219214655/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/statistics/index.shtml

Many of the tables are historical and likely of little interest except to historians and CAP-o-philes --- they offer historical caseload and expenditure statistics on each of the CAP cost-sharing components (General Assistance - Homes for Special Care for Children and Adults - Child Welfare - Health Care - Other Welfare Services and Work Activity).

Scroll down the list of tables
[ http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/page02.shtml ]
... to find a particular program, then click on its name to access the HTML version of the table (the HTML page includes links to the PDF and Excel versions of the table).

You'll find many key stats tables and some interesting analyses here - only a few of which appear below
- includes links to over two dozen tables (Tables 352-911) with info on federal contributions under the Canada Assistance Plan (CAP) and the Canada Health and Social Transfer (CHST) to the cost of provincial and territorial welfare programs.
NOTE: for more info about CAP, the CHST and the Canada Social Transfer (CST, which replaced the CHST in April 2004), see the Canada Assistance Plan / Canada Health and Social Transfer / Canada Social Transfer Resources page of this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/cap.htm

A few sample tables:

Table 360
Total Federal-Provincial Cost-Shared Program Expenditures, 1978-79 to 1999-2000
http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/pre/tab360.shtml
NOTE: Table 360 traces the evolution/devolution of transfers under the Canada Assistance Plan (in dollars) from 1976 to 1999. No new claims were paid out under CAP after the Canada Health and Social Transfer came into effect in April 1996; amounts shown as CAP expenditures for the fiscal years after 1995-96 are final settlements with each jurisdiction for all outstanding commitments by the federal government.

Table 361
Canada Assistance Plan (CAP) - Number of Beneficiaries of General Assistance (including dependants), as of March 31, 1979 to 1996

http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/pre/tab361.shtml
- This is a key table for research on welfare programs - welfare dependency statistics by jurisdiction over the years. These are the final, definitive numbers.

Table 362
Total Federal-Provincial Cost-Shared Expenditures for General Assistance, by Province/Territory, 1978-79 to 1995-96

http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/pre/tab362.shtml
- this table should be of special interest for welfare historians and number-crunchers - it shows exactly when Canadian government spending on welfare (by the federal and provincial/territorial governments) started looking a little fuzzier. When the feds imposed the cap on CAP (max. 5% annual increase in total CAP payments) in Ontario, Alberta and BC in the early 1990s, those three provinces stopped reporting how much of their CAP dollars were going to welfare (vs. other CAP components covered under the same federal contribution). Table 362 shows that as of 1991-92, the federal contribution to those three provinces for General Assistance appears as "n/a" - so it's been impossible to produce a national figure since then. Unless, of course, one wanders over into the minefield of provincial government welfare statistics, where welfare programs (and related expenditures) have undergone a major transformation. If you *do* want to check out welfare stats for each Canadian jurisdiction, your best starting point is the Key Welfare Links Page of this website - http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare.htm - which includes links to welfare stats in each province and territory where they're available.

Table 434
Total Federal Payments under CAP, 1978-79 to 1999-2000

http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/pre/tab434.shtml
[The note under table 360 also applies to this table. ]

Table 435
Number of Beneficiaries (including dependants) of Provincial and Municipal Social Assistance, as of March 31, 1997 to 2003
http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/pre/tab435.shtml

Table 438
Provincial and Municipal Social Assistance Program Expenditures, 1980-81 to 2002-03
http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/pre/tab438.shtml

Table 526
Provincial and Territorial Children's Benefits and Earned Income Supplements, Expenditures for Fiscal years 1978-79 to 2002-03
http://web.archive.org/web/20070630131119/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/pre/tab526.shtml

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/home.shtml
Dept. name changed to Employment and Social Development Canada

Archive source:
Archive.org
https://archive.org/

Official Source:
Collections Canada
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/
[Library and Archives Canada]


January 27, 2012
Brickbats and Kudos:

Brickbats to Human Resources and Skills Development Canada!

During the 1990s, five separate editions of Social Security Statistics, Canada and Provinces - a valuable statistical report for social researchers of every stripe - were posted to the website of the Department that is currently (01/2012) known as Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). Each edition contains 25 years of stats on Canadian social programs, and each edition adds a few years' stats but it also drops the oldest stats. For the most complete set of statistics - covering fiscal years 1970-71 to 2002-2003 - researchers had to download both the oldest edition (1970-71 to 1994-95) and the most recent (1978-79 to 2002-2003). In late 2011, HRSDC did a cleanup of its website, which included deleting not one or two but all five editions of Social Security Statistics, along with a few other historical gems. Evidently, there was no historian among the group that decided to remove this report from the site.
Boooooo.

Kudos to the Government of Canada Web Archive!

The Government of Canada Web Archive
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/webarchives/index-e.html
Since the Fall of 2007, Library and Archives Canada has been harvesting the web domain of the Federal Government of Canada (starting in December 2005). Client access to the content of the Government of Canada Web Archive is provided through searching by keyword, by department name, and by URL. The archive currently contains over 170 million digital objects and more than 7 terabytes of data.
Source:
Library and Archives Canada

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/index-e.html
Comment (by Gilles):
The Government of Canada Web Archive is a handy tool to track down website content that's been deleted from the Internet, but only for federal government site content and only back to December 2005. It was relatively simple for me to find an old version of the HRSDC website and to drill down to the Social Policy reports, including five complete editions of Social Security Statistics covering the period from 1970-71 to 2002-2003.

Social Policy Reports (this link is from the Govt. of Canada Web Archive)
http://goo.gl/5MLk0
This is how the Social Policy Reports page looked before it was "cleaned up" in December 2011.
It includes functional links to the full text of five editions of Social Security Statistics, Canada and Provinces and many other historical treasures that no longer appear on the HRSDC reports page.

See also:

Publications Canada
http://publications.gc.ca/
The federal government's Depository Services Program (DSP) and Publications websites have been integrated into a single searchable, browseable database of federal government publications. The website of the Depository Services Program was officially decommissioned on December 8, 2011.

NOTE:
If you're searching for "older" (pre-December 2005) deleted website content o
r for any content that's not from a federal govt. site, try the Wayback Machine (Internet Archive):
http://www.archive.org/web/web.php
Copy and paste a URL into the search box on the Wayback Machine home page and click "Take Me Back".
The Results page consists of a calendar where you can retrieve earlier versions of that page by clicking on any date that's in a blue circle.

 

January 21, 2016
Family violence in Canada: A statistical profile, 2014
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/160121/dq160121b-eng.htm

Family Violence in Canada, 2014 (Infographic)
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-627-m/11-627-m2016001-eng.htm

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

February 25, 2013
Violence against women, 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/130225/dq130225a-eng.htm
According to police-reported data, just over 173,600 women aged 15 and older were victims of violent crime in 2011, a rate of 1,207 female victims for every 100,000 women in the population. Common assaults accounted for about half of all police-reported violent crimes against women.

Related report:

Measuring violence against women: Statistical trends
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2013001/article/11766-eng.htm
Edited by Maire Sinha
Highlights:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2013001/article/11766/hl-fs-eng.htm
Foreword
Introduction
Section 1: Prevalence and severity of violence against women
Section 2: Risk factors for violence against women
Section 3: Impact of violence against women
Section 4: Responses to violence against women
Survey descriptions

---

February 26, 2012
Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/89-503-x/89-503-x2010001-eng.htm
This is the sixth edition of Women in Canada – representing the 25th anniversary of this publication. (...) As noted in the original 1985 report, "Women in Canada is intended to aid the continuing discussion and evaluation of the changing roles and social characteristics of Canadian women as well as contribute to the development of policies concerning the status of women in Canada."

General contents of this publication:

(Click the link above, then select a chapter in the left-hand margin of that page.
Each section appears in HTML format, and a link to the PDF file appears at the top of each section.)

* Female population
* Families, Living Arrangements and Unpaid Work
* Women and Health
* Women and Education
* Paid work
* Economic Well-being
* Women and the Criminal Justice System
* First Nations, Métis and Inuit Women
* Immigrant Women
* Visible Minority Women
* Senior Women
* Women with activity limitations
* Tables and charts <========== links to 200+ tables and charts!
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/89-503-x/2010001/tbl-c-g-eng.htm
* More information
* Other issues in this series

Source:
Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report - Product main page*
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=89-503-X&lang=eng
Understanding the role of women in Canadian society and how it has changed over time is dependent on having information that can begin to shed light on the diverse circumstances and experiences of women. Women in Canada provides an unparalleled compilation of data related to women's family status, education, employment, economic well-being, unpaid work, health, and more.
---
[ * On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue
of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

Related subjects:

* Population and demography
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=3867&lang=eng&more=0

* Society and community
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/theme-theme.action?pid=75&lang=eng&more=0

* Women and gender
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/subtheme-soustheme.action?pid=75&id=78&lang=eng&more=0

Source:
The Daily
[Statistics Canada]

Welfare Statistics

Current/Historical Provincial/Territorial Welfare Statistics:
- see the Key Welfare Links page of this site - it contains links to welfare statistics in all Canadian provinces, and these are usually more detailed than the stats that appear below.

-----------------


UPDATED APRIL 1, 2015
Welfare Historian Number-Cruncher Alert:

Social Assistance caseload/beneficiary statistics and expenditure information, 1997 to 2014

By Gilles: The Caledon link immediately below will take you to the latest (as at March 2015) and most comprehensive resource on social assistance dependency on a province-by-province basis (+NWT) . Provincial-territorial authorities provided input into the process and feedback on the final report. It's the ONLY source of national welfare dependency statistics that the Canadian Social Research Links Guy recommends. The second resource below ("Federal Support") is a Finance Canada link to actual spending on social assistance programs of final resort (among other major transfers).

----------------------

1. Social Assistance caseload/beneficiary statistics

From the
Caledon Institute of Social Policy:

Social Assistance Summaries 2014 (PDF - 235KB, 49 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1062ENG.pdf
Anne Makhoul, March 2015

The informative Social Assistance Statistical Report [ http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2011/rhdcc-hrsdc/HS25-2-2008-eng.pdf ], published by the federal and provincial/territorial governments, was last released in 2010 and presented 2008 data. In its place, the Caledon Institute will publish a Social Assistance Summaries series as part of its web-based Canada Social Report, which will be operational in spring 2015. In the interim, this publication offers an advance viewing of 12 of Canada’s 13 provincial and territorial Social Assistance programs. Material from Nunavut was not available in time to be included in this paper.
A summary was prepared for each province and territory with input and feedback from government representatives in every jurisdiction. All reports include program descriptions and data on the number of social assistance cases and recipients dating, in most jurisdictions, from 1997 to 2014. The summaries will be updated annually.

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy
http://www.caledoninst.org/

--------------------------------------------------

2. Major federal transfers to provinces/territories and to persons:

Federal Support to Provinces and Territories – 2005-06 to 2015-16
http://www.fin.gc.ca/access/fedprov-eng.asp
Tables showing total expenditures by province/territory for each major transfer program : the Canada Health Transfer (CHT), the Canada Social Transfer (CST), Equalization and Territorial Formula Financing (TFF).
You're welcome to pore through the Finance Canada bumph on federal contributions under the CST and other transfers, but please don't call on me for clarification of technical details in the matter of bysantine federal transfers to provinces and territories.

Source:
Finance Canada
http://www.fin.gc.ca/

-----------------------------------------------

From Statistics Canada:

Social program spending in Canada:

Government transfer payments to persons
On this one table, you'll find the latest five years' worth of information on national expenditures (provincial stats available for a small fee) in the area of transfers to persons, which includes (among other programs):

* Family and youth allowances * Child tax benefit or credit * Pensions - First and Second World Wars * War veterans' allowances * Grants to aboriginal persons and organizations * Goods and services tax credit * Employment insurance benefits * Old Age Security Fund payments * Provincial Social assistance, income maintenance * Social assistance, other [bolding added] * Workers compensation benefits * Canada and Quebec Pension Plans.
NOTE: In case you're interested in province-level stats, click the "384-0009" link under 'Source' at the bottom of the table. There you can obtain more specialized CANSIM tables, including provincial tables, for a few dollars each. The "Find information related to this table" link (which is also at the bottom of the StatCan table) contains methodological notes and other related StatCan products, many of which are free of charge.

---

Historical program statistics:

Social Security Statistics, Canada and Provinces, 1978-79 to 2002-2003
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/webarchives/20061209215836/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/tables/page02.shtml


National Welfare Statistics

Welfare Dependency in Canada
National Statistics? What national statistics?

For the fiscal year ending March 31, 2011, about $6.6 Billion of the federal government's Canada Social Transfer to the provinces and territories will be for welfare and social programs.

As taxpayers, how can we tell whether that money is well spent if the latest national, public welfare dependency statistics are for March 2005?

Click the link above to access a table from the National Council of Welfare showing the number of people receiving provincial-territorial welfare benefits by province and territory, from March 1995 to March 2005
PLUS a comparable table showing the number of people receiving provincial-territorial welfare benefits for the period from March 2005 to March 2009 prepared by the Institut de la statistique du Québec in the context of the Institut's ongoing interprovincial comparisons.
PLUS a rant about the pitiful state of Canadian welfare statistics and
why the Canadian Social Research Links Guy thinks the situation may get worse before it gets better.

Some tidbits from the table
that you'll find by clicking the above link:

In March 1995, there were 3,070,900 people on welfare in Canada.
By 2005, that number had dropped to 1,682,500.
In March 2009, there were 1,711,500 people on welfare in Canada.
The percentage of the Canadian population on welfare in March 2005 was 5.2%.
By March 2009, that proportion had decreased to 5.1%.
[% of the population was not calculated in March 1995.]

Un GROS MERCI à l'Institut de la statistique du Québec d'avoir produit
et rendu publique cette source précieuse de statistiques sur l'aide sociale au Canada!

A GIANT THANK-YOU to the Institut de la statistique du Québec [English Home Page]
for producing this important table on welfare dependency and for posting it online for all to use


September 12, 2010
NOTE: See Welfare stats are important! for a rare (but deserved) accolade from me on behalf of all social researchers to the six provinces that are presenting current welfare statistics on their websites.
- includes links to the website of each of the six sources of current provincial welfare stats


Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2008
HTML: http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2011/rhdcc-hrsdc/HS25-2-2008-eng.pdf
(PDF - 608K, 141 pages):

http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2011/rhdcc-hrsdc/HS25-2-2008-eng.pdf

[Posted online July 2011]
Produced by the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Directors of Income Support
This report includes a description of, and statistics related to, the welfare system in each province and territory, information about federal-provincial-territorial jurisdictional and funding issues, a bit of historical info on the Canada Assistance Plan and the Canada Health and Social Transfer, etc.

"In recognition of the growing public demand for comprehensive information on provincial and territorial social assistance programs and caseloads, the Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2008 is the fifth annual joint publication by federal, provincial and territorial governments. The report provides a general overview of social assistance in Canada, as well as a description of income support-related/social assistance programs in each jurisdiction. This report does not include social assistance rates as this information is currently available to the public on most provincial and territorial government Web sites."
(Excerpt from Chapter 1 - Summary)

NOTE: Chapter Two of the report is a seven-page descriptive overview of social assistance in Canada in 2008, comprising a (very) brief history of federal social assistance since 1966 and general information about how welfare works in Canadian provinces and territories (including the treatment of federal child benefits under welfare programs, welfare eligibility conditions and administrative rules, etc.). Other chapters of the report provide, for each province and territory, information on eligibility (including asset and income exemption levels) and benefits (but no actual benefit levels), as well as an impressive number of statistical tables, graphs and charts providing numbers of cases and beneficiaries (time series statistics going back as far as the mid-1990s, depending on the jurisdiction), profile information (age/education/sex of household head, cases by reason for assistance) and even (for most jurisdictions) the percentage of households reporting income.

Source:
[ Human Resources and Skills Development Canada ]

< Begin social researcher's lament. >

It's great to see the 2008 edition of this report online*, but the numbers in this report *are* over three years old --- none of the welfare ripple effects of the economic disaster of 2008 and 2009 are evident in the March 2008 stats in this report. This really isn't timely enough to help in the policy formulation process, nor is it timely enough to ensure accountability with respect to spending by federal, provincial and territorial governments on Canada's social assistance programs.
---
* "Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2008" is online, but not on the HRSDC website. The above links point to a copy of the report that was archived by the Internet Archive. Thanks for nothing, HRSDC.

The Internet Archive also contains the earlier versions of this statistical report:

Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2004 http://web.archive.org/web/20110807030546/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/publications/reports/sp-626-09-05e/page00.shtml

Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2005
http://web.archive.org/web/20110807030546/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/cs/sp/sdc/socpol/publications/reports/sd10-3-2004e/page00.shtml

Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2006
http://web.archive.org/web/20110807030546/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/social_policy/fpt/page00.shtml

Social Assistance Statistical Report: 2007
http://web.archive.org/web/20110807030546/http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/social_policy/sasr_2007/page00.shtml

---

So why are timely welfare statistics important?
To tell, among other things, how many new welfare cases are "EI exhaustees" (households whose Employment Insurance benefit period has expired) and how many are there because they didn't qualify for EI in the first place. Welfare reporting must be comprehensive AND reasonably current.
Perhaps it's time to farm out the production of welfare statistics and related information to an objective, non-politicized third party...

< /End social researcher's lament. >



Historical snapshots of the mid-1990s, when the world was a (somewhat) kinder, gentler place...

Social Assistance in Canada, 1994
* Also available from the Government of Canada Web Archive:
http://goo.gl/au93G
Over 40 pages of information on Canadian social assistance programs as they operated in 1994. Much of the information in this document is still as relevant today as it was back then - eligibility, benefits, administrative rules, and more. Includes information about cost-sharing of welfare costs under the Canada Assistance Plan. Question-and-answer format for quick reference. This work was part of a larger study of social assistance in 24 countries released by the OECD early in 1996. I was the author of this report, with a lot of input from a number of colleagues in the Department at the time. If you want a snapshot of what welfare was like in Canada before the Canada Health and Social Transfer in 1996, try this one...

NOTE: Social Assistance in Canada, 1994 is the final submission of the Canadian federal government in the context of the 1996 OECD study appearing immediately below. This report is a critical and comparative overview of how social assistance or welfare operated in the mid-1990s in 24 countries (including Canada, with a special focus on Ontario). The chapter on Canada presents a factual snapshot of how welfare was working in Canada just before the 50-50 federal cost-sharing under the Canada Assistance Plan (CAP) was replaced by a block fund, the Canada Health and Social Transfer, in April of 1996.

The OECD study consisted of a two-stream approach: for each country involved in the study, an "expert informant" (academic) and a "national government official" received a questionnaire on social assistance programs. The questionnaires were different from one another - federal government officials were asked to provide factual responses to over 70 questions, while the academics' questionnaire focused more on an in-depth critique of those same programs. Social Work Professor Patricia Evans was the Canadian expert informant, and I completed the submission, with input from a number of other government colleagues, on behalf of the Canadian government.

---


1996 OECD international social assistance study:

- detailed comparison of how social assistance programs operated
in 24 OECD countries, including Canada and the United States (see Volume II)

Social Assistance in OECD Countries
Volume I : Synthesis Report
(PDF - 2.6MB, 207 pages)
A study carried out on behalf of the Department of Social Security and the OECD by the Social Policy Research Unit
1996

---

Social Assistance in OECD Countries
Volume II : Country Reports
(PDF - 4.8MB, 499 pages)

A study carried out on behalf of the Department of Social Security and the OECD by the Social Policy Research Unit
By Tony Eardley, Jonathan Bradshaw, John Ditch, Ian Gough and Peter Whiteford
1996

Participating countries:
* Australia * Greece * Norway * Austria * Iceland * Portugal * Belgium * Ireland * Spain * Canada * Italy * Sweden * Denmark * Japan * Switzerland * Finland * Luxembourg * Turkey * France * Netherlands * United States * Germany * New Zealand * United Kingdom

Source:
United Kingdom
Department for Work and Pensions (DWP)



September 12, 2010
NOTE: See Welfare stats are important! for a rare (but deserved) accolade from me on behalf of all social researchers to the six provinces that are presenting current welfare statistics on their websites.

Poverty/income statistics

New from
Citizens for Public Justice (CPJ):

The Burden of Poverty: A snapshot of poverty across Canada
http://cpj.ca/burden-of-poverty
October 2014
“The Burden of Poverty: A snapshot of poverty across Canada” uses the most recent data from Statistics Canada to demonstrate the reality of poverty across the country. This report provides an accessible set of materials to support national and community-level anti-poverty work across the country, including CPJ’s own outreach and engagement activities, and Dignity for All: the campaign for a poverty-free Canada.

Download the complete report:

The Burden of Poverty: A snapshot of poverty across Canada (PDF - 1MB, 7 pages)
http://cpj.ca/sites/default/files/docs/files/The%20Burden%20of%20Poverty%20Report.pdf
October 2014
There is no reason why poverty should exist in a country as wealthy as Canada. Approximately 4.8 million people in Canada live in poverty according to the Low Income Measure. That’s roughly 1 in 7.

Highlights of the “Burden of Poverty” report:
*
Measuring the unequal impact of poverty on some groups, like new immigrants, families led by single mothers, un-attached adults, youth and Aboriginal people.
* Presenting poverty rates for each province and territory as well as 32 communities across Canada.
* Calling for a federal plan to deal with the causes of poverty.

Source:
Citizens for Public Justice
(CPJ)
http://cpj.ca/
Citizens for Public Justice promotes public justice in Canada by shaping key public policy debates through research and analysis, publishing, and public dialogue. CPJ encourages citizens, leaders in society, and governments to support policies and practices which reflect God’s call for love, justice, and stewardship.

Related links:

Dignity for All: the campaign for a poverty-free Canada
http://www.dignityforall.ca/

Chew on This
http://www.chewonthis.ca/
Join Dignity for All in this campaign as we call on the federal government to step up and take action to address poverty and food insecurity in Canada.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

New from
Statistics Canada
:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

---

Low Income Lines, 2011-2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75f0002m/75f0002m2013002-eng.htm
Excerpt from the Abstract:
In order to provide a holographic or complete picture of low income, Statistics Canada implements an approach that uses three complementary low income lines: the Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs), the Low Income Measures (LIMs) and the Market Basket Measure (MBM). While the first two lines were developed by Statistics Canada, the MBM is based on concepts developed by Human Resources and Skill Development Canada. Though these measures differ from one another, they give a generally consistent picture of low income status over time. None of these measures is the best. Each contributes its own perspective and its own strengths to the study of low income, so that cumulatively, the three provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of low income as a whole. These measures are not measures of poverty, but strictly measures of low income.

Table of contents:
* Introduction
* Low income cut-offs
* Low income measures
* Market Basket Measure (2011 base)
* Low income rate and low income gap ratio
* Tables and figure
* Annex
* Annual consumer price index

"On poverty and low income" - by Ivan Fellegi (1997)
- explains why StatCan's low income cut-offs should not be used as the "official" poverty line for Canada.

How can LICOs, LIMs and the MBM can be measures of low income without being measures of poverty?
(A rose is a rose is a rose, no?...)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

June 27, 2013
Income of Canadians, 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/130627/dq130627c-eng.htm
Median after-tax income for families of two or more people was $68,000 in 2011, virtually unchanged from 2010. This was the fourth consecutive year without significant change in after-tax income. When comparing 2007 (the year prior to the recent economic downturn) to 2011, after-tax income increased from $66,700 to $68,000. Two-parent families with children saw an increase in median after-tax income from $81,100 in 2010 to $83,600 in 2011. There was no significant change in the median income for other family types.
- includes links to the following three tables:
Table 1 : Selected income concepts by main family types, 2010 and 2011
Table 2 : Selected income concepts for economic families of two persons or more by province, 2011
Table 3 : Percentage of persons in low income (1992 base after-tax income low income cut-offs)

Available in CANSIM tables:
* Table 202-0101 to 202-0107 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=202-0101..202-0107&p2=31
* Table 202-0201 to 202-0203 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=202-0201..202-0203&p2=31
* Table 202-0301 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=202-0301&p2=31
* Table 202-0401 to 202-0411 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=202-0401..202-0411&p2=31
* Table 202-0501 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=202-0501&p2=31
* Table 202-0601 to 202-0606 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=202-0601..202-0606&p2=31
* Table 202-0701 to 202-0709 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=202-0701..202-0709&p2=31
* Table 202-0801 to 202-0809 : http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=202-0801..202-0809&p2=31

Related subjects:

Income, pensions, spending and wealth
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3868&id=3868&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Household, family and personal income
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3868&id=2812&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Low income and inequality
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3868&id=3874&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

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From Statistics Canada:

Income in Canada - product main page *
Income in Canada is an annual analytical report which summarizes the economic well-being of Canadians. It includes an extensive collection of income statistics, covering topics such as income distribution, income tax, government transfers, and low income back to 1976.
---
[ * On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue
of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

---

From the
Caledon Institute of Social Policy:

June 29, 2012

THE BAD NEWS:
Information is under attack in Ottawa.

* In 2010, the Harper Government™ announced that it was axing the long-form Census.
* Key social statistics are gone:.
--- The Participation and Activity Limitation Survey or PALS (the major source of national information on persons with disabilities and the supports they require to live independently) is being replaced, but the disability community hasn't yet been told what the new resource will be.
--- Social Security Statistics: Canada and Provinces, fantastic resource for historical statistical analysis of Canadian social programs over 25 years, has simply disappeared.
--- Ottawa has jettisoned the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) which gathered priceless information on changes experienced by individuals over time, such as movement in and out of poverty.
--- The National Council of Welfare (advisory body to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development) was abolished.
[ http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ncw.htm ]

The last cut noted above places in jeopardy the future of two of the Council’s most important series – Welfare Incomes and Poverty Profile.

THE GOOD NEWS:
Caledon to the rescue!

The Caledon Institute of Social Policy will take over the task of gathering and analyzing the welfare and low income data in the two series. This vital information will form the first elements of a new Caledon product, the Canada Social Report.

Caledon is uniquely qualified to take over the Council’s welfare and poverty data. Twenty-five years ago, Ken Battle and Sherri Torjman (then Director of the National Council of Welfare and consultant, respectively, now President and Vice-President of Caledon) created the welfare incomes methodology as part of the pioneering report, Welfare in Canada: The Tangled Safety Net. Sherri Torjman went on to write five more Welfare Incomes reports. Ken Battle created the first Poverty Profile in 1982 and wrote several editions thereafter before he left the Council to found Caledon in 1992.

More information will be provided as plans advance for incorporating the welfare and poverty data in the new Canada Social Report.
The statement whose link appears below provides some analysis and explanation of the Welfare Incomes and Poverty Profile series, tracing their origins and evolution over the years. It then makes the case as to why Caledon is uniquely qualified to save them.

The Caledon Statement:

Saving Welfare Incomes and Poverty Profile (PDF - 44K, 6 pages)
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/989ENG.pdf
By Ken Battle and Sherri Torjman
June 2012

KUDOS to Ken and Sherri of Caledon for committing to saving and updating these two important reports!!

Source:
Caledon Institute of Social Policy

http://www.caledoninst.org/

---

Poverty report shows single men faring less well than single moms
June 15, 2011
By Bruce Cheadle and Heather Scoffield
(...) A new national study by Statistics Canada shows poverty is still much higher among single mothers than among the general public. But with one in five single moms living in poverty, they have seen a steady improvement for the last 15 years — even during the recession. The same study, released Wednesday, found that almost a third of single men are living in poverty.About 21.5 per cent of single mothers were living below the low-income cutoff in 2009, according to StatsCan. That's less than in the 23.4 per cent in 2008 and steep drop from the mid-1990s, when more than half of single mothers were considered to be living in poverty. The dramatic improvement is partly because single mothers are far more active in the workforce now than 15 years ago, says Armine Yalnizyan, senior economist at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. (...)
Plus, key social programs developed in the late 1990s have greatly benefited mothers, said Toronto-based social scientist John Stapleton. The benefits are usually attached to children — such as the Child Tax Benefit. Stapleton believes child support has also improved as courts have become more vigilant, and are able to enforce guidelines and use DNA evidence to force fathers to pay more.
Source:
Macleans.ca

---

Poverty in Canada has increased: STATSCAN reports
Jun 16, 2011
As expected, the effects of the recession were felt across the country and caused an increase in the number of Canadians struggling with low-income. Yesterday, STATSCAN released its report on incomes for 2009, which indicated that almost 10% of the population (3.2 million) is struggling with poverty, and average incomes have stagnated. This confirms what many social justice and anti-poverty advocates have long stated in the past year looking at recent foodbank and social assistance reports – poverty in Canada is getting worse.
Source:
Canada Without Poverty (CWP)
Canada Without Poverty is a federally incorporated, non-partisan, not-for-profit and charitable organization dedicated to the elimination of poverty in Canada. [ More info ]
NOTE : Canada Without Poverty was founded in 1971 as the National Anti-Poverty Organization and changed its name to CWP in April 2009

Partners:

Dignity for All: the campaign for a poverty-free Canada
Dignity for All is a multi-year, multi-partner, non-partisan campaign. This campaign’s vision is to make a poverty-free and more socially secure and cohesive Canada a reality by 2020. The conviction behind this campaign is that Canadians must respect and defend the right of every person to dignity and security.

Citizens for Public Justice (CPJ)
Mission : to promote public justice in Canada by shaping key public policy debates through research and analysis, publishing and public dialogue. CPJ encourages citizens, leaders in society and governments to support policies and practices which reflect God’s call for love, justice and stewardship.

Make Poverty History
The Make Poverty History campaign is a coalition of organizations that have come together for the common cause of making poverty history both at home and abroad. [ More info ]

---

"On poverty and low income" - by Ivan Fellegi (1997)
- explains why his agency's low income cut-offs should not be used as the "official" poverty line for Canada.

How can LICOs, LIMs and the MBM can be measures of low income without being measures of poverty?
(A rose is a rose is a rose, no?...)

Related link:

A New Era for Measuring Poverty in Canada
Posted by Iglika Ivanova
June 18, 2010
Last Thursday’s Statistics Canada release of individual and household income data for 2008 marks a new era in the study of poverty in Canada. Instead of reporting only on the Low Income Cut Offs (LICO), as they used to, Statistics Canada reported on three of the most common measures of low income in the same publication (LICO, the low income measure and the market basket measure). Gone are the days of looking for different studies produced by different institutions to compare trends of low income in Canada. Even more importantly for those of us looking for reliable and timely data on low incomes, Statistics Canada has now taken over producing the Market Basket Measure (MBM) from HRSDC.
Source:
Relentlessly Progressive Economics Blog
[ The Progressive Economics Forum ]

June 3, 2009
Income of Canadians, 2007
Median after-tax income, adjusted for inflation, for families with two or more people rose 3.7% from 2006 to $61,800 in 2007. Significant growth was observed in seven provinces. Median after-tax income for unattached individuals rose 3.9% from 2006 to $24,200 in 2007. Since 2002, the year following the high-tech slowdown, the average annual growth of the median after-tax income for families was 1.8%. Over the same period, the average annual growth for unattached individuals was 1.4%.
[ Report : Income in Canada, 2007 - 979K, 143 pages ]

---
Related StatCan subjects:
o Income, pensions, spending and wealth
o Household, family and personal income
o Low income and inequality
---

June 3, 2009
Low income cut-offs for 2008
and low income measures for 2007
(PDF - 291K, 40 pages)
Low income cut-offs (LICOs) are income thresholds, determined by analysing family expenditure data, below which families will devote a larger share of income to the necessities of food, shelter and clothing than the average family would. To reflect differences in the costs of necessities among different community and family sizes, LICOs are defined for five categories of community size and seven of family size.
Low income measures (LIMs), on the other hand, are strictly relative measures of low income, set at 50% of adjusted median family income.
[ HTML version - use the links in the left-hand margin to navigate)

[ Earlier editions in this series ]

---

"On poverty and low income" - by Ivan Fellegi (1997)
The Chief Statistician of Canada explains why his agency's low income cut-offs should not be used as the "official" poverty line for Canada.

---

May 11, 2007
Study: Income inequality and redistribution, 1976 to 2004
Inequality in after-tax family income grew through the 1990s, driven by an increase in inequality in family market income, according to a new study.

Complete study:

Income Inequality and Redistribution in Canada: 1976 to 2004
By Andrew Heisz
Executive summary
Complete study
(PDF file - 395K, 58 pages)
[ View earlier reports from the
Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series
]

Related Links:
Go to the Poverty Measures Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty.htm

---------------------------------------------------------------------

From the Canadian Council on Social Development (CCSD):

Stats & Facts
Poverty, welfare and income stats
Stats & Facts, a new on-line service of the Canadian Council on Social Development, provides accessible and accurate statistical information. This site is intended for anyone with an interest in timely data on social and economic indicators. We anticipate that Stats & Facts will be frequently used by policy analysts, community planners, activists, journalists, and students.Users will find informative facts sheets organized by topic areas covering demographics, families, health, education , economic security and the labour market.

CCSD Economic Fact Sheets (2004-2005)
- includes links to stats in the following areas: * Income * Household Spending Patterns * Poverty

Wealth and wealth inequality

From
Statistics Canada:

March 20, 2013
Measuring wealth
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/interaction/eng/blog-blogue/cs-sc/measuring-wealth
In fall 2012, some 20,000 households across Canada were asked to open their doors to Statistics Canada interviewers, and share details of their financial lives, assets, debts, income, and pensions as part of the
Survey of Financial Security
:
http://www23.statcan.gc.ca/imdb/p2SV.pl?Function=getSurvey&SDDS=2620&lang=en&db=imdb&adm=8&dis=2

Table : Assets and debts held by family units, total amounts : 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/interaction/eng/blog-blogue/cs-sc/wealth-tbl1
This survey provides information of the net worth (wealth) of Canadian families, that is, the value of their assets less their debts.
- includes national figures for 1999 and 2005, along with a column showing the changes during that same period.

Pension and Wealth Research Paper Series
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=13F0026M&chropg=1&lang=eng

Related subjects:

* Income, pensions, spending and wealth
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3868&id=3868&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

* Household assets, debts and wealth
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3868&id=1989&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

* Household spending and savings
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3868&id=2180&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

June 22, 2012
Study: The evolution of wealth over the life cycle, 1977 to 2005
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120622/dq120622c-eng.htm
The net worth accumulated by Canadians as they reached their late 30s to early 50s varied little from one generation to another. However, the process by which individuals built their wealth differed between generations. This was because recent generations accumulated higher levels of both assets and debt than earlier ones. This study uses survey data covering the assets and debts of Canadians to follow the accumulation of wealth by several generations as they progress through the life cycle. The term 'wealth' refers to net worth, or net assets, expressed in 2010 constant dollars.

The study:

The evolution of wealth over the life cycle
By Amélie Lafrance and Sébastien LaRochelle-Côté
HTML version:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-001-x/2012003/article/11690-eng.htm
PDF version (180K, 16 pages):
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-001-x/2012003/article/11690-eng.pdf
---
TIP: If you're thinking of checking out the dozens of links to related studies and resources embedded in the text of this study, I'd recommend the HTML version, where you can click through to the related resources directly; in the PDF version, you have to copy each link and paste it into your browser to access the file.
---

This study uses a series of cross-sectional surveys to estimate the wealth accumulation process from the young adult years (ages 28 to 34) to the near-retirement period (ages 56 to 62) for three successive cohorts of Canadians who entered adulthood in 1977, 1984 and 1999.

Table of contents of this study:
* The wealth accumulation process
* Wealth among young adults
* Evolution of wealth over the life cycle
* Debt-to-income and debt-to-assets ratio
* Dispersion measures
* Conclusion
* Imputing pension assets for the 1977 and 1984 samples
* Data source and definitions

Source:
Perspectives on Labour and Income - product main page*
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=75-001-X&lang=eng
This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of labour and income data. Topics include youth in the labour market, pensions and retirement, work arrangements, education and training, and trends in family income.
[ * On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues. ]

Related subjects:

* Income, pensions, spending and wealth
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3868&id=3868&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

* Household assets, debts and wealth
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3868&id=1989&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

* Household spending and savings
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3868&id=2180&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

* Household, family and personal income
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3868&id=2812&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

---

Source:
The Daily

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

Changes in Household Net Worth in Canada: 1990-2009 (PDF - 1.4MB, 10 pages)
Research Highlight
October 2010
[Version française:
Evolution de la valeur nette des ménages au Canada, 1990 à 2009 (PDF - 1.3Mo., 10 pages) ]

This Research Highlight reviews changes from 1990 to 2009 in the assets, debts, and wealth of Canadian households. It examines the contribution of real estate to the net worth of Canadians and shows that the gap between the wealth of homeowners and renters has been widening. It finds that the collective net worth of households doubled, household debts grew faster than disposable incomes, and falling interest rates reduced debt servicing costs.

[ More 2010 Research Highlights - links to 20+ reports PLUS links (in left margin) to reports for earlier years ]

Source:
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

---

The evolution of wealth inequality in Canada, 1984-1999 (PDF - 432K, 59 pages)
November 2003
By R. Morissette, X. Zhang and M. Drolet
"
Our main findings are as follows: 1) Wealth inequality has increased between 1984 and 1999; 2) the growth in wealth inequality has been associated with substantial declines in real average and median wealth for recent immigrants and young couples with children; 3) real median wealth and real average wealth rose much more among families whose major income recipient is a university graduate than among other families; 4) real median and average wealth fell among families whose major income recipient is aged 25–34 and increased among those whose major income recipient is aged 55 and over; 5) the aging of the Canadian population over the 1984–1999 period has tended to reduce wealth inequality; 6) changes in permanent income do not explain a substantial portion of the growing gap between low-wealth and high-wealth families. Factors that may have contributed to rising wealth inequality—which cannot be quantified with existing data sets—include differences in the growth of inheritances, inter vivos transfers, rates of return on savings and number of years worked full-time. In particular, rates of return on savings may have increased more for wealthy family units than for their poorer counterparts as a result of the booming stock market during the 1990s."
Source:
The Levy Economics Institute
Annandale-on-Hudson (New York)

---

Rags and Riches: Wealth Inequality in Canada - goes back to 1970
December 2002
by Steve Kerstetter
- includes links to the report itself, the appendices and related studies and reports
Source:
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) - BC Office

Total income of farm operators, 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/130722/dq130722c-eng.htm
Data on total income of farm operators are now available for 2011.
The Agriculture Taxation Data Program uses taxation records to produce data on total income of farm operators.

Available in CANSIM tables 002-0034 to 002-0042:
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=002-0034..002-0042&p2=31

Related subjects:

Agriculture
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=920&id=920&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Farm financial statistics
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=920&id=3953&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Farms and farm operators
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=920&id=1637&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Statistics about families

From Statistics Canada:

Canadian Megatrends – Fertility: Fewer children, older moms
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-630-x/11-630-x2014002-eng.htm
November 13, 2014
Despite some fluctuations, the total fertility rate in Canada has been below the replacement level for over 40 years. In fact, 1971 was the last year the replacement-level fertility of 2.1 children per woman was reached—meaning that couples, on average, had produced enough children to replace themselves. In 2011, the total fertility rate was 1.61 children per woman, up slightly from the record low of 1.51 about a decade earlier.

Fertility patterns—specifically the number of children born and the average age at childbearing—affect the dynamics of population growth and the age structure of Canadian society, as well as family formation and household composition. This demographic shift over the last 150 years has resulted in a transition from a country with a relatively young and growing population to one with an aging population, which is increasingly reliant on immigration for population growth.

Earlier report from Canadian Megatrends:

Population growth: Migratory increase overtakes natural increase
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-630-x/11-630-x2014001-eng.htm
October 9, 2014
In recent times, the contribution of natural increase to population growth has waned as the Canadian population aged and fertility rates declined. Today, natural increase accounts for less than one-third of Canada’s population growth and has ceased to be the major player in the equation. Meanwhile, migratory increase plays an increasing role in Canada’s population growth.

Migratory increase currently accounts for about two-thirds of Canada’s population growth.

.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

April 29, 2014
Study: Living arrangements of children in Canada, 1901 to 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/140429/dq140429c-eng.htm
Between 1901 and 2011, the family circumstances and living arrangements of Canadian children changed in many ways, according to historical information from the censuses of population.
(...) The 2011 Census was the first to provide information about stepfamilies in Canada. That year, 11% of all Canadian children aged 24 and under, or about 1 million children, were in stepfamilies.

The article "Living arrangements of children in Canada: A century of change": (PDF - 926K)
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-006-x/2014001/article/11919-eng.pdf
...is now available online in the most recent edition of Insights on Canadian Society:
http://goo.gl/z09QLL

Related subjects:

Children and youth
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=20000&id=20000&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Families, households and housing
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=40000&id=40000&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Living arrangements of individuals
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=40000&id=40002&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Population and demography
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3867&id=3867&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Population changes
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3867&id=3869&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Selected Tables on Families in Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/89-650-x/89-650-x2012001-eng.htm
For the fifth time, in 2011, the General Social Survey (GSS) collected detailed information on families in Canada. Previous GSS surveys on this topic were conducted in 1990, 1995, 2001 and 2006. The 2011 survey updated most of the information collected in previous surveys, including leaving the family home, conjugal history (marriages, common-law unions, separations and divorces), children (biological, adopted or step), maternity and parental leave, childcare arrangements, intentions to form (or re-form) a union, fertility intentions, custody and financial support agreements and work history.

Related subjects:

Census : Main Page
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/index-eng.cfm

Families, households and housing
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=40000&id=40000&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Family history
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=40000&id=40004&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Family types
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=40000&id=40005&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Household characteristics
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=40000&id=2918&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Society and community
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=75&id=75&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Living arrangements of individuals
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=40000&id=40002&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Population and demography
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=3867&id=3867&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

---

Fifty years of families in Canada: 1961 to 2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/cgi-bin/IPS/display?cat_num=98-312-X201100311702

---

Portrait of Families and Living Arrangements in Canada (22 pages)
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-312-x/98-312-x2011001-eng.cfm
The 2011 Census of Population counted 9,389,700 census families in Canada, up 5.5% from 8,896,840 families in 2006. Married couples remained the predominant family structure (67.0%) in 2011 but the share has decreased over time.

---

New Census products and studies
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120919/pn120919-eng.htm
- links to dozens and dozens of special analyses of 2011 Census data

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From the
Vanier Institute of the Family:

Families Count - Profiling Canada's Families IV
Press Release
October 4, 2010
New Report Puts Spotlight on What Matters Most To Canadians – Families
Ottawa: The Vanier Institute of the Family has released Families Count: Profiling Canada’s Families IV. Timed to provide a backdrop for National Family Week, (October 4-9), Families Count details the many trends that are reshaping family life in Canada. (...) Families Count updates data on a wide range of metrics from demographics, educational attainment, work-life balance, economic well-being, housing, and the provision of care within and between generations.

Highlights (PDF - 203K, 4 pages)
* Two basic resources all families require are time and money, and for a growing number of families, these basics are in short supply.
*Family and child poverty remain persistent social problems, while enormous inequalities of wealth and income continue to separate rich and poor. Particularly vulnerable are Canada’s Aboriginal families, new immigrants and families that rely on a single earner. Food banks have become familiar
community institutions.
*...

Complete report (10MB, 211 pages)
Large file, but well worth the download - highly recommended!

Presentation : 70+ topics (see below), each containing a page of text, a chart and a table.


* Canada’s People, Canada’s Families
* Recent Increase in Number of Births
* Canada’s Aging Population
* Canadian Families and Disability
* Growing Aboriginal Population
* Immigrant Population on the Rise
* Greater Racial and Ethnic Diversity
* Many Languages Spoken
* Faith and Family
* High Levels of Educational Attainment
* Changing Urban / Rural Divide
* Families on the Move
* Changing Family Structure
* Projected Number of Families
* Trends in Family Size
* Marriage, Common-law and Single
* Conjugal Status over the Life Course
* Declining Rates of Marriage
* Average Age at First Marriage Rising
* Same-sex Marriages Legally Recognized
* Common-law Unions More Common
* Four in Ten Marriages end in Divorce
* Most Repartner after Divorce or Separation
* Reasons why People Marry
* Reasons why People Separate
* Fertility – If, When and How Many
* Births to Common-law Families and Single Mothers Rise
* Families and Adoption

* Children in Care
* Majority of Young People aspire to have Children
* Children’s Changing Family Context
* Children and Family Transitions
* Child Custody and Support
* Stepfamilies and Blended Families
* Mid-life Families
* Home Leaving ... and Home Returning
* Older Families and Where they Live
* Converging Labour Force Participation Rates
* High Rates of Employment among Mothers
* Working Part-time and Shift
* Dual-Earner Families
* Absences from Work
* Limited Availability of Family-Friendly Work Arrangements
* Turning Away from Early Retirement?
* Family Pathways to Retirement
* Family Incomes: Sources and Trends
* Income Profile of Couple Families
* One- and Two-earner Families
* More Women are Primary Earners
* Incomes of Lone-parent Families
* Canada’s “Forgotten” Poor

* Deteriorating Economic Position of Recent Immigrant Families
* The Income Return on Education
* Family Income Inequality has Increased
* Middle Class Families under Pressure
* Poverty in Canada
* Family Poverty
* The Working Poor
* Food Insecurity in Canada
* Families and Wealth
*
Record Levels of Home Ownership
* Wealth Inequality
* The Cost of Raising Children
* The Affordability Gap
* Household Savings at Record Low
* Household Debt at Record High
* Longer Work Days for Men and Women
* Canadian Teens working Hard
* Caring over the Life Course
* Families and Eldercare
* Families and Children with Disabilities
* Less Time with Family and Friends

Source:
Vanier Institute of the Family
Founded by former Governor General George Vanier and Mme Pauline Vanier in 1965, the Vanier Institute of the Family continues to research and publish data and analysis on family life in Canada. Families Count is the fourth in a series of publications since 1994 that draws on the most recent data to provide a new picture of Canadian families and the challenges they face.

Food banks and food security

New from
Statistics Canada:

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html

December 12, 2013
Health Indicators
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/131212/dq131212g-eng.htm
Health Indicators have been updated to include information on household food insecurity as well as selected Canadian Cancer Registry and Vital Statistics indicators by census metropolitan area.

Household food insecurity, 2011-2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-625-x/2013001/article/11889-eng.htm
Food security is commonly understood to exist in a household when all people, at all times, have access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food for an active and healthy life.1 Conversely, food insecurity occurs when food quality and/or quantity are compromised, typically associated with limited financial resources. (...) The 2011-2012 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) collected national data on household food insecurity, with a focus on whether members of a given household could afford to buy the food they need. The food insecurity questions resulted in an overall household measure of food insecurity, as well as separate adult and child measures.
(...)
In 2011-2012, 8.3% of households, or almost 1.1 million households, experienced food insecurity. Of that amount, 5.8% was reported as moderate and 2.5% was severe. Lone parent households had the highest incidence of food insecurity for all living arrangements, for both adult and child measures. Couples without children had the lowest rate.

CANSIM Data Tables:

105-0545 : http://goo.gl/9RUoVV
105-0546 : http://goo.gl/FDMrh4
105-0547 : http://goo.gl/ulN644

----------------------------------------------------------

HungerCount 2012 (PDF - 2.6MB, 36 pages)
http://goo.gl/Uzl3y
October 2012
HungerCount is the only report of its kind in Canada which analyses food bank use nationally.
Source:
Food Banks Canada
Food Banks Canada (formerly the Canadian Association of Food Banks) is a national charitable organization representing the food bank community across Canada.

----------------------------------------------------------

Household Food Insecurity in Canada
Source:
Health Canada

---------------------------------------------------------

Statistical Resources for Food Security (PDF - 104K, 4 pages)
Dozens of links to food security resources in Toronto, in Ontario, in Canada and internationally
Source:
Ryerson University Centre for Studies in Food Security

----------------------------------------------------------

Food statistics
from Statistics Canada

This publication contains information on food available for consumption and food nutrition.

---

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm

Employment/unemployment statistics

NOTE : For links to stats on Employment Insurance in Canada,
go to the Employment Insurance Links page:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm

---

Supplementary Measures of Unemployment in Canada
HTML version :
http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/LOP/ResearchPublications/2013-14-e.htm
PDF version (427K, 8 pages) : http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/LOP/ResearchPublications/2013-14-e.pdf
By Emmanuel Preville
6 March 2013
(...) The official unemployment rate is the standard measure of what constitutes unemployment. But other dimensions of the labour market can be explored by analyzing supplementary rates. Data on subpopulations such as involuntary part-timers and discouraged searchers provide a broader understanding of the state of the labour market.
Contents:
1 Introduction
2 The Official Unemployment Rate and Supplementary Unemployment Rates
3 Long-Term Unemployment
4 Non-Participants and Hidden Unemployment
5 Total Underutilization
6 International Unemployment Indicators
7 Conclusion

Source:
Library of Parliament Research Publications

http://www2.parl.gc.ca/Sites/LOP/VirtualLibrary/ResearchPublications-e.asp
Parliament of Canada
http://www.parl.gc.ca/

----------------------------------------------------------------

From
Statistics Canada:

Employment and unemployment statistics
Labour market activities and characteristics of the employed or unemployed, including provincial and sub-provincial employment or unemployment levels, rates or trends, labour force status by age or gender, breakdowns between employees and the self-employed, public versus private sector employment, multiple job-holding, hiring, job creation, and duration of unemployment.

Employment Insurance Statistics Maps - Product main page*
Set of maps presenting Employment Insurance Statistics. The maps show the percentage change in the number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance benefits in the last 12 months, by Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) and Census Agglomerations (CAs), using 2001 Census geography. Data are also shown in a tabular format.
---
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue
of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

---

From the
Globe and Mail Economy Lab:

Duration of unemployment in Canada, 2007-2011
http://goo.gl/XFZmi
February 8, 2012
- age 15 and higher, in thousands

---

Job vacancies by province
http://goo.gl/vdggb
January 24, 2012
- three-month average ending September, 2011

---

Mind the gap
November 9, 2009
Canada's monthly unemployment statistics have a significant gap that must be filled. They do not reveal the number of people whose employment-insurance benefits have expired and who are still out of work. (...) People who have dropped off the unemployment rolls - and are thus no longer included in the numbers - may have found new jobs, but they may also have simply exhausted their benefits. That shifts them into a much more harrowing situation where they are likely facing dire financial straits and may be forced to consider welfare. But we have no way of knowing if that is the case. (...)This is not just an issue of concern to economists interested in crunching the numbers to make their latest projections. It is about vital data that can direct governments and social agencies in their design of policies and their preparations to deliver resources to those most in need. Without these numbers, for example, no one knows how many people may be forced to seek welfare in the short term - a key issue for the provinces and municipalities that fund and administer the welfare system.
Source:
Globe and Mail

---

- Go to the Employment Insurance Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/ei.htm



From Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada:

Aboriginal Demographics and Well-Being
Aboriginal demographics and well-being are two of several drivers for policy development.
This presentation is an introduction to the demographic and well-being trends of Aboriginal populations and communities.

Basic Departmental Data (1995 to 2004 only)
- Large collection of statistics on a wide range of topics of interest in the area of First Nations social programs
- includes demographics, health, education, social conditions, housing, self-government and The North. The Social Conditions section offers statistics (including a number of ten-year time series) on children in care, adults in institutional care, social assistance recipients and beneficiaries, and social assistance program administration. Also includes a glossary.

From Statistics Canada:

Aboriginal peoples
The Aboriginal peoples of Canada, as defined by the Constitution Act, 1982, comprise the Indian, Inuit and Métis peoples of Canada. These distinct groups have unique heritages, languages, cultures. Statistical information is available for the total Aboriginal population and each of the three groups.

Subtopics:
1. Aboriginal peoples (general)
2. Aboriginal society and community
3. Business and finance
4. Education, literacy and skills
5. Health and well-being
6. Households, housing and environment
7. Justice issues
8. Languages and cultures
9. Population characteristics
10. Work, income and spending
11. All subtopics for Aboriginal peoples

Income Assistance Beneficiaries : Dependency Rate
http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1369766807521/1369766848614

Income Assistance Program:
http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100035256/1100100035257


Canadian Income Tax Statistics
and GST/HST Statistics



Canada Customs and Revenue Agency
(formerly Revenue Canada)

Income [Tax] Statistics and GST/HST Statistics

Final Statistics - Sample Data
Detailed profiles of Canadian taxfilers based on a stratified random sample of individual tax returns.

Interim Statistics - Universe Data
Preliminary statistics based on the universe of all returns filed and processed during a given tax year.

Locality code statistics
Tax data based on geographic area.

Compendium of GST/HST Statistics
Detailed profiles of goods and services tax/harmonized sales tax (GST/HST) registrants.

T2 Corporate Statistics
Key taxation and select accounting information for all corporation tax returns that have been assessed or re-assessed.

Indicators of Well-being in Canada
http://www4.hrsdc.gc.ca/h.4m.2@-eng.jsp
This report gathers data from different sources and presents a comprehensive, up-to-date picture of the well-being of Canadians and Canadian society. It also shows how this picture may be changing over time. (...)
You will find a wide range of indicators, or statistical measures, that show how things are going for Canadians. For example, there are data on how many hours we work each week, our education levels compared with the levels in other countries, the affordability of housing, and much more.

Areas of well-being that are covered in this report include:
*
Work * Learning * Financial Security * Family Life * Housing * Social Participation * Leisure * Health * Security * Environment

Each of these areas is further broken down into sub-groups.
For example, "Financial Security" [ http://www4.hrsdc.gc.ca/d.4m.1.3n@-eng.jsp?did=4 ] includes:
Standard of Living - Family Income - Retirement Income - Low Income Incidence - Low Income Persistence - Net Worth (Wealth) - Life events - Personal Bankruptcies - Key influences - Income Distribution

Recommended reading!
The timeliness of the information and statistics in this HRSDC sub-site varies by area and sub-group --- some analysis dates back to 2007 and earlier, but most of the stats and trend analysis are for the year 2009. The content of certain sections is more recent --- for example, the What's New page [ http://www4.hrsdc.gc.ca/c.4nt.2nt@-eng.jsp?cid=28 ] shows that on September 8, 2011, "t
he following indicators have been updated with the latest data: Life Expectancy at Birth - Infant Mortality - Patient Satisfaction - Low Birth Weight - Victims of Property Crime - Victims of Violent Crime - Age of Mother at Childbirth."

Source:
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/home.shtml

---

- Go to the Poverty Measures - Canadian Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty.htm

Canadian Health Statistics

Statistics Canada Health Statistics - from Statistics Canada
- incl. links to :
* Health Publications
* Health Surveys and Statistical Programs
* Health Subtopic
* Health Summary Tables
* Health Data in CANSIM
* Products
* Health Indicators
* Health Fact Sheets
* Health at a Glance
* Health Profile
* Health Reports
* Health Trends
* For researchers
* Health Research Working Paper Series
* How to access data
* Record Linkage Program
* Links
* Associated products
* Partners
* Workshops and conferences
* More...

Health
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2966&id=2966&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Health care services
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2966&id=2967&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Seniors
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=70000&id=70000&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Care and social support
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=70000&id=70001&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Society and community
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=75&id=75&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Volunteering and donating
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=75&id=80&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

---

Canadian Institute for Health Information
The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) is an independent, national, not-for-profit organization working to improve the health of Canadians and the health care system by providing quality, reliable and timely health information. Our mandate is to lead the development and maintenance of comprehensive and integrated health information that enables sound policy and effective health system management that improve health and health care.
- incl. links to : Types of Care - Health System Performance - Spending and Health Workforce - Factors Influencing Health - Quick Stats - Standards and Data Submission - Events and Education

Quick Health Statistics

Canadian Statistics on
Affordable Housing and Homelessness :

Statistics and Data
Click the link above for the following stats:

Preliminary Housing Start Data
Housing Information Monthly
Monthly Housing Statistics
Canadian Housing Statistics
Housing Now — Regional
Housing Now — Major Centres
Rental Market Report — Canada and Provincial Highlights
Rental Market Statistics
Rental Market Reports — Major Centres
Housing Market Tables: Selected South Central Ontario Centres
Residential Construction Digest (Prairie Region)
Seniors' Housing Report
- from the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

---

Families, households and housing

Subtopics:

Families, households and housing (general)
Divorce and separation
Family history
Family types
Household characteristics
Housing and dwelling characteristics
Living arrangements of individuals
Marriage and common-law unions
- from Statistics Canada

Old Age Security / Canada Pension Plan Statistics

Includes links to the following Old Age Security and Canada Pension Plan stats:

* ISP Information Card (Rate Card) - updated quarterly,gives the maximum monthly rates for Canada Pension Plan, Quebec Pension Plan and Old Age Security benefits, as well as other selected figures. For current amounts, you can also consult the Old Age Security Payment Amounts and the Canada Pension Plan Payment Amounts

* Tables of Amounts for Old Age Security, Guaranteed Income Supplement and the Allowances are updated quarterly and list the benefit entitlements according to income level and marital status.

* Canada Pension Plan and Old Age Security Statistical Bulletin - a monthly publication that provides detailed information such as the number of benefits in pay, the amounts paid, and the distribution of various benefits by age and sex.

* Canada Pension Plan Contributors Tables - released annually and provide historical statistics on the number of contributors by places of residence and the distribution of contributors by earnings. Although the release is annual, the data are two years in arrears. This is due to ongoing updates of the Canada Revenue Agency T4 files prior to issuing.

* Canada Pension Plan Maximum Monthly Amounts of New Benefits - includes maximum monthly amounts for new CPP benefits from 1967 to date.

* Canada Pension Plan Disability Benefits by Class of Diagnosis includes distribution of beneficiaries by age group updated on an annual basis. This annually updated table represents beneficiaries in pay as of December of each year.

* CPP and OAS Annual Statistics Tables contain historical data on CPP and OAS, average monthly benefits and net payments in fiscal years.

* Number and Amount of Benefits Paid Outside Canada to Countries with which Canada has concluded a Social Security Agreement to people who have lived or worked in another country.

Source:
Service Canada
http://www.servicecanada.gc.ca/

From
The Globe and Mail:

The Data Room : Interactives, videos and graphics
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/economy/economy-lab/data-room/
The Data Room is The Globe and Mail's new resource for digging into the raw data on the economy.

Selected graphs from
the Data Room:

Old Age Security expenditures as a percentage of Gross Domestic Product
http://goo.gl/1mC7h
February 8, 2012
- total of the Old Age Pension, the Guaranteed Income Supplement and The Allowance (as % of GDP)

---

OAS expenditures: 1966-2060
http://goo.gl/ksENL
February 8, 2012
- historical (to 2009) and projected. Total includes expenditures realting to OAS, GIS and The Allowance and administrative expenses. Dollars are in projected nominal values.

---

OAS and GIS beneficiaries: 1966-2060
http://goo.gl/SJnmb
February 8, 2012
- Old Age Security and Guaranteed Income Supplement Beneficiaries Historical (to 2009) and projected

Source:
The Globe and Mail

Labour statistics from Statistics Canada
The labour market activities of the Canadian population, including: how many people are employed or unemployed; the unemployment rate; which industries or occupations people work in; the hours they work; commuting patterns; wage and non-wage benefits; job training; labour mobility; work absences, and more...


OOPSIE : Statistics Canada retracts July jobs report because of 'error'
- August 15, 2014
(CBC News)

---

From
Statistics Canada:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html

Media advisory: Statistics Canada releases corrected Labour Force Survey Data
http://www42.statcan.gc.ca/smr09/smr09_053-eng.htm
August 15, 2014
OTTAWA — Statistics Canada released today updated estimates for the July 2014 Labour Force Survey.
Today’s release replaces the information published August 8.

August 15, 2014
Labour Force Survey, July 2014 (corrected)
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/140815/dq140815a-eng.htm
Employment rose by 42,000 in July, the result of an increase in part-time work (+60,000). The unemployment rate declined 0.1 percentage points to 7.0%.

Labour Force Survey (LFS):
Detailed information for July 2014
http://www23.statcan.gc.ca/imdb/p2SV.pl?Function=getSurvey&SDDS=3701
Data release - August 8, 2014
The Labour Force Survey provides estimates of employment and unemployment which are among the most timely and important measures of performance of the Canadian economy.
* Questionnaire(s) and reporting guide(s)
* Description
* Data sources and methodology
* Data accuracy
* Documentation
* Data file

History of the Labour Force Survey (small PDF file, 3 pages)
http://www23.statcan.gc.ca/imdb-bmdi/document/3701_D7_T9_V1-eng.pdf

--------------------------------------------

From the Toronto Star:

StatsCan says 42,000 jobs — not 200 — were created in July
http://www.thestar.com/business/economy/2014/08/15/statscan_says_42000_jobs_not_200_were_created_in_july.html
By Dana Flavelle
August 15, 2014
Statistics Canada issued what it said were the correct job creation figures for July, fixing the error it made last Friday. Most of the jobs gains were in the service sector, and among youth. Ontario was a big winner, gaining 39,500 jobs (see the Ontario link below).

Source:
Toronto Star

http://www.thestar.com/

--------------------------------------------

From
CBC News:

Statistics Canada retracts July jobs report because of 'error':
Original release claimed 200 jobs were created in the month, new figure to be released Friday
http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/statistics-canada-retracts-july-jobs-report-because-of-error-1.2734470
August 12, 2014
Statistics Canada retracted its July employment report on Tuesday, four days after reporting that the Canadian economy created only 200 jobs during the month. "An error has been detected in the processing of the Aug. 8 Labour Force Survey release," the data agency said. "This error impacts only the July 2014 estimates."

Source:
CBC News:

[ http://www.cbc.ca/news/ ]

--------------------------------------------

From the
Globe and Mail:

Please excuse our margin of error: Statscan
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-debate/editorials/please-excuse-our-margin-of-error-statscan/article20083701/
August 17, 2014
Human error – is there any other kind? – has been blamed for the embarrassingly large discrepancy between Statistics Canada’s labour-force numbers published on Aug. 8 and the much-revised numbers on Friday.

Source:
Globe and Mail
[
http://www.theglobeandmail.com ]

--------------------------------------------

Ontario

Ontario Gains 39,500 Jobs in July
Province Focused on Growing the Economy, Building Ontario Up

http://news.ontario.ca/medt/en/2014/08/ontario-gains-39500-jobs-in-july.html
News Release
August 15, 2014
Ontario gained 39,500 net new jobs in July, 24,400 more than previously reported in the Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey. The province's youth (ages 15-24) employment increased by 15,200 net new jobs.

Source:
Ontario Government Newsroom

http://news.ontario.ca/newsroom/en

 

Labour Force Information - main product page*
This publication provides the most current monthly labour market statistics. Each month, this publication contains a brief commentary highlighting recent developments in the Canadian labour market. It also includes a series of charts and tables on a variety of labour force characteristics, such as employment and unemployment for Canada, the provinces, metropolitan areas and economic regions.
---
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue
of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.

Related subjects:
Labour
Employment and unemployment

--------------------------------------------------------

Perspectives on Labour and Income - product main page*
This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of labour and income data. Topics include youth in the labour market, pensions and retirement, work arrangements, education and training, and trends in family income.
* On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues

Related subjects:
* Families, households and housing
* Income, pensions, spending and wealth
* Household, family and personal income
* Low income and inequality
* Labour
* Wages, salaries and other earnings



Crime/Justice Statistics

From Statistics Canada:

Crime and Justice Statistics
The nature and extent of crime and the administration of criminal and civil justice in Canada.
Click the link to view resources (Daily releases, data tables, publications, and more ...) for the following subtopics:
1. Crime and justice (general)
2. Civil courts and family law
3. Correctional services
4. Crimes and offences
5. Criminal courts
6. Family violence
7. Justice system spending
8. Legal aid
9. Victims and victimization

Quick links
* Recently released analytical studies on crime and justice
* Statistics by subject: Crime and justice
* Crimes and offences
* Victims and victimization

-------------------------------------------------

Selected studies and
reports f
rom StatCan:

May 10 2016
Young adult offenders in Canada, 2014
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/160510/dq160510c-eng.htm
Police-reported data in Canada show that young adults aged 18 to 24 have the highest rates of criminal offending of any age group. In 2014, there were over 183,000 young adults accused of police-reported crimes, a rate of 5,428 individuals accused per 100,000 young adults.

Youth correctional statistics in Canada, 2013/2014
by Correctional Services Program
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2015001/article/14164-eng.htm
April 22, 2015
Salient points:
- The rate of youth involved in the correctional system continues to fall
- Majority of youth begin a period of supervision on probation or in pre-trial detention
- Admissions decline in most jurisdictions
- Most admissions to youth correctional services involve males
- Majority of admissions to the correctional system involve older youth
- Aboriginal youth are over-represented in the correctional system
- Time spent in custody shorter for female youth
- Survey descriptions
- Detailed data tables
- References
- Notes

---

Adult correctional statistics in Canada, 2013/2014
by Correctional Services Program
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2015001/article/14163-eng.htm
April 22, 2015
Salient points:
- Fewer adults are being supervised by the correctional system
- Incarceration rate is down but there is variation across the country
- More adults are in remand than in sentenced custody
- Probation is the most common form of community supervision
- Number of admissions to adult correctional services declining
- Males account for the majority of admissions to adult correctional services
- Most admissions involve younger adults
- Aboriginal adults account for one in four admissions to provincial/territorial correctional services
- Most adults spend one month or less in provincial/territorial custody
- Operating expenditures for adult correctional services reached more than $4 billion in 2013/2014
- Survey descriptions
- Detailed data table
- Notes

Source:
Juristat
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/index-eng.htm

July 23, 2014
Police-reported crime statistics, 2013
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/140723/dq140723b-eng.htm

The Police-reported Crime Severity Index, which measures the volume and severity of crime, declined 9% in 2013 compared with 2012. This was the 10th consecutive decrease in the index. The traditional crime rate also declined in 2013 compared with 2012, falling 8%.1111111

Family income and income of individuals, related variables: Sub-provincial data, 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/140723/dq140723c-eng.htm

Related subjects:

Crime and justice
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2693&id=2693&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Crimes and offences
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2693&id=2102&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

July 25, 2013
Police-reported crime statistics, 2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/130725/dq130725b-eng.htm
The police-reported crime rate, which measures the overall volume of crime that came to the attention of police, continued a long-term decline in 2012, falling 3% from 2011. The Crime Severity Index, which measures the severity of crime, also decreased 3%.
[This report contains three charts and three tables.)

June 13, 2013
Adult criminal court statistics in Canada, 2011/2012
HTML version :
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2013001/article/11804-eng.htm
PDF version (748K, 28 pages) : http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2013001/article/11804-eng.pdf

Highlights
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2013001/article/11804/hl-fs-eng.htm
* In 2011/2012, about 386,500 cases involving almost 1.2 million Criminal Code and other federal statute offences were completed in Canadian adult criminal courts, representing a 6% decrease from the previous year.
* All provinces and territories reported a decrease in the number of cases completed, except Newfoundland and Labrador and Quebec. The largest declines in 2011/2012 occurred in the Northwest Territories (-17%), Prince Edward Island (-13%) and Yukon (-10%).
* In 2011/2012, there were fewer cases completed involving almost all types of offences.
* Slightly more than three-quarters (76%) of cases completed in adult criminal courts in 2011/2012 involved offences that were non-violent in nature.

---
COMMENT by Gilles:

Cases completed down by 6% since last year?
Decrease in the number of cases completed (except NL and QC)?
Probation STILL the most commonly imposed sentence for adults found guilty in 2011/2012?
The Harper Government™ Response:
"Hey, let's build more prisons!!"

June 13, 2013
Youth court statistics, 2011/2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/130613/dq130613d-eng.htm
Canadian youth courts, which handle cases involving 12 to 17 year-olds, completed about 48,000 cases in 2011/2012, down 10% from the previous year. The 2011/2012 decrease marks the third consecutive annual decline and the lowest number of cases completed in youth courts since national data were first collected in 1991/1992.
---
COMMENT by Gilles:

Cases down by 10% since last year?
Third consecutive annual decline?
Lowest number of cases since 1991?
Harper Government™ Response:
"Hey, let's build more prisons!!"
---

Related subjects:

Children and youth
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=20000&id=20000&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Crime and justice (youth)
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=20000&id=20002&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Crime and justice
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2693&id=2693&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Crimes and offences
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2693&id=2102&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Criminal courts
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2693&id=2695&lang=eng&type=DAILYART


From the
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA):

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/

Crime, Punishment and Politics
Hennessy's Index: A number is never just a number
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/commentary/crime-punishment-and-politics

By Trish Hennessy
August 1, 2012

October 11, 2012
Adult correctional services, 2010/2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/121011/dq121011c-eng.htm
On any given day in 2010/2011, there were about 38,000 adults in Canada's prisons. This was nearly 900 more than the year before, resulting in a 0.9% increase in the rate of incarceration per 100,000 adults.

Related link:

Adult correctional statistics in Canada, 2010/2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2012001/article/11715-eng.htm
By Mia Dauvergne
Table of contents:
* Rate of adults in the correctional system declines slightly in 2010/2011
* Quebec reports lowest rate of adults in correctional services
* Canada’s incarceration rate increases slightly in 2010/2011
* Manitoba reports highest incarceration rate among the provinces
* Remand rate decreases for the first time in more than a decade
* Most adults in sentenced provincial or territorial custody for non-violent offences
* Aboriginal people continue to be over-represented in custody
* Adults in custody in Saskatchewan have an average of four out of six rehabilitative needs
* Most adults under community supervision are on probation
* One in ten adults under community supervision on a conditional sentence
* Parole rate drops steadily since mid-1990s
* Summary

October 11, 2012
Youth correctional services, 2010/2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/121011/dq121011d-eng.htm
On any given day in 2010/2011, there were about 14,800 young people aged 12 to 17 under the supervision of Canada's correctional system. Of these, just over 13,300 (90%) were under supervision in the community, usually on probation. The remaining 1,500 (10%) were in custody.

Related link:

Youth correctional statistics in Canada, 2010/2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2012001/article/11716-eng.htm

By Christopher Munch
Table of contents:
* Rate of youth under correctional supervision decreases in 2010/2011
* British Columbia reports lowest rate of youth in the correctional system
* Rates for youth admitted to correctional services increase with age
* Aboriginal youth over-represented in the correctional system
* Youth incarceration rate declines for the third year in a row
* Crimes committed by youth admitted to sentenced custody tend to be non-violent
* Youth in remand outnumber those in sentenced custody for the fourth year in a row
* Most youth under community supervision are on probation
* Summary

October 9, 2012
Criminal court statistics, 2010/2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/121009/dq121009a-eng.htm
Additional data for 2010/2011 on adult criminal courts and youth courts in Canada are now available for the provinces and territories reporting to the Integrated Criminal Court Survey.

Available without charge in CANSIM:
Table 252-0055 --- http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=252-0055&p2=31
Table 252-0066 --- http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=252-0066&p2=31

Related subjects:

Crime and justice
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2693&id=2693&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Criminal courts
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2693&id=2695&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

May 22, 2012
Family violence in Canada: A statistical profile, 2010
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120522/dq120522a-eng.htm
According to police-reported data, about 99,000 Canadians were victims of family violence in 2010. Of these, almost 50% were committed by their spouse. An additional 17% were committed by a parent, 14% by an extended family member, 11% by a sibling and 9% by a child, usually a grown child. Unlike other forms of violent crime, the risk of becoming a victim of family violence was more than twice as high for females as for males.

Related subjects:

Children and youth
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=20000&id=20000&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Violence among children and youth
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=20000&id=20009&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Crime and justice
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2693&id=2693&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Crimes and offences
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2693&id=2102&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Family violence
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2693&id=2696&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

Victims and victimization
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/subject-sujet/result-resultat.action?pid=2693&id=455&lang=eng&type=DAILYART

April 13, 2012
Police-reported data on street gang crime and cyber crime, 2010
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120413/dq120413d-eng.htm
Data for 2010 on street gang crime and cyber crime are now available for a sub-set of police services across Canada reporting to the newest version of the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey.Data are available upon request only.

For more information, or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, contact
Statistics Canada's National Contact Centre (toll-free 1-800-263-1136; 613-951-8116;
infostats@statcan.gc.ca) or the Media Hotline (613-951-4636; mediahotline@statcan.gc.ca).

April 12, 2012
Police-reported hate crimes, 2010
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120412/dq120412b-eng.htm
Both the number and rate of police-reported hate crimes declined in 2010. Canadian police services reported 1,401 hate crimes in 2010 or 4.1 hate crimes per 100,000 population. This rate was 18% lower than in 2009 and followed two consecutive annual increases.

March 8, 2012
Study: Victimization of older Canadians, 2009
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/120308/dq120308b-eng.htm
In 2009, more than 154,000 or 2% of people aged 55 or older living in the 10 provinces reported that they had been the victim of a violent crime in the previous 12 months. Older Canadians reported experiencing close to 241,000 incidents of violence in 2009, representing a rate of 28 per 1,000 population. This rate remained essentially unchanged from 2004, when data were last collected.

Related article from Juristat:

Victimization of older Canadians, 2009
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2012001/article/11627-eng.htm
By Shannon Brennan
* Self-reported violent victimization of older Canadians
* Self-reported household victimization of older households
* Reporting victimizations to the police
* Impacts of victimization
* Perceptions of personal safety and community cohesion
* Summary
* Methodology for the General Social Survey on Victimization
* Detailed data tables

With inmate tide looming, half of Canada's prisons to expand [dead link]
By Janice Tibbetts
October 19, 2010
OTTAWA — About half of Canada's 57 federal penitentiaries will be renovated and expanded in the next four years to cope with an influx of new prisoners expected as a result of the Harper government's sentencing laws, says the commissioner of the Correctional Service of Canada. (...) The federal government's $2-billion spending estimate, released earlier this year by Public Safety Minister Vic Toews, is significantly less than the additional $5 billion that parliamentary budget watchdog Kevin Page predicts it will cost the prison system to cope with one new piece of legislation alone.
Source:
Canada.com

July 20, 2010
Police-reported crime statistics, 2009
Police-reported crime in Canada continues to decline. Both the volume and severity of police-reported crime fell in 2009, continuing the downward trend seen over the past decade.

And yet...
http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/canada/prison-construction-costs-to-jump-87099482.html
The increase in prison construction costs make sense to me now.
NOT.


Legal Aid

Statistics Canada:

Legal Aid in Canada: Resource and Caseload Statistics - Product main page*
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=85F0015XWE&lang=eng
Access to justice in Canada is a concern for governments and policy makers, legal professionals and the public. One characteristic of accessibility is the availability of legal services. Legal aid plans have been established in all provinces and territories, with the common goal of assisting low-income Canadians who require professional legal counsel. This report presents information on the operation of Canada's 13 legal aid plans. The report includes information on the legal aid plans, personnel resources, revenues and expenditures, as well as information concerning applications for legal aid. It presents a broad analytical overview of legal aid in Canada and provides data tables and figures at both the provincial/territorial and national levels. Most of the information for the report is based on data collected from the Legal Aid Survey, conducted annually by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.
---
[ * On the product main page, click "View" to see the latest issue
of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier editions. ]

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Selected editions of this report
(starting with the most recent):

April 20, 2016
Legal aid in Canada, 2014/2015
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/160420/dq160420e-eng.htm
Data on legal aid in Canada are now available for 2014/2015.
StatCan note to readers:
The data summarized in the CANSIM tables are drawn from the Legal Aid Survey, which is conducted annually on a fiscal year basis (from April 1 to March 31). The survey provides information on revenues, expenditures, personnel and caseload statistics associated with the delivery and administration of legal aid in Canada.

April 8, 2015
Legal aid in Canada, 2013/2014
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/150408/dq150408b-eng.htm
Highlights:
* A majority of jurisdictions spend more on criminal matters
* Just over 465,000 applications for full legal aid services were approved in 2013/2014
* Legal aid plans may use members of the private bar or staff lawyers to provide legal services to clients
* Further information and source data
* Detailed data table
* References
* Notes

Related information
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/olc-cel/olc.action?objId=85-002-X201500114159&objType=47&lang=en&limit=0
- includes links to the following related resources:
* Surveys and methods
* CANSIM Tables
* Summary Tables
* Subjects
* Keywords

CANSIM Tables : Legal Aid in Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/160420/dq160420e-cansim-eng.htm

More crime and justice stats
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/ssi/homepage/rel-com/theme2693-eng.htm

--------------------------------------------------

Legal aid in Canada, 2012/2013
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2014001/article/11910-eng.htm
By Manon Diane Dupuis and Mary Bess Kelly
* A majority of jurisdictions spend more on criminal matters
* Close to 475,000 applications for full legal aid services were approved in 2012/2013
* Legal aid plans may use members of the private bar and/or staff lawyers to provide legal services to clients
* Further information
* Detailed data table
* Notes

Table : Legal aid in Canada, 2012/2013
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2014001/article/11910/tbl/tbl01-eng.htm

--------------------------------------------------

March 7, 2013
Legal aid, 2011/2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/130307/dq130307e-eng.htm
Data on resource and caseload statistics for legal aid in Canada are now available for 2011/2012. The data summarized in the tables are drawn from the Legal Aid Survey, which is conducted annually on a fiscal year basis (from April 1 to March 31).

Available in CANSIM: tables CANSIM table258-0001 to 258-0004:
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a03?lang=eng&pattern=258-0001..258-0004&p2=31

Legal Aid in Canada: Resource and Caseload Statistics, 2011/2012
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85f0015x/85f0015x2012000-eng.htm
Highlights
Tables
Data quality, concepts and methodology
Appendices
User information
Related products

Source:
Legal Aid in Canada: Resource and Caseload Statistics - Product main page*
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/olc-cel/olc-cel?catno=85F0015X&lang=eng
---
* On the product main page, click View" to see the latest issue of this report online; click "Chronological index" for earlier issues.
---

--------------------------------------------------

March 14, 2012
Legal Aid in Canada: Resource and Caseload Statistics, 2010/2011
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85f0015x/85f0015x2011000-eng.htm
Data on resource and caseload statistics for legal aid in Canada are now available for 2010/2011. The data summarized in the tables are drawn from the Legal Aid Survey, which is conducted annually on a fiscal year basis (from April 1 to March 31).
* Highlights
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85f0015x/2011000/part-partie1-eng.htm
* Tables
* Data quality, concepts and methodology
* Appendices
* User information
* Related products
* PDF version (568K, 128 pages)
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85f0015x/85f0015x2011000-eng.pdf

NOTE : Here's the link to the 2000/2001 edition of the same report if you want to compare two snapshots ten years apart
(PDF - 108K, 20 pages):
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85f0015x/85f0015x2001000-eng.pdf
[see the source below for links to earlier editions back to 1997/1998]

Source:

Source:
The Daily
:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm
[ Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html ]

Related subjects:
* Crime and justice
* Legal aid

--------------------------------------------------------

British Columbia

Legal Aid Changes Planned for 2010 (PDF - 285K, 3 pages)
Media Release
November 3, 2009
VANCOUVER – The Legal Services Society, which oversees legal aid throughout the province, will be changing its operations in five communities next year. Effective April 1, 2010, the Society will replace
its regional centres in Kamloops, Prince George, Kelowna, Surrey and Victoria with local agents and an expanded, province-wide call centre.
Source:
BC Legal Services Society

---------------------------
Earlier this year...
---------------------------

Service and operational changes (PDF - 371K, 5 pages)
Feb. 25, 2009
The Legal Services Society (LSS or the society) will be changing some services and some of its operations this year. These changes are necessary because the society’s current government and non-government revenues are insufficient to cover the current demand for legal aid.
Source:
BC Legal Services Society

Related links:

B.C. legal aid services hit by new round of cuts
November 5, 2009
Regional offices will be closed in Kelowna, Kamloops, Prince George, Victoria and Surrey next year.
The Justice Access Centre in Nanaimo will also be shut down.
The B.C. Legal Services Society has been targeted for another round of cuts by the Gordon Campbell Liberal government - the second attack on its budget this year.
Source:
National Union of Public and General Employees

-----------------------------------------------------
How does that compare
with the situation in Ontario?
-----------------------------------------------------

Ontario agency trying to break legal-aid boycott, lawyers say
October 30, 2009
In one of a flurry of moves, LAO is offering $5,000 bonuses across the country to non-boycotting attorneys
Source:
Globe and Mail

Stop behaving badly, boorish lawyers told
Multiple complaints of rude, abusive conduct spark campaign to restore some civility to courts

November 1, 2009
Source:
Toronto Star

--------------------------------------
...and in the rest of Canada?
--------------------------------------

Legal Aid in Canada:
Resource and Caseload Statistics, 2007/2008
(PDF - 616K, 127 pages)
February 2009
* In 2007/2008, $670 million was spent on providing legal aid services in 10 provinces and territories. This represents over $20 for every person living in these jurisdictions.
* In the last five years, legal aid spending after inflation has decreased just as many times as it has increased, but on average, it has risen about 1% per year. Compared to the previous year, spending in 2007/2008 was virtually unchanged, up by less than one-half of one percent.
[ Highlights ]
[ Earlier editions of this report ]
[ Statistics Canada ]

---------------------------------------------
What's the situation in the U.S.?
---------------------------------------------

Civil Legal Aid in the United States:
An Update for 2013
(PDF - 212K, 29 pages)
By Alan W. Houseman
November 2013
The United States is facing a crisis of funding at both the federal and state levels. As a result of substantial reductions in domestic discretionary spending because of the Budget Control Act of 2011 and sequestration, and the prospect of even more reductions in 2014, we anticipate that the LSC (Legal Services Corporation) appropriations may go down even below where we currently are in 2013.
(...)
An integrated and comprehensive civil legal assistance system should have the capacity to:
(1) educate and inform low-income persons of their legal rights and responsibilities and the options and services available to solve their legal problems; and
(2) ensure that all low-income persons, including individuals and groups who are politically or socially disfavored, have meaningful access to high-quality legal assistance providers when they require legal advice and representation.
Source:
Center for Law and Social Policy

May 13, 2009
Juristat - May 2009
The May 2009 issue of Juristat contains four articles.
(Click the link above for links to the articles below.)

* Residents of Canada's shelters for abused women, 2008
This article focuses on the residents of shelters that assist female victims of violence and their children.

* Police-reported hate crime in Canada, 2007
This article examines the nature and extent of hate-motivated crimes reported to Canadian police services.

* Youth custody and community services in Canada, 2007/2008
This article provides an overview of youth admitted to and released from custody and community services in 2007/2008 and examines trends in admissions and releases since the Youth Criminal Justice Act came into effect.

* Trends in police-reported drug offences in Canada
This article explores long-term trends in the possession, trafficking, production, importing and exporting of illegal drugs.

[ earlier editions of Juristat ]

December 12, 2008
Police Resources in Canada, 2008
Police personnel and expenditures
Following a period of decline throughout the 1990’s, police strength in Canada has increased over the past decade. At 196 officers per 100,000 population, the 2008 rate was 8% higher than in 1998, although 5% lower than its peak in 1975. While police officer strength has been increasing, Canada's police reported crime rate has been decreasing. The 2007 crime rate was at its lowest point in over 30 years. At the same time, the proportion of crime solved by police reached a 30 year high.
- incl. two interesting charts:
* Rates of police officers and civilian personnel, 1963 to 2008
* Police officer strength among the provinces, 2008
Complete report (PDF - 427K, 60 pages)

December 9, 2008
Adult and youth correctional services: Key indicators, 2007/2008
Canada's incarceration rate in 2007/2008 rose by 2% from the previous year, the third consecutive annual increase. The gain was driven by the growing number of adults being held on remand in provincial/territorial jails while awaiting trial or sentencing.

May 20, 2008
Youth court statistics, 2006/2007
Fewer young people aged 12 to 17 have been appearing before a judge since the enactment of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA) in April 2003, and fewer are being sent to custody. There were 56,463 youth court cases completed during the 2006/2007 fiscal year. Although virtually unchanged from the previous year, this amount was 26% lower than in 2002/2003, the year prior to the enactment of the new legislation.
Complete report (PDF - 236K, 23 pages)
Highlights (HTML)

May 20, 2008
Adult Criminal Court Statistics, 2006/2007
In 2006/2007, adult criminal courts in Canada processed 372,084 cases involving 1,079,062 charges. The number of cases processed was virtually unchanged from the previous year.
Complete report (PDF - 256K, 21 pages)
Highlights (HTML)

May 16, 2008
Youth crime, 2006
The crime rate among young people aged 12 to 17 climbed 3% between 2005 and 2006, but was 6% lower than a decade earlier, according to data reported by Canadian police services. While property crime rates among youth declined over the previous decade, rates for other types of offences, including violent crime, increased.

Related report:
Youth Crime in Canada, 2006 (PDF - 196K, 16 pages)
by Andrea Taylor-Butts and Angela Bressan

-------------------------------------
The Situation in the U.S.
-------------------------------------

Data Collection: National Prisoner Statistics (NPS)
Annual and semiannual national and state-level data on the number of prisoners in state and federal prison facilities. Aggregate data are collected on age, race, and sex, inmates held in private facilities and local jails, system capacity, noncitizens, and persons under age 18. Findings are released in the Prisoners series. Data are from the 50 state departments of correction and from the District of Columbia (until 2001, when the District ceased operating a prison system).
Source:
Bureau of Justice Statitistics

---

From the Pew Center on the States:

One in 31 U.S. Adults are Behind Bars, on Parole or Probation
Press Release
Washington, DC
March 2, 2009
Explosive growth in the number of people on probation or parole has propelled the population of the American corrections system to more than 7.3 million, or 1 in every 31 U.S. adults, according to a report released today by the Pew Center on the States. The vast majority of these offenders live in the community, yet new data in the report finds that nearly 90 percent of state corrections dollars are spent on prisons. One in 31: The Long Reach of American Corrections examines the scale and cost of prison, jail, probation and parole in each of the 50 states, and provides a blueprint for states to cut both crime and spending by reallocating prison expenses to fund stronger supervision of the large number of offenders in the community.

Complete report:

One in 31: The Long Reach of American Corrections (PDF - 2MB, 48 pages)
Key findings include:
* One in 31 adults in America is in prison or jail, or on probation or parole (vs 1 in 77 twenty-five years ago).
* Overall, two-thirds of offenders are in the community, not behind bars.
* Correctional control rates are highly concentrated by race and geography: 9.2% black adults, 3.7% Hispanic adults, 2.2% white adults; 5.5% men, 1.1% women
* Georgia, where 1 in 13 adults is behind bars or under community supervision, leads the top five states that also include Idaho, Texas, Massachusetts, Ohio and the District of Columbia.
The report also analyzes the cost of current sentencing and corrections policies.

Source:
Pew Center on the States
[ Pew Charitable Trusts ]
The Pew Charitable Trusts applies the power of knowledge to solve today's most challenging problems.
Pew's Center on the States identifies and advances state policy solutions.

Previous edition of this report:

One in 100: Behind Bars in America 2008 (PDF file - 635K, 37 pages)
Febraury 2008

Related links:

Canada:
U.S. Tops in the World in Incarceration Rate: Conservatives Hoping to Catch Up
By Brian Gordon
February 4, 2008
The United States has more people in prison, per capita, than any other country in the world. More than China, more than Iran, more than oppressive dictatorships the world over. And this is the model that Stephen Harper and the Conservatives want to follow by implementing 'tougher' drug laws.
Source:
Green Party of Canada


Provincial/Territorial Government Statistical Information Sources

Newfoundland and Labrador
Nova Scotia
Prince Edward Island
Québec
Ontario
Saskatchewan
Alberta Vital Statistics (from Service Alberta)
BC Stats
Vital Statistics Agency - British Columbia
Northwest Territories
Yukon
Nunavut

NOTE: if any of the links above are broken, try this alternate source:
Provincial and territorial vital statistics offices
- from Service Ontario

Miscellaneous Canadian statistical links

Finding Canadian statistics
950 links to Canadian statistics on a wide range of topics from Aboriginal Peoples to Women
Source:
University of Toronto Data Library Service



Research Resources for the Social Sciences (Craig McKie) - MEGASITE!
- Craig McKie's Links to Demographic Sites


Lars Osberg
Professor of Economics, Dalhousie University

Working Papers - dozens of papers back to 1993

CV/Publications by Lars Osberg - 175+ links articles, book chapters, etc.

Canada-U.S. studies - see the Canadian Social Research Links Canadiana Links page

How does Canada compare with other countries?

Numbeo
http://www.numbeo.com/
Numbeo is the world’s largest database of user contributed data about cities and countries worldwide. Numbeo provides current and timely information on world living conditions including cost of living, housing indicators, health care, traffic, crime and pollution.
* 1,275,187 prices in 4,452 cities entered by 147,644 users
* information updated 2014-05-31

Numbeo lets you compare the cost of living in two cities or two countries focusing on the following indicators:
* Cost Of Living * Property Prices * Crime * Health Care * Pollution * Traffic * Traffic * Quality Of Life * Travel

I highly recommend this online resource!
(It even includes a Taxi Fare Calculator, a Gas Prices Calculator and Hotel Prices!)

Country links
[Scroll down to the bottom half of the Numbeo home page for country links, including Canada:
[ http://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/country_result.jsp?country=Canada ]
You can check and compare each of the above indicators between Canada and other countries or compare cities within in Canada.
NOTE : The database contains info on 100+ Canadian cities.

Numbeo.com was launched in April 2009.
The research and available data at Numbeo.com are not influenced by any governmental organization.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

How Canada Performs, 2011 - February 2013
(Conference Board of Canada)

Canada failing to close the income inequality gap
http://www.newswire.ca/en/story/1108475/canada-failing-to-close-the-income-inequality-gap
February 4, 2013
Canada has been unable to reverse the rise in income inequality - and poverty rates - that occurred in the 1990s. Low rankings on these social equity measures mar an otherwise solid "B" grade in The Conference of Canada's Society report card, released today.
Canada places 7th in the How Canada Performs: Society analysis, based on international data from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.
HIGHLIGHTS:
* Canada gets an overall "B" grade and ranks 7th of 17 countries
* One in seven Canadian children live in poverty.
* The 2008-09 financial crisis and recession increased the share of people in low income; elderly and working-age Canadians were most affected.

Source:
Canada Newswire
http://www.newswire.ca/en/index

----------------------------------------------------------

From the
Conference Board of Canada:

How Canada Performs 2011 : A Report Card on Canada
http://www.conferenceboard.ca/hcp/default.aspx
How Canada Performs is a multi-year research program to help leaders identify relative strengths and weaknesses in Canada’s socio-economic performance.
The site has over 80 pages covering a wide number of indicators, including: · Employment · GDP Growth · Income Inequality · Patents per Population · Exports · Life Expectancy · University Completions and many more.
- includes an a
bstract of the report and a link to the complete report:
https://www.conferenceboard.ca/web/Login.aspx?ReturnURL=http://www.conferenceboard.ca/e-library/abstract.aspx?did=4423
NOTE : The Conference Board of Canada "asks" visitors to register by creating a free e-Library account before downloading the report. If you really, really want to read this report, prepare to divulge the name of your organization and your job function, along with your street address and telephone number and more. I value my privacy and I didn't give any of my personal and private information, so I couldn't download the report.
(!?&*@$^!!)
Pity...

Each indicator contains data from 17 countries:
* Australia * Austria * Belgium* Canada * Denmark * Finland * France * Germany * Ireland * Italy * Japan * Netherlands * Norway * Sweden * Switzerland *
United Kingdom * United States

Details and Analysis:
Categories and indicators

http://www.conferenceboard.ca/hcp/Details.aspx
- incl. links to ALL indicators under the following categories:
* Economy * Environment * Society * Health * Innovation * Education and Skills

Selected content from the
"Society" category:

Jobless Youth --- http://www.conferenceboard.ca/HCP/Details/society/jobless-youth.aspx
Disabled income --- http://www.conferenceboard.ca/HCP/Details/society/disabled-income.aspx
Elderly poverty --- http://www.conferenceboard.ca/HCP/Details/society/elderly-poverty.aspx
Child poverty --- http://www.conferenceboard.ca/HCP/Details/society/child-poverty.aspx
Working-age poverty --- http://www.conferenceboard.ca/HCP/Details/society/working-age-poverty.aspx
Income inequality --- http://www.conferenceboard.ca/hcp/Details/society/income-inequality.aspx
Intergenerational income mobility --- http://www.conferenceboard.ca/hcp/Details/society/intergenerational-income-mobility.aspx
Social isolation --- http://www.conferenceboard.ca/hcp/Details/society/social-isolation.aspx
Gender income gap --- http://www.conferenceboard.ca/hcp/Details/society/gender-income-gap.aspx
---
To access the links for the following categories, click "Details and analysis" above.
---
Voter turnout
Confidence in parliament
Homicides
Burglaries
Assaults
Life satisfaction
Acceptance of diversity
Suicides

---

Society : Key Messages and links
http://www.conferenceboard.ca/hcp/Details/society.aspx
* Canada earns a “B” and ranks 7th out of 17 peer countries in the Society report card. Canada’s middle-of-the-pack ranking means it is not living up to its reputation or its potential.
* Canada’s social performance has remained a “B” over the last two decades.
* Canada’s “D” grade on the poverty rate for working-age people, and its “C” grades on child poverty, income inequality and gender equity are troubling for a wealthy country.
---
NOTE : When the U.N. Rapporteur on Food Security said pretty much the same thing recently about poverty and inequality in pretty much the same words in May 2012 [ http://goo.gl/15eP9 ], senior federal ministers called him "a bit patronizing" and "ill-informed."
So is the Conference Board of Canada also "a bit patronizing" and "ill-informed"??

Source:
How Canada Performs 2011 : A Report Card on Canada

http://www.conferenceboard.ca/hcp/default.aspx
Conference Board of Canada

http://www.conferenceboard.ca/
The Conference Board builds leadership capacity for a better Canada by creating and sharing insights on economic trends, public policy and organizational performance.

--------------------------------------------------------------

The World Factbook : Canada
- incl. entries under the following headings:
* Geography * People * Government * Economy * Communications * Transportation - Military * Transnational Issues
Source:
CIA: The World Factbook
[ Central Intelligence Agency ]

--------------------------------------------------------------

Canada - from The World Bank Group
- incl. Canada and the World Bank Group - News & Events - Students and Youth - Academics and Researchers - Business Community - Civil Society - Media - Parliamentarians - Development Assistance from Canada - Contacts and Data

--------------------------------------------------------------

From the
Centre for the Study of Living Standards (CSLS) (Canada):
"The Centre for the Study of Living Standards is a non-profit, national, independent organization that seeks to contribute to a better understanding of trends in and determinants of productivity, living standards and economic and social well-being through research."

Index of Economic Well-being
Has economic well-being increased or decreased in recent years, and is it higher or lower in one country compared to others? Traditionally these questions have been answered by looking at trends in and comparisons of GDP per capita, but this is a poor measure of economic well-being. It measures consumption incompletely, ignoring the value of leisure and longer life spans, and it also ignores the value of accumulation for future generations. Furthermore, since it is an average, GDP per capita gives no indication of the likelihood that an individual will share in prosperity nor of the degree of anxiety with which individuals contemplate their futures."
- incl. links to:
Introduction and Methodology - The Index for Canada -The Index for Canada and the United States - The Index for Canada and the Provinces - The Index for OECD Countries - An Index of Labour Market Well-being - Weighting tool for Canada and OECD Countries.

The International Productivity Monitor is published by the Centre for the Study of Living Standards (CSLS) for Industry Canada. The objective of the Monitor is to focus attention on the importance of productivity for improving living standards and quality of life. The Monitor publishes high-quality articles on productivity issues, trends and developments in Canada and other countries and serves as a vehicle for the international discussion of productivity topics.

--------------------------------------------------------------

TradingEconomics.com
NOTE : On the Trading Economics website home page, you'll find info for different regions of the world and for each of 232 countries on the following : * GDP Billions US$ * GDP Growth * Interest rate * Inflation rate * Jobless rate * Gov. Budget * Exchange rate * Population

"Trading Economics provides its users with accurate information for 232 countries including historical data for more than 300.000 economic indicators, exchange rates, stock market indexes, government bond yields and commodity prices. Our data is regularly checked for inconsistencies and based on official sources; with the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, central banks and national statistics bureaus being the most important. TradingEconomics.com has received more than 10 million page views from more than 200 countries."

--------------------------------------------------------------

Canada Country Report - from The Project on Human Development (Boston University)
[select Canada from the list of countries]

--------------------------------------------------------------

Canada Country Information - from CountryReports.org

 


The Joy of Stats (video, duration 59:06)
http://ww3.tvo.org/video/172756/joy-stats
Hans Rosling can tell the story of the world in 200 countries over 200 years using 120,000 numbers - in just four minutes. Rosling's passion for using statistics to understand the world and his entertaining online lectures have made him a YouTube legend. In this mind-expanding roller coaster ride through the world of statistics, Rosling explores the history of statistics, how stats work mathematically, and how, using statistics, we can take the massive deluge of data of today's computer age and use it to see the world as it really is.
.

American Statistical Links (links are added in reverse chronological order)

[U.S.] Beyond the Numbers
http://www.bls.gov/opub/btn/
For readers who love stats and facts, Beyond the Numbers, which is published biweekly by the Bureau of Labor Statistics [http://www.bls.gov/ ], will provide hours of fresh insights on a range of topics. The home page always features the latest update, as well as three recent articles (available in PDF format), such as "Understanding health plan types: What's in a name?" However, the real meat of the site can be found by browsing the Archive, which takes readers to topics dating all the way back to 1996 when the feature was first published. The archives can be browsed in chronological order. They can also be searched utilizing seven distinct themes, including employment & unemployment, global economy, regional economics, and others.

Source:
The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout 1994-2015.

https://www.scout.wisc.edu

Country Meters Population Clocks for Every Country
(Real Time Statistics)

http://countrymeters.info/
Click on the name of a country in the list, and the next page will tell you its current population PLUS male-to-female ratio, births and deaths this year, net migrations, population growth and economic indicators (GDP and national debt).
Recommended resource!

From the
U.S. Dept of Agriculture:

Food Insecurity in Households With Children:
Prevalence, Severity, and Household Characteristics, 2010-11
(PDF - 1MB, 59 pages)
http://www.ers.usda.gov/media/1120651/eib-113.pdf
By Alisha Coleman-Jensen, William McFall, and Mark Nord
May 2013
An estimated 79 percent of households with children were food secure throughout the year in 2011, meaning that all the household members had consistent access to adequate food for active, healthy lives. This report examines the prevalence and severity of food insecurity in households with children by selected household characteristics.

Report Summary (small PDF file)
http://www.ers.usda.gov/media/1120647/eib113-summary.pdf

Related Topics and Data
http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/eib-economic-information-bulletin/eib113.aspx

Source:
U.S. Dept of Agriculture

http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usdahome

From
Spotlight on
Poverty and Opportunity:

Spotlight on the States
50-State Resource Map Compiles Data,
Research, News and Policy Information

November 14, 2011

State and local governments, community-based organizations and other non-profits play a significant role in implementing policies and programs to reduce poverty and promote opportunity. Click the link above, then hover your mouse over a state to get a snapshot of poverty statistics in the state, then click or use the drop-down menu to access information and resources, news articles, and links to learn more about state efforts to reduce poverty.
-
includes:
State poverty data and statistics: A compilation of data, including poverty, unemployment and asset poverty rates, and information on housing. Each data point links to its source.
State policies: A listing of key state tax, asset-building and work support policies that help support low-income families; includes links to state or national organizations that track the issue.
Research: A compilation of relevant state research reports on issues related to poverty and opportunity.
News: A news feed of articles about poverty in a given state.

At a time when federal, state and local governments are seeking to reduce deficits by cutting programs for the needy, this resource provides vital up-to-date information for advocates, researchers, policymakers and foundations working to reduce poverty and promote opportunity.

Source:
Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity:
The Source for News, Ideas and Action

Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity: The Source for News, Ideas and Action is a non-partisan initiative that brings together diverse perspectives from the political, policy, advocacy and foundation communities to find genuine solutions to the economic hardship confronting millions of Americans. Through the ongoing exchange of ideas, research and data, Spotlight seeks to inform the policy debate about reducing poverty and increasing opportunity in the United States.

---

- Go to the Links to American Non-Governmental Social Research (M-Z) Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us3.htm

CLASP DataFinder is a custom, easy-to-use tool developed to provide select demographic information as well as administrative data on programs that affect low-income people and families. Users can create and download custom tables that present a national picture, a state picture or a comparative look at states and communities. The DataFinder currently includes state and national data on:
* child care assistance spending and participation * Head Start and Early Head Start participation* Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) expenditures * young child demographics; and poverty. The tool also provides community-level statistics on education, demographics and youth violence. CLASP will add more data to this evolving tool over time.
1. Choose one or more states.
2. Choose one or more years (earliest year : 1997)
3. Choose Variables from the list below:

* Poverty
* Young Child Demographics
* Child Care Subsidies: CCDBG Participation
* Child Care Subsidies: Spending
* Head Start: All Programs
* Early Head Start
* Temporary Assistance Expenditure Data
* Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Caseload Data
* Educational Attainment
* Working Families Demographics
* Income and Work Supports

Source:
Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP)
Since 1968, CLASP has been a trusted resource, a creative architect for systems change, and one of the country's most effective voices for low income people. CLASP's mission is to develop and advocate for policies at the federal, state and local levels that improve the lives of low income people. In particular, we seek policies that work to strengthen families and create pathways to education and work.
[ Source: About CLASP ]

[ Watch a two-minute video about CLASP - from the CLASP About Us page. ]

From the
U.S. Census Bureau:

The 2012 Statistical Abstract
The Statistical Abstract of the United States, published since 1878, is the authoritative and comprehensive summary of statistics on the social, political, and economic organization of the United States.
Use the Abstract as a convenient volume for statistical reference, and as a guide to sources of more information both in print and on the Web. Sources of data include the Census Bureau, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Bureau of Economic Analysis, and many other Federal agencies and private organizations.

Click the link above to scan the latest (2012) Statistical Abstract Table of contents and download the individual sections in PDF format.
Move your cursor over the list of sections in the left-hand margin to see the content of each of those sections.


Selected contents:

Banking, Finance, & Insurance
Births, Deaths, Marriages, & Divorces, Family Planning, Abortions, Life Expectancy
Business Enterprise
Economic Indicators
Construction & Housing (Homeownership and Housing Costs, Housing Sales, Housing Units and Characteristics
Education (All Levels of Education)
Elections
Federal Gov’t Finances & Employment
Health & Nutrition
Income, Expenditures, Poverty, & Wealth
Consumer Expenditures
Family Income
Gross Domestic Product (GDP)
Household Income
Income and Poverty--State and Local Data
Income for Persons
Personal Income
Poverty
Wealth
Information & Communications
International Statistics
Vital Statistics, Health, Education


Labor Force, Employment, & Earnings
Work Stoppages and Unions
Law Enforcement, Courts, & Prisons
Correctional Facilities, Prisoners
Courts
Crimes and Crime Rates
Criminal Justice Expenditures
Criminal Victimizations
Juvenile Delinquency, Child Abuse
National Security & Veterans Affairs
Population
Consumer Price Indexes, Cost of Living Index
Social Insurance & Human Services
Child Support, Head Start, Child Care
Employee Benefits, Government Transfer Payments, Social Assistance
Food Programs
Philanthropy, Nonprofit Organizations, Volunteering
Social Security, Retirement Plans
Supplemental Security Income, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families
Unemployment, Disability, Workers’ Compensation
State & Local Gov’t Finances & Employment
Federal Aid to State and Local Governments
State Government Finances
State and Local Government Finances
U.S. Postal Service
Urban Transit


NOTE:

The U.S. Census Bureau is terminating the collection of data for the Statistical Compendia program effective October 1, 2011.

The Statistical Compendium program is comprised of the Statistical Abstract of the United States and its supplemental products - - the State and Metropolitan Area Data Book and the County and City Data Book. In preparation for the Fiscal Year 2012 (FY 2012) budget, the Census Bureau did a comprehensive review of a number of programs and had to make difficult proposals to terminate and reduce a number of existing programs in order to acquire funds for higher priority programs. The decision to propose the elimination of this program was not made lightly. To access the most current data, please refer to the organizations cited in the source notes for each table of the Statistical Abstract.

Earlier editions of the Statistical Abstract - right back to 1878

Related link:

Don’t kill America’s databook
By Robert J. Samuelson
August 21, 2011
If you want to know something about America, there are few better places to start than the “Statistical Abstract of the United States.” Published annually by the Census Bureau, the Stat Abstract assembles about 1,400 tables describing our national condition. (...) The Stat Abstract is headed for the chopping block. The 2012 edition, scheduled for publication later this year, will be the last, unless someone saves it. (...) It can be argued that much of what’s in the Stat Abstract is online somewhere. True — but irrelevant. Many government and private databases are hard to access and search, even if you know what you want. Often, you don’t. The Stat Abstract has two great virtues. First, it conveniently presents in one place a huge amount of information from a vast array of government and private sources. (...) Second, the footnotes show where to get more information. (...) Without the Stat Abstract, statistics will become more hidden, and our collective knowledge will suffer. Must this be? If Census doesn’t rescind its misguided death sentence, the agency could contract with some wealthy private foundation to support the abstract.
Source:
Washington Post

United States Census 2010 - Home Page
Census Day was April 1 in the U.S. - the day when all Americans were counted by the Census Bureau.
The last day to return completed Census 2010 questionnaires was April 16.

[ 2010 United States Census - from Wikipedia ]


Welfare Dependence in America

NOTES:

1. "Welfare dependence" is the proportion of all individuals in families that receive more than half of their total family income in one year from the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program (formerly the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program); the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly Food Stamps); and the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program."
Source: Twelfth Report to Congress, page x
[ http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/13/Indicators/rpt.pdf ]

2. In Canada, the federal government contributes towards the cost of provincial/territorial welfare programs under the Canada Social Transfer.
In the U.S., the federal government contributes towards the cost of state programs providing time-limited financial assistance to families with children* under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program.

[ Keep scrolling down this page for the latest Canadian government report tabled in Parliament about welfare in Canada. ]
---
* I used the expression "time-limited financial assistance to families with children" in the above blurb because state programs under TANF are NOT comparable to Canadian social assistance programs on a number of levels.
If you plan to compare Canadian and U.S. stats, please take some time to check out the list of caveats entitled Welfare in Canada vs the U.S.:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/canada_us_welfare.htm

Welfare in America - Reports to Congress

Indicators of Welfare Dependence, Twelfth Annual Report to Congress, 2009-2013 (PDF- 2.1MB, 168 Pages)
http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/13/Indicators/rpt.pdf
March 2013
As directed by the Welfare Indicators Act, this report focuses on benefits under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, formerly the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program; the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly Food Stamps); and the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program.
TIP : See Appendix A of the report for 48 pages of program info and stats on these three programs (TANF - SNAP - SSI)

Source:
Indicators of Welfare Dependence, Annual Report to Congress (report main page)
The Welfare Indicators Act of 1994 directed the Secretary of Health and Human Services to study the most useful statistics for tracking and predicting dependence on three means-tested cash and nutritional assistance programs: Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Food Stamps, and Supplemental Security Income (SSI).
- includes links to earlier annual reports going back to 1997

- Indicators of Dependence include : Degree of Dependence - Receipt of Means-Tested Assistance and Labor Force Attachment - Rates of Receipt of Means-Tested Assistance - Rates of Participation in Means-Tested Assistance Programs - Multiple Program Receipt - Dependence Transitions - Program Spell Duration - Welfare Spell Duration with No Labor Force Attachment - Long-Term AFDC/TANF Receipt - Events Associated with the Beginning and Ending of Program Spells

- includes longitudinal and current caseload and expenditure data for Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), the Food Stamp Program and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). In addition, you'll find dozens of tables and charts showing predictors and risk factors associated with welfare receipt, such as : Poverty Rates - Deep Poverty Rates - Experimental Poverty Measures - Poverty Spells - Child Support - Food Insecurity - Lack of Health Insurance - Labor Force Attachment - Employment among the Low-Skilled - Earnings of Low-Skilled Workers - Educational Attainment - High School Dropout Rates - Adult Alcohol and Substance Abuse - Adult and Child Disability - Births to Unmarried Women/Teens - much more...

Earlier annual reports - back to 1997

Source:
Human Services Policy (HSP)
Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation ASPE)
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)

Complementary report from HHS:

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program (TANF) :
Ninth Report to Congress

June 1, 2012
Executive Summary
In 1996, Congress created the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program. This $16.5 billion a year block grant was enacted under the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA), which replaced the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) and other related welfare programs. Fostering self-sufficiency through work was a major goal of the 1996 reform, which required States and Territories to meet minimum levels of participation in work or work-related activities

This report describes the characteristics and financial circumstances of TANF recipients and presents information regarding TANF caseloads and expenditures, work participation and earnings, State High Performance Bonus awards, child support collections, two-parent family formation and maintenance activities, out-of-wedlock births, child poverty, characteristics and financial circumstances of TANF recipients, Tribal TANF and specific Provisions of State Programs.

Complete report:

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program (TANF) :
Ninth Annual Report to Congress
(PDF - 1.3MB, 173 pages)
[Excerpt] TANF caseloads declined slightly throughout FY 2007 and continued to decline from the official start of the recession in December 2007 through July 2008. TANF caseloads then began to rise. From the low in July 2008 through September 2009, close to 199,000 families were added to the TANF rolls, representing an increase of 12 percent.
Child-only cases continued to comprise a large fraction of the total TANF caseload. These are cases where no adult is included in the benefit calculation and only the children are aided. In FY 2009, child-only cases represented 48.1 percent of the total TANF caseload.

Appendix (PDF - 2.7MB, 421 pages)
June 2012
- includes detailed information and tables on the following aspects of welfare for able-bodied families with children in America :
Caseload - Expenditures and Balances - Work Participation Rates - Work and Earnings - High Performance Bonus - Child Support Collections - Formation and Maintenance of Married Two-Parent Families - Out-of-Wedlock Births - Child Poverty and TANF - Characteristics and Financial Circumstances of TANF Recipients - Tribal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families and Native Employment Works - Specific Provisions of State Programs - TANF Research and Evaluation - State Profiles

Source:
Administration for Children and Families
[ Department of Health and Human Services ]

CANADIAN FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
REPORTS ABOUT WELFARE TABLED IN PARLIAMENT:

NONE.
ZILCH.
NADA.
NYET.

Under the Canada Assistance Plan ("CAP", 1966-1996), the federal Department of Health and Welfare was required by law to table, in the House of Commons, an annual report on the operation of welfare programs and social services in Canada, in the same manner as the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services presents annual reports on welfare dependence to Congress.

---
Annual Report of the Canada Assistance Plan for the Year Ending March 31, 1968:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/cap6768.htm
---

In April 1996, a block fund called the Canada Health and Social Transfer (CHST) replaced CAP's 50-50 cost-sharing as the statutory mechanism for determining federal contributions to provincial/territorial welfare programs. [ See A History of the Health and Social Transfers] Neither the CHST nor its successor, the Canada Social Transfer (since April 2004), contains rules regarding the production of reports about welfare for tabling and discussion in the Parliament of Canada. In fact, the last national public report about welfare in Canada that was tabled and discussed in the House of Commons was the final CAP Annual Report for 1995-96. In my view, that's not much accountability for a program of this magnitude. The CST will cost the Canadian taxpayer almost $11 billion in 2009-10 in cash transfers alone, all without any debate or even discussion in the House of Commons.

Because the CST is a block fund, and because it covers post-secondary education, early learning and childcare as well as welfare and social services, it's no longer possible to calculate how much each province and territory receives annually from Ottawa specifically earmarked for welfare. That's why you won't see any Canadian equivalent to Indicators of Welfare Dependence: Annual Report to Congress in the near future. That, and the fact that there doesn't appear to be any political will by the ruling federal party to support provincial-territorial programs of last resort at this time.

Related reading from Finance Canada:

Federal Transfers to Provinces and Territories - updated January 2009
...everything you ever wanted to know about federal transfers.
(or what the Department of Finance wants you to know about federal transfers)


International Comparisons


TradingEconomics.com

NOTE : On the Trading Economics website home page, you'll find info for different regions of the world and for each of 232 countries on the following : * GDP Billions US$ * GDP Growth * Interest rate * Inflation rate * Jobless rate * Gov. Budget * Exchange rate * Population

"Trading Economics provides its users with accurate information for 232 countries including historical data for more than 300.000 economic indicators, exchange rates, stock market indexes, government bond yields and commodity prices. Our data is regularly checked for inconsistencies and based on official sources; with the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, central banks and national statistics bureaus being the most important.


Bank Deposit Rates in Canada

- unique Canada, U.S. and international bank interest rates, currency and risk research information. In particular, it provides interest rates from the major institutions in Canada, which you can compare to the United States, Asia or Europe.

See also:

Bank Deposit Rates Around the World


Rethinking Poverty : Report on the World Social Situation 2010 - January 2010
Fifteen years ago, in Copenhagen, global leaders at the World Summit for Social Development described poverty eradication as an ethical, political and economic imperative, and identified it as one of the three pillars of social development. Poverty eradication has since become the overarching objective of development, as reflected in the internationally agreed development goals, including the Millennium Development Goals, which set the target of halving global extreme poverty by 2015. Rethinking Poverty, the 2010 issue of the Report on the World Social Situation seeks to contribute to rethinking poverty and its eradication.

Complete report (PDF - 8MB, 203 pages)

=====> Executive summary (PDF - 196K, 8 pages)
* Poverty: the official numbers * The poverty of poverty measurement * Deprivation, vulnerability and exclusion * Macroeconomic policies and poverty reduction * Economic liberalization and poverty reduction * Labour-market and social policies and poverty reduction * Poverty reduction programmes * Rethinking poverty reduction interventions

Source:
United Nations Department
of Economic and Social Affairs
- DESA
The UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs provides support services to the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), the principal body coordinating the economic and social work of the United Nations and its operational arms.

Also from DESA:

* World Population Ageing 2009 (PDF - 894K, 82 pages) - February 2010
This report provides a description of global trends in population ageing and includes a series of indicators of the ageing process by development regions, major areas, regions and countries. This new edition includes new features on ageing in rural and urban areas, the coverage of pension systems and the impact of the 2007-2008 financial crisis on pension systems. The report is intended to provide a solid demographic foundation for the follow-up activities of the Second World Assembly on Ageing

AgeSource/AgeStats Worldwide
http://www.aarpinternational.org/database/

The American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) covers aging and aging-related topics quite well, and this website is one of their many compelling initiatives. The databases, AgeSource and AgeStats, on AARP's international website are designed to "facilitate the international exchange of policy and program-relevant information in aging." Under the "Aging Everywhere" tab is an interactive map that allows the visitor to read "Country Profiles" as well as read articles about a region selected from the map. A "Comparative Data Search" can also be done by clicking on the link above the map. There are multiple ways to search the information in the databases. On the left hand menu visitors can explore by topic or by region. Some of the topics include "Aging & Society", "Economic Retirement & Security", "Livable Communities" and "Long-Term Care". Searching for a particular topic can be accomplished by using the keyword search box in the middle of the page. The search can be further limited by deciding which databases to search, and by information type, geographic coverage, and language.
Reviewed by:
The Scout Report
http://scout.wisc.edu/

Also from the Scout Report

Economic Indicators (posted Dec. 12/08)
http://www.gpoaccess.gov/indicators/
Both scholars and those with a penchant for statistics will want to bookmark this fine website created and maintained by the federal government. The site provides monthly compilations of economic indicators covering prices, wages, production, business activity, purchasing power, credit, money, and Federal finance. Visitors can use the search engine to type in their desired terms, or they can browse every month from January 1998 forward via a series of drop down tabs. For those who might be looking for more specific data, the "Search Tips" feature is quite useful. The site also contains links to the Federal Reserve Archival System for Economic Research (FRASER), which contains economic indicators back to 1948. Overall, the site will be a real boon to those looking for high quality, accurate information regarding current and past economic trends and patterns in the United States.

World Health Organization: Health Economics (posted Dec. 12/08)
http://www.who.int/topics/health_economics/en/
The World Health Organization (WHO) has created this site to provide the general public with high-quality information about their various research initiatives and reports related to the field of health economics. Given the nature of the WHO's mission, the work focuses on key challenges facing global health financing, with particular attention paid to healthcare systems in the developing world. The materials here include a nice fact sheet that provides a global overview of current spending on health care, along with links to related sites that deal with health financing policy and national healthcare systems. In the "Related Links" area, visitors can browse on over to a specialized site dedicated to the health economics of the European Union.

Gapminder
http://www.gapminder.org/
In London, riders on the Tube are reminded to "Mind the Gap". On the Gapminder website, visitors are reminded to mind a variety of gaps, whether they be in income inequality or quality of health care. This rather absorbing website was created as a non-profit venture to promote "sustainable global development and achievement of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals by increased use and understanding of statistics and other information." The site makes use of Trendanalyzer software to offer visualizations related to questions that include "Which country has the best teeth in the world?" and "Who gets what: Farm subsidies". Visitors can find such information under the "Latest News" area, and they can also take advantage of the videos, "Gapcasts", and world charts offered here. The "Gapcasts" are quite good, and they cover carbon emissions, public services, and globalization. Also, if visitors have their own set of statistical indicators they can create their own unique Gapminder-like bubble graph on their website. It's a powerful tool, and one that might be important for other non-profits, think tanks, educators, and students.

Reviews by:
The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2009
http://scout.wisc.edu/


From the
United States Census Bureau:

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2013
http://www.census.gov/newsroom/press-releases/2014/cb14-169.html
September 16, 2014
News Release
The U.S. Census Bureau announced today that in 2013, the poverty rate declined from the previous year for the first time since 2006, while there was no statistically significant change in either the number of people living in poverty or real median household income. In addition, the poverty rate for children under 18 declined from the previous year for the first time since 2000. The results for the nation were compiled from information collected in the 2014 Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement [ http://goo.gl/oCZyGf ].

The nation’s official poverty rate in 2013 was 14.5 percent, down from 15.0 percent in 2012. The 45.3 million people living at or below the poverty line in 2013, for the third consecutive year, did not represent a statistically significant change from the previous year’s estimate. Median household income in the United States in 2013 was $51,939; the change in real terms from the 2012 median of $51,759 was not statistically significant. This is the second consecutive year that the annual change was not statistically significant, following two consecutive annual declines.

The percentage of people without health insurance coverage for the entire 2013 calendar year was 13.4 percent; this amounted to 42.0 million people.

These findings are contained in two reports (see links below):
* Income and Poverty in the United States: 2013,
and
* Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2013.

---

Income and Poverty in the United States: 2013
Current Population Reports
(PDF - 1.7MB, 72 pages)
https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2014/demo/p60-249.pdf
September 2014
Summary of findings:
• Real median household income in 2013 was not statistically different from the 2012 median income.
• The official poverty rate decreased between 2012 and 2013, while the number in poverty in 2013 was not statistically different from 2012.

---

Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2013
Poulation reports
(PDF - 1.1MB, 28 pages)
http://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2014/demo/p60-250.pdf
September 16, 2014
Health insurance is a means for financing a person’s health care expenses. While the majority of people have private health insurance coverage, primarily through an employer, many others obtain health insurance through programs offered by the government. Other individuals do not have health insurance at all. This report presents statistics on health insurance coverage in the United States based on information collected in the 2014 Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement [ http://goo.gl/oCZyGf ] and the 2013 American Community Survey (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/). Estimates from both surveys, conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau, reflect health insurance coverage during the year 2013.

Selected Highlights:
• In 2013, the percentage of people without health insurance coverage for the entire calendar year was 13.4 percent, or 42.0 million.
• The percentage of people with health insurance for all or part of 2013 was 86.6 percent.
• In 2013, the majority of individuals, 64.2 percent, were covered by private health insurance.

The largest single type of health insurance in 2013 was employment-based health insurance, which covered 53.9 percent of the population.

Source:
United States Census Bureau

http://www.census.gov/

---

From The White House:

Five Key points in Today's
Report from the Census Bureau:
http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2014/09/16/income-poverty-and-health-insurance-united-states-2013
September 16, 2014
1. The overall poverty rate declined to 14.5 percent in 2013 due to the largest one-year drop in child poverty since 1966.
2. Real median income for family households rose by $603 in 2013 but remains below pre-crisis levels.
3. While still too wide, the gender pay gap narrowed slightly in 2013, with the female-to-male earnings ratio climbing above 78 percent for the first time on record.
4. Children and the elderly were much more likely than non-elderly adults to have health insurance coverage in 2013, reflecting the contributions of public programs like Medicare, Medicaid, and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).
5. The data released today by the Census Bureau cover the calendar year 2013, and so do not reflect the notable improvement in the labor market seen over the first eight months of 2014.

Source: The White House
http://www.whitehouse.gov/

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From Huffington Post.com:

2013 Census Data on Poverty, Income Tells a Story About Our Priorities
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tiziana-dearing/2013-census-data-on-pover_b_5830404.html
September 17, 2014
So where should we invest? In training for the knowledge economy, small scale manufacturing in cities and a "green" workforce that puts people in jobs while turning our country energy independent. Protect non-cash programs like SNAP and EITC, scale them up and model other interventions after them. Create public policies that build assets for non-stock holders, using mechanisms like matched savings, other tax credits and asset-based welfare.

Source:
Huffington Post

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From CLASP:

New Census Data Tell Us That Poverty Fell in 2013:
Children and Young Adults Still Face the Greatest Risks
http://www.clasp.org/resources-and-publications/publication-1/2014.09.16-Census-Bureau-Poverty-Data-Report-FINAL.pdf
September 16, 2014
According to 2013 Census data released today, the overall poverty rate fell by half a percentage point, to 14.5 percent. Poverty for children fell by nearly 2 percentage points. Yet children (especially young children) once again experienced the highest rates of poverty in the United States. Young adults were close behind. Four years after the Great Recession officially ended, nearly one in five children and young adults lived in poverty.
NOTE : Skip to the bottom of the article for links to 25+ related resources.

Also from CLASP:

2013 Poverty Data: A Glimpse of Good News for Children, But We Can Do Better
http://www.clasp.org/issues/child-care-and-early-education/in-focus/2013-poverty-data-a-glimpse-of-good-news-for-children-but-we-can-do-better
September 16, 2014
By Hannah Matthews
For the first time since 2000, the overall child poverty rate fell, according to U.S. Census Bureau Current Population Survey (CPS) data released today on income, poverty, and health insurance coverage in the year 2013. This is good news. The numbers indicate a return from the extraordinarily high child poverty rates experienced during the depths of the recession. But these decreases don’t diminish the unacceptably high number of children still living in poor families, particularly our youngest children and Black and Hispanic children

Source:
CLASP - Solutions that work for low-income people
http://www.clasp.org/
Since 1969, CLASP has been a trusted resource, a creative architect for systems change, and one of the country's most effective voices for low income people.

---

From Poverty Dispatch:

September 16, 2014
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2014/09/16/
Income and Poverty in the United States: 2013 (6 articles)
Source:
Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)

http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch

 

---------------------------------------------------

Note : for a similar extensive collection of links to this report for 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013, go to:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/income_poverty_health_archive.htm

 

What are good sources of information on basic trends in poverty, welfare and related issues in America?
Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

FedStats - The gateway to statistics from over 100 U.S. Federal agencies

From the U.S. Census Bureau:

Census Bureau Poverty Page
- includes links to : * Poverty Home * Overview *What's new * Publications * Definitions * Poverty Thresholds * Poverty Data Sources * Current Poverty Data * Microdata Access * Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates * History of the Poverty Measure * Poverty Measurement Studies and Alternative Measures * Related Sites * FAQ

Links to Related Sites
Find other agencies or organizations which provide Poverty Measurement Research

Census Bureau Income Page - incl. links to : * What's New * Income Main * Overview * Reports * Definitions * Guidance about the Sources * How Income Data is Collected * Micro Data Access * Related Topics * FAQ * Current and historical income data

Statistical Resources on the Web - from the University of Michigan Documents Center
Includes links to a wide range of statistical sites, mainly American but with some international content.
- includes : Agriculture - Foreign Governments - Statistical Agencies - Foreign Trade - U.S. Imports and Exports - Comprehensive Subjects Directories - Health - Cost of Living - Price Indexes and Comparative Costs - Housing - Homelessness - Demographics (Population, Social, Economic Characteristics, Poverty) - Labor (Labor Force, Occupations, Salaries) - Economics - Military - Education - Politics - Science - Environment - Sociology (Children, Crime, Elderly, Immigration, Refugees) - Finance and Currency - Transportation - Foreign Economics - International Sources - and more...

EconStats
http://www.econstats.com/index.htm

For anyone looking for a vast cornucopia of economic statistics culled from all over the world, they need look no further than the EconStats website. The homepage is a bit visually cluttered, but one couldn't ask for better and more complete data, as visitors can quickly access a wide range of economic data from the United States, such as information about inflation, unemployment levels, productivity, new factory orders, and the price of crude oil. The homepage also contains links to economic data from Canada, Britain, Germany, the European Union, France, Italy, Russia, and China. On the right-hand side of the page, visitors can click through to interest rates for dozens of countries, check in on various stock markets, and look up commodity and futures prices. Those individuals looking for quick help with pressing questions can post queries to the "Econ Chat" section of the homepage.

Reviewed by:
The Scout Report,
Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2008.

Global Distribution of Poverty
For policymakers and academics alike, having access to information about the global distribution of poverty is crucial. Based at the Earth Institute at Columbia University, The Poverty Mapping Project at The Center for International Earth Science Information Network is a very fine resource for anyone interested in this subject. Understandably, the site provides access to dozens of maps which document the geographic and biophysical conditions of where the poor live. In the "Maps" section, visitors can look over 300 poverty maps offered at a number of spatial scales. Visitors will also want to peruse their nice publication, "Where the Poor Are: An Atlas of Poverty", which includes information about how some of this data has been used in poverty interventions. Persons looking for data for their own research will want to consider downloading the subnational and national poverty data sets that are made available here. Overall, it's a well-designed site and one which can be used in a variety of settings.
Reviewed by:
The Scout Report
, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2008

Global Social Change Reports
Excellent resources - well worth a visit for anyone interested in major world demographic, social, political and communication trends over the last several decades.

- includes the following resources (among many others):
--- Basic Guide to the World: Quality of Life Throughout the World (PDF file - 228K, 34 pages) - December 2005
This describes world and regional trends in infant mortality rate, gdp per capita, literacy, freedom, and world and regional life satisfaction. An html version http://gsociology.icaap.org/report/cqual.html is a brief review of global quality of life, major trends and regional comparisons.
--- Basic Guide to the World: Population changes and trends, 1960 to 2003 (PDF file - 183K, 11 pages) - October 2005
Presents graphs and tables showing trends in world, regional population.
--- Basic Guide to the World: Economic Growth, 1970 to 2007 (PDF file - 140K, 16 pages) May 2007
Brief descriptions of trends in economic growth, world regional and for selected countries.
--- Major demographic trends - summary of main demographic trends of the past several decades; changes in population size, population growth, infant mortality rates, age distributions.
--- Major social trends - summary of main socio-demographic trends of the past several decades; changes in urbanization, education and ethnolinguistic fractionalization.
--- much more (major political trends, major economic trends, major technological trends: communication, energy production and consumption, context of change in the 21st century
- also includes free datasets, free online statistical tools, useful public domain and other free to use data, etc.

Source:
The Global Social Change Research Project
- links to online books, manuals and guides about evaluation and social research methods, such as surveys, observations, and others
- links to sites about data quality, statistical analysis, and free software such as statistical, office suites, spreadsheets and more.

- links to many sites with research or data about globalization, democracy and freedom and other related topics.


Bureau of Labor Statistics
(U.S. Department of Labor)
[The Bureau of Labor Statistics is the American equivalent to Statistics Canada]

Inflation & Consumer Spending - Consumer Price Index • Inflation Calculator • Contract Escalation • Producer Price Indexes • Import/Export Price Indexes • Consumer Expenditures • Price Index Research
Wages, Earnings, & Benefits - Wages by Area and Occupation • Earnings by Industry • Employee Benefits • Employment Costs • State and County Wages • National Compensation Data • Collective Bargaining
Productivity - Productivity and Costs • Multifactor Productivity • International Comparisons
Safety & Health - Injuries and Illnesses • Fatalities
International - Import/Export Price Indexes • Foreign Labor Statistics • International Technical Cooperation
Occupations - Occupational Outlook Handbook • Occupational Outlook Quarterly • Employment • Wages by Area and Occupation • Injuries, Illnesses, and Fatalities • Employment Projections • Standard Occupational Classification (SOC)
Demographics - Demographic Characteristics of the Labor Force • Geographic Profile of Employment and Unemployment • Consumer Expenditures • Injuries, Illnesses, and Fatalities • Longitudinal Studies
Other Statistical Sites - FEDSTATS • Census Bureau • Bureau of Economic Analysis
BLS Information Offices

Employment & Unemployment - National Employment • National Unemployment Rate • State and Local Employment • State and Local Unemployment Rates • Mass Layoffs • Employment Projections • Job Openings and Labor Turnover • Employment by Occupation • Longitudinal Studies • State and County Employment • Time Use • Business Employment Dynamics • Employment Research
At a Glance Tables - U.S. Economy at a Glance • Regions, States, and Areas at a Glance • Industries at a Glance
Publications & Research Papers - Occupational Outlook Handbook • Monthly Labor Review Online • Compensation and Working Conditions Online • Occupational Outlook Quarterly • The Editor's Desk • Career Guide to Industries • Economic News Releases • Research Papers
Industries - Industries at a Glance • Employment, Hours, and Earnings • Occupations • Injuries, Illnesses, and Fatalities • Producer Price Indexes • Employment Costs • Productivity • NAICS
Business Costs - Producer Price Indexes • Employment Costs • Employee Benefits • Foreign Labor Costs • Import/Export Prices • Unit Labor Costs
Geography - State and Local Employment • State and Local Unemployment Rates • State and County Employment and Wages • Geographic Profile of Employment and Unemployment • Mass Layoffs • Consumer Price Index • Consumer Expenditures • Injuries, Illnesses, and Fatalities • Wages by Area and Occupation • Create Customized Maps (Unemployment Rates)
Kids' Page - Career Information for Kids

Also includes Latest Numbers : CPI - Unemployment Rate - Payroll Employment - Average Hourly Earnings - PPI - ECI - Productivity - U.S. Import Price Index


Population Reference Bureau (PRB) (U.S. - world)
Providing timely and objective population information
The Population Reference Bureau is the leader in providing timely and objective information on U.S. and international population trends and their implications.
PRB Web Sites.
PRB has five Web sites that provide the latest and most accurate data on a range of topics within the field of population, health, and nutrition.
The main PRB Web siteis your first stop for population information.
MEASURE Communication promotes wider dissemination and increased use of information on population, health, and nutrition for planning and decisionmaking in developing countries.
PopNet is a comprehensive directory of population-related Web sites-by topic or keyword, by organization, or through a world regions map. All 200 countries in the World Population Data Sheet are indexed.
AmeriStat includes a series of charts, graphs, and brief narratives describing demographic trends in five subject areas including marriage and family, education, and poverty and income.
The Center for Public Information on Population Research explains and publicizes the findings of population research and their implications.



General Social Survey
(GSS)
The General Social Survey (GSS) is a survey used to collect data on demographic characteristics and attitudes of residents of the United States. The survey is conducted face-to-face with an in-person interview by the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago, of a randomly-selected sample of adults (over 18) who are not institutionalized.

Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR)

Institute for Social Research(Ann Arbor)
 - Asset and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old (AHEAD)
- Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID)
- National Election Studies (NES)

Justice Information Service

Roper Center (University of Connecticut)

National Center for Education Statistics

National Archives and Records Administration

Population Studies Center (University of Michigan)


European and other International Links


TradingEconomics.com

NOTE : On the Trading Economics website home page, you'll find info for different regions of the world and for each of 232 countries on the following : * GDP Billions US$ * GDP Growth * Interest rate * Inflation rate * Jobless rate * Gov. Budget * Exchange rate * Population

"Trading Economics provides its users with accurate information for 232 countries including historical data for more than 300.000 economic indicators, exchange rates, stock market indexes, government bond yields and commodity prices. Our data is regularly checked for inconsistencies and based on official sources; with the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, central banks and national statistics bureaus being the most important.


Bank Deposit Rates in Canada

- unique Canada, U.S. and international bank interest rates, currency and risk research information. In particular, it provides interest rates from the major institutions in Canada, which you can compare to the United States, Asia or Europe.

See also:

Bank Deposit Rates Around the World



UNdata
http://data.un.org
UNdata is a statistics database service that provides users with quick and easy access to a wide range of data that cover themes including agriculture, crime, education, energy, industry, labour, national accounts, population and tourism. UNdata is part of the “Statistics as a Public Good” project launched by the United Nations Statistics Division (UNSD) that aims to provide free access to global statistics, assist National Statistical Offices of member countries with strengthening their data dissemination capabilities, and educate users on the importance of statistics in evidence-based policy and decision making.

Source:
United Nations
http://www.un.org


World Bank Data on Poverty and Equity

Source:
World Bank Group

Comparative Welfare Entitlements Dataset (CWED)
http://cwed2.org
September 2013
The Comparative Welfare Entitlements Dataset (CWED) contains information about the structure and generosity of social insurance benefits in 33 countries around the world, INCLUDING CANADA. The data contained here are an updated and extended version of CWED 1, which has been available since 2004. This web site allows you to download customized portions of the CWED 2 data, browse the Working Paper Series or access documentary material.

NOTE : The nice folks at CWED would like to keep track of who is using their dataset and to be able to notify users of updates.
They ask that visitors supply their name, institution, and a contact email address.
If you prefer not to share your personal information, just click the handy "Skip" button located on the signup page and you'll go directly to the dataset.

Comments by Armine Yalnizyan
(who suggested the CWED site):

"Pure wonk heaven - a big new data set measuring welfare indicators in 33 countries."

"Absolutely incomprehensible without the codebook" (PDF - 616K, 115 pages):
http://cwed2.org/Data/Codebook.pdf
This data set provides systematic data on institutional features of social insurance programs in 33 countries spanning much of the post-war period. Its purpose is to provide an essential complement to program spending data that is available from international sources like the OECD’s Social Expenditure Database.

This codebook contains details the data set providing information about different institutional features of national social insurance programs in 27 OECD and 6 non-OECD countries. General information is provided in separate sections of the codebook. Country-specific sources and notes are provided in the country chapters of the codebook.

CWED DOWNLOAD TOOL
http://cwed2.org/download.php
Select countries, years, and variables in the menu below and press "Submit" at the bottom of the site to receive a CVS file with the data.

World Bank Is Opening Its Treasure Chest of Data
By Stephanie Strom
July 2, 2011
(...) The World Bank’s traditional role has been to finance specific projects that foster economic development, whereas the I.M.F.’s goal is to safeguard the global monetary system. But many people, particularly in the developing world, have long questioned whether the economic prescriptions that these two lofty institutions hand down from Washington — essentially: liberalize, privatize and deregulate — have done anything but advance the interests of wealthy nations like the United States. (..) So it might come as a surprise that the president of the World Bank, Robert B. Zoellick, a career diplomat and member of the Republican foreign-policy elite, argues that the most valuable currency of the World Bank isn’t its money — it is its information.
(...)
Long regarded as a windowless ivory tower, the World Bank is opening its vast vault of information. True, the bank still lends roughly $170 billion annually. But it is increasingly competing for influence and power with Wall Street, national governments and smaller regional development banks, who have as much or more money to offer. It is no longer the only game in town. And so Mr. Zoellick, 57, is wielding knowledge — lots of it. For more than a year, the bank has been releasing its prized data sets, currently giving public access to more than 7,000 that were previously available only to some 140,000 subscribers — mostly governments and researchers, who pay to gain access to it. Those data sets contain all sorts of information about the developing world, whether workaday economic statistics — gross domestic product, consumer price inflation and the like — or arcana like how many women are breast-feeding their children in rural Peru. (...) Mr. Zoellick says the bank’s newfound openness is part of a push to embrace competition, both internally and externally, as it tries to reduce poverty and foster economic development.

Source:
New York Times

[Comment (by Gilles) : Ironic that the Harper Government™ appears to be moving in the opposite direction with its (His) decision to axe the Census long form questionnaire - see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/2011_census_questionnaire.htm for more on that.]

From the World Bank:

Virtual Statistical System (VSS)
The VSS is an online resource for national statistical offices, other data producing agencies, data users, including policy makers, academics, students, or anyone who wants to know more about official statistics. The VSS provides in-depth information on how effective statistical systems/organizations operate and the essential knowledge prerequisites of official statisticians working in these organizations.

Open Data
The Data Catalog provides download access to over 7,000 indicators from World Bank data sets.
View profiles by country - [ Canada profile ]

Source:
World Bank

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

World Bank Frees Up Development Data
April 20, 2010—The World Bank Group said today it will offer free access to more than 2,000 financial, business, health, economic and human development statistics that had mostly been available only to paying subscribers. An initial 330 indicators are available in French, Spanish and Arabic. The decision - part of a larger effort to increase access to information at the World Bank - means that researchers, journalists, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), entrepreneurs and school children alike will be able to tap into the World Bank's databases via a new website. Experts say open access policy will foster innovation, support evidence-based policymaking.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

World Bank Data
The World at a Glance : Key development indicators from the World Bank

* Countries
- Afghanistan to Zimbabwe (yes, including Canada)

* Topics
- Agriculture & Rural Development - Infrastructure - Aid Effectiveness - Labor & Social Protection - Economic Policy and External Debt - Poverty - Education - Private Sector - Energy & Mining - Public Sector - Environment - Science & Technology Financial sector - Social Development - Health - Urban Development

* Indicators
- 331 indicators from the World Development Indicators (WDI) covering 209 countries from 1960 to 2008 translated into Spanish, French and Arabic.

* Data Catalog
The data catalog is a listing of available World Bank data sources, including databases, pre-formatted tables and reports. Each of the listings includes a description of the data source and a direct link to that source. Where possible, the databases are linked directly to a selection screen to allow users to select the countries, indicators, and years they would like to search. Those search results can be exported in different formats. Users can also choose to download the entire database directly from the catalog.

Related link:

World Bank Reform
The World Bank Group is advancing multiple reforms to promote inclusiveness, innovation, efficiency, effectiveness, and accountability. It is expanding cooperation with the UN, the IMF, other multilateral development banks, donors, civil society, and foundations. But the effort must go further to realize a World Bank Group that represents the international economic realities of the 21st Century, recognizes the role and responsibility of growing stakeholders, and provides a larger voice for developing countries.

Source:
The World Bank
The World Bank is a vital source of financial and technical assistance to developing countries around the world. Our mission is to fight poverty with passion and professionalism for lasting results and to help people help themselves and their environment by providing resources, sharing knowledge, building capacity and forging partnerships in the public and private sectors.
---
NOTE: The World Bank is not without its detractors.
See the "Criticism" section of this Wikipedia article on The World Bank.

United Nations Statistical Yearbook - Fifty-second Issue
February 2010
This is an annual compilation of a wide range of international economic, social and environmental statistics for over 200 countries and areas of the world, compiled from sources including United Nations agencies and other international, national and specialized organizations. The fifty-second issue contains data available to the Statistics Division as of June 2008 and presents them in 68 tables on topics such as: agriculture; balance of payments; communication; development assistance; education; energy; environment; finance; gender; industrial production; international merchandise trade; international tourism; labour force; manufacturing; national accounts; nutrition; population; prices; research and development; and wages. The number of years of data shown in the tables varies from one to ten, with the ten-year tables covering 1996 to 2005 or 1997 to 2006. Accompanying the tables are technical notes providing brief descriptions of major statistical concepts, definitions and classifications.

Table of contents (PDF - 124K, 4 pages)
NOTE: The complete report (the link below) is a large file and a slow download even for someone with a broadband connection.
Check the table of contents first by clicking the link above, then (if you wish to continue), click the link below.

Complete Yearbook (PDF - 9.6MB, 848 pages)
[ Statistical Yearbook - two previous years online ]
Source:
United Nations Department
of Economic and Social Affairs
- DESA
The UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs provides support services to the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), the principal body coordinating the economic and social work of the United Nations and its operational arms.

Also from DESA:

* World Population Ageing 2009 (PDF - 894K, 82 pages) - February 2010
This report provides a description of global trends in population ageing and includes a series of indicators of the ageing process by development regions, major areas, regions and countries. This new edition includes new features on ageing in rural and urban areas, the coverage of pension systems and the impact of the 2007-2008 financial crisis on pension systems. The report is intended to provide a solid demographic foundation for the follow-up activities of the Second World Assembly on Ageing.

* Rethinking Poverty : Report on the World Social Situation 2010 - January 2010
Fifteen years ago, in Copenhagen, global leaders at the World Summit for Social Development described poverty eradication as an ethical, political and economic imperative, and identified it as one of the three pillars of social development. Poverty eradication has since become the overarching objective of development, as reflected in the internationally agreed development goals, including the Millennium Development Goals, which set the target of halving global extreme poverty by 2015. Rethinking Poverty, the 2010 issue of the Report on the World Social Situation seeks to contribute to rethinking poverty and its eradication.

Complete report (PDF - 8MB, 203 pages)
Executive summary (PDF - 196K, 8 pages)

Table of contents (HTML) +links to individual chapters, including:
* Poverty: the official numbers * The poverty of poverty measurement * Deprivation, vulnerability and exclusion * Macroeconomic policies and poverty reduction * Economic liberalization and poverty reduction * Labour-market and social policies and poverty reduction * Poverty reduction programmes * Rethinking poverty reduction interventions



From the
United Nations Population Fund
:

The State of World Population 2008
Reaching Common Ground:
Culture, Gender and Human Rights
(PDF - 2.5MB, 108 pages)
Contents :
* Overview * Human Rights * Women’s Empowerment and Gender Equality * Reproductive Health and Reproductive Rights * Poverty, Inequality and Population * War, Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment *
Conclusions

New report shows cultural sensitivity critical
to successful development strategies, women's equality
( (Word file - 86K, 2 pages) [dead link]
12 November 2008
Press Release
UNITED NATIONS, New York, 12 November 2008—Development strategies that are sensitive to cultural values can reduce harmful practices against women and promote human rights, including gender equality and women’s empowerment, affirms The State of World Population 2008 report from UNFPA, the United Nations Population Fund. Reaching Common Ground: Culture, Gender and Human Rights, launched 12 November 2008, reports that culture is a central component of successful development of poor countries, and must be integrated into development policy and programming. The report, which coincides with this year’s 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, is based on the concept that the international human rights framework has universal validity. Human rights express values common to all cultures and protect groups as well as individuals. The report endorses culturally sensitive approaches to development and to the promotion of human rights, in general, and women’s rights, in particular.
Source:
Press kit & Resources
* The Reports * Media Outreach * Feature Stories * Contact Information * Graphs and Tables * Photographs
Source:
United Nations Population Fund
The United Nations Population Fund is an international development agency
that promotes the right of every woman, man and child to enjoy a life of health and equal opportunity.
Related link:The State of World Population 2008
http://www.unfpa.org/swp/2008/en/
In November 2008, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) put out its State of World Population book, along with a Youth Supplement, and both are available in their entirety on the UNFPA website. The book is entitled "Reaching Common Ground: Culture, Gender and Human Rights" and the Youth Supplement is entitled "Generation of Change: Young People and Culture". This website offers so much worthwhile information to the visitor, in part because the entire 108 pages can be downloaded as a pdf by clicking on "Download PDF" under Resources on the left side of the page. The information in each of the nine chapters is eminently readable, extremely heart wrenching, and definitely eye-opening. However, the book does offer hope, as it includes the considerable successes by the UNFPA, which were achieved by being culturally sensitive to the traditions and beliefs of the groups with which they were working. To read the stories from the Youth Supplement, scroll down slightly and choose, from on the left, one of the young people's stories, such as "Grita", "Tsehay", or "Seif". Child marriage, females playing in male sports, becoming a Vietnamese hip-hop sensation, youth in politics, are all examples of topics found among these youth's stories. Visitors should not miss checking out the Photo Gallery, which can be accessed by scrolling down to the middle of the page, and clicking "View," located on the left side of the page. The line "there is laughter every day in the terrible streets of Calcutta," from a Jack Gilbert poem comes to mind upon seeing these photographs.
Review by:
The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2008.
http://scout.wisc.edu


UNdata
http://data.un.org
UNdata is a statistics database service that provides users with quick and easy access to a wide range of data that cover themes including agriculture, crime, education, energy, industry, labour, national accounts, population and tourism. UNdata is part of the “Statistics as a Public Good” project launched by the United Nations Statistics Division (UNSD) that aims to provide free access to global statistics, assist National Statistical Offices of member countries with strengthening their data dissemination capabilities, and educate users on the importance of statistics in evidence-based policy and decision making.

Source:
United Nations
http://www.un.org




NationMaster

"NationMaster is a vast compilation of statistical information gathered from a number of sources. Beyond providing statistics, this site allows users to compare economic, population, communication, military, transportation and other statistics. You may choose to compare the statistics of different nations with the statistical data sets provided, or create your own comparative graphical and statistical data on any number of countries and topics. The site is searchable and provides links to interesting facts and figures. Individual country profiles are also provided and include maps, flags, and lists of major cities and states. Data sources include: the CIA World Factbook, United Nations, World Health Organization, World Bank, World Resources Institute, UNESCO, UNICEF and OECD."
Found in:
[ Foreign Affairs Canada / International Trade Canada ]

From the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) :


OECD Online

(Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development)
OECD Online is to the world what Statistics Canada is to Canada - the number-crunchers' jackpot, Mother of all statistical agencies!
This is an enormous site containing a wealth of information on myriad subjects in the area of social programs. Plan to explore this site over several visits - it can be overwhelming...

- incl. links to:
* Browse (About OECD - By Topic - By Country - By Department) - From A to Z
* Find (Statistics - Publications & Documents - News Releases)
* Resources for (Journalists - Government Officials - NGOs & Civil Society and Parliamentarians)
* OnLine Services (OnLine Bookshop - OnLine Library - E-mail Alerts - MyOECD) - more...

Information by Country - links to country information for all OECD countries
Click on the country of your choice and all OECD documents pertaining to that country will be listed.
NOTE: includes cross-country comparisons

Information by Country : Canada --- from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)
- all OECD documents pertaining to Canada

OECD Website Sitemap

Source:
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development


Eurostat
Eurostat’s mission is to provide the European Union with a high-quality statistical information service.
Eurostat is the statistical office of the European Union situated in Luxembourg. Its task is to provide the European Union with statistics at European level that enable comparisons between countries and regions.

United Nations Statistics Division
The United Nations Statistics Division provides a wide range of statistical outputs and services for producers and users of statistics worldwide. By increasing the global availability and use of official statistics, this work facilitates national and international policy formulation, implementation and monitoring.

Millennium Indicators (United Nations Statistics Division)
- socioeconomic indicators for countries covering the period 1985-2000. These indicators are being used to monitor implementation of the goals and targets of the United Nations Millennium Declaration.

United Nations Population Division
- United Nations Population Information Network (POPIN)
- Here, you'll find all kinds of world population information, including many links by country to government and other organizations involved in population studies.

United Nations Population Fund
The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) is “an international development agency that promotes the right of every woman, man and child to enjoy a life of health and equal opportunity.” Within their general mission, the UNFPA also promotes a variety of public health initiatives, such as HIV/AIDS prevention and education programs and the reduction of maternal and infant mortality. With a pleasing visual layout and a series of tabs for each thematic area, even first-time visitors should have no problem finding their way around. Visitors can get a sense of their mission by looking over some of these tabs, which include sections titled “Making Motherhood Safer” and “Promoting Gender Equality”. Within each section, visitors can read a basic précis of their general policy approach to dealing with each population issue and also learn about their collaborative efforts with different non-governmental organizations around the globe."
Reviewed by:
The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2006.

State of the World Population 2002
December 2002
- incl. Population Issues - Meeting Development Goals - Improving Reproductive Health - Supporting Adolescents and Youth - Preventing HIV/AIDS - Promoting Gender Equality - Securing Essential Supplies - Assisting in Emergencies - Advancing Sustainable Development - Building Support
Source : United Nations Population Fund

OECD Statistics
Browse: O
ECD Home - About OECD - By Topic - By Country - By Department
Find: Statistics - Publications & Documents - News Releases

Resources for: Journalists - Government Officials - NGOs & Civil Society
OnLine Services: OnLine Bookshop - OnLine Library - E-mail Alerts - MyOECD

Purchasing Power Parities (PPPs) [dead link]
PPPs are currency conversion rates that both convert to a common currency and equalise the purchasing power of different currencies. In other words, they eliminate the differences in price levels between countries in the process of conversion. This site has been set up as a means of providing information on work undertaken by the OECD and Eurostat on PPPs to as wide an audience as possible, including extracts from the OECD's latest publication, statistics and the latest research, reports and papers relating to PPPs.

Council of European Social Science Data Archives (CESSDA)
CESSDA promotes the acquisition, archiving and distribution of electronic data for social science teaching and research in Europe.
Use the clickable maps to get to the social science data archives of 16 European countries
If you're looking for links to international social science data, this is an excellent launchpad.

CROP - International Social Science Council: Comparative Research Programme on Poverty

Demographic and Health Surveys - Providing Information for Informed Decisions in Population, Health and Nutrition
International Data Base (Demographic and socio-economic data)
HIV/AIDS Surveillance Data Base
Social Sciences Data Collection
Social Science Data Archives

Council of European Social Science Data (CESSDA)
CESSDA promotes the acquisition, archiving and distribution of electronic data for social science teaching and research in Europe. Use the clickable maps to get to the social science data archives of 16 European countries or 14 North American states and provinces (links to data libraries from UBC [British Columbia] to Carleton [Ontario] universities).
If you're looking for links to international social science data, this is an excellent launchpad.

Luxembourg Income Study
The Luxembourg Income Study is an ongoing cooperative research project (started in 1983) with a membership that includes 25 countries on four continents: Europe, America, Asia and Oceania

Internet Guide to Demography and Population Studies - from the Australian National University (Canberra)
Links to hundreds of sites with information about population and demographics around the world, including Canada.

[See also LINKS TO AMERICAN RESEARCH]


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