Canadian Social Research Links

American Non-Governmental
Social Research Links
(A-J)

Sites de recherche sociale au Canada

Sites non-gouvernementaux de
recherche sociale aux États-Unis
(A-J)

Updated December 11, 2016
Page révisée le 11 décembre2016

Go to American NGO Social Research Links II (M-Z)
[this takes you to a separate page of links]

SEARCH
FREE WEEKLY NEWSLETTER


To search the complete
Canadian Social Research Links website ,
use the text box below:


To search ONLY the page you are now reading,
use Ctrl + F to open a search window.


SUBSCRIBE TO THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER

Sign up to receive this free weekly newsletter by e-mail or read it online
(including archives back to January 2005).
Each issue includes all links added to this site during the previous week.
(2800+ subscribers in January 2017)


[ Go to Canadian Social Research Links Home Page ]


Related Canadian Social Research Links pages:

American Non-Government Social Research Links (M-Z)
American Government Social Research Links

U.S. Social Security Reform
Children and Families - International
Social Research Statistics
Poverty measures:
- Canadian resources
- U.S. and other international resources


What are good sources of information on basic trends in poverty, welfare, and related issues in America?
Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)

[University of Wisconsin-Madison ]


Welfare reform - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
Movements in many countries around the world push for welfare reform. Sizeable and powerful reform movements exist in the United States of America, Canada, Great Britain, and France among many others.
- incl. the following : * United States * The Welfare System and reform in Great Britain * The Welfare System and reform in France * References * External links


NOTE: For a large collection of links related to poverty measurement in the U.S. and elsewhere in the world, go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page of this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm


Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC)
https://www.opressrc.org/
The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse is an ever growing virtual portal of research on low-income and TANF families and an online hub for professional networking among researchers, policymakers and practitioners who serve these populations.

SSRC is an initiative of
The Administration for Children and Families Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE):
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/

Browse the SSRC Clearinghouse by TOPIC:
https://www.opressrc.org/topics
Click on the link above, then select one of the topics below to explore resources and research relevant to that topic.
Topics:
*
Asset-Building, Tax Policies, and Subsidies * Child Care
* Child Support * Community Development and Housing * Education and Training * Employment * Family Formation and Family Structure * Food Assistance * General Research on Income and Poverty * Health * TANF Policy, Services, and Benefits * Transportation



For reasons NOT to compare welfare in Canada with welfare in the U.S., go the Welfare in Canada vs the U.S. page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/canada_us_welfare.htm


Poverty Dispatch
- U.S.
[NOTE: Content updated most weekdays.]
- links to news items back to July 2006, mostly from the American press, about poverty, homelessness, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

----

NOTE: For links to info about the U.S. health care reform initiative,
See this
special section of the U.S. Govt. links page

------------------------------------------------------------------------

And the Looney Republican of the Year Award goes to...
Michelle Bachmann!

Bachmann: ‘We Must Ban Falafel’ in School Lunches
Sept. 28, 2012
(...) "Falafel is a gateway food. It starts with falafel, then the kids move on to shawarma. After a while they say 'hey this tastes good, I wonder what else comes from Arabia?' Before you know it our children are listening to Muslim music, reading the Koran, and plotting attacks against the homeland. We need to stop these terror cakes now, before they infiltrate any further."
Source:
Minnesota Congresswoman Michelle Bachmann

http://dailycurrant.com/2012/09/28/bachmann-we-ban-falafel-school-lunches/

More Dumb Michelle Bachmann Quotes:
http://politicalhumor.about.com/od/republicans/a/michele-bachmann-quotes.htm

------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Simplest Explanation Of Obamacare. Ever. (video, duration 6:53)
http://www.upworthy.com/the-simplest-explanation-of-obamacare-ever



Quotes from the The American Taliban
- memorable quotes from Ann Coulter, Jerry Falwell, Laura Schlessinger and other American Conservative quotables.

NOTE : The links below are organized in reverse chronological order, with the most recent additions at the top.

NEW

DECEMBER 2016

New from the
Heron Foundation:
[ http://heron.org/ ]
Heron’s mission is to help people and communities help themselves out of poverty. The foundation works with a diverse set of investment strategies focused on fostering economic innovations and practices that lead to long-term economic opportunity and prosperity for all.

Poor U.S.: Reimagining a Path to Prosperity
http://heron.org/engage/pulse/poorus-jobs
December 8, 2016
A series of videos recasts the narrative around what it is to be poor in the United States and suggests ways to reinvent the economy to provide paths to prosperity. Over the month of December, through a series of short videos, we will share stories that depict an economy that leaves many to struggle, and the people who are working to reinvent the economy in a way that ensures people can find a path out of poverty through quality employment.

[ Click the link above to access all of the videos below. ]

Chapter One: The Hidden Poor (Released Dec. 2)
--- An intimate, first-person account of the Murphy family’s struggle to make it in a broken economy. The short documentary challenges traditional myths around what it is to be poor in America and sheds light on the structural nature of current day U.S. poverty.

Chapter Two: When the Poor are Not at the Table (Released Dec. 8)
https://vimeo.com/176326738
--- Linda Tirado, essayist and activist, discusses why “it sucks to be poor” and work in the United States.

Chapter Three : (Released Dec. 15)
--- Good Employers Make Money

Chapter Four: (Released Dec. 22)
--- Employing the Most Vulnerable (Released Dec. 22)

Chapter Five: (Released Dec. 29)
--- Not Just a Quantity of Jobs, but a Quality of Jobs

Source:
Human Pictures

http://www.humanpictures.me/
Human Pictures is a production company born out of our frustration with the mounting injustice we see all around us and our belief in the potential of humanity to face up to it and confront it.

Recent releases from the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:

---

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) at 20
http://www.cbpp.org/tanf-at-20
The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant, with which states provide cash assistance, child care, education and job training, and other services to low-income families, was created in 1996 to replace Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC).

TANF approaches its 20th anniversary on August 22.

TANF reaches many fewer families than it used to, and TANF benefits have lost a fifth of their value since 1996 in most states, making it very hard for families to meet basic needs. We analyze federal and state TANF issues and help states design their TANF programs so they can reach more eligible families and meet their particular needs.

---

Policy Basics: An Introduction to TANF
http://www.cbpp.org/research/policy-basics-an-introduction-to-tanf
Updated June 15, 2015

TANF at 20: Time to Create a Program that Supports Work and Helps Families Meet Their Basic Needs
http://www.cbpp.org/research/family-income-support/tanf-at-20-time-to-create-a-program-that-supports-work-and-helps
August 15, 2016
By Ladonna Pavetti, Ph.D. and Liz Shott

TANF at 20: Time to Create a Program that Supports Work and Helps Families Meet Their Basic Needs
http://www.cbpp.org/research/family-income-support/tanf-at-20-time-to-create-a-program-that-supports-work-and-helps
August 15, 2016

TANF at 20, Part 1: Providing a Safety Net for Fewer Poor Families
http://www.cbpp.org/blog/tanf-at-20-part-1-providing-a-safety-net-for-fewer-poor-families
August 15, 2016

TANF at 20, Part 2: Failing to Help Most Unemployed Parents Find and Maintain Work
http://www.cbpp.org/blog/tanf-at-20-part-2-failing-to-help-most-unemployed-parents-find-and-maintain-work
August 16, 2016

TANF at 20, Part 3: States Not Investing in Core Welfare Reform Areas
http://www.cbpp.org/blog/tanf-at-20-part-3-states-not-investing-in-core-welfare-reform-areas
August 17, 2016

TANF at 20, Part 4: Addressing TANF’s Failures
http://www.cbpp.org/blog/tanf-at-20-part-4-addressing-tanfs-failures
August 18, 2016

1996 Welfare Law Cut Food Assistance, Too
http://www.cbpp.org/blog/1996-welfare-law-cut-food-assistance-too
August 18, 2016
August 22 marks not just the 20th anniversary of the problematic Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant, which the 1996 welfare law created. That law also brought cuts — many of which remain in effect — to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, then called food stamps), which have left monthly benefits smaller than they otherwise would be

More info on SNAP
http://www.cbpp.org/search?search_text=SNAP

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
http://www.cbpp.org/



May 8, 2016
Dear Mr. Trump

NOTE (by Gilles) : Because I was born and raised in Canada, I won't be eligible to vote in the American Presidential Election in November of this year. However, I don't want to miss the opportunity of adding my name to and my support for this open letter to let the rest of the world know that we're not ALL a bunch of effing lunatics here in North America. Scary to consider that it might be The Donald, with his cool, calm demeanor and his political acumen (not!) whose finger will be hovering over the big red button in the Oval Office, awaiting his next temper tantrum...

Dear Mr. Trump
https://secure.avaaz.org/en/deartrump/
Add your voice to the open letter from AVAAZ below -- when enough people sign, it will run as a full page ad in major newspapers around the world.

"Dear Mr. Trump,

This is not what greatness looks like. The world rejects your fear, hate-mongering, and bigotry. We reject your support for torture, your calls for murdering civilians, and your general encouragement of violence. We reject your denigration of women, Muslims, Mexicans, and millions of others who don’t look like you, talk like you, or pray to the same god as you. Facing your fear we choose compassion. Hearing your despair we choose hope. Seeing your ignorance we choose understanding.

As citizens of the world, we stand united against your brand of division."

Source:
AVAAZ
https://secure.avaaz.org/en/
According to The Guardian (U.K), AVAAZ is the globe's largest and most powerful online activist network.
The AVAAZ website says it is a global web movement to bring people-powered politics to decision-making everywhere.


Despite recovery, a big spike in U.S. poverty rates
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/why-so-many-americans-think-the-recession-isnt-over/
By Aimee Picchi
December 4, 2015
As many Americans can tell you, the post-recession years haven't been easy. Now, new data backs that up. Poverty increased in about one-third of U.S. counties between 2010 to 2014 when compared with the previous five years, according to the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey, which studies more than 3,000 counties . Does that mean the rest of the country was lifted into prosperity during those years? Not so much. Only 4 percent of counties saw a decrease in poverty over the more recent span.

Also by By Aimee Picchi:

America's quagmire: Stubborn poverty and slumping income
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/americas-quagmire-stubborn-poverty-and-slumping-income/
September 16, 2015

Source:
CBS News

http://www.cbsnews.com/

Medicaid at 50: Ten Key Facts
http://www.cbpp.org/blog/medicaid-at-50-ten-key-facts
July 30, 2015
Today marks the 50th anniversary of Medicaid — the public insurance program that provides health coverage to low-income families and individuals, including children, parents, pregnant women, seniors, and people with disabilities.

Here are 10 key facts about how Medicaid helps millions of Americans live healthier, more secure lives:
(Click the link above for more info on each fact.)

1. Medicaid provided quality health coverage for 80 million low-income Americans over the course of 2014.
2. Medicaid has cut dramatically the number of Americans without health insurance.
3. Medicaid participation is high.
4. Medicaid has improved access to care for millions, including those with chronic conditions.
5. Medicaid provides significant financial support to low-income beneficiaries.
6. Medicaid produces long-term educational benefits for kids.
7. Medicaid is cost-effective.
8. Medicaid gives states flexibility to design their own programs.
9. Health reform’s Medicaid expansion is saving states money.
10. Medicaid expansion supports work.

As Medicaid turns 50, learn more about how it improves access to health care, its long-term benefits, and why states should expand Medicaid:
http:// www.cbpp.org/medicaid-at-50

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP)
http://www.cbpp.org/
CBPP is a nonpartisan research and policy institute. We pursue federal and state policies designed both to reduce poverty and inequality and to restore fiscal responsibility in equitable and effective ways

More CBPP research
http://www.cbpp.org/research/view-all

How Housing Matters
http://howhousingmatters.org/

Over the past seven years, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation has invested $25 million in grants to support research into how access to quality, affordable housing affects families and communities. How Housing Matters, an online resource from the MacArthur Foundation and the Urban Land Institute, was created in 2014 to make that research available to the general public. The site provides data-driven suggestions from the opening page. For instance, research has shown that reducing childhood moves, increasing access to economically diverse schools, and lowering rents so that families can invest on enrichment can all improve education outcomes. The meat of the page, however, lies in the Featured Content section, which is searchable by a dozen categories, including Community Profile, Expert Q&A, Research Brief, and by date.

Source:
The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout 1994-2015.
https://www.scout.wisc.edu

2015 Index of Economic Freedom
http://www.heritage.org/index/ranking

The Index of Economic Freedom is published annually by the Wall Street Journal and The Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank whose stated mission is to "formulate and promote... the principles of free enterprise, limited government, individual freedom, traditional American values, and a strong national defense." The 2015 rankings break countries into five categories based on a cumulative metric. Countries like Hong Kong, Singapore, and New Zealand are considered economically Free. Other nations fall into the categories of Mostly Free, Moderately Free, Mostly Unfree, and Repressed. While rankings and economics might not be for everyone, readers may also find much to ponder in the dozens of profiles of individual nations. Here, they can read about measures of Rule of Law, Regulatory Efficiency, Limited Government, Open Markets, and other metrics. The website also allows readers to compare nations. For instance, a comparison of Hong Kong and the United States shows Hong Kong outperforming the U.S. in most categories of economic freedom every year for the past 20 years.

Source:
From The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout 1994-2015.

https://www.scout.wisc.edu

The Effect of Rising Inequality on Social Security
https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/economy/report/2015/02/10/106373/the-effect-of-rising-inequality-on-social-security/
By Rebecca Vallas, Christian E. Weller, Rachel West, Jackie Odum
February 10, 2015
Social Security has become a core component of retirement security in the United States: Nearly two-thirds of seniors rely on the program’s benefits for most of their income. Year after year, Social Security serves as our nation’s most effective anti-poverty program; in 2012, it kept more than 22 million Americans out of poverty.

Source:
Center for American Progress
https://www.americanprogress.org/
The Center for American Progress is an independent nonpartisan educational institute dedicated to improving the lives of Americans through progressive ideas and action.

Reducing Our Obscene Level of Child Poverty
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/28/opinion/charles-blow-reducing-our-obscene-level-of-child-poverty.html
January 28, 2015

Today, the Children’s Defense Fund released a report entitled Ending Child Poverty Now that calls this country’s rate of child poverty “a moral disgrace."

People may disagree about the choices parents make — including premarital sex and out-of-wedlock births. People may disagree about access to methods of family planning — including contraception and abortion. People may disagree about the size and role of government — including the role of safety-net programs. But surely we can all agree that no child, once born, should suffer through poverty.

Surely we can all agree that working to end child poverty — or at least severely reduce it — is a moral obligation of a civilized society.

Source:
New York Times:

http://www.nytimes.com

-------------------------------------------------

Complete report:

Ending Child Poverty Now
http://www.childrensdefense.org/library/PovertyReport/EndingChildPovertyNow.html
It is a national moral disgrace that there are 14.7 million poor children and 6.5 million extremely poor children in the United States of America – the world’s largest economy. It is also unnecessary, costly and the greatest threat to our future national, economic and military security.
For the first time, this report shows that by investing an additional 2 percent of the federal budget into existing programs and policies that increase employment, make work pay, and ensure children’s basic needs are met, the nation could reduce child poverty by 60 percent and lift 6.6 million children out of poverty.

Table of contents
Overview
Chapter 1 : Poverty Hurts Children and Our Nation's Future
Chapter 2 : How to Reduce Child Poverty Right Now
Chapter 3 : Combined Impacts and Costs
Tradeoffs: Paying to End Child Poverty
Chapter 4 : Conclusion and Recommendations

Source:
Children’s Defense Fund (CDF)

http://www.childrensdefense.org/
CDF provides a strong, effective and independent voice for all the children of America who cannot vote, lobby or speak for themselves. We pay particular attention to the needs of poor children, children of color and those with disabilities.

---

Related links from
the Urban Institute:

Reducing Child Poverty in the US: Costs and Impacts of
Policies Proposed by the Children’s Defense Fund
(PDF - 3.8MB, 158 pages)
http://goo.gl/QoPsdb
By Linda Giannarelli et al.
January 2015
A large portion of US children live in poverty—22 percent according to the official measure, and 18 percent according to the Census Bureau’s Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM). The SPM shows that child poverty is alleviated by the current safety net, but despite those benefits child poverty has risen over the last decade.

Within that context, the Children’s Defense Fund (CDF) contracted with the Urban Institute to assess the costs and impacts of a variety of policy options that could further reduce child poverty.

Source:
Urban Institute
http://www.urban.org/
The nonprofit Urban Institute is dedicated to elevating the debate on social and economic policy. For nearly five decades, Urban scholars have conducted research and offered evidence-based solutions that improve lives and strengthen communities across a rapidly urbanizing world.

Chart Book: The Earned Income Tax Credit and Child Tax Credit
HTML version : http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=5253
PDF version (22 pp.) : http://www.cbpp.org/files/1-7-15tax-chartbook.pdf
January 7, 2015
The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and Child Tax Credit (CTC) are successful federal tax credits for low- and moderate-income working people that encourage work, help offset the cost of raising children, and lift millions of people out of poverty. Recent research suggests that income from these credits leads to far-reaching benefits at every stage of life, including improved school performance, higher college enrollment, and increased work effort and earnings in adulthood. Unless policymakers act, key features of the EITC and CTC will expire at the end of 2017, causing millions of low-income working families to lose all or part of their credits.

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
http://www.cbpp.org/

Related links:

Earned Income Tax Credit
http://goo.gl/3bfKsR

Child Tax Credit (CTC)
http://goo.gl/YZoaGc

Civil Legal Aid in the United States:
An Update for 2013
(PDF - 212K, 29 pages)
By Alan W. Houseman
November 2013
The United States is facing a crisis of funding at both the federal and state levels. As a result of substantial reductions in domestic discretionary spending because of the Budget Control Act of 2011 and sequestration, and the prospect of even more reductions in 2014, we anticipate that the LSC (Legal Services Corporation) appropriations may go down even below where we currently are in 2013.
(...)
An integrated and comprehensive civil legal assistance system should have the capacity to:
(1) educate and inform low-income persons of their legal rights and responsibilities and the options and services available to solve their legal problems; and
(2) ensure that all low-income persons, including individuals and groups who are politically or socially disfavored, have meaningful access to high-quality legal assistance providers when they require legal advice and representation.
Source:
Center for Law and Social Policy

Recent releases from the Annie E. Casey Foundation:

Nearly half of America's families with young children struggle to make ends meet
http://www.aecf.org/blog/nearly-half-of-americas-families-with-young-children-struggle-to-make-ends/
Blog post
November 12, 2014
With almost half the nation’s young children growing up in low-income households, a new report from the Casey Foundation calls for a comprehensive effort to lift kids out of poverty. (...) The KIDS COUNT® policy report, Creating Opportunity for Families: A Two-Generation Approach, outlines how the public, nonprofit and private sectors must work together to reduce poverty among the 10 million low-income families with young children in the United States.

The complete report:

Creating Opportunity for Families: A Two-Generation Approach (PDF - 1.9MB, 20 pages)
http://www.aecf.org/m/resourcedoc/aecf-CreatingOpportunityforFamilies-2014.pdf
Nearly half of the nation's families with young children struggle to make ends meet. This report makes the case for creating opportunity for families by addressing the needs of parents and their children simultaneously. The report describes the Foundation's two-generation approach, which calls for connecting families with early childhood education, job training and other tools to achieve financial stability and break the cycle of poverty, and recommends ways to help equip families with what they need to thrive.
(...)
The report outlines three broad recommendations:
1. Create policies that equip parents and children with the income, tools and skills they need to succeed — as a family and as individuals.
2. Put common sense into common practice by structuring public systems to respond to the realities facing today’s families.
3. Use existing child, adult and neighborhood programs and platforms to build evidence for practical pathways out of poverty for entire families.

A Collection of Resources on Two-Generation Approaches
http://www.aecf.org/blog/learn-more-a-collection-of-resources-on-two-generation-approaches/
November 12, 2014

---

2014 KIDS COUNT Data Book
http://www.aecf.org/resources/the-2014-kids-count-data-book/
The 25th edition of Casey’s annual report on child well-being — the 2014 KIDS COUNT Data Book — examines how U.S. children have fared since 1990. While national and state policies have resulted in positive gains in child health and education, the Data Book notes a decline in the economic well-being of children and the communities in which they live. In addition to its retrospective analysis, the report looks at the latest data and uses 16 key indicators to rank states on child well-being. Using an index of 16 indicators, the 2014 report ranks states on overall child well-being and in four domains: (1) economic well-being, (2) education, (3) health, and (4) family and community. For 2014, the three highest-ranked states for child well-being were Massachusetts, Vermont and Iowa; the three lowest-ranked were Nevada, New Mexico and Mississippi

Complete report:

The 2014 KIDS COUNT Data Book:
An annual report on how children are faring in the United States
(PDF - 6.3MB, 60 pages)
http://www.aecf.org/m/resourcedoc/aecf-2014kidscountdatabook-2014.pdf

Child Well-Being Rankings by state (small PDF file)
http://www.aecf.org/m/databook/aecf-2014kidscountdatabook-rankings-2014.pdf
Overall Rank - Economic Well-Being Rank - Education Rank - Health Rank - Family and Community Rank

2014 National and State Data Profiles
http://www.aecf.org/resources/the-2014-kids-count-data-book/national-and-state-data-profiles/

News Releases for the 2014 KIDS COUNT Data Book (national and state level)
http://www.aecf.org/resources/the-2014-kids-count-data-book/news-releases/

Most Popular KIDS COUNT Resources
http://www.aecf.org/work/kids-count/
Includes links to the following:
* Creating Opportunity for Families * The 2014 KIDS COUNT Data Book * Race for Results * Early Reading Proficiency in the United States * The 2013 KIDS COUNT Data Book * Early Warning! Why Reading by the End of Third Grade Matters * The First Eight Years * Why Income Inequality Hurts Kids and Families * Reducing Youth Incarceration in the United States

KIDS COUNT Network
http://www.aecf.org/work/kids-count/kids-count-network/
A group of state-based child advocacy and research organizations that use data to promote smart policies on issues ranging from child welfare and juvenile justice to education and economic opportunity.

Kids Count Data Center
http://datacenter.kidscount.org/
A project of the Annie E. Casey Foundation, KIDS COUNT is the premier source for data on child and family well-being in the United States. Access hundreds of indicators, download data and create reports and graphics on the KIDS COUNT Data Center that support smart decisions about children and families.

Source:
Annie E. Casey Foundation

http://www.aecf.org/
The Annie E. Casey Foundation is a private philanthropy that creates a brighter future for the nation’s children by developing solutions to strengthen families, build paths to economic opportunity and transform struggling communities into safer and healthier places to live, work and grow.

New from
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:

Changing Priorities: State Criminal Justice Reforms and Investments in Education
By Michael Mitchell and Michael Leachman
October 28, 2014
Most states’ prison populations are at historic highs after decades of extraordinary growth; in 36 states, the prison population has more than tripled as a share of the state population since 1978. This rapid growth, which continued even after crime rates fell substantially in the 1990s, has been costly. Corrections spending is now the third-largest category of spending in most states, behind education and health care. If states were still spending on corrections what they spent in the mid-1980s, adjusted for inflation, they would have about $28 billion more each year that they could choose to spend on more productive investments or a mix of investments and tax reductions.

The Full Report:

HTML version : http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=4220
PDF version (21 pages) : http://www.cbpp.org//files/10-28-14sfp.pdf

Source:
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP)

http://www.cbpp.org/
is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals.

---

Also from CBPP:

Data Show TANF Didn’t Respond Adequately to Need
During Recession, Contrary to New Study’s Claims

http://goo.gl/9Ik2hy
September 10, 2014 at 2:56 pm
A recent study [ http://goo.gl/C2ZHx1 ] from researchers at the Brookings Institution and the University of Nevada concludes that the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program responded to increased need during the Great Recession in the majority of states as a good safety net program would. This conclusion, however, is based on seriously flawed analysis, as we explain in a new paper [ http://goo.gl/Er6Rkl ].

Source:
Off the Charts Blog
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/
The Off the Charts Blog is an ongoing feature of the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
http://www.cbpp.org/

By the Numbers: U.S. Poverty
http://billmoyers.com/2013/05/29/u-s-poverty-by-the-numbers/
Updated July 24, 2014
By Greg Kaufmann

[Excerpts only --- click the link for the complete collection of numbers]:
Unless otherwise noted, all figures are based on 2012 Census Data on poverty, the most recent released.

* US poverty (less than $19,090 for a family of three): 46.5 million people, 15 percent
* People who would have been in poverty if not for Social Security, 2012: 61.8 million (program kept 15.3 million people out of poverty)
* People in the US experiencing poverty by age 65: Roughly half
* Twice the poverty level (less than $46,042 for a family of four): 106 million people, more than 1 in 3 Americans
* Jobs in the US paying less than $34,000 a year: 50 percent
* Families receiving cash assistance, 1996: 68 for every 100 families living in poverty
* Families receiving cash assistance, 2011: 27 for every 100 families living in poverty
* Impact of public policy, 2010: Without government assistance, poverty would have been twice as high — nearly 30 percent of population
*
Annual cost of child poverty nationwide: $500 billion

Author Greg Kaufmann is a senior fellow with the Center for American Progress [ http://www.americanprogress.org/ ]

Source:
Bill Moyers.com
http://billmoyers.com/

Inequality for All
http://billmoyers.com/episode/full-show-inequality-for-all/
September 20, 2013
Robert Reich tells Bill Moyers about 'Inequality for All,' a documentary about our shrinking middle class and the growing problem of income inequality.
[ Robert Reich was Bill Clinton’s secretary of labor; he is currently a professor at the University of California Berkeley.

NOTE : This video is almost an hour long, and WELL worth the time to watch!

Source:
BillMoyers.com
[ http://billmoyers.com/ ]

The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) at 18
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/?fa=view&id=3566
August 22, 2014
Eighteen years ago, the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant was created as a part of the 1996 welfare reform law to replace the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program. Welfare reform provided states with a fixed block grant in exchange for greater flexibility in how they could use the funds. In addition, for the first time, cash benefits were time limited and states were held accountable for engaging most cash assistance recipients in work or work-related activities.
(...)
Looking back over TANF’s history, it is impossible to reconcile the facts with claims that welfare reform was such an extraordinary success that we should use it as a model for reforming other safety net programs. In TANF’s 18-year history, never-married mothers with a high school education or less made substantial gains in employment in only the first four years — largely due to the roaring economy of the late 1990s — and those gains have almost entirely eroded in the subsequent 14. It is wishful thinking to assume that we could see the same employment gains we saw in TANF’s early years in today’s sluggish labor market.

Related areas of research:

Welfare Reform/TANF
http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=42

Federal Policies
http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=101

State Policies
http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=124

Trends
http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=125

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

http://www.cbpp.org/

---

NOTE TO SOCIAL PROGRAM RESEARCHERS WHO MIGHT
CONSIDER COMPARING THE RELATIVE SUCCESS
OF AMERICAN WELFARE REFORMS WITH CANADIAN
WELFARE REFORMS:

DON'T.

In the U.S., state programs under TANF are NOT comparable to Canadian social assistance programs on a number of levels.
For more on the incomparability of American and Canadian welfare systems and the federal cash contributions in each country,
see http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/canada_us_welfare.htm

Ryan Budget Would Slash SNAP by $137 Billion Over Ten Years
By Dottie Rosenbaum
House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan’s budget plan includes cuts in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as the Food Stamp Program) of $137 billion — 18 percent — over the next ten years (2015-2024), which would necessitate ending food assistance for millions of low-income families, cutting benefits for millions of such households, or some combination of the two. Chairman Ryan proposed similarly deep SNAP cuts in each of his last three budgets. The new Ryan budget specifies two categories of SNAP cuts:
1.
It includes every major benefit cut in a House-passed version of the recent farm bill that Congress ultimately rejected when enacting the final farm bill.
2. It would convert SNAP into a block grant beginning in 2019 and cut funding steeply -- by $125 billion (or almost 30 percent) over 2019 to 2024.

View the full report:

http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=4118
http://www.cbpp.org/files/4-4-14fa.pdf (PDF - 9pp)

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

http://www.cbpp.org/

Also from the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:
(January 10, 2014)

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on the 50th anniversary of the War on Poverty, unemployment insurance, the economy, health care, and state budgets and taxes.

* On the War on Poverty at 50, Arloc Sherman explained how the safety net kept 41 million people out of poverty in 2012 under the federal government’s Supplemental Poverty Measure.
http://goo.gl/8X6uXN

* On unemployment insurance (UI), Chad Stone laid out four key points that justify restoring federal emergency unemployment benefits.
http://goo.gl/8caIE7

* On the economy, Chad Stone cautioned that December’s surprisingly disappointing jobs report should temper recent optimism of an improving labor market in 2014.
http://goo.gl/fiFlbN

* On health care, Paul Van de Water noted that health spending growth in 2012 remained low for the fourth consecutive year.
http://goo.gl/ISIbgf

* On state budgets and taxes, Michael Mazerov explained why Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s proposed business tax cuts are not the ticket to growth for New York.
http://goo.gl/tccWYz

-----------------------------

Media coverage of CBPP work in the past week:

* 50 years of the War on Poverty. But which poverty? (Market Place - January 8, 2014)
http://goo.gl/XdeMGI

* On Fighting the Last War (On Poverty) (The New York Times - January 8, 2014)
http://goo.gl/QcTvAB

* Unemployment Insurance: Six Need-to-Know Insights (The Fiscal Times - January 6, 2014)
http://goo.gl/5Zr37Z

* 50 years later, war on poverty has new battle lines (USA Today - January 6, 2014)
http://goo.gl/R3b24H

Source:
Off the Charts
("Policy insight beyond the numbers")
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/

Off the Charts is the official Blog of the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP)

http://www.cbpp.org/

Related link:

War on Poverty - from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_on_Poverty

How poverty disenfranchises millions of Americans
http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2014/01/poverty-vs-democracy-in-america/282809/

More on the 50th anniversary of the War on Poverty – it’s not a lost cause:
http://www.latimes.com/opinion/commentary/la-oe-stevens-war-on-poverty-20140108,0,4908370.story

Mapping poverty in America – census data creates detailed map:
http://billmoyers.com/2014/01/07/how-close-to-poverty-are-you/

---

New from the
Brookings Institution:

A Dozen Facts about America’s Struggling Lower-Middle-Class
http://www.brookings.edu/research/reports/2013/12/12-facts-lower-middle-class
By Benjamin H. Harris and Melissa S. Kearney
December 4, 2013
This Hamilton Project policy paper provides a dozen facts on struggling lower-middle-class families focusing on two key challenges: food insecurity, and the low return to work for struggling lower-middle-class families who lose tax and transfer benefits as their earnings increase. These facts highlight the critical role of federal tax and transfer programs in providing income support to families struggling to remain out of poverty.

Source:
The Hamilton Project
http://www.hamiltonproject.org/
http://www.brookings.edu/about/projects/hamiltonproject
The Hamilton Project was launched in April 2006 as an economic policy initiative at the Brookings Institution by a unique combination of leading academics, business people, and public policy makers who wanted to develop a serious, systematic strategy to address the challenges that our economy faces.

Brookings Institution
http://www.brookings.edu/

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Strengthening SNAP for a More Food-Secure, Healthy America
http://www.brookings.edu/research/papers/2013/12/03-strengthening-snap-food-secure-healthy-america-schanzenbach
By: Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach
December 4, 2013
The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the fundamental safety-net program in the United States. Over its fifty-year history, it has effectively reduced hunger and buffered American families against economic downturns. This paper provides an overview of SNAP’s shortcomings, and a proposed detailed policy agenda to improve SNAP’s effectiveness. In particular, I propose to subsidize healthy foods in order to encourage better nutrition among SNAP recipients and to reform eligibility and payment rules to enable SNAP to better fight hunger and support program beneficiaries.

Paper:
Strengthening SNAP for a More Food-Secure, Healthy America
(PDF - 624K, 32 pages)
http://goo.gl/m9rs7G

Policy Brief:
Strengthening SNAP for a More Food-Secure, Healthy America (PDF - 368K, 8 pages)
http://goo.gl/XfaOAM

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Giving Secondary Earners a Tax Break:
A Proposal to Help Low- and Middle-Income Families
(PDF - 704K, 32 pages)
http://goo.gl/ZLqqdn
Discussion Paper
December 2013
Abstract
The current structure of the tax and transfer system in the United States makes it particularly challenging for low-income married couples with children to work their way into the middle class. Specifically, the tax and transfer system has an inherent secondary-earner penalty that discourages work efforts and reduces the return to work for a second earner within a married couple. When children are present, a spouse’s work efforts often brings associated child-care costs, making the return to work even lower. Our estimates suggest that under the current federal tax and transfer system, and assuming standard child-care costs, a family headed by a primary earner making $25,000 a year will take home less than 30 percent of a spouse’s earnings. We propose a secondary-earner deduction for low- to moderate-income families. This incremental modification to the tax code would increase disposable income for affected families.

[ Policy Brief on the above discussion paper : http://goo.gl/aXoYlt ]

Source:
Brookings Institution

http://www.brookings.edu/

29 Incredible Facts Which Prove That Poverty In America Is Absolutely Exploding
http://theeconomiccollapseblog.com/archives/29-incredible-facts-which-prove-that-poverty-in-america-is-absolutely-exploding
By Michael Snyder
October 27, 2013
Did you know that the number of Americans on welfare is higher than the number of Americans that have full-time jobs? Did you know that 1.2 million public school students in the U.S. are currently homeless?
(...)
Yes, things are great in New York City, Washington D.C. and San Francisco, but almost everywhere else economic conditions continue to steadily get worse. (...) The following are 29 incredible facts which prove that poverty in America is absolutely exploding.

Source:
The Economic Collapse Blog
http://theeconomiccollapseblog.com/

The Astonishing Decline of Homelessness in America
... and why this quiet trend is about to reverse itself

http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2013/08/the-amazing-and-astonishing-decline-of-homelessness-in-america/279050/
By Stephen Lurie
August 26, 2013
Despite a housing crisis, a great recession, rising income inequality, and elevated poverty, there is some good news among the most vulnerable segment of American society. America’s homeless population – an estimated 633,000 people – has declined in the last decade.
(...) The decline of homelessness over the past eight years is nothing short of a blue-moon public policy triumph. Why don’t you know about it?
(...) As quietly as homelessness has fallen, so too it will go up quietly – unless there is major intervention. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development estimates that sequestration cuts from homelessness programs are set to expel 100,000 people from a range of housing and shelter programs this year. That’s nearly one sixth of the current total homeless population. Far from gently raising the homeless rate, it would undo a full decade of progress.

Source:
The Atlantic
http://www.theatlantic.com/

Related link:

Obama vows to end homelessness in 10 years
http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2010/06/22/96322/obama-administration-vows-to-end.html
June 22, 2010
Opening Doors : A Federal Strategic Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness [PDF - 3MB, 74 pages : http://bit.ly/cUHO2Q ], calls for ending child and family homelessness in 10 years while wiping out chronic homelessness and homelessness among veterans in five years. According to the 74-page plan, "Stable housing is the foundation upon which people build their lives — absent a safe, decent, affordable place to live, it is next to impossible to achieve good health, positive educational outcomes or reach one's economic potential."

Source:
McClatchy.com
http://www.mcclatchydc.com/

Why Get off Welfare?
http://www.cato.org/publications/commentary/why-get-welfare
Commentary by Michael D. Tanner
August 22, 2013
Contrary to stereotypes, there is no evidence that people on welfare are lazy. Indeed, surveys of welfare recipients consistently show their desire for a job. But there is also evidence that many are reluctant to accept available employment opportunities. Despite work requirements included in the 1996 welfare reform, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services says less than 42% of adult welfare recipients participate in work activities nationwide. Why the contradiction? Perhaps it’s because, while poor people are not lazy, they are not stupid either. If you pay people more not to work than they can earn at a job, many won’t work.
A new study by the Cato Institute found that in many states, it does indeed pay better to be on welfare than it does to work.

[ Author Michael Tanner is a senior fellow at the Cato Institute.]

Cato Institute
http://www.cato.org/
The Cato Institute is a public policy research organization — a think tank – dedicated to the principles of individual liberty, limited government, free markets and peace.

Also by
Michael Tanner:

The Work versus Welfare Trade-Off: 2013
http://www.cato.org/publications/white-paper/work-versus-welfare-trade
By Michael D. Tanner and Charles Hughes
August 19, 2013
In 1995, the Cato Institute published a groundbreaking study, The Work vs. Welfare Trade-Off, which estimated the value of the full package of welfare benefits available to a typical recipient in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. It found that not only did the value of such benefits greatly exceed the poverty level but, because welfare benefits are tax-free, their dollar value was greater than the amount of take-home income a worker would receive from an entry-level job. Since then, many welfare programs have undergone significant change...

Complete white paper (PDF - 4.2MB, 52 pages):
http://object.cato.org/sites/cato.org/files/pubs/pdf/theworkversus.pdf

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Rebuttal from the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:

Cato’s Fundamentally Flawed Analysis
By Sharon Parrott
August 22, 2013
The Cato Institute released a report this week that argues that people on “welfare” are better off than low-income working families. In reality, that couldn’t be further from the truth, as we explain in our recent commentary.

Cato’s analysis makes two fundamental errors:
1. It substantially overstates the help that poor jobless families receive.
2. It substantially understates the help that low-income working families get.

View the full blog post:
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/catos-fundamentally-flawed-analysis/

View the related commentary:
* HTML : http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=4004
* PDF (4 pages) : http://www.cbpp.org/files/8-21-13pov.pdf

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

http://www.cbpp.org/

Round-Up: Everything You Need to Know About
the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program

http://www.offthechartsblog.org/round-up-everything-you-need-to-know-about-snap/
July 12, 2013
Yesterday, the House of Representatives broke from the long-standing, bipartisan practice of pairing food assistance and agriculture programs when it passed a stand-alone farm bill reauthorizing agriculture programs, but removed the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as the Food Stamp program).

Click the link above for the following compilation of analyses and blog posts that provide background about the SNAP program:
---
Introduction to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) - March 28, 2013
--- SNAP Is Effective and Efficient - January 29, 2013
--- SNAP Responded to the Recession and Will Shrink as the Economy Improves - May 15, 2013
--- SNAP Benefits Will Be Cut for All Participants in November 2013 - May 1, 2013
--- The Relationship Between SNAP and Work Among Low-Income Households - January 29, 2013

Source:
Off the Charts Blog
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

http://www.cbpp.org/
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is a nonprofit, nonpartisan policy organization working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals.

---

- Go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm


From the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP):

Online Services for Key Low-Income Benefit Programs:
What States Provide Online with Respect to SNAP, TANF, Child Care Assistance, Medicaid, CHIP, and General Assistance
Updated May 1, 2013
HTML version :
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=1414
PDF version (736 K, 41 pages) :
http://www.cbpp.org/files/1-14-04tanf.pdf

- includes hundreds of links to information in all U.S. states about the five main state-administered low-income benefit programs:
* SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly known as Food Stamps)
* TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families)
* Medicaid
(Means-tested health program for certain people and families with low incomes and resources)
* CHIP
(Children’s Health Insurance Program)
* Child Care Assistance

The state-by-state links in this directory will be particularly useful to those researching basic information about each state’s programs or variations across states with respect to policies or applications. There are several caveats to consider when using these resources, however (see p. 7 ("Online Links") for those caveats.

NOTE : In addition to information provided for the five main state-administered low-income benefit programs listed in the previous paragraph, this directory includes links to the 30 states that have General Assistance (GA) programs for individuals not qualifying for any other public assistance.

Recommended resource!!
This collection of links offers direct access to information (FOR EACH STATE] about the five programs mentioned above (including General Assistance) under the following headings:
* Online applications * Online policy manuals * Printable applications * Eligibility Screener/Calculator and Online Applications * Check application status * Renew benefits * Update information/report changes * View account information * Program data

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP)
http://www.cbpp.org/

New from the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities :

Working-Family Tax Credits Help Over 1 Million Military Families:
Credits Keep More Than 140,000 Veteran and Active-Duty Families Out of Poverty
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3986
PDF of this article(small file, 3pages)
http://www.cbpp.org/files/7-2-13pov.pdf
By Arloc Sherman
July 2, 2013
About one in four current or former armed forces families with children, or 1.5 million military families, receive either the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) or the low-income component of the Child Tax Credit (CTC), two tax credits for low- and moderate-income working families, according to an analysis of Census and IRS data. In about 280,000 of these families, a parent is currently serving in the armed forces; in the rest, a parent is a veteran.

The 1.5 million families contain about 3 million children under age 18 and received, on average, about $1,000 per household from the low-income portion of the Child Tax Credit in 2011 and $2,650 from the EITC. Studies have found that children whose families receive more income support from the EITC tend to do better in school and are more likely to attend college and to earn more as adults.

Related areas of research:

Poverty and Income
http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=36

Tax — Federal
http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=30

Earned Income Tax Credit and Child Tax Credit
http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=27

Individuals and Families
http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=135

Taxes and the Economy
http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=137

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
http://www.cbpp.org/
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals.

New from the
Annie E. Casey Foundation:

Child Poverty Still on the Rise, but Outlook for Children
Better in Education and Health, KIDS COUNT report finds
(PDF - 232K, 3 pages)
http://datacenter.kidscount.org/~/media/159/USA2013DataBookNewsRelease.pdf
Gradual economic recovery presents national opportunity to refocus on investments in early childhood development
June 24, 2013
News Release
BALTIMORE — As the nation’s economy recovers, America’s children are showing some signs of improvement despite an ever-growing poverty rate, according to new data in the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s KIDS COUNT® Data Book.
(...)
Children continue to progress in the areas of education and health. From roughly 2005 to 2011, the teen birth rate dropped by 15 percent to a historic low. (...) The percentage of children without health insurance decreased by 30 percent. Although the economic well-being of the nation’s children improved slightly from 2010
to 2011, the negative impact of the recession remains evident. (...) In particular, younger children are disproportionately affected by the lingering effects of the recession: The poverty rate among children younger than 3 is 26 percent; among 3- to 5-year-olds, it is 25 percent — higher than the national average for all kids.

Source:
2013 Kids Count
National and State News Releases
http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications/databook/StateNewsReleases/2013

--------

2013 KIDS COUNT Data Book
National and state-by-state data on key indicators of child well-being
http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications/databook/2013
- main page for this book, includes links to (1) download or order the book, (2) media resources, (3) state rankings & interactive wheel, and (4) custom data reports.

The complete book:

2013 Kids Count Data Book : State Trends in Child Well-Being (PDF - 7MB, 56 pages)
http://datacenter.kidscount.org/files/2013KIDSCOUNTDataBook.pdf

Contents:
Foreword
Kids Count Data Center
Overall Child well-being
Economic well-being
Education
Health
Family and Community
Conclusion
Appendices:
--- About the Index
--- Definitions and Data Sources
--- Primary Contacts for State Kids Count Projects
--- About the Annie E. Casey Foundation and Kids Count

- Indicators include:
* Demographics * Economic Well-Being * Education * Family & Community * Health * Safety & Risky Behaviors

U.S. national and state profiles
http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications/databook/StateProfileSheets/2013

Kids Count Data Center
http://datacenter.kidscount.org/

Source:
Annie E. Casey Foundation

http://www.aecf.org/
The Annie E. Casey Foundation creates a brighter future for the nation’s children by developing solutions to strengthen families, build paths to economic opportunity and transform struggling communities into safer and healthier places to live, work and grow.

---

Related media coverage:

June 24, 2013
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch/2013/06/24/
2013 Kids Count Data Book
Click the link above to access all 14 articles whose headlines appear below:
--- Kids Count: Parents finding themselves increasingly without jobs, Associated Press
--- Children living in poverty longer, putting their futures at risk, Washington Post
--- As economy improves, so do lives of children in state, study says, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
--- ‘Good news and bad news’ in Iowa Kids Count report, Des Moines Register
--- Kids Count report: Michigan ranks last in Great Lakes states for child well-being, Mlive.com
--- Kentucky, Indiana children slide economically in Kids Count report, Louisville Courier-Journal
--- Arizona still lags in child welfare, Arizona Republic
--- Are New Mexico kids all right? Report says no, Santa Fe New Mexican
--- Utah’s slipping when it comes to well-being of children, report shows, Deseret News
--- More Colorado children living in poverty, Denver Post
--- California ranks low in child well-being; Northeast tops, Los Angeles Times
--- Oregon children fare poorly in economic well-being, national report says, The Oregonian
--- Report: Economic well-being of kids in Washington still down, 2013, Seattle Times

Source:
Poverty Dispatch (U.S.)
http://www.irp.wisc.edu/dispatch
The Poverty Dispatch is a daily scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

U.S. Budget for Fiscal Year 2014

On April 10, 2013, President Barack Obama sent his Budget for Fiscal Year 2014 to Congress for debate and approval.
For links to detailed information about the budget process in the U.S. and about the President's 2014 budget proposals, see:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm#2014_budget

Selected recent releases from the
Center for Budget and Policy Priorities:

Welfare Reform is No Model for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/welfare-reforms-no-model-for-snap/
June 28, 2013
As House leaders consider next steps [ http://goo.gl/JIvMo ] on the farm bill (which the House rejected last week), a key question is the fate of its punitive Southerland amendment [ http://goo.gl/lWnt2 ] , which would reward states that end SNAP benefits for unemployed families that want to work.

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) defended the amendment on the House floor by linking it to the 1996 welfare reform law, which created Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). But, in reality, the amendment is not the same as the work requirements [ http://goo.gl/YJpIy ] in programs like TANF, and the facts don’t support Rep. Cantor’s claim that the welfare law’s “results were nothing but a success”:

So, were the results of American welfare (TANF) reforms really "nothing but a success"?

Fact #1: Single mothers’ employment rose during the early years of welfare reform, but it started losing ground in 2000 and, now, nearly all of those gains have been lost.
Fact #2: Welfare reform contributed only modestly to the rise in employment for single mothers during the 1990s
Fact #3: TANF, the centerpiece of welfare reform, helps many fewer poor families than its predecessor, Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC)
Fact #4: States did not respond to higher need during hard economic times.
TIP : Scroll to the bottom of the article for links to three related blog posts.

Source:
Off the Charts blog
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/

Related link:

A Quick Guide to SNAP Eligibility and Benefits
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=1269

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
http://www.cbpp.org/
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals.

---

Related links:

Lessons of the Great Recession: How the Safety Net Performed
http://economix.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/06/24/lessons-of-the-great-recession-how-the-safety-net-performed/
June 24, 2013
By Jared Bernstein
Though the economy is clearly improving, we’ve yet to fully escape the gravitation pull of the great recession. The job market remains weak, and wages and middle-class incomes remain stagnant.
(...)
...the poor and their advocates were not the ones who tanked the economy. Nor should they be on the defensive when the safety net expands to offset some of the damage. The right question at such times is thus not why the SNAP rolls are so high. It’s whether SNAP, unemployment insurance, T.A.N.F. et al are expanding adequately to meet the needs of the poor.

TIP : Scroll to the bottom of the article for links to the following posts:
* Food Stamps and Unemployment Insurance
* Has the 1996 Welfare Reform Been Reversed?
* Jobless Benefits as an Antipoverty Program
* Food Stamps: Married People Need Not Apply
* Millions Caught by the Social Safety Net

Source:
New York Times Business Blog
http://economix.blogs.nytimes.com/


Temporary Assistance to Needy Families Emerging from the Downturn a Weaker Safety Net (with State-by-State data)
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3915
By LaDonna Pavetti, Ife Finch, and Liz Schott
March 1, 2013
Nationally, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), which provides basic assistance to families with little or no income, responded only modestly to the severe recession that began in December 2007, and the national TANF caseload began to decline in January 2011. State TANF caseloads varied widely in their responsiveness during the recession, growing substantially in some states but changing little in many others.

State-by-State Fact Sheets
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3378

Related link:

Policy Basics: An Introduction to TANF
HTML : http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=936
PDF ( 7 pages) : http://www.cbpp.org/files/7-22-10tanf2.pdf
By Liz Schott
Updated December 4, 2012
What Is TANF?
Congress created the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant through the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996, as part of a federal effort to “end welfare as we know it.” TANF replaced Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), which had provided cash welfare to poor families with children since 1935.

Related areas of research:

Welfare Reform : http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=42
Federal Policies : http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=101
State Policies : http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=124
Trends : http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=125

Source:
Center for Budget and Policy Priorities

http://www.cbpp.org/


Off the Charts (CBPP Blog) - February 8, 2013

Selected content from the
latest issue of Off the Charts,
the CBPP blog:
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/

On state budgets and taxes, Jon Shure explained why millionaires are unlikely to leave California as a result of a recent tax increase.
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/tax-hike-wont-drive-millionaires-from-california/

On health reform, Sarah Lueck noted that federal tax credits will help keep insurance premium costs down for young adults.
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/new-tax-credits-blunt-insurance-premium-increases-for-young-adults/

On safety net programs, we highlighted Robert Greenstein’s commentary on how the safety net lifts millions of Americans out of poverty and has positive long-term effects especially for low-income children.
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/greenstein-safety-net-lifts-millions-out-of-poverty-and-has-positive-long-term-effects/

On Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefit cuts, Stacy Dean illustrated the serious hardship that an impending benefit cut will likely cause for some program participants.
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/snap-beneficiaries-face-a-food-cliff-in-november/

We also issued a paper on impending SNAP benefit cuts.
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3899

[ Related link:
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
http://www.fns.usda.gov/snap ]

On the Child Tax Credit (CTC), Chuck Marr noted House Majority Leader Eric Cantor’s praise for CTC and explained that making recent improvements to the CTC and the Earned Income Tax Credit permanent would improve the lives of working families.
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/working-family-tax-credits-deserve-bipartisan-praise-and-action/

On the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, we outlined LaDonna Pavetti’s presentation at the Center for American Progress on the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program and explained the important improvements to the EITC and CTC that Congress extended through 2017.
* http://www.offthechartsblog.org/building-a-better-tanf-program/
* http://www.offthechartsblog.org/important-improvements-to-two-key-tax-credits-explained/

On the effectiveness of the safety net, we issued Robert Greenstein’s commentary on the effectiveness of the safety net and Jared Bernstein’s congressional testimony on the importance of investing in education as part of growing the economy.
* http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3898
* http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3897

Finally, we updated the following backgrounders:

* the number of weeks of unemployment benefits available in each state:
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3164

* the ABCs of state budgets:
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3067

* the federal-state unemployment insurance system:
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=1466

* policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions:
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3167

* climate-change legislation and low-income consumers:
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3168

Source:
Off the Charts, the CBPP blog:
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/

Center on Budget and Policy Priorities - (CBPP)
http://www.cbpp.org/
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is a nonprofit, nonpartisan policy organization working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals.


* Policy Basics: Federal Rental Assistance Programs
HTML - http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3890
PDF (3 pages) - http://www.cbpp.org/files/PolicyBasics-housing-1-25-13RA.pdf
Federal rental assistance enables 5 million low-income households to afford modest homes. Three major programs — Housing Choice Vouchers, Section 8 Project-Based Rental Assistance, and Public Housing— assist about 90 percent of these households.

* Housing Choice Vouchers:
HTML - http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=279
PDF (2 pages) - http://www.cbpp.org/files/PolicyBasics-housing-1-25-13vouch.pdf
Created in the 1970s, the “Section 8” Housing Choice Voucher Program has become the dominant form of federal housing assistance.

* Section 8 Project-based Rental Assistance
H
TML - http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3891
PDF (2 pages) - http://www.cbpp.org/files/PolicyBasics-housing-1-25-13PBRA.pdf
The Section 8 Project-Based Rental Assistance (PBRA) programs enable more than 2 million people in 1.2 million low-income households to afford modest apartments by contracting with private owners to rent some or all of the units in their housing developments to low-income families.

* Public Housing
HTML -
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=2528
PDF (3 pages) - http://www.cbpp.org/files/policybasics-housing.pdf
Public housing is one of the nation’s three main rental assistance programs. Public housing developments provide affordable homes to 2.2 million low-income Americans


Online Services for Key Low-Income Benefit Programs:
What States Provide Online with Respect to SNAP, TANF, Child Care Assistance, Medicaid, and CHIP
Revised January 11, 2013
Virtually all states have made basic program information on the five main state-administered low-income benefit programs — SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly known as Food Stamps), Medicaid, CHIP (Children’s Health Insurance Program), TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families), and child care assistance — available to the public via the Internet. Many states, however, go much further, providing information such as application forms and data on the number of participants. This paper provides links to state information available online for these benefit programs.

View the full report:
HTML :
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=1414
PDF (40 pages) : http://www.cbpp.org/files/1-14-04tanf.pdf


SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) Online:
A Review of State Government SNAP Websites
Updated January 8, 2013
All states make information available to the public via the Internet regarding the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as the Food Stamp Program, including their applications, state policy manuals or regulations, and general program information. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities reviewed all the states’ web pages to determine what information and services they offer regarding the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.

View the full report:
HTML :
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=618
PDF (20 pages) : http://www.cbpp.org/files/8-23-05fa.pdf

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
http://www.cbpp.org/
The Center conducts research and analysis to help shape public debates over proposed budget and tax policies and to help ensure that policymakers consider the needs of low-income families and individuals in these debates. We also develop policy options to alleviate poverty.

From CLASP
(Center for Law and Social Policy):

[NOTE : Both of the articles below contain a number of links to more information.]

Harsh and Unbalanced
http://www.clasp.org/issues/in_focus?type=work_supports&id=0077
December 20, 2012
By Elizabeth Lower-Basch
In less than two weeks, a combination of expiring programs, automatic spending cuts, and tax increases, popularly called the "fiscal cliff," is scheduled to take effect. This week, Speaker Boehner appears to have abandoned attempts to come to agreement with the President on a comprehensive package to prevent this. Instead, he is expected to bring up for a vote in the House of Representatives two proposals, together which would slash spending, particularly on programs that serve low-income individuals, in order to preserve tax breaks for the wealthy and defense spending. Adopting these proposals would be significantly worse than heading off the "fiscal cliff."

---

What’s at Stake for Low-Income Individuals
and Families in the Fiscal Cliff?
http://www.clasp.org/issues/pages?type=poverty_and_opportunity&id=0075
By Elizabeth Lower-Basch
Confused about the fiscal cliff? No wonder since so much media coverage has focused on whether President Obama or the House Republicans have the upper hand, and not on what difference the policies they support will make in real people's lives, particularly low-income individuals and families.

---

Source:
Center for Law and Social Policy
http://www.clasp.org/
CLASP seeks to improve the lives of low-income people. Work We develop and advocate for federal, state and local policies to strengthen families and create pathways to education and work.

-------------------------------------------------

Related links:

From the
Christian Science Monitor:
http://www.csmonitor.com/

'Fiscal cliff' 101: five basic questions answered
http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Politics/2012/1120/Fiscal-cliff-101-5-basic-questions-answered/
President Obama and congressional leaders are working furiously to stop the United States from going over the “fiscal cliff,” a combination of higher taxes and lower spending set to take effect Jan. 1, 2013. What is the fiscal cliff? Where did it come from? And will it get solved before sending the US into a recession? Here are five steps to understanding the fiscal cliff.

---

From About.com:
http://www.about.com/

What is the Fiscal Cliff?
http://bonds.about.com/od/Issues-in-the-News/a/What-Is-The-Fiscal-Cliff.htm

---

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page

United States fiscal cliff
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_fiscal_cliff

From
CNNMoney:

America's near poor: 30 million and struggling
http://money.cnn.com/2012/10/24/news/economy/americans-poverty/
By Tami Luhby
October 24, 2012

They aren't in poverty, but they are just a step away from falling into its clutches. More than 30 million Americans are living just above the poverty line [ http://goo.gl/R7OMH]. These near poor, often defined as having incomes of up to 1.5 times the poverty threshold , were supporting a family of four on no more than $34,500 last year.

The other unemployment rate
http://money.cnn.com/2012/10/18/news/economy/other-unemployment-rate/index.html
By Annalyn Censky
October 18, 2012
U.S. unemployment fell to 7.8% in September. But that doesn't mean the other 92.2% of adults are working. The unemployment rate only measures people who have searched for jobs in the last four weeks, while millions of other out-of-work Americans aren't included. But some economists think there's a better way to measure the health of the job market.

Along with the official unemployment rate, the Department of Labor also calculates something called the employment-population ratio [ http://data.bls.gov/timeseries/LNS12300000], which measures the percent of the U.S. adult population that has a job. The rate currently stands at 58.7%. While it jumps around slightly from month to month, it has essentially been stuck there for three years -- close to the lowest level since the 1980s.

Source:
CNNMoney
http://money.cnn.com/

Below the line: Poverty in America
Official figures say 46 million Americans live in poverty.
Beyond that, there's little about poverty that Americans can agree on.
http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Global-Issues/2012/1007/Below-the-line-Poverty-in-America
By Jina Moore
October 7, 2012
Last month, the US Census Bureau released the latest official poverty figures, putting the number of poor people at 46.2 million, or 15 percent of the population. That's the same as the previous year – meaning the United States has sustained, for the second year in a row, the biggest increase in poverty since the government started keeping poverty records in 1969.
But what do these numbers tell us?
And what are they used for?
And what – and who – might they leave out?

Source:
Christian Science Monitor

http://www.csmonitor.com/
The Christian Science Monitor is an international news organization that delivers thoughtful, global coverage via its website, weekly magazine, daily news briefing, email newsletters, and mobile site. The Monitor is global, both in practice and in spirit. The Christian Science Monitor is a real news organization owned by a church – The First Church of Christ, Scientist, in Boston, Mass.

The Hidden Cost of Counting the Homeless
http://www.theatlanticcities.com/housing/2012/10/hidden-cost-counting-homeless/3495/
October 04, 2012
By Nate Berg
During the last week of January, volunteers blanket the streets of cities across the U.S. to seek out what they might otherwise ignore. They peek into alleyways and under freeway overpasses to find and count the homeless. It's an effort framed as a way to help communities understand their homeless populations and how best to serve them. Next January, they'll be doing it again, spanning out into neighborhoods all over the country to put a number on one of the most persistent social issues in urban America.

But all this counting may not actually be doing much to good. Christine Jocoy, an associate professor of geography at California State University, Long Beach, worries that too much emphasis is being placed on collecting the data and not enough on actually using it. In a commentary published recently in the journal Cultural Geographies, Jocoy criticizes what she calls a "culture of quantification."

Source:
The Atlantic Cities

http://www.theatlanticcities.com/
Part of
The Atlantic
http://www.theatlantic.com/

From the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:

Pennsylvania Shuts Down Its Safety Net of Last Resort
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/pennsylvania-shuts-down-its-safety-net-of-last-resort/
August 1, 2012
Pennsylvania ended cash assistance today for very poor residents who cannot work and don’t qualify for other assistance, joining many other states that have scaled back or eliminated their General Assistance programs even as the need has grown. Roughly 60,000 childless adults (and the adult heads of some families) whom the state considers unemployable because of a disability or for certain other reasons — they are elderly, escaping domestic violence, or caring for a disabled family member, for example — got about $200 a month from the program.
Source:
Off the Charts Blog

http://www.offthechartsblog.org/

Related link:

General Assistance Programs: Safety Net Weakening Despite Increased Need
HTML version:

http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3603
PDF version (1MB, 19 pages):
http://www.cbpp.org/files/10-26-11pov.pdf
By Liz Schott and Clare Cho
Updated December 19, 2011
State General Assistance programs, which provide a safety net of last resort for those who are very poor and do not qualify for other public assistance, have weakened considerably in recent decades and are continuing to do so, despite the large increase in need resulting from the recession. This report discusses how General Assistance Programs have been weakened over the years, with a closer look at actions in 2011 state legislative sessions, and provides an overview of program policies across the 30 states with programs in 2011.

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
http://www.cbpp.org/
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals.

---------------------------------

CAVEAT (by Gilles):

The whole area of "State General Assistance programs" is but one of many reasons that no self-respecting social researcher would ever compare American and Canadian welfare systems without first defining the range of programs that fall under the definition of "welfare" in each country.

In Canada, financial assistance from provincial-territorial welfare programs is available to single childless individuals and families alike on the basis of financial need. Welfare benefits cover (up to legislated maximum amounts) food, shelter, clothing, personal and household needs, and specified regularly-recurring special needs. In addition to health care coverage, which is universal in Canada, each Canadian jurisdiction offers a range of assistance for special medical needs under its welfare program.


In order to compare Canadian and American welfare, the following American programs *must* be included:

* Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) - welfare
* State General Assistance programs
* Medicaid
* SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly known as food stamps)
* Housing vouchers
* Supplemental Security Income (SSI)
* School lunch and breakfast programs
* Earned Income Tax Credit

About those TANF time limits on eligibility...

In the U.S., when a household times out of TANF welfare (between two and five years, depending on the state), they can still apply for some aid from the above programs and other state programs of last resort. If "timing out" were possible in Canada, individuals and families would have no other recourse except the back door of the local church. But there's no time limit on welfare in Canada ---- you can continue to receive welfare as long as you can prove financial need and you meet other eligibility requirements. The Government of British Columbia actually imposed a time limit in 2002 that was similar to what many U.S. states had adopted - two years eligibility for welfare out of five.
The policy flopped.
For more on the BC welfare time limit policy, see the Canadian Social Research Links BC Welfare Time Limits Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/bc_welfare_time_limits.htm

---

For more reasons why Canadian and American welfare systems shouldn't be compared without contextual information,
go to the Welfare in Canada vs the U.S. Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/canada_us_welfare.htm


From the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP):

Studies Show Earned Income Tax Credit Encourages Work and Success in School and Reduces Poverty
By Jimmy Charite, Indivar Dutta-Gupta, and Chuck Marr
June 26, 2012
Some 27 million working adults with low and moderate incomes, most of whom are raising children, received the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) in 2009 to reduce their taxes and supplement their earnings. Studies have found that the EITC encourages work, reduces poverty, helps families meet basic needs, and improves children’s achievement in school and likely increases their earnings as adults. The Child Tax Credit (CTC), a related tax credit designed to help offset the cost of raising children, also plays a pivotal role in helping low-income families.

View the full analysis:
HTML:
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3793
PDF:
http://www.cbpp.org/files/6-26-12tax.pdf (13 pages)

More CBPP State Budget and Tax Analyses:
http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=40

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

http://www.cbpp.org/
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals. The Center conducts research and analysis to help shape public debates over proposed budget and tax policies and to help ensure that policymakers consider the needs of low-income families and individuals in these debates. We also develop policy options to alleviate poverty.

Weakened Safety Net Devastates Families
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/weakened-safety-net-devastates-families/
June 20, 2012
A new Huffington Post article [ http://goo.gl/dYvVy ] starkly portrays TANF’s [ Temporary Assistance for Needy Families - http://goo.gl/GsSJP ] failure to provide a safety net in Georgia. It vividly reminds us how important the safety net is to families in need – and the devastating consequences that can result when families who are desperately seeking help are turned away.
The situation in Georgia may seem extreme but, unfortunately, it’s not. TANF provides a weaker safety net across the country, as we described in a recent paper. In fact, our 50-state data showed that the ratio of families receiving TANF cash assistance to the number of families in poverty fell in every state between 1995 and 2010.
(...)
Congress will not likely reauthorize TANF this year but, as I’ve outlined before, Congress could make several changes that would improve the program in the short term and help to set the stage for next year’s deliberations — changes that would give states greater flexibility in administering TANF and increase the help they can provide to needy families.

Related Posts:

* Fixing Some of TANF’s Failures
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/fixing-some-of-tanfs-failures/

* TANF Weakening as a Safety Net
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/tanf-weakening-as-a-safety-net/

* Full Series: Greenstein on the Safety Net
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/tag/greenstein-on-the-safety-net-series/

Source:
Off the Charts Blog
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/

Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
http://www.cbpp.org/
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals

Agriculture Reform, Food and Jobs Act of 2012
http://www.ag.senate.gov/issues/farm-bill/
Every five years, Congress passes a bundle of legislation, commonly called the "Farm Bill" that sets national agriculture, nutrition, conservation, and forestry policy. The last Farm Bill was passed in 2008, and expires on September 30, 2012. The Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry passed the bill by a vote of 16-5. The bill will now be discussed in the Senate before the final vote. It's an important bill because it's the legislative authority for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program or SNAP (formerly known as the Food Stamp Program), and the bill cuts SNAP funding by $4.49 billion over 10 years.

From the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:

SNAP Working as Intended to Fight Hunger and Lift Families Out of Poverty
http://goo.gl/7Q0pg
May 8, 2012
Testifying today before the House Agriculture Subcommittee on Nutrition and Horticulture, Stacy Dean, the Center’s Vice President for Food Assistance Policy, explained that the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps) “is working as it’s supposed to work” to meet the critical needs of one in seven Americans — a figure that speaks both to the extensive need across the country and to SNAP’s important role in addressing it.

The main findings of her testimony:

SNAP does an admirable job of meeting its core purpose — to provide a basic nutrition benefit to low-income Americans. The program has largely eliminated severe hunger and malnutrition in the United States.
SNAP is highly responsive to need. As an entitlement, it responds quickly and effectively to support low-income families and communities during times of economic distress. Since December 2007, when the recession began, SNAP enrollment has increased by 19 million people.

---

Introduction to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=2226

---

House Agriculture Committee Proposal Would Cut 2 Million
Off Food Stamps, Reduce Benefits for More Than 44 Million Others

http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3749
By Stacy Dean and Dottie Rosenbaum
April 18, 2012

Source:
Off the Charts Blog

http://www.offthechartsblog.org/
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP)
http://www.cbpp.org/
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals.

NOTE : For more articles by CBPP about the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program,
go to the International section of the Food Banks and Hunger Links page:

http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm#international

Related links:

The Agriculture Reform, Food and Jobs Act of 2012 (PDF - 1.2MB, 980 pages)
http://goo.gl/w7Fp7
[See Title IV—Nutrition - Subtitle A : Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program]

---

Chartbook:
The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)
Helps Struggling Families Put Food On The Table
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3744
April 9, 2012
[formerly the Food Stamp program]
The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the nation’s most important anti-hunger program. SNAP reaches millions of people in need of food assistance. It is one of the few means-tested government benefit programs available to almost all households with low incomes. For more detail on the program’s basics, see http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=2226.

SNAP is an efficient part of the nationwide safety net. Payment accuracy – the delivery of the correct amount of benefits to eligible households – is at an all-time high. For more on the program’s efficiency, see http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3239.

This chartbook highlights some of the key characteristics of the approximately 46 million people using the program as well as trends and data on program administration and use.
Part I: SNAP is highly responsive to poverty and the economy
Part II: Benefits are modest
Part III: SNAP serves very vulnerable people
Part IV: SNAP supports working families and those unable to work
Part V: With some important exceptions, SNAP reaches most eligible people
Part VI: SNAP is efficient and effective
Part VII: SNAP is an important public/private partnership

It is intended to complement more detailed analysis on particular aspects of SNAP, available on our website:
http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=31

Related areas of CBPP research:

Food Assistance
http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=31

Food Stamps
http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=69

Poverty and Income
http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=36

Trends
http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=83


Related study:

Alleviating Poverty in the United States: The Critical Role of SNAP Benefits
By Laura Tiehen, Dean Jolliffe, and Craig Gundersen
April 2012
The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is one of the largest safety net programs in the United States, serving 44.7 million individuals in an average month in 2011. We used Current Population Survey data to examine the effect of SNAP on poverty from 2000 to 2009, by adding program benefits to income and calculating how SNAP benefits affected the prevalence, depth, and severity of poverty.

Complete report (PDF - 3.48MB, 30 pages):
http://www.ers.usda.gov/Publications/ERR132/ERR132.pdf

Report summary (PDF - 1.2MB, 2 pages):
http://www.ers.usda.gov/Publications/ERR132/ERR132_ReportSummary.pdf

Report abstract:
http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/err132/
- includes a Zip file with all charts and graphs (in .png format) from this report

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Related links:

Food Stamps Helped Reduce Poverty Rate, Study Finds
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/10/us/food-stamp-program-helping-reduce-poverty.html
By Sabrina Tavernise
April 9, 2012
WASHINGTON — A new study by the Agriculture Department has found that food stamps, one of the country’s largest social safety net programs, reduced the poverty rate substantially during the recent recession. The food stamp program, formally known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, reduced the poverty rate by nearly 8 percent in 2009, the most recent year included in the study, a significant impact for a social program whose effects often go unnoticed by policy makers.

Source:
New York Times
http://www.nytimes.com/

The Impact of State Income Taxes on Low-Income Families in 2011
April 4, 2012
By Phil Oliff et al.
The successful bipartisan effort over the last two decades to reduce state income taxes on working-poor families has stalled and is in danger of reversing. No new states exempted working-poor families of four from income taxes in 2011, and in almost all of the 15 states where such families still pay income taxes, they saw their income taxes increase.Taxing the incomes of working-poor families runs counter to decades of efforts by policymakers across the political spectrum to help families work their way toward the middle class.

View the full report:

HTML version:
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3740

PDF version:
http://www.cbpp.org/files/4-4-12sfp.pdf (21 pages.)

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
http://www.cbpp.org/

Welfare Reform Worked
http://www.brookings.edu/opinions/2012/0228_welfare_reform_haskins.aspx
By Ron Haskins

February 28, 2012
(...)
Among the poor, surprisingly, never-married mothers have gained the most in recent decades. Their story shows the best way to reduce poverty and inequality: by encouraging individuals to work more and by supplementing their earnings with tax credits, child-care subsidies and other benefits for low-income working parents.
(...) even in the worst recession since the Depression, more are employed and they are less poor than they were before the 1996 law. In fact, researchers Bruce Meyer of the University of Chicago and James Sullivan of Notre Dame have found that if all the work-based benefits given to low-income workers were included — such benefits are mostly ignored by the official poverty measure — the incomes of these mothers and children would be even higher and their poverty rate even lower.

The reasons for this policy success are clear, suggesting some lessons for the future*. The 1996 law created strong incentives, both positive and negative, for the most uneducated, untrained and unpromising welfare recipients to join the workforce. As shown by their high employment rates, poor mothers responded to these incentives even more resourcefully than most policymakers had expected despite their often chaotic domestic circumstances.
---
* and perhaps even some lessons for Canada...
---
Source:
Brookings Institution
http://www.brookings.edu/

From the Off the Charts Blog
(Center on Budget and Policy Priorities):
March 2012

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on the economy, income inequality, and our special series on extreme poverty.

On the economy:
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/todays-jobs-report-in-pictures-10/
Chad Stone examined the February jobs report, noting that despite another solid month of job growth, the recovery still has a long way to go to restore a strong labor market.

On state and local education employment:
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/education-job-losses-finally-ending/
Nick Johnson pointed out that the jobs report showed an uptick in state and local education employment after several years of large job losses.

On income inequality:
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/even-in-a-down-year-top-1-percent-had-more-total-income-than-bottom-50-percent/
Chuck Marr showed that even in 2009, a “down” year for high earners, the top 1 percent of households had more total Adjusted Gross Income than the bottom 50 percent.

On the share of the nation’s income going to the top 1 percent:
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/incomes-bouncing-back-at-the-top/
Chad Stone noted that the share of the nation’s income going to the top 1 percent rebounded in 2010, and he contrasted those gains with the increase in the number of people in severe poverty in recent years [ http://www.offthechartsblog.org/things-looking-up-at-the-top-down-at-the-bottom/ ].

More on the 1 percent:
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/income-growth-at-the-top-mostly-occurring-at-the-tippy-top/
Hannah Shaw noted that the income gains for the top 1 percent in 2010 occurred mostly at the very top of that group.

On extreme poverty:
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/under-2-dollars-a-day-in-america-part-1/
We wrote a three-part series on extreme poverty, and Arloc Sherman highlighted a new study showing that the number of families living on less than $2 per person a day more than doubled in the last 15 years.

On SNAP (food stamps):
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/under-2-dollars-a-day-in-america-part-2/
Stacy Dean showed that SNAP (food stamps) is a powerful antidote to extreme poverty, and Barbara Sard explained that proposals to raise rents on the poorest recipients of federal housing assistance would add to the hardships of families in extreme poverty [ http://www.offthechartsblog.org/under-2-a-day-in-america-part-3/ ].

In other news this week, we released Chad Stone’s statement on the February jobs report:
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3698

... and a report on the increase in income concentration at the top in 2010:
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3697

Source:
Off the Charts Blog

http://www.offthechartsblog.org/
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
http://www.cbpp.org/
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals.

Right-Wing Talking Points Translated Into English
http://cons-lie.com/2010/08/19/right-wing-talking-points-translated-into-english/
August 19, 2010
In an effort to serve the public, let me offer this handy translation of some of the current rightist talking points into a more understandable common English. These points are often heard on talk radio and Faux “News”, or are written in the conservative blogosphere or newspapers published by ultra-rich cult leaders.
Source:
The Conservative Lie
http://cons-lie.com/
A blog about the lies that the new conservative movement tell and how they use them to convince otherwise intelligent people in the U.S. to vote against their own self interests.

New from the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:

U.S. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
(formerly known as the Food Stamp Program)

Five Things You Probably Don’t Know About Food Stamps
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/five-things-you-probably-dont-know-about-food-stamps/
January 20, 2012
The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as the Food Stamp Program, is in the news these days because of comments made by some Republican presidential candidates. Below are five things you probably don’t know about the program.
1. A large and growing share of SNAP households are working households.
2. SNAP responded quickly and effectively to the recession.
3. Today’s large SNAP caseloads mostly reflect the extraordinarily deep and prolonged recession and the weak recovery.
4. SNAP has one of the most rigorous quality control systems of any public benefit program.
5. SNAP’s recent growth is temporary.

---

Policy Basics: Introduction to SNAP

In 2011, SNAP helped almost 45 million low-income Americans to afford a nutritionally adequate diet in a typical month. Nearly 75 percent of SNAP participants are in families with children; more than one-quarter are in households with seniors or people with disabilities. While SNAP’s fundamental purpose is to help low-income families, the elderly, and people with disabilities afford an adequate diet and avoid hardship, it promotes other goals as well, such as reducing poverty, supporting and encouraging work, protecting the overall economy from risk, and promoting healthy eating.

View the full Policy Basic:

HTML:
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=2226

PDF (8 pages):
http://www.cbpp.org/files/policybasics-foodstamps.pdf

-------------------------

SNAP Is Effective and Efficient

SNAP caseloads have risen significantly since late 2007, as the recession and lagging recovery battered the economic circumstances of millions of Americans and dramatically increased the number of low-income households who qualify and apply for help from the program. Yet, despite the rapid caseload growth, SNAP payment accuracy has continued to improve, reaching all-time highs. Moreover, the Congressional Budget Office predicts that SNAP spending will fall as a share of the economy in coming years as the economy recovers and temporary benefit expansions that Congress enacted in 2009 expire.

View the full analysis:

HTML:
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3239

PDF (7 pages):
http://www.cbpp.org/files/7-23-10fa.pdf

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP)
http://www.cbpp.org/
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals.

Taking Stock of the Safety Net : Series
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/tag/taking-stock-of-the-safety-net-series/
We will issue a series of posts in the coming days that will look back at some of the major programs that helped struggling families during the year — their goals, impact, and issues facing policymakers in 2012. Today, we’ll begin by setting the context.

Taking Stock of the Safety Net, Part 1: Overview
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/taking-stock-of-the-safety-net-part-1-overview/
December 14, 2011

Taking Stock of the Safety Net, Part 2: Meeting Families’ Basic Needs Through TANF
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/taking-stock-of-the-safety-net-part-2-meeting-families-basic-needs-through-tanf/
December 15, 2011

Taking Stock of the Safety Net, Part 3: Helping Families Afford Decent Housing
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/taking-stock-of-the-safety-net-part-3-helping-families-afford-decent-housing/
December 16, 2011

Related Series and Posts:

Hardship in America Series: Parts 1-4
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/tag/hardship-in-america-series
November 21, 2011

Income Inequality Series: Parts 1-5
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/tag/income-inequality-series/
November 28, 2011

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) at 15
http://www.offthechartsblog.org/tag/tanf-at-15/
August 22, 2011

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP):
http://www.cbpp.org/
CBPP is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals.

Also from CBPP:

Key Things to Know About Unemployment Insurance
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3646
By Hannah Shaw and Chad Stone
December 16, 2011
In the heat of the battle over how to address the imminent expiration of federal emergency unemployment insurance (UI) benefits (and the payroll tax cut), policymakers should not lose sight of what UI is and how it has functioned over the years

A Guide to Statistics on Historical Trends in Income Inequality (14 pages)
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3629
By Chad Stone, Hannah Shaw, Danilo Trisi and Arloc Sherman
November 28, 2011
This guide consists of four sections. The first describes the commonly used sources and statistics on income and discusses their relative strengths and limitations in understanding trends in income and inequality. The second provides an overview of the trends revealed in those key data sources. The third and fourth sections supply additional information on wealth, which complements the income data as a measure of how the most well-off Americans are doing; and poverty, which measures how the least well-off Americans are doing.

More CBPP reports on Poverty and Income
http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=36

CLASP DataFinder is a custom, easy-to-use tool developed to provide select demographic information as well as administrative data on programs that affect low-income people and families. Users can create and download custom tables that present a national picture, a state picture or a comparative look at states and communities. The DataFinder currently includes state and national data on:
* child care assistance spending and participation * Head Start and Early Head Start participation* Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) expenditures * young child demographics; and poverty. The tool also provides community-level statistics on education, demographics and youth violence. CLASP will add more data to this evolving tool over time.
1. Choose one or more states.
2. Choose one or more years (earliest year : 1997)
3. Choose Variables from the list below:

* Poverty
* Young Child Demographics
* Child Care Subsidies: CCDBG Participation
* Child Care Subsidies: Spending
* Head Start: All Programs
* Early Head Start
* Temporary Assistance Expenditure Data
* Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Caseload Data
* Educational Attainment
* Working Families Demographics
* Income and Work Supports

Source:
Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP)
Since 1968, CLASP has been a trusted resource, a creative architect for systems change, and one of the country's most effective voices for low income people. CLASP's mission is to develop and advocate for policies at the federal, state and local levels that improve the lives of low income people. In particular, we seek policies that work to strengthen families and create pathways to education and work.
[ Source: About CLASP ]

[ Watch a two-minute video about CLASP - from the CLASP About Us page. ]

Half in Ten : A Campaign to Cut Poverty in the United States in Half in Ten Years

Half in Ten Campaign Starts the Clock on Cutting Poverty in Half in Ten Years
Releases signature report, “Restoring Shared Prosperity: Strategies to Cut Poverty and Expand Economic Growth”
News Release
October 26, 2011
Washington, D.C. – Today the Half in Ten campaign released a landmark report contrasting the number of struggling families in today’s economy with comprehensive data on the challenges we face in creating enough decent-wage jobs, supplying sufficient affordable housing units, and other foundational supports to ensure pathways out of poverty for millions of Americans.

The report:

Restoring Shared Prosperity:
Strategies to Cut Poverty and Expand Economic Growth
(PDF - 5.6MB, 128 pages)
October 2011
Table of contents:
* Introduction and summary
* Chapter one : Poverty in the United States today
* Chapter two : More good jobs
* Chapter three : Strengthening families and communities
* Chapter four : Family economic security
* Conclusion: A call to action
In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, the Center for American Progress convened a diverse taskforce of national experts to examine the causes and consequences of poverty in the United States and to devise a plan to reduce poverty and promote greater opportunity for all. The result was a landmark report, released in April 2007, “From Poverty to Prosperity: A National Strategy to Cut Poverty in Half.” The report laid out a series of policy recommendations which if implemented could cut poverty in our nation in half in 10 years.
Source:
Restoring Shared Prosperity: 2010
- report main page, includes an introduction to, and summary of, the report, as well as links (in the left margin of the page) to individual chapters of the report in PDF format.

Top 10 Findings from Half in Ten’s Inaugural (2010)
Report Tracking Our Progress Reducing Poverty
1. Since 1970 real wages have not kept pace with employee productivity.
2. In 2010 people with disabilities had an employment rate of 18.6 percent, which was just one-third that of people with no disabilities (63.5 percent).
3. Between 1979 and 2007 overall direct expenditures by the federal government on education, training, and employment services fell by half, from 8.8 percent of GDP to 4.3 percent.
4. The transportation sector provides new opportunities for equitable job growth.
5. Poverty rates for households headed by a single mother drop from 40.7 percent to 14 percent when the mother has full-time, year-round employment.
6. Only 4 percent of households with more than one earner are in poverty as compared to 24 percent of households with a single earner.
7. Among those facing employment challenges, more than one-third (35 percent) had home or family reasons for not working all or part of the year, such as a sick child or parents, and disruptions in child care.
8. African Americans and Latinos are more than five times more likely than whites to be “unbanked.”
9. High poverty rates among families with children cannot simply be explained by low work effort.
10. In 2009 the earned income tax credit lifted 6 million people—half of them children—out of poverty.

Perhaps the most important finding from the report is that we have both the experience and the policy tools necessary to cut poverty in half.

Related links:

Half in Ten : From Poverty to Prosperity
A Campaign to Cut Poverty in the United States in Half in Ten Years

More than 46 million Americans live below the official poverty line—which is now approximately $22,314 for a family of four—and 16.4 million children are poor in this country. Inequality of wealth has reached record highs—it is greater than at any time since 1929.

Half in Ten : Our Key Issues
* Creating Good Jobs
* Strengthening Families
* Promoting Economic Security
* Cutting Poverty in Half
Restoring Shared Prosperity
Half in Ten provides a view on the statistics and data behind poverty, and show the path to restoring shared prosperity.
Visit now ?

Half in Ten is a project of:

* Center for American Progress (CAP) Action Fund
The CAP Action Fund is a progressive think-tank dedicated to improving the lives of Americans through ideas and action. (...) Our mission is to transform progressive ideas into policy through rapid response communications, legislative action, grassroots organizing and advocacy, and partnerships with other progressive leaders throughout the country and the world.
The Center for American Progress is a sister organization of the Center for American Progress (CAP).The Center for American Progress is dedicated to improving the lives of Americans through progressive ideas and action. (...) We believe an open and effective government can champion the common good over narrow self-interest, harness the strength of our diversity, and secure the rights and safety of its people.

* Coalition on Human Needs
The Coalition on Human Needs (CHN) is an alliance of national organizations working together to promote public policies which address the needs of low-income and other vulnerable populations.

* The Leadership Conference
The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights is a coalition charged by its diverse membership of more than 200 national organizations to promote and protect the civil and human rights of all persons in the United States. Links:

More related links:

- Go to the National/Federal and International Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty2.htm

Work and Family
Fall 2011 (Journal)
HTML version
PDF version (1.2MB, 214 pages)
Table of contents:
* Work and Family: Introducing the Issue
* Changing Families, Changing Workplaces
* Policies to Assist Parents with Young Children
* Families with School-Age Children
* Children with Health Issues
* Families and Elder Care in the Twenty-First Century
* Workplace Flexibility: From Research to Action
* The Role of the Government in Work-Family Conflict
* International Perspectives on Work-Family Policies:
* Lessons from the World’s Most Competitive Economies

Executive Summary (PDF - 156K)
Policy Brief (PDF - 234K)

Past volumes of Work and Family
Selected topics covered in past volumes of this newsletter (back to the early 1990s):
* Immigrant Children * Fragile Families * Transition to Adulthood * Preventing Child Maltreatment * America's High Schools * Juvenile Justice * Children and Electronic Media * The Next Generation of Antipoverty Policies (Fall 2007) * Excellence in the Classroom * Opportunity in America * Childhood Obesity * Marriage and Child Wellbeing * School Readiness: Closing Racial and Ethnic Gaps *
[ Journal archive - newsletters back back to the early 1990s ]
Source:
The Future of Children
The Future of Children is a collaboration of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University and the Brookings Institution. The mission of The Future of Children is to translate the best social science research about children and youth into information that is useful to policymakers, practitioners, grant-makers, advocates, the media, and students of public policy. [ About this site ]

Misconceptions and Realities About Who Pays Taxes
By Chuck Marr and Brian Highsmith
May 31, 2011
PDF of this report (9pp.)
A recent finding by Congress’ Joint Committee on Taxation that 51 percent of households owed no federal income tax in 2009 is being used to advance the argument that low- and moderate-income families do not pay sufficient taxes. Apart from the fact that most of those who make this argument also call for maintaining or increasing all of the tax cuts of recent years for people at the top of the income scale, the 51 percent figure, its significance, and its policy implications are widely misunderstood.

RELATED AREAS OF RESEARCH:
* Tax — Federal
* 2001/2003 Tax Cuts
* Earned Income Tax Credit
* Individuals and Families
* Taxes and the Economy

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP)
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals. The Center conducts research and analysis to help shape public debates over proposed budget and tax policies and to help ensure that policymakers consider the needs of low-income families and individuals in these debates. We also develop policy options to alleviate poverty.

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families is 15 years old this year.
Dr. LaDonna Pavetti, Vice President for Family Income Support Division at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities wrote this five-part analysis of TANF for the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

TANF at 15, Part I: How Well Does It Provide Income Support for Poor Families?
August 22, 2011
President Clinton signed the 1996 welfare law 15 years ago today, creating the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant to replace the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program. We’ll present a series of posts this week that provide a closer look at how welfare reform has played out over the last 15 years. Today’s post focuses on TANF as a source of income support for poor families.

TANF at 15, Part II: How Have States Spent Their TANF Dollars?
August 24, 2011
Under the 1996 welfare law, which replaced AFDC with the TANF block grant, states receive fixed federal funding each year in exchange for greater flexibility in using that funding. Unlike AFDC, therefore, federal TANF funding does not decrease in good economic times when cash assistance caseloads fall or rise in hard economic times when cash assistance caseloads increase. Given the dramatic decline in cash assistance caseloads I described in Monday’s post, today we look briefly at TANF funding over time and how states have spent their TANF dollars.

TANF at 15, Part III: What Is TANF’s Record of Success?
August 25, 2011
Over the 15 years since President Clinton and Congress reformed welfare in 1996, states have transformed what were previously their AFDC programs, which were primarily focused on providing income support, into work-based systems that tie cash assistance to participation in work or work-related activities such as job search.

TANF at 15, Part IV: Looking Ahead
August 26, 2011
In the 15 years since its creation as part of welfare reform, TANF has performed better than most people expected when the economy was booming and jobs were plentiful, and worse than most people expected during the continuing severe downturn. Gordon Berlin, the highly respected president of the research organization MDRC — which has conducted the vast majority of evaluations of state welfare reform efforts — laid out the challenge ahead:
" Now with unemployment rates at levels unimaginable even five years ago, the context for reform has changed, posing profound questions for Congress as it revisits the law that 'changed welfare as we knew it' when it expires next month."

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP)
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals. The Center conducts research and analysis to help shape public debates over proposed budget and tax policies and to help ensure that policymakers consider the needs of low-income families and individuals in these debates. We also develop policy options to alleviate poverty.

Earlier related work from CBPP:

TANF’s Inadequate Response to Recession Highlights Weakness of Block-Grant Structure
Proponents Wrong to See It as Model for Medicaid, SNAP, or Other Low-Income Programs

PDF of this report (10pp.)
By LaDonna Pavetti, Ph.D. and Liz Schott
July 14, 2011
Leading conservatives in Congress – including House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan – as well as some conservative activists and commentators [1] have recently cited welfare reform and the TANF block-grant structure as a model for reshaping the federal-state funding relationship in other programs for low-income families, such as Medicaid and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps). The TANF block grant, however, is not the shining success that they suggest.

Related links:

Happy Birthday, Welfare Reform
Fifteen years after President Clinton cut a hole in the social safety net, poor Americans are paying the price.
By Jake Blumgart
August 22, 2011
Fifteen years ago today, Bill Clinton signed the law that created the program commonly known as welfare-to-work, fulfilling a campaign promise to “end welfare as we know it.” Today, there is little doubt that the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act did just that, removing what had been a large cash-assistance program from the social safety net. The decline continues. With the law’s federal authorization expiring September 30 and the numbers of impoverished Americans climbing ever higher, welfare is a dead letter in most states.
Source:
The American Prospect
The Prospect was founded in 1990 as an authoritative magazine of liberal ideas, committed to a just society, an enriched democracy, and effective liberal politics. Since then, the Prospect has grown into a print journal with an average monthly readership of some 100,000, a special in-depth report in most issues, and a daily Web magazine with nearly 1 million unique monthly visitors.

---

Welfare reform law faces revision at 15
Safety net again under scrutiny on Hill

By Cheryl Wetzstein
August 21, 2011
Don’t expect much hoopla or cake-cutting as the landmark welfare reform law passed by President Clinton and congressional Republicans in the mid-1990s celebrates its 15th anniversary Monday. Even though the widely touted overhaul of the national safety net for the poor and unemployed has touched the lives of virtually every American family, the Obama administration and Congress are debating new changes to the system, and a temporary extension of the main welfare programs is likely again with another funding deadline looming Sept. 30. But another round of welfare reform is not being ignored on Capitol Hill. Both the House and Senate have had committee hearings, and in March, a group of House Republicans introduced a bill to begin “managing” welfare by requiring a public accounting of the costs of 70-plus federal anti-poverty programs
Source:
Washington Times

Recent report from
The Children's Defense Fund (CDF):

The State of America's Children® 2011 Report
CDF’s new report The State of America's Children 2011 finds children have fallen further behind in many of the leading indicators over the past year as the country slowly climbs out of the recession. This is a comprehensive compilation and analysis of the most recent and reliable national and state-by-state data on population, poverty, family structure, family income, health, nutrition, early childhood development, education, child welfare, juvenile justice, and gun violence.

Click the link above and then scroll down the next page
to a collection of links organized under the following headings:

* Child Population * Child Poverty * Family Structure * Family Income * Child Health * Child Hunger and Nutrition * Early Childhood * Education * Child Welfare * Juvenile Justice * Gun Violence

Download the complete report (PDF - 3.5MB, 206 pages)

How much do you know about the state of America's children?
Take this short quiz.

Related article
in the Huffington Post:

The State of America's Children 2011
By Marian Wright Edelman (President, Children's Defense Fund)
Posted July 15, 2011
The Children’s Defense Fund has just released a new report, The State of America’s Children® 2011, which paints a disturbing portrait of child needs across our country. With rampant unemployment, housing foreclosures, homelessness, hunger, and massive looming federal and state budget cuts, children’s well-being is in great jeopardy. One in five children is poor and children are our nation’s poorest age group. Child poverty increased almost 10 percent between 2008 and 2009, the largest single year increase since data were first collected. Fifteen and a half million children are adrift in a sea of poverty, and every 32 seconds another child is born poor. As our country struggles to climb out of the recession millions of our children are falling further behind
Source of this article:
Huffington Post

Children's Defense Fund
The Children's Defense Fund is a non-profit child advocacy organization that has worked relentlessly for over 35 years to ensure a level playing field for all children. We champion policies and programs that lift children out of poverty; protect them from abuse and neglect; and ensure their access to health care, quality education and a moral and spiritual foundation.

Kids’ Share 2011: Report on Federal Expenditures on Children through 2010
July 25, 2011
By Julia B. Isaacs et al.
This fifth annual Kids’ Share report marks a milestone in the analysis of federal expenditures on children because available data now span 50 years, from 1960 to 2010. During the past half-century, the size and composition of expenditures on children has changed considerably. Back in 1960, the largest federal contributions to families due to the presence of children came from the dependent exemption, Social Security, and education. Fifty years later, the dependent exemption has much less relative value, and Medicaid, the earned income tax credit, and the child tax credit have become the three largest federal expenditures on children.

Complete report (PDF - 2MB, 44 pages)
(...) Only once in the past 50 years has spending on children declined as much as it is projected to decline in the next five years. Unless priorities shift, children are not expected to benefit from any of the projected growth in outlaysover the next decade. The future for children’s spending is particularly difficult to predict this year, given
current policy debates about federal spending and revenues .
[Excerpt from the conclusion, p. 30]

Data Appendix (PDF - 1.2MB, 73 pages)
- includes an overview of the three-step methodology for estimating federal expenditures in each year. First, we define spending on children and identify programs with children’s spending. Second, we describe the process of collecting expenditure data for the more than 100 programs and tax provisions included in our report, as well as the sources for these data. Third, we explain how we calculate the share of these expenditures that go to children. In addition, we explain the data and assumptions used to generate projections, briefly describe the sources for our state and local estimates, and specify the ways in which our methodology has changed from previous Kids’ Share reports. In the second section of this document, we present a summary table of expenditures in 2010 detailing the programs included in our analysis, estimated expenditures, and the share of the expenditure going to children.

Source:
Brookings Institution
and
Urban Institute

---

- Go to the International Children, Families and Youth Links page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/chn2.htm

Air Conditioning, Cable TV, and an Xbox:
What is Poverty in the United States Today?

July 18, 2011
By Robert Rector and Rachel Sheffield
Abstract:
For decades, the U.S. Census Bureau has reported that over 30 million Americans were living in “poverty,” but the bureau’s definition of poverty differs widely from that held by most Americans. In fact, other government surveys show that most of the persons whom the government defines as “in poverty” are not poor in any ordinary sense of the term. The overwhelming majority of the poor have air conditioning, cable TV, and a host of other modern amenities. They are well housed, have an adequate and reasonably steady supply of food, and have met their other basic needs, including medical care. Some poor Americans do experience significant hardships, including temporary food shortages or inadequate housing, but these individuals are a minority within the overall poverty population.
Source:
The Heritage Foundation
Founded in 1973, The Heritage Foundation is a research and educational institution—a think tank—whose mission is to formulate and promote conservative public policies based on the principles of free enterprise, limited government, individual freedom, traditional American values, and a strong national defense.

--

Counterpoint by Stephen Colbert
- 12-minute video from the Colbert Report (Comedy Network)
Scroll down past the video window and click on the link to the July 26 episode.
The video is just over 12 minutes long, but you can go directly to the Heritage Foundation report on poverty segment - it starts at the 4:02 mark.

[U.S.] Continuing cost overruns on the F-35 Strike Fighter raise questions about the aircraft and its production
The Scout Report - July 22, 2011

[By Gilles : Nine billion dollars would *almost* pay for a national, affordable, quality early childhood education and child care program in Canada.
I'm just sayin'...]

The Scout Report links
and blurb about the F-35:

The last manned fighter
http://www.economist.com/node/18958487

Air Force to start operational testing of F-35
http://www.airforcetimes.com/news/2011/07/defense-air-force-to-start-opeval-test-f35-071511/

F-35 Lightning II Program
http://www.jsf.mil/

GAO: Joint Strike Fighter-Restructuring Places Program on Firmer Footing, but Progress Still Lags
http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d11325.pdf

United States Senate Armed Services Committee
http://armed-services.senate.gov/

National Museum of the USAF
http://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/index.asp

Over the past twenty years, there has been significant concern over the rising cost of certain military projects in the United States, and in times of fiscal austerity the Department of Defense has had to defend certain projects vigorously. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, there was a public outcry over the cost of the B-2 Spirit (or "Stealth") bomber, as each one cost over $900 million. Today, there are similar worries surrounding the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, which as a whole, will be the most expensive military-industrial program in history.(...) The most recent cost estimates from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) from May 2011 indicate that the average price of each plane in what are known as "then-year" dollars had risen from $69 million in 2001 to $133 million today.

The first link will take interested parties to a good piece on the F-35 Strike Fighter from last week's Economist. The second link leads to a piece from the Air Force Times about the initial testing of the F-35 Strike Fighter. Moving on, the third link leads to the official homepage for the F-35 Strike Fighter program, complete with photos, videos, and news updates. The fourth link leads to an official report from the Government Accountability Office from April 2011 on the progress of the Strike Fighter program. The fifth link leads to the official homepage of the United States Senate Armed Services Committee. Here visitors can view live webcasts of their hearings, along with looking over their publications and press releases. The final link leads to the homepage of the National Museum of the US Air Force on the Wright-Patterson Air Force base in Ohio. Looking over the site may inspire a trip to the Museum, and visitors can read about their exhibits, learn about their operating hours, and also check out some of their collections

Source:
July 22 issue of The Scout Report
[ Internet Scout Project ]

Why Privacy Matters Even if You Have 'Nothing to Hide'
May 15, 2011
By Daniel J. Solove
When the government gathers or analyzes personal information, many people say they're not worried. "I've got nothing to hide," they declare. "Only if you're doing something wrong should you worry, and then you don't deserve to keep it private."
(...)
Commentators often attempt to refute the nothing-to-hide argument by pointing to things people want to hide. But the problem with the nothing-to-hide argument is the underlying assumption that privacy is about hiding bad things. By accepting this assumption, we concede far too much ground and invite an unproductive discussion about information that people would very likely want to hide. As the computer-security specialist Schneier aptly notes, the nothing-to-hide argument stems from a faulty "premise that privacy is about hiding a wrong."
(...)
The deeper problem with the nothing-to-hide argument is that it myopically views privacy as a form of secrecy. In contrast, understanding privacy as a plurality of related issues demonstrates that the disclosure of bad things is just one among many difficulties caused by government security measures.
(...)
Privacy is often threatened not by a single egregious act but by the slow accretion of a series of relatively minor acts.
(...)
Privacy is rarely lost in one fell swoop. It is usually eroded over time, little bits dissolving almost imperceptibly until we finally begin to notice how much is gone.

Source:
Chronicle of Higher Education
The Chronicle of Higher Education is the No. 1 source of news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty members and administrators. Based in Washington, D.C., The Chronicle has more than 70 writers, editors, and international correspondents. [ About the Chronicle ]

From the
New York Times Opinion Pages:

July 14, 2011
Out of Poverty, Family-Style
An initiative that brings struggling families together to help each other out of poverty is providing a new model for social welfare.

Trusting Families to Help Themselves
By DAVID BORNSTEIN
July 19, 2011
To give support to struggling families without prescribing solutions requires respect and discipline.

---

Family Independence Initiative (FII)
Recreating the conditions under which generation after generation
of Americans secured a future for their children and communities

The Family Independence Initiative is a national center for anti-poverty innovation that over this last decade has demonstrated that investing in people’s strengths and initiative delivers stronger, more sustainable and cost effective outcomes for working poor families. Our strength-based approach, as radical and as old as our democracy, is inspired by the historical successes of poor and immigrant communities in the U.S.

FII’s work with cohorts of families in cities across the country shows that low-income people can advance together if we:

* Make resources and funding available more directly to people, not just institutions
* Allow families the freedom to determine their own paths, instead of taking direction from case managers and social workers
* Encourage and reward personal initiative, instead of penalizing or reducing eligibility for help if a family makes progress
* Support and promote mutuality and building social capital, instead of helping individuals outside of the context of their families and communities
* Honor resident leadership and expertise, instead of professionals and outside intervention
* View families as consumers with valuable feedback entitled to hold services and programs accountable, instead of needy victims

Read evaluations of our work in San Francisco (January 2011, PDF - 2MB, 22 pages) and Boston (January 2011, PDF - 1.4MB, 33 pages)

FII Initiatives - San Francisco - Oahu - Oakland - Boston

---

- Go to the National/Federal and International Anti-poverty Strategies and Campaigns page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/antipoverty2.htm

Internet Resources on Aging
Browse AARP's database on Internet resources, and link to more than 1,200 of the best sites for people age 50+.
This resource was last updated November 2010.
Topics and Subtopics:
* Aging of Special Populations
* Aging Organizations and General Interest
* Caregiving, Supportive Services, and Assistive Devices
* Death and Dying
* Employment, Finances, and Retirement
* Family, Personal Relationships, and Online Community
* Government, Legislation, and Public Policy
* Health and Well-Being
* Housing and Long Term Care
* Law and Legal Issues
* Leisure, Learning, and Personal Growth
* Medicaid, Medicare, and Social Security
* Older Drivers and Transportation
* Research and Reference
* State and Local Resources

Source:
AARP (formerly called the American Association of Retired Persons)
AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization with a membership that helps people age 50 and over have independence, choice and control in ways that are beneficial and affordable to them and society as a whole, ways that help people 50 and over improve their lives. Since 1958, AARP has been leading a revolution in the way people view and live life. Our work reaches deep into members' communities through support from staffed offices in all 50 states, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

New study calculates number of deaths caused by poverty
By Nicholas Bakalar for the New York Times News Service
July 4, 2011
Poverty is often cited as contributing to poor health. Now, in an unusual approach, researchers have calculated how many people poverty kills and presented their findings, along with an argument that social factors can cause death the same way that behaviour like smoking cigarettes does. In an article published online for the June 16 issue of the American Journal of Public Health, scientists calculated the number of deaths attributable to each of six social factors, including low income.

[ 114 comments ]

Source:
Globe and Mail

---

Estimated Deaths Attributable to Social Factors in the United States
Sandro Galea, Melissa Tracy, Katherine J. Hoggatt, Charles DiMaggio, and Adam Karpati
Published June 16, 2011
[Abstract]
[PDF - requires a paid subscription to American Journal of Public Health Online ]
Source:
American Journal of Public Health

---

Death by Poverty?
June 16, 2011
How many U.S. deaths are caused by poverty, low levels of education and other social factors?
A new study finds that the numbers are in the same range as deaths from heart attacks and stroke.
Source:
Mailman School of Public Health
at Columbia University

Only in the good ole U.S. of A.??

CoalCares™
[NOTE : this is not a joke website.]

"Why Free Inhalers? Because COAL CARES.
Coal Cares™ is a brand-new initiative from International Coal Group, one of America's proud family of coal companies, to reach out to American youngsters with asthma and to help them keep their heads high in the face of those who would treat them with less than full dignity. For kids who have no choice but to use an inhaler, Coal Cares™ lets them inhale with pride. Puff-Puff™ inhalers are available free to any family living within 200 miles of a coal plant [emphasis added], and each inhaler comes with a $10 coupon towards the cost of the asthma medication itself. "

[Don't miss KIDZ KOAL KORNER!]

Another excerpt from the site:

"What causes asthma?
There is actually no single cause of childhood asthma. In fact, many non-asthmatic children experience asthma-like symptoms while engaging in strenuous exercise, as we all do. More seriously, air-borne particulates from certain plants can cause severe vasal restriction in the airways of particularly susceptible children, leaving them gasping for air at the most inopportune moments. Even more worrisome, bee and wasp stings and snake bites can cause paroxysms and a drawn-out death in particularly allergic individuals. Symptoms from long-term coal particulate exposure, while a great deal more common than the above, are many times less dramatic than the symptoms brought on by extreme allergic reactions."

This is sick.
Only in America, you say?
In the not-too-distant future:
"Today the Harper Government™ passed a Supplementary Appropriations Bill to purchase 100,000 copies of the "How to live on $9 a day" CD for distribution to poor households living within a 200-mile radius of a Conservative government."

How the McEconomy Bombed the American Worker
The Hollowing Out of the Middle Class

May 9, 2011
By Andy Kroll
Think of it as a parable for these grim economic times. On April 19th, McDonald's launched its first-ever national hiring day, signing up 62,000 new workers at stores throughout the country. For some context, that's more jobs created by one company in a single day than the net job creation of the entire U.S. economy in 2009. And if that boggles the mind, consider how many workers applied to local McDonald's franchises that day and left empty-handed: 938,000 of them. With a 6.2% acceptance rate in its spring hiring blitz, McDonald’s was more selective than the Princeton, Stanford, or Yale University admission offices
Source:
Common Dreams.org
Common Dreams is a national nonprofit, progressive, nonpartisan citizens' organization founded in 1997 by political activists Craig Brown and his late wife, Lina Newhouser. We are a powerful online voice for change in America.

A Hand Up:
How State Earned Income Tax Credits Help Working Families Escape Poverty in 2011
April 2011
By Nicholas Johnson and Erica Williams
"The federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC)… is often heralded as the most effective anti-poverty program in the United States, particularly for children in working families…. The credit effectively boosts the income of working families earning low wages by offsetting their income and payroll taxes and increasing their workforce participation. In other words, it makes work pay by allowing low- and moderate-income families to keep more of what they earn.

"State EITCs build on the success of the federal credit. They reduce state income taxes and help families pay for state and local sales and property taxes, which hit lower-income households hardest. They enhance the federal EITC’s positive effects on workforce participation and boost the after-tax incomes of working families, further reducing poverty.

"The first state EITC was offered in 1987 in Maryland. Since that time, 22 additional states plus the District of Columbia have followed suit, creating their own EITCs. They are effective and straightforward to design and administer. And over the years, they have received support from Republican and Democratic leadership and have been championed by business, labor, faith-based, and social service advocacy groups.

"Today, with working families battered by economic problems as never before, state EITCs play a particularly important role. Families use EITCs to fill in for the loss of wages that can result from reductions in hours or layoffs. As long as they are still working at least some hours a year, families can benefit from the EITC."

View the full report:
HTML : http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3474
PDF : http://www.cbpp.org/files/4-18-11sfp.pdf
(26 pages)

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (Washington)

The New Demography of Poverty:
The Wisconsin Poverty Measure and
Effects of Federal and State Policies in Wisconsin

By Julia B. Isaacs, Timothy M. Smeeding et al.
Paper prepared for presentation at the
2011 Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America
Washington, D.C.
March 31, 2011
Full Paper (PDF - 630K, 24 pages)
Abstract + links to related content
This paper describes efforts to develop a more comprehensive and up-to-date measure of poverty in Wisconsin as a model for other states to follow. The Wisconsin model uses American Community Survey data to measure the level, depth, and trends in poverty and the effects on poverty of such programs as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly food stamps) and refundable tax credits, as well as out-of-pocket health care costs and work-related expenses including child care. In many ways, the Wisconsin measure, which was unveiled in September 2010, is a preview of the forthcoming federal Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM). However, the two measures differ in important respects. After a brief review of methodology underlying the Wisconsin measure, this paper focuses on a comparison of poverty across two vulnerable demographic subgroups, children and the elderly, and analyzes how specific federal and state policies affect low-income children and elderly in Wisconsin.
Source:
Brookings Institution

Related link:

Wisconsin Poverty Report:
New Measure, Broader View
(PDF - 1.5MB, 12 pages)
September 2010
Source:
Institute for Research on Public Policy

From the
The Atlantic Magazine : April 2011 issue:

Secret Fears of the Super-Rich
Does great wealth bring fulfillment? An ambitious study by Boston College suggests not. For the first time, researchers prompted the very rich—people with fortunes in excess of $25 million—to speak candidly about their lives. The result is a surprising litany of anxieties: their sense of isolation, their worries about work and love, and most of all, their fears for their children.
The results of the study are not yet public, but The Atlantic was granted access to portions of the research, provided the anonymity of the subjects was strictly maintained. The center expects to present the full conclusions gradually at upcoming conferences and to publish them over the next several months. The study is titled The Joys and Dilemmas of Wealth.

New Health Insurance Survey: 9 Million Adults Joined Ranks of Uninsured
Due to Job Loss in 2010; Few Viable Health Insurance Options Exist for Unemployed

News Release
March 16, 2011 - An estimated nine million working-age adults—57 percent of people who had health insurance through a job that was lost—became uninsured in the last two years, according to the Commonwealth Fund 2010 Biennial Health Insurance Survey.

The Survey:

Help on the Horizon: How the Recession Has Left Millions of Workers
Without Health Insurance, and How Health Reform Will Bring Relief

- includes an overview and executive summary along with a summary of findings and links to related resources

Full Report (PDF - 747K, 54 pages)

* Chartpack (PDF - 5.5MB)
* Chartpack (PowerPoint - 5.6MB)

Source:
Commonwealth Fund
The mission of The Commonwealth Fund is to promote a high performing health care system that achieves better access, improved quality, and greater efficiency, particularly for society's most vulnerable, including low-income people, the uninsured, minority Americans, young children, and elderly adults.

U.S.Tax Breaks vs. Budget Cuts (Infographic)
February 22, 2011
http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2011/02/tax_breaks_infographic.html

Economic Policy Institute publishes State of Working America
Press Release
February 1, 2011
The Economic Policy Institute today published The State of Working America, a website that provides academics, policymakers, the media and the public with comprehensive data on the economic condition of working Americans. The State of Working America presents data in eight broad issue areas: jobs, wages, income, mobility, wealth, poverty, health and international comparisons. It also allows users to view data by the demographic factors of race and ethnicity, gender, age, education level, family type, immigration status and union membership.

Key State of Working America findings include:

* The Great Recession saw job loss twice as severe as the three recessions prior to it.
* This job loss, combined with growth in the working-age population, means that roughly 11 million jobs need to be created to return the unemployment rate to pre-recession levels.
* There has been a “lost decade” for typical American households, as median income has declined.
* The top 1% of Americans have benefited disproportionately from economic growth over most of the past 30 years.
* Poverty no longer falls when the economy grows—the two have become de-linked in the past three decades.

The State of Working America
February 14, 2011
The State of Working America, an ongoing analysis published since 1988 by the Economic Policy Institute, includes a wide variety of data on family incomes, wages, jobs, unemployment, wealth, and poverty that allow for a clear, unbiased understanding of the economy’s effect on the living standards of working Americans.
- covers the following subjects :
* Economy Track * Health * Income * International * Jobs * Mobility * Poverty * Wages * Wealth
...and the following demographics:
* Age * Education Level * Family Type * Gender * Immigration Status * Race & Ethnicity * Union Membership

Source:
Economic Policy Institute
The Economic Policy Institute, a nonprofit Washington D.C. think tank, was created in 1986 to broaden the discussion about economic policy to include the interests of low- and middle-income workers. Today, with global competition expanding, wage inequality rising, and the methods and nature of work changing in fundamental ways, it is as crucial as ever that people who work for a living have a voice in the economic discourse.

Poverty in Numbers: The Changing State of Global Poverty from 2005 to 2015
By Laurence Chandy and Geoffrey Gertz
January 2011
Poverty reduction lies at the core of the global development challenge. For the international development community, this objective serves not only as a source of motivation, but as a defining theme across its work. Many of the world’s most prominent aid organizations cite poverty reduction as their overarching goal. (...) How many poor people are there in the world, and how many are there likely to be in 2015? In which countries and regions is poverty falling? How is the composition of global poverty changing and where will poverty be concentrated in the future? These are central questions for which we currently have few, if any, answers. This policy brief attempts to fill this gap by providing a best approximation in response to each of these questions, before offering policy recommendations based on these findings.

Complete report (PDF - 2.3MB, 23 pages)
Executive Summary (PDF - 26K, 1 page)

Source:
The Brookings Institution
The Brookings Institution is a nonprofit public policy organization based in Washington, DC. Our mission is to conduct high-quality, independent research and, based on that research, to provide innovative, practical recommendations that advance three broad goals:
1. Strengthen American democracy;
2. Foster the economic and social welfare, security and opportunity of all Americans, and
3. Secure a more open, safe, prosperous and cooperative international system.

TANF Responded Unevenly to Increase in Need During Downturn
Findings Suggest Needed Improvement When Program Reauthorized
By LaDonna Pavetti, Ph.D., Danilo Trisi and Liz Schott
January 25, 2011
"Nationally, the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, which provides basic assistance to low-income families with little or no income, has only been modestly responsive to the economic downturn… TANF caseloads increased by just 13 percent, while Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps) caseloads grew by 45 percent and the number of unemployed persons doubled… Moreover, in 22 states, TANF caseloads responded very little or not at all to the recession: 16 states had caseload increases of less than 10 percent and six states had caseload declines.”

View the full report:

HTML version
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3379

PDF version (16pp.)
http://www.cbpp.org/files/1-25-11tanf.pdf

---

State-by-state fact sheets:

HTML version
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3378

PDF version (55pp.)
http://www.cbpp.org/files/1-25-11tanf-methodology.pdf

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals. The Center conducts research and analysis to help shape public debates over proposed budget and tax policies and to help ensure that policymakers consider the needs of low-income families and individuals in these debates. We also develop policy options to alleviate poverty.

The Other Welfare (December 12-14, 2010)
This three-part series of articles in The Boston Globe by Patricia Wen examines the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program for children, which was created mainly for those with severe physical disabilities. But the $10 billion in federal benefit checks now goes primarily to indigent children with behavioral, learning and mental conditions.
NOTE: to see all three articles you must register (free).
Source:
Boston Globe

COMMENT:
My purpose in linking to this series of articles wasn't to highlight a U.S. Government initiative that appears to be facing some criticism, but rather to present a situation that we often see occurring here in Canada that's commonly known as "the welfare wall". That's when a client of the welfare system finds it daunting or even impossible to leave that system to accept a job because "breaking free" from welfare means losing some important benefits, such as the drug assistance, dental and vision coverage that are vital to some welfare households, particularly those with kids. The absence of universal, subsidized day care is another barrier for parents trying to leave welfare --- day care costs can quickly eat up a low-income worker's take-home pay, sometimes leaving them with less household income than they would receive on welfare to meet the cost of basic necessities. Another significant barrier to welfare clients who find a job is the earnings exemption policy of the welfare system where they live. In some Canadian jurisdictions, new applicants to the program face a dollar reduction in their welfare entitlement for every dollar of work income --- pretty low incentive to find a job, if you ask me...
This last point about the earnings exemption policies under provincial and territorial welfare programs is the link with the Boston Globe series of articles on SSI for children --- in the states, too many young SSI beneficiaries feel that they can't work because their family's financial well-being might be jeopardized by the treatment of income from work under SSI rules.

Related links:

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) - Government website

Supplemental Security Income - from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Supplemental Security Income (or SSI) is a United States government program that provides stipends to low-income persons who are either aged (65 or older), blind, or disabled. SSI is administered by the Social Security Administration and funded from general tax revenues in the United States.
SSI was created in 1974 to replace federal-state adult assistance programs that served the same purpose. The restructuring of these programs was intended to standardize the eligibility requirements and level of benefits. Today, the program provides benefits to 7.9 million American adults and children.

[U.S.] Grants for Single Moms
Single Mom Financial Aid, Scholarship Resources, Food and Housing Programs, Parenting Advice, and more

Created by a mother with 13 years of experience as sole-support parent, this website is intended for American single-parent mother-led households seeking supports, but it will also interest social researchers because it offers glimpses of how American social supports work for single moms and their families.
- includes practical information (and some links to further resources) in the areas of:
* Medicaid * Child Care Assistance * Food Stamp Tips * Housing Assistance * Help With Utility Bills * Assistance to Go to College * Dental Care * Transportation * Working From Home* Activities On A Tight Budget * Money Saving Tips * Student Loans For Single Moms * Nursing Grants and Other Financial Aid For Single Mothers *more to come...

- Go to the Links to International Sites about Women's Social Issues page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/womeninternat.htm

An Update on State Budget Cuts:
At Least 46 States Have Imposed Cuts that Hurt Vulnerable Residents and Cause Job Loss
By Nicholas Johnson, Phil Oliff and Erica Williams
November 4, 2010
“With tax revenue still declining as a result of the recession and budget reserves largely drained, the vast majority of states have made spending cuts that hurt families and reduce necessary services. These cuts, in turn, have deepened states’ economic problems because families and businesses have less to spend. Federal recovery act dollars and funds raised from tax increases have greatly reduced the extent, severity, and economic impact of these cuts, but only to a point. And federal aid to states is slated to expire well before state revenues have recovered.”

At least 46 states plus the District of Columbia have cut major areas of state services since the start of the recession, including

* Health care (31 states),
* Services to the elderly and disabled (29 states and DC),
* K-12 education (34 states and DC), and
* Higher education (43 states)

View the full report:

HTML version :
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=1214

PDF version :
http://www.cbpp.org/files/3-13-08sfp.pdf
(15 pp.)

Related:
States Continue to Feel Recession's Effects
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=711

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
(CBPP)
CBPP is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals.

[U.S.] Online Information About
Key Low-Income Benefit Programs in Each State

Virtually all states have made basic program information regarding the five main state-administered low-income benefit programs — Food Stamps, Medicaid, CHIP, TANF, and child care assistance — available to the public via the internet. Some provide a simple description of each program on their agencies’ websites. Others offer additional information, such as application forms, eligibility screening tools, policy and procedure manuals used by state agency eligibility workers, and statistical information regarding the number of participants. A number of states allow individuals to apply for certain types of benefits online.

This paper provides links to online state information provided about these benefit programs. Individuals seeking information about eligibility and benefits in a particular state will find these links a useful place to start.

View the full collection of links:
HTML : http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=1414
PDF : http://www.cbpp.org/files/1-14-04tanf.pdf
38 pp.

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP)
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals. )

Tax Data Show Richest 1 Percent Took
a Hit in 2008, But Income Remained
Highly Concentrated at the Top
Recent Gains of Bottom 90 Percent Wiped Out

October 21, 2010

By Hannah Shaw and Chad Stone
“The average income of the top 1 percent of households fell by 20 percent from 2007 to 2008, after adjusting for inflation, wiping out almost half of the gains this group achieved between 2002 and 2007.
“The average income of the bottom 90 percent of households fell 7 percent from 2007 to 2008, in inflation-adjusted dollars, the largest one-year drop for this group since 1938. The loss in 2008 more than wiped out the increase from 2002 to 2007, leaving the average income for the bottom 90 percent of households at its lowest level since 1996.”

View the full report:
HTML : http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3309
PDF : http://www.cbpp.org/files/10-21-10inc.pdf
(4pp.)

Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals.

More than 49 million Americans 'food insecure': study
September 2, 2010
WASHINGTON (AFP) - More than 49 million people in the United States do not have regular access to nutritious meals, putting them at risk for a raft of physical, psychological and social problems, a report said Thursday. Nearly 15 percent of households in the United States, representing 49.1 million individuals, experienced food insecurity sometime during 2008, the report published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association says.
Source:
Rogers/Yahoo! News

Related link:

Position of the American Dietetic Association: Food Insecurity in the United States
September 2010
(...)Negative nutrition and non–nutrition-related outcomes have been associated with food insecurity in children, adolescents, and adults, including substandard academic achievement, inadequate intake of key nutrients, poor health, increased risk for and development of chronic disease, poor disease management, and poor psychological and cognitive functioning.
Source:
Abstract
HTML / PDF Full text - if you click either of these links in box on the right-hand side of the page, you'll be asked to register your email with the Journal. When you do, you'll have free access to select full text articles, including the food insecurity article whose abstract appears above on the page you're now reading.

Source:
Journal of the American Dietetic Association
[ American Dietetic Association
]

New from the
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:

Policy Basics:
Top Ten Facts about Social Security on the Program's 75th Anniversary
August 13, 2010
“[Social Security] remains one of the nation’s most successful, effective, and popular programs. It provides a foundation of income on which workers can build to plan for their retirement. It also provides valuable social insurance protection to workers who become disabled and to families whose breadwinner dies.”

View the full report:
HTML : http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3261
PDF : http://www.cbpp.org/files/PolicyBasics_SocSec-TopTen.pdf (172K, 8 pages)

---

What the Trustees’ Report Shows about Social Security
By Kathy Ruffing and Paul N. Van de Water
August 13, 2010
“On August 5, the Social Security Board of Trustees issued the 70th annual report on the program’s financial and actuarial status. The trustees’ report shows some mild deterioration in the program’s short-term outlook — a finding that was widely expected — and a mild improvement in its long-run finances, thanks largely to the recent enactment of health reform.”

View the full report:
HTML : http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3262
PDF : http://www.cbpp.org/files/8-13-10socsec.pdf ( 240K, 6 pages)

---

Social Security Keeps 20 Million Americans
Out of Poverty: A State-By-State Analysis

Paul N. Van de Water and Arloc Sherman
August 11, 2010
(...) Although most of those kept out of poverty by Social Security are elderly, nearly a third are under age 65, including 1.1 million children. Depending on their design, reductions in Social Security benefits could significantly increase poverty, particularly among the elderly.

Source:
Center on Budget Policy and Priorities
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is one of the nation’s premier policy organizations working at the federal and state levels on fiscal policy and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals. The Center conducts research and analysis to help shape public debates over proposed budget and tax policies and to help ensure that policymakers consider the needs of low-income families and individuals in these debates. We also develop policy options to alleviate poverty.

Related links:

With Obama address, Democrats revive specter of GOP threat to Social Security
By Michael D. Shear and Lori Montgomery
August 15, 2010
Reviving a political tactic that Democrats have used before, President Obama said in his radio address Saturday that "some Republican leaders in Congress" want to privatize Social Security -- even though few GOP lawmakers today support the idea.
Source:
Social Security - A washingtonpost.com special report detailing the debate over proposed changes to Social Security, the nation's largest entitlement program.
- also includes links to :
* A Glimpse of Older America
* Aging Population Poses Challenges
*
more similar articles...
Source:
Washington Post

The White House Blog:

Weekly Address: Honoring Social Security, Not Privatizing It
Video
Transcript
Posted August 14, 2010
Source:
The White House Blog
[ The White House ]

Alliance for Aging Research
http://www.agingresearch.org/

Founded in 1986, to "promote medical and behavioral research into the aging process", the Washington D.C.-based Alliance for Aging Research has a website that covers many different "Topics". Visitors can explore general topics, such as "Caregiving", "Longevity", "Medical Innovation", and "Policy", as well as "Focus Areas". The focus areas include "Access to Breakthroughs", "Drug Development", "Persistent Pain" and "Vision Loss". On the homepage visitors can take "Surveys & Quizzes", like "Understanding Persistent Pain" and "Valve Disease Quiz - How Much Do You Know?" Related to the valve disease quiz is the recent podcast of a valve surgery patient, who discusses the symptoms she felt that resulted in her recent visit to the doctor, how she was diagnosed, her growing knowledge of the surgical procedure, and how she felt after surgery. Visitors can find that podcast and others, at the "Media" link near the bottom of the homepage. Also in the "Media" link, visitors can find videos, such as "Will Science Cure Aging?", and a rich archive of videos and podcasts

Source:
The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2010

2010 Kids Count Data Book <==================links to 16 related articles (child poverty, child welfare, etc.)

Source:
July 29 Poverty Dispatch
[
Poverty Dispatch (U.S.) ]
- the content of this link changes several times a week
- scan of U.S. web-based news items dealing with topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.

Food Research And Action Center
The Food Research and Action Center (FRAC), based in Washington DC, is "working to improve public policies and public-private partnerships to eradicate hunger and under-nutrition in the US...[as it] works with hundreds of national, state and local nonprofit organizations, public agencies, and corporations to address hunger and its root cause, poverty." Visitors to the FRAC website will find that the "Hunger in the U.S." link located in the middle green box on the homepage has a lot of good information on hunger that many people may be unfamiliar with, including a definition of "Hunger and Food Insecurity" and how it is typically measured. The link to the 2010 Anti-Hunger Policy Conference Presentations at the bottom left of the homepage allows visitors to view PowerPoint presentations on such topics as "Running on Empty: Nutritional Access for Children in Cook County, IL", "Making the Case for Anti-Hunger Priorities in Tight State Budgets", and "Obesity, Poverty and Hunger". The Disaster Food Resources link informs visitors of the extra food stamps made available to food stamp recipients in a disaster situation, as well as the disaster food stamps that are made available to those who do not normally receive food stamps.
Reviewed by:
The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2010.

Losing the Fight Against Child Poverty
July 6, 2010
By David Frum
"(...) I agree with Lowry and Ponnuru – and Charles Murray too – that American freedom and individualism are important national values to be celebrated and defended.
But let’s not flatter ourselves: Those values exact a social cost – and they would be easier to defend if the cost were less high. And the fact that this cost is not being paid by my children or (probably) yours does not make the cost less real to the one-third of America whose children do pay it."
Source:
David Frum - from Wikipedia
FrumForum:
FrumForum.com is a site edited by David Frum, dedicated to the modernization and renewal of the Republican party and the conservative movement.
---
NOTE: this link is from Jennefer Laidley's Daily Media Scan elsewhere in this newsletter.
I chose to highlight it separately because its author is the son of the late Barbara Frum, beloved and respected icon and social conscience of CBC Radio. She was a social justice champion and he is a dyed-in-the-wool social and fiscal conservative Republican with a 'maverick' libertarian streak. For anyone who knows David Frum, this article is pure science fiction. What next - Christopher Sarlo suggesting a welfare rate increase??

Child poverty in the U.S. must be getting pretty bad when even social conservative David Frum is expressing his concern - albeit in a detached, rhetorical sense, without offering any solutions - about the one-third of America's children who pay the social cost for American freedom and individualism.


OOPS!
April 19, 2010

The new Supplemental Poverty Measure (the SPM, described below) was originally described in these pages as an intrinsic part of the 2010 U.S. Census.

This was incorrect.
The SPM is distinct from the 2010 Census.

Read the words of the kind anonymous contributor
who set the record straight in an email earlier today:

"The U.S. Census Bureau’s new Supplemental Poverty Measure is completely separate from the U.S. 2010 Decennial Census. The 2010 Decennial Census (unlike earlier Decennial Censuses) does not contain any questions about income, so it cannot be used to measure poverty. The income data used to measure poverty according to both the current official poverty measure and the new Supplemental Poverty Measure will be taken from the Current Population Survey (and presumably also the American Community Survey); these surveys are separate from the Decennial Census."

[Thank you for this correction,
kind anonymous contributor...]
Gilles

---

Census to Redefine Poverty
By Ron Haskins, Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution
Doug Nelson , CEO, Annie E. Casey Foundations
March 12, 2010
With so many policy debates mired in partisan politics, the announcement last week by the U.S. Census Bureau that it plans to develop a supplemental poverty measure and then open it to public scrutiny is something both Republicans and Democrats can agree on.
Source:
Brookings Institution

Related links:

Observations from the
Interagency Technical Working Group
on Developing a Supplemental Poverty Measure
(PDF - 138K, 8 pages)
March 2010
(...)The Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM) would not replace the official poverty measure. The Working Group has designed it as an experimental measure that defines thresholds and resources in a manner different from the official poverty measure. The SPM should be considered a work in progress, with the expectation that there will be improvements to it over time. (...) The official statistical poverty measure, as defined in OMB Statistical Policy Directive No. 14, will continue to be produced and updated every year. This is the statistical measure that is released annually in the fall and is sometimes identified in legislation regarding program eligibility and funding distribution.
Source:
Poverty resources page
[ U.S. Census Bureau]

[ United States Census 2010 - Home Page ]
Americans were required to mail in their completed 2010 Census forms by Friday, April 16

[ 2010 United States Census - from Wikipedia ]

Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page of this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

---

Supplemental Federal Poverty Measure Explained (2.5 minute video)
The U.S. Census Bureau announced that it will be developing an alternative way to measure poverty. This new method will better reflect the realities facing struggling families and ways in which current government programs can help them to get back on their feet. Unlike the traditional poverty measure, which is based in a 1960s reality, this supplemental measure will provide a more accurate accounting of household budgets and better determination of whether a family has enough resources to meet its most basic needs.
Source:
Half in Ten: From Poverty to Prosperity
The Campaign to Cut Poverty in Half in Ten Years

More than thirty-seven million Americans live below the official poverty line (which is now $21,203 for a family of four), and more than 13.3 million children are poor in this country. Inequality has reached record highs – it is greater than at any time since 1929. (...)

Links to Federal Poverty Measurement Resources
- links to key organizations that study and track developments on the federal poverty measure.


Quotes from the The American Taliban
- memorable quotes from Ann Coulter, Jerry Falwell, Laura Schlessinger and other American Conservative quotables.

 

 

 


American Non-Governmental Organizations (A-J)

AARP (formerly called the American Association of Retired Persons)
"AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan membership organization for people 50 and over. We provide information and resources; advocate on legislative, consumer, and legal issues; assist members to serve their communities; and offer a wide range of unique benefits,special products, and services for our members. These benefits include AARP Webplace at www.aarp.org, Modern Maturity and My Generation magazines, and the monthly AARP Bulletin. Active in every U.S. state and territory, AARP celebrates the attitude that age isn't just a number -- it's about how you live your life."


Site review
by The Scout Report:
The American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) covers aging and aging-related topics quite well, and this website is one of their many compelling initiatives. The databases, AgeSource and AgeStats, on AARP's international website are designed to "facilitate the international exchange of policy and program-relevant information in aging." Under the "Aging Everywhere" tab is an interactive map that allows the visitor to read "Country Profiles" as well as read articles about a region selected from the map. A "Comparative Data Search" can also be done by clicking on the link above the map. There are multiple ways to search the information in the databases. On the left hand menu visitors can explore by topic or by region. Some of the topics include "Aging & Society", "Economic Retirement & Security", "Livable Communities" and "Long-Term Care". Searching for a particular topic can be accomplished by using the keyword search box in the middle of the page. The search can be further limited by deciding which databases to search, and by information type, geographic coverage, and language.
Reviewed by:
The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2009.
http://scout.wisc.edu/

Internet Resources Related to Aging (U.S.)
List of Contents - like a site map, incl. links to sites organized under the following headings : General Interest - Government - Health - Housing - Income - Law - Leisure - Libraries, Clearinghouses and Databases - Social Services - States and Communities - Statistics and Research - Listservs - Newsgroups - Electronic Magazines - Search Tools - Alphabetical Index
Other Internet Directories Related to Aging - links to 9 directories, most from the U.S. Administration on Aging, including state and even local links to resources for seniors

Links to AARP sites in all states

AARP Online U.S. Pension Calculator

---

AgeSource/AgeStats Worldwide
http://www.aarpinternational.org/database/
AgeSource Worldwide identifies several hundred information resources in some 25 countries which are significant either in size or in their unique coverage of particular aging-related issues. The resources include, among others, clearinghouses, libraries, databases, training materials, major reports, and Web metasites. AgeStats Worldwide provides access to statistical data that compare the situation of older adults across countries or regions around a variety of issues, such as demography, pensions, health and long-term care. The most recent data and projections as far ahead as 2050 are provided where available. You may search either or both databases at one time. Access is free-of-charge. AgeSource and AgeStats Worldwide have been created by AARP to facilitate the international exchange of policy and program-relevant information in aging.

Almanac of Policy Issues - U.S.
"The Almanac of Policy Issues provides comprehensive background information and links on major U.S. public policy issues. The Almanac is an independent public service not affiliated with any particular issue or cause. Every effort is made to present all sides of each issue, and to do so in an unbiased, journalistic format."
- incl. links to:
Criminal Justice (Death Penalty, Drug Policy, Gun Control ...)
Culture and Society (Abortion, Arts, Civil Rights ...)
Economic Issues (Budget and Tax, Job Training ...)
Education (Elementary & Secondary, Higher Education ...)
Environment (Endangered Species, Global Warming....)
Government Operations (Campaign Finance Reform, Privatization ...)
Health (Health Insurance, Medicare ...)
Social Welfare
(Social Security, Welfare [incl. welfare reform info up to October 2002]...)
World: Foreign Affairs & National Security (Israel, Iraq ...)
Minimum Wage

American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research
The American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research is a private, nonpartisan, not-for-profit institution dedicated to research and education on issues of government, politics, economics, and social welfare. (...) The Institute's community of scholars is committed to expanding liberty, increasing individual opportunity, and strengthening free enterprise.

What Prosperity Means
By Ryan Streeter
October 27, 2009
"The Legatum Institute, where I am a senior fellow, just released the 2009 Prosperity Index, the world’s only global assessment of wealth and well-being. The Index is based on what most people would consider a fairly intuitive concept of prosperity—namely that “prospering” requires money, but ultimately much more than money. (...) The Prosperity Index builds a complex and sophisticated methodology on top of this basic and intuitive understanding of prosperity. The index ranks 104 countries covering 90 percent of the world’s population. The index consists of nine sub-indexes that are themselves comprised of 79 variables. It assesses how well nations around the world perform on economic fundamentals, innovation, government policy, health, social capital, and more. Its nine sub-indexes are based on reams of research into what makes economies grow and citizens happy."
[Spoiler : The Nordic countries are at the top of the list, Canada is seventh and the United States ninth.]
NOTE: the two links in the preceding paragraph weren't working on Oct. 27, but that's likely from the volume of traffic generated by the launch of this report.
The links are correct - just keep trying until you get in...
Source:
The Enterprise Blog
[ The American, A Magazine of Ideas ]

The American Prospect (TAP)
"The aim of The American Prospect is to contribute to a renewal of America's democratic traditions by presenting a practical and convincing vision of liberal philosophy, politics, and public life. We publish articles for the general reader that attempt to break through conventional understanding and creatively reframe public questions. Ours is not a magazine of complaint, of angry gestures, or of private irritations. It is a magazine of public ideas, firmly committed -- however unfashionably -- to a belief in public improvement. America can do much good, and it can do much better."
Subject Index of hundreds of American Prospect Online articles going back several years
Links to Issue Pages - incl. Globalization - Children and Families - Checkbook Democracy - Common Wealth - Election 2000 Archive

War and Rebuilding - The American Prospect
Volume 12, Issue 19.
Cover Date : November 5, 2001
- Select from almost two dozen features and articles relating to the September World Trade Center attacks and the aftermath.

Here are two sample articles from that issue:

How to Be Tough on Terrorism
by Robert B. Reich
Spreading prosperity and relieving human suffering are in our national interest to the extent that they reduce the anger felt by many of the world's poor toward rich and powerful America while creating opportunities for the poor to share the benefits of the global economy.
NOTE : Go to Robert Reich's page on the TAP website to read about the author; keep scrolling down the page for a large collection of his editorials and commentaries. Reich was U.S. Secretary of Labor (in 1993) when he and Lloyd Axworthy proposed to the OECD that it perform periodic social audits of different countries in addition to its economic audits. I've liked Reich since then, and I'd recommend that you read more of his articles (by clicking on his name above).

Behind the Burqa
by Noy Thrupkaew
Article concerning the plight of Afghan women under the rule of the Taliban and the struggle for their liberation.

American Public Human Services Association (APHS)
"Founded in 1930, APHSA is a nonprofit, bipartisan organization of individuals and agencies concerned with human services. Our members include all state and many territorial human service agencies, more than 1,200 local agencies, and several thousand individuals who work in or otherwise have an interest in human service programs."

American RadioWorks
"AMERICAN RADIOWORKS® is the national documentary unit of American Public Media. ARW is public radio's largest documentary production unit; it creates documentaries, series projects, and investigative reports for the public radio system and the Internet."
Reviewed by:
The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2006.

After Welfare
In August 1996, landmark legislation fulfilled the promise to "end welfare as we know it" in the U.S. Congress gave the states money to run their own programs and required them to move many welfare recipients into the workforce.
Supporters declared it a new day, the beginning of self-sufficiency for poor families. Others warned the action would push women and children into the streets, perhaps by the millions.

After Welfare - U.S.
May 2006
[requires Real Player and Macromedia Flash Player]
Over the past few years, the American RadioWorks has raised the bar for like-minded radio documentary programs, producing thought-provoking and insightful studies on topics such as, Congressional reform, intelligent design, and international adoption programs. In this recently released documentary, John Biewen has created this introspective look into the world of welfare reform in the United States, and how it has affected the lives of five different women and their families. The women profiled come from a host of different backgrounds, and visitors may be surprised at some of the findings that Biewen presents in the documentary. The site also includes an interactive feature that allows users to find out how their own state ranks in terms of welfare and foodstamp recipients, welfare check sizes, time limits, and unemployment rates. Visitors can also look over a list of additional external links of interest and also read the complete transcript of the program.
Source:

Related Links:

Your State of Welfare (also fromAmerican RadioWorks)
"Find out how your state ranks in terms of welfare and foodstamp recipients, welfare check sizes, time limits poverty and unemployment rates, welfare cases closed (and why) and more."
Comment: Wow - very impressive. Move your cursor over the map of the U.S. and it expands to let you click on the smaller states - provided that you know the names and locations of the states (it took me three tries to find Minnesota

Links and Resources - links to a dozen online resources

The latest Government report to Congress on welfare reform:

TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE FOR NEEDY FAMILIES (TANF)
Sixth Annual Report to Congress

November 2004
Source:
Office of Family Assistance
[ part of the Administration for Children and Families ]
[ part of the Department of Health and Human Services ]

America’s Second Harvest has changed its name to Feeding America. This new name best conveys our mission—providing food to Americans living with hunger—and will be supported through expansive public outreach campaigns that will raise awareness of domestic hunger and our work.

America's Second Harvest Changes Name to Feeding America
Nation’s largest domestic hunger-relief charity changes its name to better engage the public in the fight against hunger
Chicago
September 5, 2008
Effective immediately, America’s Second Harvest—The Nation’s Food Bank Network, an organization of more than 200 food banks that provide food and grocery products to food pantries, soup kitchen and other emergency food agencies across the country, will become Feeding America. The primary objective of the branding change is to more fully engage the public in the fight against hunger.

[NOTE: For more American links to hunger and food banks, see the Canadian Social Research Links Food Banks and Hunger page

American Women's History: A Research Guide
Sections include : General Reference & Biographical Sources -
Subject Index to Research Sources - State and Regional History Sources - Finding Books | Journal Articles | Theses - Finding Primary Sources: Tools/Formats
Source : Ken Middleton (Reference / Microforms Librarian, Middle Tennessee State University)

Annie E. Casey Foundation
Serving children and families. Building supportive communities. Reforming public systems. Gathering and evaluating data. Promoting equity. Achieving results.

U.S. Election 2008:
Major Foundation Initiative to Shine Spotlight on
Poverty and Opportunity in America
(PDF file - 68K, 3 pages)
New Study Shows Growing Number of Voters Concerned About Hunger and Poverty
Presidential Candidates Weighing In with their Perspectives and Proposals

WASHINGTON, D.C. (October 30, 2007)—A major foundation initiative, Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity, was launched today at the National Press Club to move the issues of poverty and opportunity to center stage during the 2008 presidential campaign. The initiative, supported by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the Eos Foundation and other major foundations, will seek to engage presidential, congressional and local candidates in substantive discussions about poverty and keep these issues in the forefront as a new administration sets its agenda.

Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity is launched as a three-tiered program, including:
* www.spotlightonpoverty.org (see below for more info)
* Forums and opportunities for national and local candidates and elected officials to discuss their ideas and views on poverty and solutions that can create opportunity.
* A continuing post-2008 election effort to ensure that poverty and opportunity issues are prominent on the national policy agenda and to press elected officials to fulfill their campaign promises.

Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity
"...includes information on candidates’ statements and proposals on poverty and filmed responses of several presidential candidates answering foundation-posed questions on poverty in America. The website also will provide daily news updates, opinion, research and census data, and links to blogs on poverty and hunger."
- on the home page, click on a presidential candidate's photo or name to access his (OR HER) speeches, position papers and more...
- home page includes links to:
* About Spotlight : Why Spotlight Poverty? - Advisory Council - Foundations - Steering Committee - Press Room - Contact Us - Sign Up
* Spotlight Questions : Setting a Goal - Opportunity - Your Past Actions - Children Roles
* Data On Your Community
* Initiatives : local - state - international
* Research : Characteristics of Poverty - Poverty Measurement - Consequences of Poverty - Mobility and Opportunity - Anti-Poverty Proposals - Immigration and Poverty - Asset Poverty - Place and Poverty
* Links : Government - Database and Statistics - Policy and Research - Journals - Campaigns on Poverty - More on the candidates

NOTE: I've highlighted the Research and Links sections of this new site, and I recommend that you take a few minutes to explore some of the interesting online resources, broader than the 2008 elections, in these two sections. Just remember that this site presents views from both the Left (e.g., Urban Institute, Brookings Institution) and the Right (e.g., Cato Institute, Heritage Foundation). Always remember to evaluate the source (by checking the About this Site page, the Funding/Partners page, etc.) of any new site that you visit to see if there are any inherent biases. [Canadian Social Research Links, of course, has no biases...]

Exclusive Commentary:
- incl. links to :
*The Earned Income Tax Credit *
The Future of Poverty as a Political Issue * New York Governor Eliot Spitzer Writes for "Spotlight" * Is Anyone Putting Forward Real Solutions? * Poverty & Campaign 2008: Where Are We Heading?

Foundations initially collaborating on Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity are:
The Annie E. Casey Foundation
"Helping vulnerable kids and families succeed"
The Eos Foundation
"Our mission is to break the cycle of poverty by investing in children’s futures.

Child Health and Safety
June 4, 2007
In conjunction with our partners in Mexico and the United States, the Canadian Council on Social Development has released Child Health and Safety, a new report in the Children in North America series. It provides indicator data on the physical, mental and environmental health of children.
- incl. links to Growing Up in North America (May 2006) and other related material

Complete report:
* Child Health and Safety in Canada, the United States and Mexico
(PDF file - 1 MB, 64 pages)

* Executive summary: Child Health and Safety in Canada, the United States and Mexico
(PDF format, 241 kb)

Français:
* Le bien-être des enfants au Canada, aux États-Unis et au Mexique (format PDF, 1 Mo)
* Sommaire executif: Le bien-être des enfants au Canada, aux États-Unis et au Mexique (format PDF, 244 kb)

Related Links:

Children in North America Project website
The Children in North America Project aims to highlight the conditions and well-being of children and youth in Canada, Mexico, and the United States. Through a series of indicator reports, the project hopes to build a better understanding of how our children are faring and the opportunities and challenges they face looking to the future.

Partners in the project:

The Annie E. Casey Foundation (U.S.)
Population Reference Bureau (U.S.)
Canadian Council on Social Development
Red por los Derechos de la Infancia (Mexico)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

39 Million Americans in Working Poor Families
Oct. 11, 2004
Associated Press
"WASHINGTON - One in every five U.S. jobs pays less than a poverty-level wage for a family of four, according to a study by the nonpartisan Working Poor Families Project.The result of so many low-paying jobs is that nearly 39 million Americans, including 20 million children, are members of "low-income working families" - those barely have enough money to cover basic needs like housing, groceries and child care, the study found."
Source:
Kansas City Star

WORKING HARD, FALLING SHORT:
America’s Working Families and the Pursuit of Economic Security
(PDF file - 3.2MB, 36 pages)
October 2004
"This report is a product of the Working Poor Families Project, a national initiative supported by the Annie E. Casey, Ford and Rockefeller foundations. This initiative, publicly launched in 2001, has involved 15 state nonprofit organizations that are committed to helping low-income adults succeed in the labor market. Each state organization prepares a report similar to this national one, assessing conditions of working families and state government efforts to assist them."

-------------------------------------------
The report presents data on "low-income working families," which it defines as working families with incomes below 200 percent of the official federal poverty thresholds. Explaining its choice of this definition, the report refers to work on family budgets done by the Economic Policy Institute, Wider Opportunities for Women, and state groups in Michigan and Texas. These budgets, which estimate the actual cost of basic needs to achieve economic self-sufficiency, generally approximate 200 percent of the poverty thresholds, although they range even higher in high-cost metropolitan areas. The report includes a recommendation that the federal government "redefine poverty more realistically and adopt a meaningful definition of self-sufficiency or low-income."
-------------------------------------------

Source:
The Working Poor Families Project

"The Working Poor Families Project was created in 2001 to assess state efforts to assist the working poor. This national initiative was started by the Annie E. Casey Foundation and is now supported by AECF and the Ford and Rockefeller Foundations."
NOTE: Click on the link above and scroll down the page that appears for links to individual state reports.

Associated Press

California:
Schwarzenegger's welfare cuts angers Dems
July 9, 2009
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's insistence on cost-cutting measures to weed out what he has described as "waste, fraud and abuse" in California's social service programs has struck a nerve with Democrats, welfare advocates and the frail. They say the Republican governor is using the poor as a scapegoat for the state's $26.3 billion budget shortfall. They also fear his proposals, if approved by the Legislature, would trigger increased unemployment and homelessness, and force thousands of people from their homes into expensive nursing facilities.
Source:

Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN)
ACORN is the nation's largest community organization of low and moderate-income families, with over 100,000 member families organized into 500 neighborhood chapters in 40 cities across the country. Since 1970 ACORN has taken action and won victories on issues of concern to our members. Our priorities include: better housing for first time homebuyers and tenants, living wages for low-wage workers, more investment in our communities from banks and governments, and better public schools. We achieve these goals by building community organizations that have the power to win changes -- through direct action, negotiation, legislation, and voter participation.
See other ACORN affiliate websites:
ACORN Housing Corporation
ACORN Law on the Web

Living Wage Resource Center - Brief history of the national living wage movement, background materials such as ordinance summaries and comparisons, drafting tips, research summaries, talking points, and links to other living wage-related sites.

Beliefnet

The Twelve Tribes of American Politics
The religious groups that comprise the U.S. electorate--and how they voted in 2004.
Source:

NOTE:
Although this is not Canadian social policy as such, I was nonetheless compelled to include a link to this short (8-page) synopsis after the death last week of Jerry Falwell, icon of the Religious Right.
Religious groups that work to influence American public policy include:
• the "religious right" • heartland culture warriors moderate evangelicals • white bread protestants • convertible catholics • the "religious left" • spiritual but not religious • seculars • latinos • jews • muslims & other faiths • black protestants

- incl. info for each group on:
• Percent of voting-age population • Percent of 2004 voters • Who they are • Examples • Ideology • Political Party • Political trend • How they voted •
What they care about

Benton Foundation - ("... working to realize the social benefits made possible by the public interest use of communications")
- Washington, D.C.
 - **Coalition for America's Children

 - **Children and Foster Care (June 1998)
American Public Human Services Association (formerly the American Public Welfare Association)

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
Bill and Melinda Gates believe every life has equal value. In 2000, they created the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to help reduce inequities in the United States and around the world.

Remarks of Bill Gates
Harvard Commencement
June 7, 2007
“From those to whom much is given, much is expected...
(...) We can make market forces work better for the poor if we can develop a more creative capitalism – if we can stretch the reach of market forces so that more people can make a profit, or at least make a living, serving people who are suffering from the worst inequities. We also can press governments around the world to spend taxpayer money in ways that better reflect the values of the people who pay the taxes. If we can find approaches that meet the needs of the poor in ways that generate profits for business and votes for politicians, we will have found a sustainable way to reduce inequity in the world. This task is open-ended. It can never be finished. But a conscious effort to answer this challenge will change the world. (...) I hope you will come back here to Harvard 30 years from now and reflect on what you have done with your talent and your energy. I hope you will judge yourselves not on your professional accomplishments alone, but also on how well you have addressed the world’s deepest inequities … on how well you treated people a world away who have nothing in common with you but their humanity."

Bloomberg
" Bloomberg is the leading global provider of data, news and analytics."

House Adopts Higher Minimum Wage, $310 Billion in Tax Cuts
July 29 2006
"The House voted to boost the minimum wage for the first time since 1997 in Republican-backed legislation that also cuts $310 billion in taxes, largely by reducing a levy on multimillion-dollar estates. The minimum wage increase, and the inclusion of $38 billion in tax cuts that many Democrats support, were described by some Republicans as a bid to attract votes for the estate tax legislation when it reaches the Senate, where it has been rejected twice in the last month."

Related Link:

COMPARING THE HOUSE MINIMUM WAGE AND ESTATE TAX PROPOSALS:
Who Benefits and By How Much?
July 28, 2006
by Joel Friedman and Aviva Aron-Dine
http://www.cbpp.org/7-28-06tax2.htm
http://www.cbpp.org/7-28-06tax2.pdf, 2pp.
Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (Washington)

Google News Search Results:
"US, minimum wage"
Google Web Search Results:
"US, minimum wage"
Source:
Google.ca

Brookings Institution
The Brookings Institution is a nonprofit public policy organization based in Washington, DC. Our mission is to conduct high-quality, independent research and, based on that research, to provide innovative, practical recommendations that advance three broad goals:
* Strengthen American democracy;
* Foster the economic and social welfare, security and opportunity of all Americans and
* Secure a more open, safe, prosperous and cooperative international system.

Sample reports from the Brookings Institution:

Five Myths About Our Land of Opportunity
By Isabel V. Sawhill and Ron Haskins
November 01, 2009
Americans have always believed that their country is unique in providing the opportunity to get ahead. Just combine hard work with a bit of talent and you'll climb the ladder—or so we've told ourselves for generations. But rising unemployment and financial turmoil are puncturing that self-image. The reality of this "land of opportunity" is considerably more complex than the myths would suggest:
1. Americans enjoy more economic opportunity than people in other countries.
2. In the United States, each generation does better than the past one.
3. Immigrant workers and the offshoring of jobs drive poverty and inequality in the United States.
4. If we want to increase opportunities for children, we should give their families more income.
5. We can fund new programs to boost opportunity by cutting waste and abuse in the federal budget.

See also:
The Socialist-Free Purity Pledge (U.S.)

What Do the Recently-Released U.S. Poverty Numbers Tell Us? (PDF - 48K, 9 pages)
September 25, 2008
Testimony to the Joint Economic Committee
Hearing entitled “Leave No Family Behind: How Can We Reduce the Rising Number of
American Families Living in Poverty?”
By Rebecca M. Blank
"(...)

Highlights:
- poverty did not fall to any appreciable extent during the economic expansion of the 2000s. This is quite unusual.
- In past decades,the poverty rate and the unemployment rate have moved together. When unemployment fell in the 1980s expansion, so did poverty. Unemployment and poverty both fell rapidly in the strong expansion of the 1990s. But when unemployment fell after 2003, poverty remained essentially flat.
- the rise in poverty reflects the generally sluggish growth in income by all families in the bottom half of the income distribution

Anti-Poverty Strategies for the Next Decade:
* Continue to Incentivize and Support Low-Wage Work
--- Work and earnings must be at the center of any anti-poverty strategy.
--- Expanding the EITC for workers without children in their immediate households would help incentivize work among less-skilled men.
--- Increase assistance to help pay child care expenses for single mothers who are caring for children.
*Assuring the Presence of an Effective Safety Net
--- Help disconnected women and their families stabilize their incomes.
--- Revisions in Unemployment Insurance. (...)
We have had real successes in our anti-poverty efforts over the past 30 years, but there is more that we can do to reduce economic need among our citizens."

Related link:

Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance
Coverage in the United States: 2007
(PDF - 2.9MB, 84 pages)
August 2008
Source:
U.S. Census

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Challenge of Achieving High Work Participation Rates in Welfare Programs - U.S.
Policy Brief
by LaDonna Pavetti
October 2004
"Efforts to reform the welfare system over the last two decades have largely focused on reducing welfare dependency by getting welfare recipients to work. By the time the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program was created by the welfare reform law of 1996, there was widespread agreement in the states that welfare recipients should be required to look for work and to do so shortly after (or even before) they began receiving cash assistance. Once TANF was implemented, work became a central focus of local welfare offices. However, as shown by the recent debates on the reauthorization, consensus on work requirements remains elusive."
HTML version
PDF version (284K, 8 pages)

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Welfare Reform: Plenty of Work Left
November 2, 2004
Philadelphia Daily News
by Margy Waller
"Late last summer, Secretary of Health and Human Services Tommy Thompson celebrated the eighth anniversary of the historic welfare-to-work law by announcing a small welfare caseload decline in 2003: 'American families are improving their lives by leaving public assistance and entering the workforce,'he said. A mere three days later, the U.S. Census Bureau announced the 2003 poverty estimates. Poverty increased and unfortunately, children accounted for most of the overall increase and more than a third of all poor people. This isn't the way things should work."
Source:
Welfare Reform - links to these two files plus dozens more articles, op-eds, speeches, (etc.) going back to 1997 on the subject of welfare reform
[ Welfare Reform and Beyond Project ]
[ The Brookings Institution ]

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Heeding Clinton's Welfare Advice
Op-ed by Margy Waller
Philadelphia Daily News
February 6, 2004
"PRESIDENT Clinton shared a few ideas about how to next proceed on welfare reform just before he left office in 2001. His thoughts are worth reviewing as the Senate prepares to take up the reauthorization of the historic 1996 welfare law. Noting that it had then been five years since the bill had passed, he said, "We need to look and see where it's working and what the problems are."
He identified five issues for policy-makers: Helping the 'hard to place' to find work, job-training, transportation, addressing the needs of places with a disproportionate concentration of recipients and reducing recidivism.
Then he went on, saying 'one of the great stories of the last eight years is that all of us who thought poor people would rather work than draw a government check for not working were right.' But he worried that 'people still have to be able, even on modest wages, to succeed at work and at home,' citing the need to raise minimum wage and his disappointment that this hadn't happened since 1996.
Finally, he said something few politicians have been willing to say in the context of welfare policy: 'we've got to make sure that people who are working, particularly if they're single parents, can do a good job with their kids, because raising children is still the most important job of any society.'"

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Welfare Reform: Building on Success
Testimony of Margy Waller (Brookings Institution) to the Senate Committee on Finance
March 12, 2003
"In my testimony, I will first review some important outcomes and lessons of the state and local implementation of the welfare law. Next, I will outline my concern that these successes will be undermined by the limitations and cost of the administration's proposal. Finally, I will make some specific recommendations to the committee for your consideration as you draft a reauthorization bill."
Full testimony (PDF file - 58K, 21 pages)

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Tax Policy as Housing Policy: The Earned Income Tax Credit's Potential to Make Housing More Affordable for Working Families
by Michael Stegman,Walter Davis, and Roberto Quercia
October 2003
Full report (PDF file - 200K, 16 pages)

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Block-Grant Mania: A Way to Cut Aid to the Working Poor?
In this op-ed, Margy Waller reviews the history of block grants and asks whether the administration's many block grant proposals are intended to lead to reduced federal funding to working poor families.
July 28, 2003

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Tax Credits for Working Families: The New American Social Policy
August 2003
Highlights
"In a policy environment averse to direct spending on programs dedicated to income support, a variety of federal tax credits have emerged as key vehicles for providing assistance to low-to-moderate income families. Indeed, the two largest individual income tax credits—the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Child Tax Credit (CTC)—will represent over $75 billion in tax expenditures in 2003."
Full Report (PDF file - 389K, 61 pages)

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Tax Reform for Families
Publication Date: July 01, 2003
"This brief argues that the time is ripe for an integrated credit that combines the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Child Tax Credit into an Earned Income Child Credit (EICC). The proposed EICC simplifies and standardizes the definition of qualifying children and those who may claim them, and indexes the new credit for inflation so that it retains its purchasing power over time. The EICC also provides enhanced benefits to low-income working families and reduces marginal tax rates. One version would cost $6 billion relative to current law (JGTRRA) in calendar year 2003.
Summary (HTML)
Complete report (PDF file - 271K, 8 pages)

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Stunning Progress, Hidden Problems: The Dramatic Decline of Concentrated Poverty in the 1990s (PDF file - 1.1MB, 24 pages)
"The issue of concentrated poverty is one that continues to engage the attention of social workers, politicians, and scholars alike. In this intriguing 24-page report from the Brooking Institution's Center on Urban and Metropolitan Policy, Paul A. Jargowsky presents findings that suggest that concentrated poverty declined significantly during the 1990s. Some of his findings include statistics indicating that the number of people living in high-poverty neighborhoods declined by 24 percent, and that concentrated poverty declined among all racial and ethnic groups, especially African-Americans. The methodology section is quite helpful, as it explains the exact definition of "high-poverty concentrations" and the federal government standards for poverty levels. Additionally, the report contains numerous tables, graphs, and charts that document this transformation, including several organized maps detailing this change in Detroit, Los Angeles, and Chicago."

Reviewed in The Scout Report (May 28, 2003), Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2002

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Welfare Reform & Beyond (PowerPoint Presentation - 714K, 101 slides)
Spring 2002
Source:
The Brookings Institution
Excellent information on the history of welfare in the U.S. ---- highly recommended - if you can put up with the cryptic language of PowerPoint slides...
(this isn't a criticism of the Brookings Institution --- PowerPoint slides are often difficult to grasp without more detailed notes...)

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Business Week

The Poverty Business
Inside U.S. companies' audacious drive to extract more profits from the nation's working poor

May 2007
"(...) In recent years, a range of businesses have made financing more readily available to even the riskiest of borrowers. Greater access to credit has put cars, computers, credit cards, and even homes within reach for many more of the working poor. But this remaking of the marketplace for low-income consumers has a dark side: Innovative and zealous firms have lured unsophisticated shoppers by the hundreds of thousands into a thicket of debt from which many never emerge."

NOTE: you'll find links to the following related items on the same page as the above article:

* Chart: Borrowing Binge
* Graphic: Extreme Interest
* Chart: The Other Banking System
* Graphic: From Thin Wallets, Big Money
* Study Now—And Pay And Pay And Pay Later
* Chart: Expensive Debt
* The Economics of the Poverty Business
* Cutting the Cost of Poverty

Source:
Business Week - May 21/07 issue

Canadian Policy Research Networks

Redesigning the “Welfare Mix” for Families: Policy Challenges
Discussion Paper by Jane Jenson, Director of the Family Network
Canadian Policy Research Networks
February 2003
Impressive, extensive collection of information on Canadian, American and European welfare (social assistance) programs and recent initiatives to improve labour market attachment as a means of reducing welfare dependency.
Includes some excellent info on the following topics (to mention but a few):
Defining the Welfare Mix - Current Challenges (An Ageing Society- Economic Marginalization and Social Exclusion - Changing Families - Child Poverty) - Redesigning the Welfare Mix: What is Being Done Elsewhere --- The European Union (An Employment-Centred Strategy for Achieving a Better Welfare Mix) - The United States (Welfare Mix of Hidden Expenditures and Dramatic Reforms) - The Adequacy of Social Assistance Benefits in Canada - Canada’s Strategies for Increasing Labour Force Attachment - Work and Family (Child Benefits and Other Supports for Families)
- also includes info about the Self-Sufficiency Project (Final Results), a table showing Adequacy of Welfare Benefits by Province and Location of Residence (Lone Parent, One Child Families and Couples with Two Children) - Comparison of Selected Countries’ Programs to Foster Labour Force Participation, Aid Transition from Social Assistance to Work, and Ensure Adequate Income - Rankings of Provinces by Amount of Social Benefit and “Poverty Gap” - Comparison of Provinces’ Programs to Foster Labour Force Participation, Aid Transition from Social Assistance to Work, and Ensure Adequate Income.

Cases and Materials on American Federalism
Purdue University
- Calumet, Indiana
By Dr. Douglas G. Amber
"These materials were developed for the Introductory American Government & public policy classes that I teach at Purdue University Calumet. The cases and materials contained herein are an attempt to create an organized net-based resource for a political science student's journey of discovery into both the "hows" and the "whys" of American Government and public policy without getting bogged down in shallow discussions of the propriety vel non of the polarizing (and usually inflammatory) current topics of popular discussion."
- great collection of historical resources, includes links to : American Socio-Political Heritage - Our Constitutional Beginnings - The Consequences of Federalism - "Democracy": Its Definition(s) & Structure(s) - The Congress - The President - The Federal Courts - Civil Liberties & Rights - Glossary - Appendices [State Law -- Relevant Political Works Available Online - A Timeline of Events Related to American Federalism - PoliticalParties & Organizations With Websites - Additional Significant "Federalism" Cases]
Sample Content :
A Timeline of Events Related to American Federalism - 1066 to 2002


Center for American Progress Task Force on Poverty
The Center for American Progress is a think tank dedicated to improving the lives of Americans through ideas and action. We combine bold policy ideas with a modern communications platform to help shape the national debate, expose the hollowness of conservative governing philosophy, and challenge the media to cover the issues that truly matter.

Selected recent site content:

August 5, 2008
UK-Style Welfare Reform
Kate Bell explains why the British government should look to its own poverty success rather than the United States' early failures for welfare reform help.

July 30, 2008
Elderly Poverty: The Challenge Before Us
The elderly are disproportionately suffering in the economic downturn. It's time to help.

July 28, 2008
Issue Brief: The Child Tax Credit
Making the Child Tax Credit fully refundable would lift some of the barriers that prevent low-income families from getting the help they need.

July 28, 2008
Want to Help 13 Million Children?
The Child Tax Credit currently leaves out many low-income families who need the help most, but a new law would help change that.

House Embraces Poverty Goal
January 25, 2008
Last April, the Center for American Progress released the report of CAP’s Task Force on Poverty, From Poverty to Prosperity [see the link below], calling for a national goal of cutting poverty in half in 10 years. This week, the House of Representatives endorsed this goal, when on January, 22, 2008, the House passed House Concurrent Resolution 198 via voice vote without objection, declaring the sense of the Congress that the United States should set a national goal of cutting poverty in half over the next 10 years.

Related link:

From Poverty to Prosperity: A National Strategy to Cut Poverty in Half
April 25, 2007
[ Highlights and recommendations - HTML ]
"(...)Consider the following facts:
* One in eight Americans now lives in poverty.
* Millions of Americans will spend at least one year in poverty at some point in their lives. One third of all Americans will experience poverty within a 13-year period.
* Poverty in the United States is far higher than in many other developed nations.
* Inequality has reached record highs.

A strategy to cut poverty in half should be guided by four principles:
* Promote Decent Work.
* Provide Opportunity for All.

* Ensure Economic Security.
* Help People Build Wealth.

Twelve key steps to cut poverty in half:
1. Raise and index the minimum wage to half the average hourly wage.
2. Expand the Earned Income Tax Credit and Child Tax Credit.
3. Promote unionization by enacting the Employee Free Choice Act.
4. Guarantee child care assistance to low-income families and promote early education for all.
5. Create 2 million new “opportunity” housing vouchers, and promote equitable development in and around central cities.
6. Connect disadvantaged and disconnected youth with school and work.
7. Simplify and expand Pell Grants and make higher education accessible to residents of each state.
8. Help former prisoners find stable employment and reintegrate into their communities.
9. Ensure equity for low-wage workers in the Unemployment Insurance system.
10. Modernize means-tested benefits programs to develop a coordinated system that helps workers and families.
11. Reduce the high costs of being poor and increase access to financial services.
12. Expand and simplify the Saver’s Credit to encourage saving for education, homeownership, and retirement.

Our recommendations would cut poverty in half. "
[Excerpts from the report]

Full report (PDF - 8.1MB, 80 pages)
Executive Summary (PDF - 3.9MB, 8 pages)

Related links:
Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

Investing in Our Children: The U.S. Can Learn From the U.K.
By Jane Waldfogel
July 30, 2007
The former and newly installed British prime ministers, Tony Blair and Gordon Brown, are longstanding Labour Party rivals, yet they were able to unite in what history may one day view as their most important domestic achievement—a commitment to end child poverty in the United Kingdom.
(...)
Although most of the focus in the United Kingdom is on relative poverty, the government also tracks its progress using an absolute poverty line, similar to the one the United States uses. On this measure, the United Kingdom has reduced poverty by a stunning 50 percent since the start of its anti-poverty campaign—reducing the numbers of children in absolute poverty before housing costs from 3.4 million in 1999 to 1.6 million in 2006. From a U.S. vantage point, this is a remarkable achievement.
Source:
Center for American Progress


Center for An Accessible Society
(U.S) - "Disability Issues Information for Journalists - A communications clearinghouse providing journalists credible information and quotable sources on national disability policy and independent living issues"
- "Funded by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, The Center for An Accessible Society is a national organization designed to focus public attention on disability and independent living issues by disseminating information developed through NIDRR-funded research to promote independent living."
- incl. links to a wealth of online information organized under the following topics : Administration Programs and Policy - Americans with Disabilities Act - ADA Supreme Court decisions - Coverage and reporting on disability - Demographics and Identity - Economics and Employment - Education - Healthcare - Housing - Independent Living - MiCASSA - Personal Assistance Services - Implementing the Supreme Court Olmstead decision - Public Perception - Technology - Travel and Transportation - Universal Design - Voting Access - Voting studies - Web and Internet Access - About The Center for An Accessible Society.



Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR)

"The Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR) was established to promote democratic debate on the most important economic and social issues that affect people's lives. In order for citizens to effectively exercise their voices in a democracy, it is necessary that they be informed about the problems and choices that they face. CEPR is committed to presenting issues in an accurate and understandable manner, so that the public is better prepared to choose among the various policy options."

Check the CEPR Publications Page for 150+ reports about everything from Social Security and NAIRU to IMF and WTO.

Sample reports:

New Method Needed to Assess What Working-Class Families Need to Make Ends Meet
Federal Poverty Measure Falls Short

News Release
December 22, 2008
Washington, D.C.- In an effort to address the shortcomings of the current federal poverty measure and inform efforts to expand the middle class, a new report from the Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR) evaluates current poverty metrics and suggests a new measure for a broader standard of basic income adequacy.

Complete report:

Measuring Povertyand Economic Inclusion:
The Current Poverty Measure, the NAS Alternative, and the
Case for a Truly New Approach
(PDF - 918K, 47 pages)
December 2008
By Shawn Fremstad
Summary:
This report examines the current U.S. poverty measure and finds that it has failed to keep up with public consensus on the minimum amount of income needed to “get along” in the United States in the 21st Century. The author then examines a potential approach to revising the measure, based on recommendations made by a National Academy of Sciences panel in 1995, that improves in some ways on the current measure, but has serious limitations of its own that require further research before it is adopted. Moreover, the NAS approach results in a poverty measure that would remain far below the public’s get-along level. This report concludes by suggesting a truly new approach that the incoming Administration should adopt- a “tiered” poverty and economic-inclusion measure that is modeled on the child poverty measure adopted in 2003 by the United Kingdom.

Source:
Center for Economic and Policy Research (Washington)
The Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR) was established in 1999 to promote democratic debate on the most important economic and social issues that affect people's lives.

Related links: Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

---

Tens of Millions of Families with Low-Wage Workers Fall Into Gap Left by Employers and Government
Nearly 41 million people in working families cannot afford basics like health care, housing, or child care, even with public work supports.
Press Release
October 10, 2007
Washington, DC--Low wages, inadequate benefits, and limited work supports leave one-in-five people (nearly 41 million) in working families struggling to make ends meet. According to a study released today by the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, DC, and the Center for Social Policy at the University of Massachusetts in Boston.

National report:

Bridging the Gaps: A Picture of How Work Supports Work in Ten States (PDF file - 1.3MB, 47 pages)
October 2007
"...new findings on how well six work supports (child care assistance, Earned Income Tax Credit, Food Stamps, housing (public housing and section), Medicaid/State Children's Health Insurance Program, and Temporary Assistance to Needy Families) provide working families with the opportunity to bridge the gaps between their earnings and a basic standard of living."

Technical Report (PDF file - 1.1MB, 88 pages)
Podcast

Welfare-To-Nothing (Op-ed)
Heather Boushey
July 10, 2006

"(...)The new welfare rules set down by the Department of Health and Human Services last week establish uniform definitions of what constitutes work or work preparation activities for welfare recipients, limiting states’ ability to make these determinations. (...) In an Orwellian fashion, the administration refers to the increased work requirements as increasing self-sufficiency and reducing dependency. But a parent who must show up in study hall rather than do her homework with her children around the kitchen table is not less self-sufficient, not more. A parent who cannot take a day off to care for a sick child is not meeting her family’s needs. It’s time this administration stopped talking about self-sufficiency and sits down to look at the actual, rather than imagined, lives of working families and developed policies that—sufficiently—foster a workable balance between work and family."

Related Links:

TomPaine.com
"TomPaine.com is for people who want to keep in touch with the progressive community but don't have time to surf dozens of websites."
(Heather Boushey's op-ed piece appeared in the most recent issue of TomPaine.com)

June 28, 2006
Bush Administration Releases Interim Final Regulation Implementing The Next Phase Of Welfare Reform
Fact Sheet: TANF Interim Final Regulations
Fact Sheet: TANF Work Activities
Fact Sheet: Deficit Reduction Act of 2005
Source:
Office of Family Assistance (OFA)
NOTE: the OFA website contains info on TANF Reauthorization and welfare reform in the U.S.
[ Department of Health and Human Services ]

The Conservative Nanny State
How the Wealthy Use the Government to Stay Rich and Get Richer (U.S.)
A free e-book by Dean Baker, published May 2006
"In his new book, economist Dean Baker debunks the myth that conservatives favor the market over government intervention. In fact, conservatives rely on a range of “nanny state” policies that ensure the rich get richer while leaving most Americans worse off. It’s time for the rules to change. Sound economic policy should harness the market in ways that produce desirable social outcomes – decent wages, good jobs and affordable health care."

"The key flaw in the stance that most progressives have taken on economic issues is that they have accepted a framing whereby conservatives are assumed to support market outcomes, while progressives want to rely on the government. This framing leads progressives to futilely lash out against markets, rather than examining the factors that lead to undesirable market outcomes. The market is just a tool, and in fact a very useful one. It makes no more sense to lash out against markets than to lash out against the wheel." (Excerpted from Preface)

Complete report:
PDF version (1MB, 119 pages)
HTML version

Press Release

Source:
Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR)
[Dean Baker is a macroeconomist and co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, DC.]

Related Link:

Socialism for the rich
by Scott Piatkowski
May 25, 2006
Source:
rabble.ca

CERP Briefing- poverty, income, and health insurance coverage for 2003
August 19, 2004
"On August 26, the U.S. Census will release new numbers on poverty, income, and health insurance coverage for 2003. This data will come from the Current Population Survey's Annual Demographic Supplement, conducted in March 2004. The Census will also release data from the 2003 American Community Survey. CERP is previewing this data on August 19 by presenting analysis on poverty, income, and health insurance coverage from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP), another Census data product, for the first six months of 2003."

Globalization - links to two dozen recent publications and news, plus links to resources on the following: The International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank - Taxing Speculation (Tobin Tax) - The World Trade Organization (WTO) - The Multilateral Agreement on Investment (MAI) - The Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA)

IMF / World Bank - links to 50+ online resources

Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP)
Since 1968, CLASP has been a trusted resource, a creative architect for systems change, and one of the country's most effective voices for low income people. CLASP's mission is to develop and advocate for policies at the federal, state and local levels that improve the lives of low income people. In particular, we seek policies that work to strengthen families and create pathways to education and work.
[ Source: About CLASP ]

Sample reports from the Center for Law and Social Policy:

New Report Reveals Higher State Poverty Rates Based on Alternative Measure
State-by-State Report Calculates Poverty Based on Modern Measure

News Release
November 4, 2009
Washington, D.C. --- The percent of Americans living in poverty is higher than the current poverty measure captures, according to a new report that, for the first time, lists how poverty rates change in each state using a modern poverty measure. The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) compiled the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) calculations of each state's poverty rate using a Census web tool and published these calculations in Measure by Measure: the Current Poverty Measure v. the National Academy of Sciences Measures.

Complete report:
Measure by Measure: the Current
Poverty Measure v. the National Academy of Sciences Measures
(PDF - 687K, 11 pages)
November 2, 2009
This report highlights alternative poverty measures for each state and the District of Columbia using a Census tool that calculates alternative measures based on a National Academy of Sciences recommendation and an NAS recommendation that considers geographic price difference adjustment.

Related links:
Go to the Poverty Measures - International Resources page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty2.htm

---

A Tool to Examine State Child Care Subsidy Policies
and Promote Stable, Quality Care for Low-Income Babies and Toddlers
(Word file - 182K, 21 pages)
November 2, 2009
This tool, part of CLASP's Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care project, is designed to provide a policy framework that lays out child care subsidy policies that can be implemented to better support babies and toddlers and their families. Users can download and save a copy of this tool, then fill in the appropriate columns with their state's current policies and opportunities for change. In addition, links are included to online resources and examples of state policy initiatives. Assistance in using this tool is available from CLASP.

---

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) reports:

TANF Emergency Funds:
State Applications Approved as of October 27, 2009
(PDF - 480K, 4 pages)
November 2, 2009
The American Recover and Reinvestment Act of 2009 created a new $5 billion TANF Emergency Fund. This document compiles data on which states applied for emergency TANF funding as of October 27, 2009, compared with the maximum they are allowed to receive.

Analysis of Fiscal Year 2008 TANF and MOE Spending by States
October 28, 2009
(Read the disclaimers re. limitations and copyright,
then click "Download Spreadsheet" to access the Excel spreadsheet.)
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has published data concerning use of federal TANF and state maintenance of effort (MOE) funds in FY 2008. This set of state-by-state charts shows how each state reported using its TANF and MOE funds in FY 2008.

Questions and Answers about the TANF Emergency Fund (PDF - 508K, 9 pages)
November 2, 2009
Since 1996, the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) grant has been assisting needy families and children. This new report answers questions about TANF funding and how it relates to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

What the TANF Emergency Fund
Can Do For Your Cash-Strapped State

CLASP Audio Conference
Monday, November 16th
12:30 - 1:30 PM EST
On Monday, November 16, CLASP will bring together leading TANF experts to discuss the latest federal guidance on innovative ways that states can draw on the TANF Emergency Fund and claim expenditures by third parties, such as counties, nonprofit service-providers, and even merchants. Participants will have an opportunity to ask questions about the TANF Emergency Fund.

Earlier CLASP reports:

Cash Assistance since Welfare Reform (PDF - 810K, 4 pages)
By Elizabeth Lower-Basch
August 6, 2009
- includes ten links to related resources (in the endnotes)
Highlights:
* Caseloads remain historically low
* No progress in employment and poverty
* Participation rate requirements were tightened by the Deficit Reduction Act
* Many "diverted" from assistance

The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Block Grant (PDF - 758K, 4 pages)
By Elizabeth Lower-Basch
August 6, 2009
- includes seven links to related resources (in the endnotes)
"(...) The ambitious goals of the TANF Program are not matched by proportionate resources, especially in states with high rates of poverty and low fiscal capacity."

Civil Legal Aid in the United States:
An Update for 2009
(PDF - 212K, 29 pages)
By Alan W. Houseman
July 2009
"(...) An integrated and comprehensive civil legal assistance system should have the capacity to: (1) educate and inform low-income persons of their legal rights and responsibilities and the options and services available to solve their legal problems; and (2) ensure that all low-income persons, including individuals and groups who are politically or socially disfavored, have meaningful access to high-quality legal assistance providers when they require legal advice and representation. The United States has made considerable progress in meeting the first of these two objectives, but progress has been slow in meeting the second."
Source:
Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP)
The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) is a national non-profit that works to improve the lives of low-income people. CLASP’s mission is to improve the economic security, educational and workforce prospects, and family stability of low-income parents, children, and youth and to secure equal justice for all.

---

Related link from
Statistics Canada
:

Legal Aid in Canada:
Resource and Caseload Statistics, 2007/2008
(PDF - 616K, 127 pages)
February 2009
* In 2007/2008, $670 million was spent on providing legal aid services in 10 provinces and territories. This represents over $20 for every person living in these jurisdictions.
* In the last five years, legal aid spending after inflation has decreased just as many times as it has increased, but on average, it has risen about 1% per year. Compared to the previous year, spending in 2007/2008 was virtually unchanged, up by less than one-half of one percent.
[ Highlights ]
[ Earlier editions of this report ]

---

Preliminary Summary of Key Provisions of the
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Aimed
at Improving the Lives of Low-Income Americans
(PDF - 184K, 5 pages)
February 13, 2009
Preliminary summary of the key provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act aimed at improving the lives of low-income Americans.

Target Practice: Lessons for Poverty Reduction (PDF - 355K, 20 pages)
January 2009
By Jodie Levin-Epstein and Webb Lyons
Target Practice outlines how governments (local, state and the federal) can use targets (goals and timelines to achieve those goals) as a policy tool for reducing poverty by drawing on lessons learned from targets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and homelessness.

Seizing the Moment: State Governments
and the New Commitment to Reduce Poverty in America

April 2008
By Jodie Levin-Epstein and Kristen Michelle Gorzelany

The three leading presidential candidates are now on record with a public commitment to address poverty and opportunity in the United States. This is in concert with growing state efforts and signals a dramatic turnaround in tackling poverty. In just the last two years, one of every five states has taken action to put poverty on the political agenda. This joint report from CLASP and Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity outlines those efforts and provides charts detailing action by policy area.

* Complete report (PDF - 540K, 53 pages)

* Overview (PDF - 138K, 14 pages)

* State-by-State Narratives (PDF - 447K, 31 pages)

* Charts Tracking State Initiatives (PDF - 131K, 11 pages)

Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity - "...to make sure that 2008 sets the stage for concerted action on poverty and opportunity in 2009 and beyond."

Final TANF [Temporary Assistance for Needy Families] Rules Include Modest Improvements;
Further Action Needed to Restore the Safety Net
(PDF File - 32K, 2 pages)
by Elizabeth Lower-Basch
February 1, 2008
This week, the Department of Health and Human Services placed on public display the final rules implementing the changes to the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program made by the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005. These regulations are scheduled for publication in the Federal Register next week. The final rule contains a number of modest changes from the interim final rule published in June 2006 and the guidance that HHS has given states since then. Many of the changes respond to concerns that CLASP and numerous other organizations submitted in response to the interim final rule. The rule also provides some helpful clarifications in areas where states were concerned that they might be subject to penalty.

What's TANF?
Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) is a block grant created by the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996, as part of a federal effort to “end welfare as we know it.” The TANF block grant replaced the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program, which had provided cash welfare to poor families with children since 1935...

Improving Access to Education and Training for TANF Participants (PDF file - 31K, 2 pages)
May 18, 2007
By Elizabeth Lower-Basch
The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant is one of the major sources of funding for services designed to help low-income parents succeed in the workplace. The TANF law limits the degree to which states can count TANF families engaged in education and training activities toward federal work participation rate requirements—an unfortunate limitation, given the strong link between educational attainment and earnings. In this two-pager, CLASP recommends that Congress remove these arbitrary limits on education and training.
"(...)policies limiting access to education and training are highly counterproductive, as there is strong evidence that education leading to a credential—whether a training certificate or a postsecondary degree—is an effective pathway to higher earnings. (...) welfare to work programs that have succeeded in helping participants find higher paying jobs typically have made substantial use of education and training, including access to postsecondary programs."

Securing Equal Justice for All:
A Brief History of Civil Legal Assistance in the United States
(3.2MB, 71 pages)
January 2007 (Revised)
by Alan W. Houseman and Linda E. Perle.
This document chronicles civil legal assistance for the low-income community in the United States from its privately funded beginnings, through its achievement of federal funding, and to its expansion and growth into a national program operating throughout the U.S. It also describes some of the political battles that have been fought around the legal services program and the restrictions that have come with government funding. It concludes with some brief thoughts about the future.

Child Care and Early Education State-by-State Data - U.S.
November 16, 2006
This set of state-by-state data includes new analysis of 2005 child care spending from Child Care Development Block Grant and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families funds and of 2005 Head Start Program Information Report data, along with data (published in March 2006) on states’ use of community-based child care to provide pre-kindergarten.

Child Care Assistance in 2005: State Cuts Continue (PDF file - 78K, 9 pages)
November 1, 2006
State spending on child care assistance declined in 2005 for the second consecutive year. Twenty-two states made cuts to their child care programs, as the number of children living in low-income families that received help from these programs continued to decline. Many families turn to child care assistance programs to get help paying for the child care they need in order to work and to succeed. This policy brief provides an overview of national expenditure data for the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) funds directed towards child care. 9 pages.

Analysis of Fiscal Year 2005 TANF and MOE Spending by States
October 10, 2006

All CLASP Publications on
Welfare Policy Released in 2006
- [in 2005] - [in 2004
]
NOTE: scroll to the bottom of the CLASP page for links to publications released in earlier years.
- incl. Reports - Policy Briefs - Fact Sheets - Legislative and Regulatory Analyses - Presentations - Testimony

Two-Thirds of States Qualify as "Needy States" for
Extended Counting of TANF Job Search and Job Readiness Assistance

July 28, 2006
by Elizabeth Lower-Basch
Under TANF rules, job search and job readiness assistance may only be counted toward the work participation rate for 6 weeks in a fiscal year; however this limit is extended to 12 weeks in high unemployment states and those qualifying as "needy" under the Contingency Fund provisions of the law. This provision gives eligible states some flexibility in providing activities that address barriers to employment and that are only countable toward meeting TANF participation rates under the job search/job readiness work activity as defined in the interim final regulations.

CLASP Federal Budget Resources
July 12, 2006
"CLASP actively tracks and analyzes developments in the areas of our focus—with the goal of promoting a federal budget that does not disproportionately disadvantage programs for vulnerable families or reduce services and supports that are effective in moving families toward self-sufficiency."

Source:

Analysis of New Interim Final TANF Rules (PDF file - 286K, 34 pages)
July 21/06
by CLASP and the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities
This collaborative analysis provides an overview of the major regulatory provisions and the implications for state policies of rules issued by the Department of Health and Human Services on June 29, 2006. The interim final regulations implement the changes to the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program made by the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005. The analysis explains the new federal definitions of the countable work activities and their implications for education and training and services for individuals with barriers to employment. The analysis also examines the treatment of child-only cases, how hours of participation must be counted tracked and verified, implications for child care, and changes in the maintenance of effort requirement.

Getting Punched: The Job and Family Clock...It's Time for Flexible Work for Workers of All Wages (PDF file - 159K, 32 pages)
July 20/06 by Jodie Levin-Epstein
Get the facts on the dramatic labor market changes that result in more and more workers facing dual and dueling responsibilities - those at work and those at home. Businesses that recognize this tension address it through responsive scheduling and paid time off; and, these businesses benefit from cost savings when they do. Getting Punched suggests 10 ways that government should get more involved in promoting responsive workplaces for workers of all wages. It's about time.

All 2006 CLASP publications on welfare reform (with links to earlier years at the bottom of the page)
All 2006 publications on child care and early education (ditto)

The UK Commitment: Ending Child Poverty by 2020 (PDF file - 100K, 17 pages)
by Elisa Minoff
January 30, 2006
In 1999, the United Kingdom (UK) announced its pledge to cut child poverty by one-quarter by 2004 and eliminate it by 2020. This paper examines the history of this ambitious commitment, and the progress to date. It also analyzes the components of the national effort—which range from employment supports, asset building initiatives, and child-targeted assistance to tax, welfare, and education policies—and the next steps the UK is considering to meet the goal of eradicating child poverty.

Source:
Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) - U.S.
"...a national, nonprofit organization founded in 1968, conducts research, policy analysis, technical assistance, and advocacy on issues related to economic security for low-income families with children."

House Cuts to Foster Care Funding Would Jeopardize Children
Living With Grandparents and Other Relatives (PDF file - 43K, 5 pages)
November 9, 2005
"The House of Representatives is considering budget reconciliation legislation that would decrease federally funded foster care services by $577 million over five years and $1.3 billion over ten years. This brief examines the provisions, which, if implemented, would discourage the placement of abused and neglected children with grandparents and other relatives, impede efforts to reunify children with their parents, and make it more difficult to provide critical services to children and families."

Families Will Lose Child Care Assistance under Ways and Means Committee Welfare Reauthorization Bill (PDF file - 36K, 4 pages)
November 1, 2005
"The House Ways and Means Committee’s budget reconciliation bill includes provisions to reauthorize the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program. Even as the bill increases families’ work requirements—and thus, the need for child care—it provides only $500 million in new child care funding over five years, despite Congressional Budget Office estimates that keeping pace with inflation will cost $4.8 billion over five years. If enacted, this bill would force states to cut child care assistance for low-income working families over the coming years."

CLASP Federal Budget and Tax Policy Page
"For quick links to these and other CLASP analyses, as well as comprehensive background materials and resources from partner organizations and coalitions, visit the CLASP federal budget and tax policy page."

Testimony of Mark Greenberg to the
Subcommittee on 21st Century Competitiveness
(PDF file - 74K, 14 pages)
Committee on Education and the Workforce, U.S. House of Representatives
March 15, 2005
Mark Greenberg
Director of Policy
Center for Law and Social Policy
This testimony discusses the work and child care provisions of the 1996 welfare law, pending reauthorization proposals, and CLASP’s recommendations.

"Between 1996 and 2000, combined federal and state funding for child care tripled. Most of the growth was attributable to federal funds, and the single biggest factor was the ability of states to redirect TANF funds. As a result of this increased funding, the number of children receiving subsidies grew from an estimated 1 million in 1996 to 2.4 million in 2001, and states were able to improve child care payment rates to providers, reduce required family copayments to make child care more affordable, and expand quality initiatives. (...) During the last three years, several key indicators have become less positive. (...) The economy entered into a recession, after which initial job growth was slow. States entered into a period of large budget deficits, placing strains on TANF funds and other state resources, and forcing cutbacks in child care and other services. The pressures resulting from the economy and state budget crises are apparent in indicators of employment, child poverty, child care, and welfare participation." (Excerpt, p. 2)
Source:
Center for Law and Social Policy

Welfare Caseloads Increase in 27 States Between June and September 2003 (PDF file - 116K, 7 pages)
February 2004

Administration is Misstating Amount of Child Care Funding in Pending TANF Reauthorization Bills
CLASP and Center for Budget and Policy Priorities
December 2003

 

Centre for Public Sector Studies (University of Victoria)
The Centre for Public Sector Studies was established in 1978 to encourage interdisciplinary research in public policy at the University of Victoria.

Summer Institute for Social Policy Analysis (UVic)

North American Institute - "NAMI's mission is to examine all aspects of the North American regional relationship, recognizing the challenges facing the governments, peoples and cultures of North America, and to develop better approaches to this changing relationship"

Center for North American Studies (Duke University) Interdisciplinary international center focusing on the political, social, and cultural consequences of regionalization, and attempts to place them within the long history of the interaction of Canada and Mexico with the United States.


Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP)
"...one of the leading organizations in the country working on fiscal policy issues and issues affecting low- and moderate-income families and individuals. The Center specializes in research and analysis oriented toward policy decisions that policymakers face at both federal and state levels. The Center examines data and research findings and produces analyses designed to be accessible to public officials, other non-profit organizations, and the media."

Key Resource for U.S. State Information on Low-Income Benefit Programs!

Online Information About Key Low-Income Benefit Programs
- incl. links to information in each U.S. state (total of 400+ links) about the five main state-administered low-income benefit programs — food stamps, Medicaid, SCHIP, TANF and child care — available to the public via the internet.
"There is significant variation between what online information is provided across states. Some provide a simple description of each program on their agencies websites. Others offer additional information, such as application forms, eligibility screening tools, and policy and procedure manuals used by state agency caseworkers. A few states allow individuals to apply for certain types of benefits online."
Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP)

List of reports in the CBPP Publications Library: All recent material is online and free; paper copies of older studies can be ordered from CBPP.
- Includes many reports and studies organized under the following themes: Federal Tax Policies - Federal Budget Priorities - State Fiscal Policies - State Welfare and TANF Issues - Federal Welfare Policies - Social Security Reform - Poverty & Income Issues - Low-Income Housing - Health - EITC Analyses - Food Assistance - Labor Market Policies - Immigrants

------------------------------------------

Sample reports from the CBPP
(in reverse chronological order):

Average Federal Tax Rates in 2007 (PDF - 65K, 7 pages)
June 2010
Source:
Congressional Budget Office

--------------

Health Reform Package Represents Historic Chance to Expand Coverage, Improve Insurance Markets, Slow Cost Growth, and Reduce Deficits
By Sarah Lueck, January Angeles, Paul N. Van de Water, Edwin Park, and Judith Solomon
March 19, 2010
“The health reform legislation now before Congress represents a historic opportunity to make significant progress in three critical areas:
* expanding the availability and affordability of health coverage,
* instituting much-needed improvements to the flawed health insurance marketplace, and
* taking steps to slow the relentless growth in health care costs.

“Not only would this legislation produce the greatest gains in health coverage since the enactment of Medicare and Medicaid 45 years ago and provide stability and security for tens of millions of Americans who now have health insurance, its costs are also fully offset and would reduce budget deficits by $138 billion over ten years, according to the Congressional Budget Office.”

View the full report:
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3126
http://www.cbpp.org/files/3-19-10health.pdf
(PDF - 6 pages)


NOTE: For links to info about the U.S. health care reform initiative,
See this special section of the U.S. Govt. links page

Also from CBPP:

State-Level Data Show Recovery Act Protecting Millions from Poverty
December 17, 2009
By Arloc Sherman
The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is keeping large numbers of Americans out of poverty in states across the country, according to new data covering 36 states and the District of Columbia. In addition to boosting economic activity and preserving or creating jobs, the recovery act is softening the recession’s impact on poverty by directly lifting family incomes.

View the full report online:
HTML - http://www.cbpp.org/cms/?fa=view&id=3035
PDF (181K, 5pp.) http://www.cbpp.org/files/12-17-09pov.pdf

-------------------

The Impact of State Income Taxes on Low-Income Families in 2008
By Phil Oliff and Ashali Singham
November 4, 2009
“Sixteen states taxed working-poor families deeper into poverty last year….
“Dire economic conditions are already reducing states’ tax revenue. This makes it harder for states to enact new tax cuts targeted to poor families. But doing so should still be a priority.
"Taxing people deeper into poverty runs counter to the goal of helping families achieve self-sufficiency.”

View the full report:
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=2976
http://www.cbpp.org/files/11-4-09sfp.pdf

View the press release:
State Income Taxes Push Many Working-Poor Families Deeper Into Poverty
HTML : http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=2977
PDF : http://www.cbpp.org/files/11-4-09sfp-pr.pdf

---

Statement: Greenstein on Census’ 2008 Health Insurance and Poverty Data
September 10, 2009
By Robert Greenstein
Today’s grim Census Bureau report shows the nation lost substantial ground in 2008 on poverty, median income, and the number of people who are uninsured. Several aspects of the Census report stand out. The number of people living in poverty jumped by 2.6 million to 39.8 million — the highest since 1960. The poverty rate — the percentage of people living in poverty — also rose, to 13.2 percent, which is its highest level since 1997. Similarly, real median household income fell by $1,860 to $50,303, its lowest level since 1997. These figures are particularly grim because they come after the disappointing record of the 2001-2007 expansion.

Stimulus Keeping 6 Million Americans Out Of Poverty In 2009, Estimates Show
by Arloc Sherman
September 9, 2009
“This analysis, which comes one day before the Census Bureau will release updated poverty figures (for 2008), examines seven of the recovery act’s provisions — two improvements in unemployment insurance, three tax credits for working families, an increase in food stamps, and a one-time payment for retirees, veterans, and people with disabilities — and finds that they alone are preventing more than 6 million Americans from falling below the poverty line and are reducing the severity of poverty for 33 million more. The analysis includes state-specific estimates for California, Texas, Florida, New York, and Illinois.”

View the full statement:
HTML
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=2910
PDF ( 16pp.)
http://www.cbpp.org/files/9-9-09pov2.pdf

Related link:

U.S. Census Bureau

NOTE - for more about Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2008,
see the American Government Social Research Links page of this website.

---

The Impact of State Income Taxes on Low-Income Families in 2008
By Phil Oliff and Ashali Singham
November 4, 2009
“Sixteen states taxed working-poor families deeper into poverty last year….
“Dire economic conditions are already reducing states’ tax revenue. This makes it harder for states to enact new tax cuts targeted to poor families. But doing so should still be a priority.
"Taxing people deeper into poverty runs counter to the goal of helping families achieve self-sufficiency.”

View the full report:
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=2976
http://www.cbpp.org/files/11-4-09sfp.pdf

View the press release:
State Income Taxes Push Many Working-Poor Families Deeper Into Poverty
HTML : http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=2977
PDF : http://www.cbpp.org/files/11-4-09sfp-pr.pdf

---

The Safety Net’s Response to the Recession
By LaDonna Pavetti, Director of Welfare Reform and Income Support
Testimony Before the House Subcommittee on Income Security and Family Support
October 8, 2009
[ PDF version - 8 pages]
Testimony focuses on four points:
* With recent Census data showing increases in poverty and declines in incomes even before Americans began experiencing the worst effects of the recession — and with further deterioration expected in both areas — policymakers face a serious challenge in helping low-income populations cope with the downturn.
* The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 [from Recovery.gov ] passed in February has kept this serious recession from being even worse. It has not only moderated the decline in GDP and increase in unemployment, but also prevented millions of Americans from falling into poverty and has helped some states to forgo significant cuts that would have weakened the safety net for very poor families with children.
* The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly food stamps, has responded quickly to rising need in all states, but the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) cash assistance program has lagged behind and has been moderately or substantially responsive in less than half of the states.
* To help ease hardship and avoid short-circuiting an economic recovery, Congress will need to adopt policy solutions that are responsive to both immediate needs and the long-term consequences of the recession.

Related links:

Policy Basics: An Introduction to
Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)
*
By Liz Schott
Revised March 19, 2009
What Is TANF? Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) is a block grant created by the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996, as part of a federal effort to “end welfare as we know it.” The TANF block grant replaced the Aid to Families… [ more ]

---

Overview of the TANF Provisions
in the Economic Recovery Act

The TANF provisions in section 2101 of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 create a new Emergency Contingency Fund under which states can receive 80 percent federal funding for increases (relative to a base year quarter) in certain TANF-related expenditures in federal fiscal years 2009 and 2010.

---

Online Information About Key
U.S. State Low-Income Benefit Programs
*
Revised April 27, 2009
Links by state to Policy Manuals, Descriptive Information, and Applications for:
* State Food Stamp Programs
* Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)
* Child Care Programs
* Medicaid
* State Children's Health Insurance (SCHIP) Programs

* Recommended starting point for research on the above-mentioned programs in each American state!
[ Note: The Canadian equivalent of the above guide, for welfare programs at least, is
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/welfare.htm
]

---

Food Stamps On-Line: A Review of State Government Food Stamp Websites
Updated July 8, 2009
This paper provides links to the addresses for each state’s food stamp web pages and also provides an overview of the types of information and services that states provide.

Safety Net Effective at Fighting Poverty, But Has Weakened for the Very Poorest
By Arloc Sherman
July 6, 2009
As mounting job losses threaten to push more Americans into poverty and make poor families still poorer, a new examination of the public benefits system finds that it is more effective in reducing poverty than previously known but has become less effective over the past decade in protecting Americans from deep poverty. In 2005 (the last year for which we have data), the nation’s safety net protected 31 million people from poverty and kept 34 million from slipping below half of the poverty line. Nonetheless, this protection became weaker for children in the poorest families from 1995 to 2005.
View the full report:
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=2859
http://www.cbpp.org/files/7-6-09pov.pdf
(15pp.)

Source:
Poverty and Income - incl. links to related resources
[ Center on Budget and Policy Priorities ]
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities conducts research and analysis to help shape public debates over proposed budget and tax policies and to help ensure that policymakers consider the needs of low-income families and individuals in these debates. We also develop policy options to alleviate poverty.

Related link:

Safety Net Is Fraying for the Very Poor
By Erik Eckholm
July 4, 2009
Government “safety net” programs like Social Security and food stamps have pulled growing numbers of Americans out of poverty since the mid-1990s. But even before the current recession, these programs were providing less help to the most desperately poor, mainly nonworking families with children, according to a new study by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a private group in Washington. The recession is expected to raise poverty rates, economists agree, although the impact is being softened by the federal stimulus package adopted this year, which temporarily expanded measures like food stamps, child tax credits, unemployment benefits and housing and tuition aid.
Source:
New York Times

---

Statement by Chad Stone, CBPP Chief Economist, on the April Employment Report
CBPP Statement
May 8, 2009
[ PDF version - 2pp.]
Today’s jobs report brings more sobering news about the depth and duration of the recession. Even if the economy hits bottom soon and begins growing again, it will take time to reverse the severe job losses and sharp increase in unemployment that have already occurred.
The official unemployment rate hit 8.9 percent in April, the highest it has been since 1983. But that figure does not portray the full difficulties that job seekers face. The Labor Department’s most comprehensive alternative unemployment rate measure — which includes people who want to work but are discouraged from looking and people working part time because they can’t find full-time jobs — rose to 15.8 percent in April, an increase of 7.1 percentage points since the recession began and the highest level on record in data that go back to 1994.

Related links:
o Special Series: Economic Recovery Watch
o Unemployment

All CBPP Reports by Date

---

AN UPDATE ON STATE BUDGET CUTS:
At Least 34 States Have Imposed Cuts That Hurt Vulnerable Residents, But the Federal Economic Recovery Package Is Reducing the Harm
March 18, 2009
By Nicholas Johnson, Phil Oliff and Jeremy Koulish
HTML version
PDF version
(13pp.)
At least nine states are already using fiscal relief provided in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to minimize cuts in public services. At least 34 states made budget cuts that threaten vital services for many residents before enactment of the recovery package. Additional cuts are likely in the coming months as recovery act funding is sufficient only to fill about 40 percent of state shortfalls.
Cuts have been enacted in the following areas:
* Public health: 18 states
* Elderly and disabled services: 18 states
* K-12 education: 21 states
* Colleges and universities: 28 states
* State workforce reductions: 37 states
* At least 15 states have increased taxes or taken other revenue raising measures.

---

STATE BUDGET TROUBLES WORSEN
March 13, 2009
By Elizabeth C. McNichol and Iris Lav
HTML version
PDF version
(10pp.)
At least 47 states faced or are facing shortfalls in their budgets for this and/or next year, and severe fiscal problems are highly likely to continue into the following year as well. Combined budget gaps for the remainder of this fiscal year and state fiscal years 2010 and 2011 are estimated to total more than $350 billion."
* At least 47 states faced or are facing shortfalls in their budgets for this and/or next year.
* Mid-year shortfalls of $53 billion have opened up in the 2009 budgets of at least 42 states and the District of Columbia. This new round of mid-year shortfalls is in addition to the budget gaps of $48 billion that 29 states closed as they adopted their budgets for this fiscal year.
* Forty-four states already project shortfalls totaling more than $105 billion for fiscal 2010. This total 2010 shortfall is expected to grow to about $145 billion. Joining this list since the last update: West Virginia.

---

POLICY POINTS:
OVERVIEW OF STATES AND THE WEAK ECONOMY
March 13, 2009
HTML version
PDF version
(3pp.)
This snapshot of state budget problems has been updated to reflect the new data on state budget cuts and shortfalls included in the above analyses.

Funding for states in economic recovery package will close less than half of state deficits
February 20, 2009
By Nicholas Johnson, Elizabeth C. McNichol, and Iris J. Lav
[ PDF version (2pp.) ]
The final economic recovery bill provides to states approximately $135 billion to $140 billion — or about 40 percent of projected state deficits — to reduce the depth of state budget cuts and moderate state tax and fee increases, which hurt the economy.

---

Should progressives shun the economic recovery package?
by Robert Greenstein (Executive Director of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities)
Special Op-Ed in The Huffington Post
Some of my fellow progressives have expressed disappointment with the economic recovery package that President Obama just signed into law. Forgive me, but I don't share it. I view the package as an outstanding piece of legislation - all the more remarkable when you consider that it came less than 30 days after the new administration took office....

View the Center's Economic Recovery Watch Series:
http://www.cbpp.org/pubs/stimulus.htm

---

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009:
State-by-State Estimates of Key Provisions Affecting
Low- and Moderate-Income Individuals

February 13, 2009
- short descriptions and tables with estimated state-by-state impacts of the following key provisions:
* Temporary Increase in State FMAP (federal matching funds for Medicaid assistance)
* State Fiscal Stabilization Fund
* Education
* Unemployment Insurance
* Child Care
* Child Support
* Training and Employment Services
* Food Stamp (or Supplemental Nutrition Assistance) Program
* Emergency Shelter Grant Program
* Child Tax Credit
* Making Work Pay Tax Credit

Facing deficits, two-thirds of states are imposing cuts that hurt vulnerable residents (12 pages)
Updated January 14, 2009
By Nicholas Johnson, Elizabeth Hudgins and Jeremy Koulish
At least 33 states have made or proposed budget cuts that threaten vital services for many residents. Targeted areas include:
* Public health: 22 states
*
Elderly and disabled services: 21 states
*
K-12 education: 21 states
*
Colleges and universities: 28 states
*
State workforce reductions: 34 states
*
At least fourteen states have increased taxes or taken other revenue raising measures.

Related link:

Most states are cutting education (3 pages)
Updated January 14, 2009

States budget troubles worsen (9 pages)
Updated January 14, 2009
By Elizabeth C. McNichol and Iris Lav
At least 45 states faced or are facing shortfalls in their budgets for this and/or next year, and severe fiscal problems are highly likely to continue into the following year."
* Combined state budget gaps for the remainder of this fiscal year and fiscal years 2010 and 2011 are estimated to total more than $350 billion.
* At least 45 states faced or are facing shortfalls in their budgets for this and/or next year, and severe fiscal problems are highly likely to continue into 2011. Texas has joined this list since the last update.
* Mid-year shortfalls of $43 billion have opened up in the 2009 budgets of at least 41 states and the District of Columbia. This new round of mid-year shortfalls is in addition to the budget gaps of $48 billion that 29 states closed as they adopted their budgets for this fiscal year.
* Thirty-nine states already project shortfalls totaling more than $80 billion for fiscal 2010. This total 2010 shortfall is expected to grow to about $145 billion. Joining this list since the last update: Texas.

For additional background on the Center's state budget estimates, please see:

Current and projected state deficits (3 pages)
Updated January 14, 2009

Policy Points: Overview of States and the Weak Economy (3 pages)
Updated January 14, 2009
This snapshot of state budget problems has been updated to reflect the new data on state budget cuts and shortfalls included in the above analyses.

---------------------------

TWO STATE BUDGET UPDATES:
STATE BUDGET TROUBLES WORSEN
Updated December 10, 2008
By Elizabeth C. McNichol and Iris Lav
Selected High/Lowlights
* In total, 43 states are facing shortfalls in their fiscal 2009 and/or 2010 budgets.
* Mid-year shortfalls totaling $31.2 billion have opened up in the 2009 budgets of at least 37 states and Washington, DC. Joining this list since the last update: Nebraska and South Dakota.
* This new round of mid-year shortfalls is in addition to the budget gaps of $48 billion that 29 states closed as they adopted their budgets for this fiscal year.
* Twenty-eight states already project shortfalls totaling more than $60 billion for fiscal 2010. Joining this list since the last update: Delaware, Idaho, Nebraska, Ohio and South Dakota.
* The total 2010 state budget gaps will likely grow to about $100 billion, based on the rate at which states’ revenue bases are deteriorating and the history of prior recessions.

This periodically-updated analysis is posted to:
http://www.cbpp.org/9-8-08sfp.htm
http://www.cbpp.org/9-8-08sfp.pdf
[ 9pp. ]

---------------------------

POLICY POINTS:
OVERVIEW OF STATES AND THE WEAK ECONOMY
Updated December 10, 2008
This snapshot of state budget problems has been updated to reflect the new data on 2009 and 2010 state budget shortfalls included in the above analysis.

This periodically-updated analysis is posted to:
http://www.cbpp.org/policy-points10-20-08.htm
http://www.cbpp.org/policy-points10-20-08.pdf
[ 2pp. ]

-----------------------------

On August 26, 2008, the U.S. Census Bureau released its annual report Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2007.
Below, you'll find links to the report itself and to analysis by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and the Economic Policy Institute.

Examining new Census data on poverty, income and health coverage
August 26, 2008
By Arloc Sherman, Robert Greenstein, and Sharon Parrott
This marks the first time on record that poverty and the incomes of typical working-age households have worsened despite six consecutive years of economic growth. The new data show that in terms of poverty and median income, the economic expansion that started at the end of 2001 was the worst on record. The data provide fresh evidence that the gains from the expansion were quite uneven and flowed primarily to high-income households.
Source:
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
[ other CBPP poverty and income reports ]

Median income rose as did poverty in 2007
2000s have been extremely weak for living standards of most households

August 26, 2008
by Jared Bernstein
"(...) While last year’s overall income gains are good news, the longer-range view is quite different. The Census figures show that the economic cycle that began in 2000 and ended late last year was one of the weakest on record for working families, despite strong overall economic growth during the same period."
Source:
Economic Policy Institute (EPI)
[ more EPI reports on poverty and family budgets ]

Related link:

Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance
Coverage in the United States: 2007
(PDF - 2.9MB, 84 pages)
Released August 26, 2008
Source:
U.S. Census Bureau

Also from EPI:

Overall health insurance coverage rises, but masks decline in private coverage
August 26, 2008

Related Web/News/Blog links:

Google Search Results Links - always current results!
Using the following search terms (without the quote marks):
"Census Bureau, Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage"
Web search results page
News search results page
Blog Search Results page
Source:
Google.ca

--------------------------------------------------

TAX FOUNDATION FIGURES DO NOT REPRESENT TYPICAL HOUSEHOLDS’ TAX BURDENS:
Figures May Mislead Policymakers, Journalists, and the Public
April 23, 2008
By Robert Greenstein and Aviva Aron-Dine
Each year, the Tax Foundation releases a report projecting “Tax Freedom Day,” which it describes as the day when “Americans will finally have earned enough money to pay off their total tax bill for the year.” Over the years, many pundits and policymakers have misinterpreted the Tax Foundation’s report as reflecting the tax burdens that the broad swath of middle-income families must shoulder.

In fact, however, according to data from authoritative sources such as the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, middle-income Americans pay significantly less in taxes as a share of their income than the Tax Foundation’s report implies.

This analysis explores significant flaws in the Tax Foundation’s report.

This piece is posted to:
http://www.cbpp.org/4-23-08tax.htm
http://www.cbpp.org/4-23-08tax.pdf
(7pp.)

Related link:

Tax Freedom Day: A Cause for Celebration or Consternation?
Prepared by:
Sheena Starky
Economics Division
18 September 2006
Source:
Parliament of Canada website

----------------------

2009 Federal Budget Analysis
February 4, 2008
- incl. links to extensive budget analysis and special features, e.g., Introduction to the Federal Budget, Slideshow: Federal Budget Overview
Sample content:
--- The Dubious Priorities of the President’s Budget
"The President's budget would provide more tax cuts heavily skewed to the most well-off while cutting vital services for low- and moderate-income Americans, generating large deficits, and increasing the strain on states already confronting budget problems as a result of the economic downturn. The budget reflects misguided priorities that would leave the American people more vulnerable in a number of ways...."
--- President's Budget Would Push States Deeper into Fiscal Crisis
"Federal grants to states and localities cut deeply in Fiscal Year 2009 Federal Budget"

----------------------

State Budget Debates
- analysis of state budget issues including multi-state trends, the adequacy and equity of tax policies, structural budget issues, and budget transparency

U.S. 2009 Federal Budget Links from the Center for Law and Social Policy:

President’s Budget Disregards Sound Investments for Young Children (small PDF file - 5 pages)
February 4, 2008
by Hannah Matthews and Danielle Ewen.
Every Administration uses the budget to send a signal about its priorities for the coming year. In this period of economic downturn, when our most vulnerable children and families need access to comprehensive supports, the message of this budget is simple and stark: children in low-income working families don’t matter.

----------------------

Related link from the Government Printing Office (GPO):

Fiscal Year 2009 Budget (FY09)
- Transmitted to Congress on February 4, 2008
- Covers the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2008

Browse the FY09 budget - links to: Budget Documents | Appendix | Supporting Documents | Related Documents | Spreadsheets
Description of FY09 budget documents

Related link from the
National Association of State Budget Officers:

State Budget Links

From the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:

Statement by Robert Greenstein, Executive Director, Center on Buget and Policy Priorities, on the new Census Bureau Data on Poverty, Income and Health Insurance
August 28, 2007
The new Census figures are disappointing for the fifth year of an economic recovery —showing a significant decline in poverty for people over 65 but no significant decline in poverty for children or adults aged 18 to 64, and only a modest improvement in median income. In 2006, the poverty rate remained higher, and median income for non-elderly households remained $1,300 lower, than in 2001, when the last recession hit bottom. It is virtually unprecedented for poverty to be higher and the income of working-age households lower in the fifth year of a recovery than in the last year of the previous recession.

Number and Percentage of Americans who are uninsured climbs again : Poverty Edges Down but Remains Higher,
and Median Income for Working-Age Households Remains Lower, than When Recession Hit Bottom in 2001

August 28, 2007
New Census data show that in 2006, both the number and the percentage of Americans who are uninsured hit their highest levels since 1999, the first year for which comparable data are available, with 2.2 million more Americans — and 600,000 more children — joining the ranks of the uninsured in 2006.

More Americans , including more children, now lack health insurance
August 28, 2007
The number of uninsured Americans rose for the sixth consecutive year in 2006, to 47.0 million,[1], [2] and the number of uninsured children rose for the second straight year, to 8.7 million, according to Census data released today

---

From the U.S. Census Bureau:

Household Income Rises, Poverty Rate Declines,
Number of Uninsured Up

Press Release
August 28, 2007
- includes a detailed backgrounder
Real median household income in the United States climbed between 2005 and 2006, reaching $48,200, according to a report released today by the U.S. Census Bureau. This is the second consecutive year that income has risen. Meanwhile, the nation’s official poverty rate declined for the first time this decade, from 12.6 percent in 2005 to 12.3 percent in 2006. There were 36.5 million people in poverty in 2006, not statistically different from 2005.
The number of people without health insurance coverage rose from 44.8 million (15.3 percent) in 2005 to 47 million (15.8 percent) in 2006.
These findings are contained in the Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2006 report [PDF file - 3MB, 78 pages]. The data were compiled from information collected in the 2007 Current Population Survey (CPS) Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC).

Also released today were income, poverty and earnings data from the 2006 American Community Survey (ACS) for states and metropolitan areas, counties, cities and American Indian/Alaska Native areas of 65,000 population or more and all congressional districts. (This year marks the first time that the population in group quarters --- such as prisons, college dorms, military barracks and nursing homes --- is included, so the 2006 estimates are not fully comparable to the 2005 estimates.)

Income, Earnings and Poverty in the United States: 2006 [PDF file - 1.5MB, 40 pages)]
August 2007

Data tables
Income data
Poverty data
Health Insurance data

Source:
American Community Survey (ACS)

The American Community Survey is a nationwide survey designed to provide communities a fresh look at how they are changing.

---

Related links:

From the Economic Policy Institute:

Census Data Find Income Up, Poverty Down but Health Coverage and Earnings Down
NewsFlash: August 28, 2007
This morning’s annual Census Bureau data release shows real income gains for the median household and a decline in poverty, but the reality is many working Americans are just working more at lower wages. An EPI analysis on the new data [see the next link below] finds many challenges, including median annual earnings by full-time workers down for the third year in a row and an increase of 8.6 million Americans without health care coverage since 2000.

Poverty, Income, and Health Insurance trends in 2006
August 28, 2007
by Jared Bernstein, Elise Gould, and Lawrence Mishel
Reflecting the fifth year of an economic expansion, the percent of the nation in poverty fell last year, and the income of the median household grew (after inflation) by about $360, or just under one percent (0.7%), according to data released today by the U.S. Bureau of the Census. This is the second year of real income gains for the median household, and the first significant decline in poverty since 2000.

-----

Study finds 89.6 million lacked health insurance
One-third of people in the U.S. under 65 went without coverage for some or all of the last two years, reports an advocacy group.
By Jordy Yager, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
September 21, 2007
WASHINGTON -- -- More than one-third of the people in the United States under the age of 65 had no health insurance for some or all of 2006 and 2007, according to a study released Thursday by Families USA, an advocacy group for the uninsured. The 89.6 million individuals identifying themselves as lacking insurance for at least a month, according to the advocacy group, was almost double the number of uninsured reported by the Census Bureau for 2006.
Source:
Los Angeles Times

Complete report:

Wrong Direction: One Out of Three Americans Are Uninsured (PDF file - 222K, 41 pages)
September 2007
"...presents new data showing that 89.6 million Americans were uninsured for some portion of 2006-2007, an increase of 17 million from the 1999-2000 period. The report provides a detailed analysis of who these uninsured people are, where they live, how long they have been without coverage, and their demographic characteristics."

[ Links to 58 more Families USA Publications about the Uninsured ]

Source:
Families USA
...a national nonprofit, non-partisan organization dedicated to the achievement of high-quality, affordable health care for all Americans. Working at the national, state, and community levels, we have earned a national reputation as an effective voice for health care consumers for over 20 years.

Related Web/News/Blog links:

Google Search Results Links - always current results!
Using the following search terms (without the quote marks):
"Census Bureau, Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage"
Web search results page
News search results page
Blog Search Results page
Source:
Google.ca

Poverty and hardship affect tens of millions of Americans
December 20, 2007
During the holiday season, we know that many national, regional, and local media focus attention on less-fortunate Americans and the efforts to help them through charities, food banks, and other institutions. With this in mind, the Center has issued a new snapshot of the state of poverty and hardship in this country. The analysis takes stock of how the poor are faring in terms of incomes, food availability, housing needs, and health coverage and explains the inadequacy of current federal programs to address those problems.

Full report:
HTML : http://www.cbpp.org/12-20-07pov.htm
PDF : http://www.cbpp.org/12-20-07pov.pdf (3pp.)

Appendix providing additional information on the data:
http://www.cbpp.org/12-20-07pov-app.pdf (4pp.)

Other reports on poverty and income

Policy Points:
ADDRESSING MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT THE NEW SENATE BUDGET PLAN
March 16, 2007
The new Senate budget resolution is a bigger break with recent congressional budget practices — and a larger step in the direction of fiscal responsibility — than some initial media reports suggest.
http://www.cbpp.org/policy-points3-16-07.htm
http://www.cbpp.org/policy-points3-16-07.pdf
- 2pp

THE SENATE BUDGET COMMITTEE'S BUDGET PLAN: A Brief Analysis
By James Horney
This analysis examines various aspects of the budget plan including:
* the adherence to Pay-As-You-Go rules,
* provisions for funding discretionary and entitlement programs,
* revenue assumptions, and
* effects on the deficit.
http://www.cbpp.org/3-16-07bud.htm
http://www.cbpp.org/3-16-07bud.pdf
- 5pp

President's budget would cut deeply into important public services and adversely affect states
February 2007
by Arloc Sherman, Sharon Parrott and Danilo Trisi
This new analysis finds that:
* The President’s budget would reduce funding for most parts of the domestic discretionary budget below the 2007 funding levels, adjusted for inflation. The cuts would start in 2008 and grow deeper in each of the four succeeding years.
* The proposed reductions would effectively shift billions of dollars in costs on to states, requiring them to scale back key public services or raise taxes to plug the holes left by the federal cuts.
* The reductions would come from a wide range of areas, including education, environmental protection, community development, and key supports for low-income families.
* At the same time, the budget would permanently extend virtually all of the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts. Extending the tax cuts would cost much more each year than all of the proposed discretionary program cuts would save.

Summary:
http://www.cbpp.org/2-21-07bud.htm

Full Report:
http://www.cbpp.org/2-21-07bud.pdf (PDF file - 294K, 21pages)

State-by-State Tables:
http://www.cbpp.org/2-21-07bud-tables.pdf (PDF file - 498K, 48 pages)

Myths and realities about the Alternative Minimum Tax
February 14, 2007
by Aviva Aron-Dine
Public discussion of issues surrounding the AMT suffers from several misconceptions, which seem to be widespread among policymakers and others.

The Alternative Minimum Tax was created in 1969 to ensure that the highest-income households could not exploit loopholes, exclusions, and deductions to avoid paying any federal income tax. The AMT acts as a stop-gap tax system, with taxpayers owing their regular income tax or AMT liability, whichever is higher. Because the AMT parameters were never indexed for inflation, and because the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts substantially lowered taxpayers’ liability under the regular income tax without changing the structure of the AMT, the tax will affect a rapidly increasing number of taxpayers in future years in the unlikely event that no changes are made.

This piece examines 1) who pays the AMT, 2) the causes of the AMT problem, and 3) options for AMT reform.
http://www.cbpp.org/2-14-07tax.htm
http://www.cbpp.org/2-14-07tax.pdf
6pp.

Tax Cuts : Myths and Realities
Revised February 13, 2007
Since 2001, the Administration and Congress have enacted a wide array of tax cuts, including reductions in individual income tax rates, repeal of the estate tax, and reductions in capital gains and dividend taxes. Nearly all of these tax cuts are scheduled to expire by the end of 2010. Making them permanent would cost about $3.5 trillion over the next decade (when the cost of additional interest on the federal debt is included). Because important decisions about these tax policies must be made in the next few years, it is essential to understand their effects on deficits, the economy, and the distribution of income. Supporters of the tax cuts have sometimes sought to bolster their case by understating the tax cuts’ costs, overstating their economic effects, or minimizing their regressivity. Here, we address some of the myths heard most frequently in recent tax-cut debates.

Implementing the TANF changes in the Deficit Reduction Act:
“win-win” solutions for families and states
Second Edition
February 9, 2007
In the coming months, states will face key choices as they decide the next direction for their Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) programs. After a lengthy and contentious reauthorization process, Congress enacted changes to TANF in the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 (DRA) that substantially increase the proportion of assistance recipients who must participate in work activities for a specified number of hours each week. In June 2006, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued new regulations that implement these changes and significantly limit states’ flexibility in assigning recipients to work activities. The new requirements will be challenging for most states to meet and likely will require increased investments in welfare-to-work programs and work supports. (...) This guidebook, intended for state policymakers, human service agency staff, policy analysts, and others, discusses strategies that can help states as they consider their policy options for this next phase of welfare reform.

Complete report (PDF file - 665K, 129 pages)
Executive summary (PDF file - 156K, 6 pages)
Table of contents - download the individual chapters and appendix by clicking on the links appearing in the table of contents in the right-hand margin of the page.
[HINT: scroll down the table of contents page to see a short sumamry of all chapters before clicking on any individual chapter link.]
--- Chapter 1: Changes to TANF Requirements Under the Deficit Reduction Act
--- Chapter 2: Improving Welfare-To-Work Programs and Increasing Engagement
--- Chapter 3: Income Supplements for Working Families
--- Chapter 4: Making TANF Work for Individuals with Disabilities
--- Chapter 5: Examining TANF Spending Priorities
--- Appendix: Additional Resources on Work Support Programs

Poverty Remains Higher, and Median Income for Non-Elderly Is Lower, Than When Recession Hit Bottom:
Poor Performance Unprecedented For Four-Year Recovery Period

August 30, 2006

The Number of Uninsured Americans Is at an All-Time High
August 29, 2006

How to Assess Tomorrow's Income and Poverty numbers
August 28, 2006
by Arloc Sherman and Robert Greenstein
Tomorrow, August 29, the Census Bureau will release findings regarding household income and poverty for 2005. This analysis provides some context within which the data should be viewed.
HTML - http://www.cbpp.org/8-28-06pov.htm
PDF - http://www.cbpp.org/8-28-06pov.pdf 2pp.

How to Assess Tomorrow's Income and Poverty numbers
August 28, 2006
by Arloc Sherman and Robert Greenstein
Tomorrow, August 29, the Census Bureau will release findings regarding household income and poverty for 2005. This analysis provides some context within which the data should be viewed.
HTML - http://www.cbpp.org/8-28-06pov.htm
PDF - http://www.cbpp.org/8-28-06pov.pdf 2pp.

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) AT 10:
Program Results are More Mixed than Often Understood

by Sharon Parrott and Arloc Sherman
August 17, 2006
"The 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act established the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant. Under TANF, states received fixed block grants and had broad flexibility to design their own rules for their cash assistance programs, and broad authority to use the block grant resources for other programs outside of cash assistance to assist low-income families, promote marriage, and reduce non-marital childbearing.

Many discussions of TANF focus on three sets of trends:
- the decline in the number of families receiving cash assistance through TANF programs,
- the increase in employment rates of single mothers during the 1990s, and
- the decline in child poverty during the 1990s.

While important, these three sets of trends miss important information about the functioning of the TANF program and the impacts on low-income families over the last decade.
This report examines a broader set of indicators.

HTML : http://www.cbpp.org/8-17-06tanf.htm
PDF : http://www.cbpp.org/8-17-06tanf.pdf 16pp.

2006 Earned Income Credit and Child Tax Credit Outreach Kit
Make Tax Time Pay!
Links to 11 documents about the 2006 EITC, including:
- Facts About Tax Credits for Working Families
-
Strategies for Promoting Tax Credits for Working Families
-
Opportunities for Linking Workers to Free Tax Help and Asset Development
- Katrina Survivors and the Earned Income Credit and Child Tax Credit
- EIC Participation for Tax Year 2004 and 2003
- EIC and CTC Benefit Amounts
-
State Earned Income Credits and Child and Dependent Care Benefits
-
Why Pay When You Can Get Your Taxes Done for Free?

THE COST AND COVERAGE IMPACT OF THE
PRESIDENT'S HEALTH INSURANCE BUDGET PROPOSALS

by Jonathan Gruber, MIT
This new analysis by one of the nation's leading health economists finds that the Administration's proposals to expand tax breaks for Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) would cause a net increase in the number of uninsured Americans.

Press Release:
February 15, 2006
http://www.cbpp.org/2-15-06health-pr.htm
http://www.cbpp.org/2-15-06health-pr.pdf - 2pp.

Full Report:
February 2006
http://www.cbpp.org/2-15-06health.htm
http://www.cbpp.org/2-15-06health.pdf - 5pp.

------------------

Administration's Health Savings Accounts Proposals
Would Cause Net Increase in Number of Uninsured:
Decline in Employer-Sponsored Coverage Would Offset Gain in Individual Coverage
February 2006
[Press Release - Feb. 15]

------------------

Administration Defense of
Health Savings Accounts Rests on Misleading Use of Statistics

February 16, 2006

------------------

Pulling Apart:
A State-by-State Analysis of Income Trends
(PDF file -
622K, 66 pages)
By Jared Bernstein, Elizabeth McNichol, Karen Lyons

January 2006
"(...)The growth of income inequality is primarily due to the growth in wage inequality. (...) Several factors have contributed to increasing wage inequality, including long periods of high unemployment, globalization, the shrinkage of manufacturing jobs and the expansion of low-wage service jobs and immigration, as well as the lower real value of the minimum wage and fewer and weaker unions. These factors have led to an erosion of wages for workers with less than a college education, who make up approximately the lowest-earning 70 percent of the workforce. More recently, even those with a college education have experienced real wage declines, in part due to the bursting of the tech bubble in high-wage industries, but also due to the downward pressure on wage growth from offshore competition."

Larger reconciliation cuts would put low-income programs at greater risk
October 21, 2005
HTML
PDF
8pp.

Impact of Additional Entitlement Cuts: A State-by-State Analysis
October 21, 2005
HTML
PDF
4pp

What Does the Safety Net Accomplish?
- special Series on accomplishments of the safety net (incl. individual reports on medical coverage/Medicaid, food and nutrition programs, the Earned Income Tax Credit [see the link below], Supplemental Security Income, etc.)
- links to the individual reports appear in the grey box near the top of the page
News Release - July 19, 2005

Sample report from this series:

The Earned Income Tax Credit:
Boosting Employment, Aiding the Working Poor

Revised August 17, 2005
"An innovative tax credit that was established in 1975 for low-income working families and has long enjoyed bipartisan support, the Earned Income Tax Credit has been found to produce substantial increases in employment and reductions in welfare receipt among single parents, as well as large decreases in poverty. Research indicates that families use the EITC to pay for necessities, repair homes and vehicles that are needed to commute to work, and in some cases, to help boost their employability and earning power by obtaining additional education or training."

ECONOMIC RECOVERY FAILED TO BENEFIT MUCH OF THE POPULATION IN 2004
"Despite the fact that 2004 represented the third full year of economic recovery, the Census data released today show that poverty increased again last year and median income failed to rise."
http://www.cbpp.org/8-30-05pov.htm
http://www.cbpp.org/8-30-05pov.pdf
, 4pp.

THE NUMBER OF UNINSURED AMERICANS CONTINUED TO RISE IN 2004
"Data released today by the Census Bureau show that the number of uninsured Americans stood at 45.8 million in 2004, an increase of 800,000 people over the number uninsured in 2003 (45.0 million). The percentage of people without health insurance, 15.7 percent in 2004, was not significantly different from the 15.6 percent rate in 2003."
August 30, 2005

HTML version:
http://www.cbpp.org/8-30-05health.htm
PDF version:
http://www.cbpp.org/8-30-05health.pdf
, 4pp.

Related Links from the U.S. Census Bureau:

Income Stable, Poverty Rate Increases, Percentage of Americans
Without Health Insurance Unchanged
Press Release
August 30, 2005
"Real median household income remained unchanged between 2003 and 2004 at $44,389, according to a report released today by the U.S. Census Bureau. Meanwhile, the nation’s official poverty rate rose from 12.5 percent in 2003 to 12.7 percent in 2004. The percentage of the nation’s population without health insurance coverage remained stable, at 15.7 percent in 2004. The number of people with health insurance increased by 2.0 million to 245.3 million between 2003 and 2004, and the number without such coverage rose by 800,000 to 45.8 million. These findings are contained in the Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2004 [PDF] report. The report’s data were compiled from information collected in the 2005 Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) to the Current Population Survey (CPS)."

Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance
Coverage in the United States: 2004
(PDF file - 3.6MB, 85 pages)
"This report presents data on income, poverty, and health insurance coverage in the United States based on information collected in the 2005 and earlier Annual Social and Economic Supplements (ASEC) to the Current Population Survey (CPS) conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau." [there's more detailed info about ASEC and CPS in the report.]

Related Links from the Census Bureau:

Income, Earnings, and Poverty from the
2004 American Community Survey
(PDF file - 1.4MB, 24 pages)
"This report looks at information on income, earnings, and poverty collected in the 2004 American Community Survey (ACS). The ACS is a new approach to collecting reliable, timely information needed by local communities. It will replace the decennial census long form in future censuses and is a critical element in the Census Bureau’s 2010 Decennial Census Program. Like the long form it is designed to replace, the ACS collects detailed demographic, socioeconomic, and housing information."

Press kit / Reports
Income data
Poverty data
Health insurance coverage data
American Community Survey data

Source:
Poverty Statistics
- includes links to : * Poverty Home * Overview * Publications * Definitions * Thresholds * Microdata Access * Related Sites * FAQ
[ U.S. Census Bureau ]

------------------------------------------
Google News search Results : "Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2004"
Google Web Search Results : "Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2004"
Source:
Google.ca

------------------------------------------

- Go to the Poverty Measures Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/poverty.htm
- Go to the Links to American Government Social Research page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/us.htm

Top Ten Facts on Social Security's 70th Anniversary
by Jason Furman
Revised August 11, 2005
PDF version of this report (57K, 5 pages)
"President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act on August 14, 1935, which established a basic compact between generations: younger workers would contribute payroll taxes, and retired workers would have a more secure retirement. Presidents from Dwight Eisenhower to Ronald Reagan have signed landmark Social Security reforms to expand Social Security to provide disability insurance (1954), index Social Security benefits so people would not become poorer as they grew older (1972), and reform Social Security to add decades to its life (1983). As Social Security approaches its 70th anniversary on August 14, 2005, it remains one of the most successful and effective, as well as one of the most popular, of government programs. It provides a universal benefit that is progressive and lifts millions of people out of poverty. It also provides extremely valuable social insurance, providing payments to those who need them most — including workers who become disabled, families whose breadwinner dies, dependent spouses, and retirees who live to a very old age and outlive their assets. (...) As policymakers contemplate changes in Social Security, they should keep in mind 10 important facts about the program:
Fact #1: About half of the elderly have incomes that, without Social Security, leave them below the poverty line. Social Security lifts 13 million elderly Americans above the poverty line.
Fact #2: Social Security does more to reduce poverty among children than any other government program.
Fact #3: Social Security is more than just a retirement program: one-third of Social Security beneficiaries receive survivors benefits or disability insurance benefits. 10 million beneficiaries are adults below the age of 65, and 4 million are children.
Fact #4: For two-thirds of the elderly, Social Security provides the majority of their income. For one-third of the elderly, it provides nearly all of their income.
Fact #5: Social Security provides benefits to 48 million Americans, with the average beneficiary receiving $10,500 per year.
Fact #6: Social Security is especially beneficial for women.
Fact #7: Social Security is particularly important for African Americans.
Fact #8: Social Security provides an especially good deal for Hispanics.
Fact #9: Social Security provides a progressive benefit that keeps up with increases in the cost of living.
Fact #10: Social Security is an extremely efficient program, with administrative costs equaling only 0.6 percent of retirement and survivors benefits."

Putting the Social Security Debate in Context
- incl. links to : An Introduction to Social Security - The President’s Social Security Plan - Other Social Security Proposals - Social Security Solvency - Accomplishments of Social Security - Social Security by the Numbers

Online Information About Key Low-Income Benefit Programs
- incl. links to information in each U.S. state (600+ links in total) about the five main state-administered low-income benefit programs — food stamps, Medicaid, SCHIP, TANF and child care — available to the public via the internet.

What Does the Safety Net Accomplish?
New Series of Reports Examines Research Findings
(U.S.)
Press Release
July 19, 2005
"Public benefit programs cut the number of poor Americans nearly in half (from 58 million to 31 million) and dramatically reduce the severity of poverty for those who remain poor, while providing health coverage to tens of millions of people who otherwise would be uninsured, according to a new report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities."
NOTE: this press release includes a short summary of each of the reports in this series

Individual reports (approx. 8-10 pages each):

Overall Impacts of the Safety Net
Medicaid
The Earned Income Tax Credit
Supplemental Security Income
Food and Nutrition Assistance

Related Link:

July 20, 2005
Programs have cut poverty in half, report says
By The Associated Press
"Food and nutrition programs, Supplemental Security Income and other public benefits have helped lift 27 million Americans out of poverty, according to a report released Tuesday by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. In 2003, the number of people nationwide living below the poverty line was nearly 31 million after counting public benefits, compared to about 58 million without those programs, said the report, which also looked at the impact of Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program and the federal earned income tax credit."
Source:
Charleston Gazette

Number of Unemployed Who Have Gone Without Federal Benefits Hits Record 3 Million
October 13, 2004
"From late December 2003 (when the temporary federal benefits program was permitted to phase out) through today, a record 3 million jobless workers have exhausted their regular unemployment benefits and gone without federal aid."
HTML version
PDF version
(23K, 3 pages)

Unemployment Insurance Does Not Explain Why TANF Caseloads Are Falling As Poverty and Need Are Rising
October 12, 2004
HTML version
PDF version
(57K, 4 pages)

Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP) Response to Health and Human Services Announcement that Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Caseloads Fell in 2003
Trend Touted by HHS but Should Be Cause for Concern
August 23, 2004
"The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced today that caseloads in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program fell in 2003. In the press release announcing the decline, Secretary Tommy Thompson said that "American families are improving their lives by leaving public assistance and entering the workforce." Last year, shortly after the Census Bureau released data showing a marked rise in child poverty in the United States in 2002, HHS issued a similar press released that trumpeted TANF caseload declines in 2002 and called them 'encouraging.' Just as last year’s release failed to note that child poverty increased in 2002, this year’s release fails to note that the proportion of single mothers who are employed fell in 2003 and the unemployment rate rose markedly among single mothers."

For additional information on employment for single mothers in 2003 and the decline in TANF participation by families who are poor enough to qualify, see the Center’s paper:
Employment Rates For Single Mothers Fell Substantially During Recent Period Of Labor Market Weakness (June 2004)

View Related CBPP Reports on Welfare Reform and TANF

Related Link:

Secretary Thompson Announces TANF Caseloads Declined in 2003
Eight Years After Reform, More Americans Achieving Self-Sufficiency

News Release
August 23, 2004
"Eight years after the signing of the historic welfare reform law, HHS Secretary Tommy G. Thompson announced today that caseloads in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program dropped 3 percent for individuals and 1.8 percent for families during 2003. Nearly 149,000 fewer people were relying on TANF benefits at the end of 2003 than at the end of 2002. As of December 2003, 4,864,905 individuals and 2,008,233 families were receiving TANF cash benefits. In December 2002, 5,013,728 individuals and 2,044,734 families were receiving TANF cash benefits."

Change in Numbers of TANF Families and Recipients
from December 2002 to December 2003
- by state

Source:
U.S. Dept. of Human Services

States are Cutting TANF and Child Care Programs
Supports for Low-Income Working Families and
Welfare-to-Work Programs are Particularly Hard Hit
June 3, 2003
"More than 35 states have made cuts in programs funded with TANF and child care block grant funds, and most of these cuts are in programs that promote the goals of welfare reform. The cuts reflect both the exhaustion of many states’ surplus TANF funds from prior years and the large budget gaps many states face."
PDF of the full report - (150K, 28 pages)
Press release
View Related Analyses

Falling TANF Caseloads Amidst Rising Poverty Should Be A Cause Of Concern,
Revised September 5, 2003,
"On September 3rd, HHS released a press release calling continued declines in the TANF cash assistance caseload "encouraging" while failing to mention that federal statistics issued the same day by the Census Bureau showed a marked increase in child poverty. This analysis describes recent research and data that strongly suggest that falling caseloads during a time of rising poverty should be a cause for concern."
Source: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

Related Link:

HHS Releases Data Showing Continuing Decline in Number of People Receiving Temporary Assistance
News Release
September 3, 2003
"Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy G. Thompson announced today that both the number of individuals and the number of families receiving assistance under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program declined between March 2002 and March 2003."
Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)
Related Link:
HHS State Caseload Statistics (March 2002 - March 2003)

States cutting welfare reform programs;
Upcoming Federal Welfare Law Could Force Additional Cuts

June 4, 2003
"Many states are making significant cuts in their welfare and child care programs, a new Center study finds, including programs to help families move from welfare to work. Even deeper cuts could be in store if the legislation Congress is crafting to renew the 1996 welfare law imposes new requirements on states but does not provide the new money needed to help meet these requirements."
- Highlights page, incl. links to the press release and the complete report

House Budget Plan Calls for Deep Cuts in Key Low-Income Entitlement Programs:
State-by-State Table Shows How Benefits and Services in Each State Would Be Affected

Revised March 28, 2003
"The budget plan passed by the House on March 21 includes deep reductions in low-income entitlement programs. The plan includes $265 billion in entitlement cuts between 2004 and 2013. Some $165 billion in cuts would be made to key low-income programs such as Medicaid, the State Children’s Health Insurance Program, SSI, EITC, Food Stamps, TANF, child nutrition programs, foster care and adoption programs, child care, and the Social Services Block Grant."

An Introduction to TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families)
Revised January 13, 2003
(5 pages if printed)
"Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) is a block grant created by the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996, as part of a federal effort to 'end welfare as we know it.' The TANF block grant replaced the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program, which had provided cash welfare to poor families with children since 1935."
NOTE: The shift from AFDC to TANF occurred at the same time - April 1996 - as the shift from the Canada Assistance Plan (CAP) to the Canada Health and Social Transfer (CHST) in Canada. Both TANF and CHST are block funds from the federal government to the province/state level, but that's where the similarity ends. The only condition that Canadian provinces and territories must respect to avoid incurring a sanction under the CHST is not to impose a minimum period of residency for eligibility under their financial assistance programs of last resort (welfare / social assistance / income support). In the U.S., the federal grant is attached to more conditions - read the text for details.

Introduction to Unemployment Insurance - Updated Jan. 2003
(5 pages if printed)
"The basic unemployment insurance program is run by the states, although it is overseen by the U.S. Department of Labor. States provide most of the funding, and pay for the actual benefits provided to workers; the federal government pays only for the administrative costs to the states of running the program. Although subject to a few federal requirements, states are generally able to set their own eligibility criteria and benefit levels."

Other CBPP reports on unemployment insurance - links to 30+ reports on UI

2003 Earned Income Tax Credit Outreach Kit
December 2002
"Earned Income Credit Campaign 2003, a national effort to help working families and individuals claim the tax credits they’ve earned. In 2002, over 19 million low- and moderate-income workers claimed Earned Income Credits (EIC) worth more than $31 billion. And, for the first time last year, many working families also were able to claim Child Tax Credit (CTC) refunds, providing an additional boost to their paychecks. The Earned Income Credit — and now the CTC — continue to be vital work supports for employees in low-wage jobs, helping many to make the transition from public assistance into the labor force."

Child Trends Data Bank
Child Trends Data Bank is "the one-stop-shop for the latest [U.S.] national trends and research on over 100 key indicators of child and youth well-being."

Welfare Receipt Among Children under AFDC and TANF
HTML version
PDF version
(99K, 6 pages)
April 2007
Between 1996, the year in which federal welfare reform was implemented, and 2004, the number of children receiving benefits from welfare declined by more than half. This continued a downward trend that started after 1995. (...) After rising from 6.1 million children in 1970 to 9.5 million children in 19949, the number of children living in families receiving AFDC/TANF payments fell to 3.9 million children in 2004. Similarly, the percentage of children living in families receiving AFDC/TANF has steadily decreased from 13.0 percent in 1995 to 5.3 percent in 2004. Among children in families with incomes below the poverty threshold, the percentage of children in families receiving AFDC/TANF also decreased from 61.5 percent in 1995 to 29.8 percent in 2004.

NOTE: for a good two-page overview of TANF and AFDC, with links to more detailed info, see
Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) / Temporary Aid for Needy Families (TANF)
- from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)

Related Indicators:

Food Stamp Receipt

Long-term Poverty

Long-Term Welfare Dependence

-------

AFDC/TANF State and Local Estimates (5.3MB, 54 pages)
This is a large download, but well worth the wait for the amount of program information and welfare statistics going back to the 1960s...
Source:
Appendix A, Table TANF13,
Indicators of Welfare Dependence Annual Report to Congress 2006
By the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)

Child Welfare Research Institute
(located at the University of California, Los Angeles)

U.S. Welfare Reform Myths
Duncan Lindsey - UCLA
- Welfare Reform led to a Reduction in Child Poverty: False
Welfare reform allowed states to reduce and, in several states, essentially dismantle income assistance for poor children. This can be seen by the declining ratio of children receiving welfare to children living in poverty:
- Welfare Reform Reduced Children Born Out-of-Wedlock: False
State charts show the percentage of children born to unmarried mothers from 1993 to 2002 has continued to increase in almost every state
-
Welfare Reform Impacts All Children Equally: False
The largest proportion of children receiving welfare are Black. The reduction of income assistance to poor children has a disproportionate impact on Black children. This can be seen by the disproportionate number of Black children who receive welfare.
- Welfare Reform will Lead to an End to Child Poverty: False
The charts displayed in “Programs for Children” indicate that post welfare reform, more children qualify for subsidized free lunch, WIC, and Head Start. In many states the child poverty rate is approaching and even exceeding pre welfare reform levels, except that these states have not restored welfare to the children living in poverty. It is unlikely that the welfare benefits will be restored. For most of the poor and disadvantaged children affected by welfare reform the essential consequence has been to make a bleak life only bleaker. Ending child poverty will require more than welfare reform.

Children's Defense Fund
"For over 30 years, CDF has struggled to make sure no child in the United States gets left behind. (...) Since 1973,CDF has worked toward, and made great progress in, reducing the numbers of neglected, sick, uneducated, and poor children in the United States. CDF's research, public education campaigns, budget and policy advocacy, and coalition building have contributed to millions of children gaining immunizations; health care; child care; Head Start; a right to education; adoptions; a chance to escape poverty; and protections in our child welfare, mental health, and juvenile justice systems. More than 400 CDF publications have educated millions about child conditions and what can be done individually and collectively to change things."

On the home page, you'll find links to content under the following headings:
Meeting Children's Needs - Preventing Poverty - Advocating for Children - Engaging Faith Communities
(the home page also includes links to : About CDF - Events - Press Releases - Data - Webstore - Donations

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2008
September 10, 2009

Children's Defense Fund Statement on
New Data Showing 8.1 Million Uninsured Children, 14.1 Million Children in Poverty in 2008
Number of Children Living in Poverty Increased by Nearly 750,000
September 10, 2009
WASHINGTON, DC—Today, Children's Defense Fund (CDF) President Marian Wright Edelman issued the following statement in response to the Census Bureau's release of data showing that, in 2008, 8.1 million children were uninsured and 14.1 million children lived in poverty.
"Today’s Census data show that there are 8.1 million uninsured children in America. This new information only underscores why health reform must guarantee that every child in America can easily access comprehensive, affordable health coverage. We know that investing in preventive services for children and addressing their health needs now is far more cost-effective than ignoring them. Communities incur increased costs when their children are not insured, often because of increased use of emergency rooms and longer hospital stays. For example, an uninsured child can cost the community as much as $2,100 more than a child covered by Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP)."
Source:
Children's Defense Fund
The Children's Defense Fund (CDF) is a non-profit child advocacy organization that has worked relentlessly for 35 years to ensure a level playing field for all children. We champion policies and programs that lift children out of poverty; protect them from abuse and neglect; and ensure their access to health care, quality education and a moral and spiritual foundation.

---

Tax and Benefits Outreach (under Preventing Poverty)
"The CDF Benefits Outreach project is a national initiative to ensure that children and poor working families receive tax insurance, income, health insurance, and other benefits for which they are eligible. The goal is to use a range of existing federal and state programs to lift children and their families out of poverty."
-----------------------
- An estimated three million families with children — about 15 percent of the total eligible families — did not receive the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC)
- Nearly 612,000 — about 25 percent of — low-income taxpayers with children did not claim the new refundable Child Tax Credit in 2001
- Almost six million children in America lack health insurance, despite living in families eligible in most states for Medicaid or the state Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP)
- More than 3.4 million children did not receive food stamps in 2000, despite living in families with incomes low enough to qualify
-----------------------
A Sampling of Tax and Benefits Outreach Resources - Recommended reading!
November 2003
Model Outreach Projects: Benefits Access (PDF file - 154K, 4 pages)
April 2003
Top 10 Reasons to do Benefits Outreach (PDF file - 131K, 1 page)
November 2003


Coalition on Human Needs

"The Coalition on Human Needs is dedicated to steadily improving and adapting the response of the federal government in meeting the needs of our nation’s most vulnerable populations, including women and children, the elderly, minorities, people with disabilities, the poor, and the working poor."

State Fact Sheets on Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (12/1/03)
December 1, 2003
"
One page state fact sheets on Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, with recent information about caseloads, work participation rates, unemployment rates, and child care cuts at the state level."

Senate Finance Committee Approves TANF Reauthorization
September 12, 2003
- incl. a detailed list of changes from the current law to the Senate Finance Committee Bill --- work requirements, marriage promotion, responsible fatherhood, child support improvements, extension of Transitional Medicaid for five years, improved transportation assistance, grants to capitalize and develop sustainable social services and more.
Source:
Article from the September 12, 2003 edition of the CHN Human Needs Report

Block Grant Proposals That Threaten Services for Families and Communities:
Shifting Responsibility for Programs Without the Resources to Pay for Them
(PDF file - 44K, 7 pages)
August 29, 2003
"From housing assistance vouchers to Head Start, block grant proposals would shift federal authority to the states, but current Bush administration block grant proposals would not ensure enough funding for states to sustain current standards and levels of services. States may find themselves in the position of having more accountability but fewer resources -- a troubling prospect especially at a time of rising needs and record-breaking state budget shortfalls. The Coalition on Human Needs has summarized the current proposals, where they stand, and the expected impact if approved on families, states, and communities.

Council for Employment, Income and Social Cohesion - Paris
Conseil de l'emploi, des revenus et de la cohésion sociale - CERC[version française]

Special : 10 years after welfare reform in the U.S.

. A decade of welfare reform : Facts and figures, (PDF file - 47K, 6 pages) from The Urban Institute, Washington, June (2006).

. Getting on, staying on and getting off welfare : The complexity of state-by-state policy choices (PDF file - 203K, 8 pages) G. Rowe and L. Giannarelli, The Urban Institute, Washington, July (2006).

. Looking forward, looking back :Reflections on the 10th Anniversary of welfare reform (PDF file - 72K, 4 pages), N. K. Cauthen, National Center for Children in Poverty, New York, August (2006).

. The outcomes of 1996 welfare reform (PDF file - 117K, 12pages), R Haskings, The Brookings Institution, Washington, Testimony, House Ways and Means Committee, July (2006).

. TANF at 10 : Program results are more mixed than often understood (PDF file - 244K, 16pages), S. Parrott and A. Sherman, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Washington, August (2006).

. Ten years after welfare reform. It's time to make work work for families (PDF file - K, 2 pages), E. Ganzglass, Center for Law and Social Policy, Washington, August (2006).

. Getting punched : The job and family clock : It's time for flexible work for workers of all wages, (PDF file - 159K, 32 pages) J. Levin-Epstein, Center for Law and Social Policy, Washington, July (2006).

 

Cover the Uninsured Week (March 10-16)
"Building on the momentum generated by the February 2002 launch of the Covering the Uninsured educational and advertising campaign and Web site, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and some of the most influential organizations in the United States will cosponsor Cover the Uninsured Week. This unprecedented week-long series of national and local activities will take place from Monday, March 10, through Sunday, March 16, 2003, in an effort to sensitize the public and opinion leaders to the plight of the more than 41 million Americans who lack health insurance."

Nearly 1 out of 3 non-elderly Americans were uninsured for all or part of 2001-2002 - PDF file (140K, 3 pages)
Press Release
March 5, 2003
" State-by-state analysis estimates 75 million people were uninsured in the last two years, two-thirds of whom lacked health coverage for at least 6 months. Diverse organizations launch ‘Cover the Uninsured Week’ in campaign to raise awareness."
Complete Report:
Going Without Health Insurance (PDF file - 338K, 57 pages)

Related Links:

Covering Kids - A National Health Access Initiative for Low-Income Children
"A majority of the more than 8 million uninsured children in the United States are eligible for Medicaid and the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) but are not enrolled."

Medicare.gov - The Official U.S. Government Site for People with Medicare
Medicare is a health insurance program for people 65 years of age and older, some disabled people under 65 years of age, and people with End-Stage Renal Disease (permanent kidney failure treated with dialysis or a transplant). Medicare is the nation's largest health insurance program, covering nearly 40 million Americans.

Medicaid (information from the Center for Medicaid and State Operations)
"Medicaid is a jointly-funded, Federal-State health insurance program for certain low-income and needy people. It covers approximately 36 million individuals including children, the aged, blind, and/or disabled, and people who are eligible to receive federally assisted income maintenance payments."

The Medicaid Resource Book
Source : Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

De-mos - A Network for Ideas and Action
- non-partisan, non-profit public policy research and advocacy organization based in New York City
"De-mos -- 'people' in Greek -- is the root word of democracy. Our mission is to create a more vibrant, fair, and inclusive America for the 21st century. We strive to help everyone realize the promise of American life through sharing in the nation's economic prosperity and participating in our democracy."

The Growth of Debt Among Older Americans (PDF file - 347K, 12 pages) - U.S.
by Tamara Draut and Heather C. Mcghee
Borrowing to Make Ends Meet Briefing Paper #1
February 2004
"In September 2003, De-mos released Borrowing to Make Ends Meet, a report on the growth of credit card debt among American families. The report documented a 53 percent average increase in self-reported household credit card debt between 1989 and 2001, based on data from the Survey of Consumer Finances. In examining debt increases by income, race, and age, the authors found that certain populations were hit harder than others. This paper is the first in a series of Borrowing to Make Ends Meet Briefing Papers, offering a closer look at the economic security of different populations as seen by examining their debt, assets, and major costs.

Related Link:

Borrowing to Make Ends Meet:
The Growth of Credit Card Debt in the ’90s

"The mid and late 1990s will always be remembered as an era of unprecedented prosperity. But for most American families, the roaring ’90s had a dark underbelly—it was also the Decade of Debt. Between 1989 and 2001, credit card debt in America almost tripled, from $238 billion to $692 billion. The savings rate steadily declined, and the number of people filing for bankruptcy jumped 125 percent. How did the average family fare?"
Complete report (PDF file - 732K, 64 pages)
Executive Summary (PDF file - 232K, 12 pages)

Democracy Uprising
"Democracy Uprising is a project under development by Mark Engler. Currently, the site contains a collection of articles that bring a progressive and internationalist perspective to critical issues facing society. The site rejects narrow specialization and instead seeks to draw connections between militarism, globalization, labor, immigration, Latin American affairs, electoral politics, religion, and the environment."
- topics include : Globalization | Labor War | Latin America | Protests | Immigration | U.S. Politics/Elections | Environment | Books | Liberation Theology | Essays | Oscar Arias

Who Pays For Poverty?
By Mark Engler
Published on September 8, 2003
"Critics questioned welfare reform during the prosperous '90s, but the real crisis is emerging in the wake of the Bush recession."

Economic Policy Institute
The Economic Policy Institute, a nonprofit Washington D.C. think tank, was created in 1986 to broaden the discussion about economic policy to include the interests of low- and middle-income workers. Today, with global competition expanding, wage inequality rising, and the methods and nature of work changing in fundamental ways, it is as crucial as ever that people who work for a living have a voice in the economic discourse.
On this site, you'll find : 
- an online collection of resources that provide data, charts, fact sheets, and links to relevant publications on a variety of topics; 
- A weekly presentation of downloadable charts and short analyses designed to graphically illustrate important economic issues. Updated every Wednesday; 
- Opinion pieces and speeches by EPI staff and associates. Updated as material becomes available; 
- A series of tables on historical labor market, earnings, and income data. Updated periodically; 
- Analyses of key government data. Updated on day of data's release; and 
- A consumer's guide to public opinion data on the web.

EPI issue guides:
- living wage - minimum wage - offshoring - poverty and family budgets - retirement security - social security - unemployment insurance - welfare

Minimum Wage - 40+ links to publications, tables, charts and other online resources
Living Wage - 30+ links
Poverty Measurement and Basic Family Budgets - 30+ links

EPI Issue Guide -- Minimum Wages
[Related Links: Canadian Social Research Links Minimum Wage Links page]

---------------------------------------------------------------

A selection of recent reports:

Declining health care coverage: the worst is yet to come
By Elise Gould
September 8, 2009
On Thursday, September 10, the U.S. Census Bureau will release its annual report on health insurance coverage in 2008. The report includes the latest numbers on the uninsured and various forms of health coverage. EPI’s same-day analysis of this report will highlight trends in employer-sponsored health insurance, including valuable state-by-state coverage rates

New 2008 poverty, income data reveal only tip of the recession iceberg
By Heidi Shierholz
September 10, 2009
(...) While the 3.6% decline in median income in 2008 was the largest one-year decline on record (since 1967) and the increase in poverty was the largest one-year increase in poverty since 1991, an important thing to keep in mind about today's data release is that it captures only a small portion of the deterioration in the economy up to this point in the recession.
Source:
Economic Policy Institute
The Economic Policy Institute, a nonprofit Washington D.C. think tank, was created in 1986 to broaden the discussion about economic policy to include the interests of low- and middle-income workers. Today, with global competition expanding, wage inequality rising, and the methods and nature of work changing in fundamental ways, it is as crucial as ever that people who work for a living have a voice in the economic discourse.

Declining health care coverage: the worst is yet to come
By Elise Gould
September 8, 2009
On Thursday, September 10, the U.S. Census Bureau will release its annual report on health insurance coverage in 2008. The report includes the latest numbers on the uninsured and various forms of health coverage. EPI’s same-day analysis of this report will highlight trends in employer-sponsored health insurance, including valuable state-by-state coverage rates
Source:
Economic Policy Institute
The Economic Policy Institute, a nonprofit Washington D.C. think tank, was created in 1986 to broaden the discussion about economic policy to include the interests of low- and middle-income workers. Today, with global competition expanding, wage inequality rising, and the methods and nature of work changing in fundamental ways, it is as crucial as ever that people who work for a living have a voice in the economic discourse.

Improving Work Supports
Closing the financial gap for low-wage workers and their families
by Nancy K. Cauthen
October 2, 2007
EPI Briefing Paper #198
HTML version
PDF version
(368K, 32 pages)
Low-wage workers and their families face rising levels of economic insecurity. Analysts estimate that anywhere from a quarter to a third of U.S. workers—35 to 46 million—hold low-wage jobs that provide few prospects for advancement and wage growth. Further, such jobs typically offer few of the employer-sponsored benefits—such as health insurance, paid sick leave, retirement plans, and the flexibility to deal with family needs—that higher-income workers often take for granted. (...) Government “work support” benefits—such as earned income tax credits, child care assistance, public health insurance coverage, and housing assistance—can help low-wage workers close the gap between insufficient earnings and basic expenses. And there is now abundant research evidence that work supports positively affect employment outcomes and family incomes, which in turn benefit children.

Source:
Agenda for Shared Prosperity - Economic Policy Institute

The American people need an economic agenda that will spur growth, reduce insecurity, and provide broadly shared prosperity. Drawing upon some of the best informed and most innovative experts, the Agenda for Shared Prosperity will advance an economic program that is comprehensive, understandable, and workable.

Census Bureau Data for 2005 Show Working Families Fell Behind
August 29, 2006
After falling each year since the economic recovery began in 2001, the income of the median household grew 1.1% (or $509) in inflation-adjusted terms in 2005. But the median income of working-age households—those headed by someone less than 65—actually fell 0.5% last year. Also troubling is the fact that poverty rates, which have risen consistently over the recovery, were unchanged, and income inequality also rose in 2005, as households at the top of the income scale saw greater income growth than everyone else.

The Who and Why of the Minimum Wage: Raising the wage floor is an essential part
of a strategy to support working families
(PDF file - 28K, 7 pages)
EPI Issue Brief
August 6, 2004
By Jeff Chapman and Michael Ettlinger
Related Links: Go to the Minimum Wage Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/minwage.htm

States move on minimum wage
Federal inaction forces states to raise wage floor to protect low-wage workers

June 11, 2003 - Issue Brief #195
"The president and Congress are poised to beat an embarrassing record currently held by their predecessors of the 1980s—eight years without raising the minimum wage. Each year the federal government fails to act, minimum wage workers pay the price, as the rising cost of living erodes the value of their paycheck."

Real Value of the federal minimum wage in the U.S., 1956-2003
"The real value of today's minimum wage is 30% below its peak in 1968, and 24% below its level in 1979"
Source:
Step up, not out - The case for raising the federal minimum wage for workers in every state
February 7, 2001 - Issue Brief #149

US Social Security
Raising the Retirement Age: The Wrong Direction for Social Security
Weller, Christian E. 
September 2000 
HTML version (8 pages) 
PDF version (8 pages) 

Any way you cut it : Income inequality on the rise regardless of how it’s measured
Briefing Paper (22 printed pages) 

September 2000 

Discusses some interesting aspects of absolute VS relative measures of poverty, for example : 

- Do different income definitions yield different answers? (compares poverty levels using a number of official US sources) 

- Does income mobility counteract the inequality problem? 

- Are low-income families better off than before? 

- Absolute and relative difficulties in meeting basic needs 

- Is rising inequality a serious concern or merely a necessary tradeoff for a growing economy? 


Employment Policies Institute - "...dedicated to studying entry-level employment issues"
EPI online.org

Recent release from the (U.S.) Employment Policies Institute:

Minimum Wages and Poverty:
Will the Obama Proposal Help the Working Poor?
(PDF - 3.1MB, 28 pages)
September 2008
Highlights - HTML
As this year’s economic crisis hit everyone’s pocketbooks, some advocates called for another increase in the federal minimum wage (from the current $6.55 to $9.50) . (...) Economists at American University and Cornell University conclude this high minimum wage would fail to improve our nation’s poverty rate because (1) over 60 percent of the benefits would go to families with incomes more than 2 times the federal poverty level, and (2) the job loss suffered by the lowest skilled employees could range from 450,000 to 4 million. The study also shows that the last minimum wage hike also fell short of achieving any poverty reductions, again because of poor target efficiency and resulting job loss.

Source:
Employment Policies Institute (EPI)

<Begin reality check.>

Lies, Damn Lies and The Internet

I enthusiastically encourage open dialogue between supporters of differing viewpoints.
What I object to is the misrepresentation of mission and objectives and the wilful omission of important contextual information, such as the fact that the Big Daddy at EPI is a Washington lobbyist for the restaurant, hotel, alcoholic beverage and tobacco industries, all of which stand to gain from low minimum wage standards.

Here's an excerpt from what SourceWatch*
has to say about the Employment Policies Institute:

The Employment Policies Institute (EPI) is one of several front groups created by Berman & Co., a Washington, DC public affairs firm owned by Rick Berman, who lobbies for the restaurant, hotel, alcoholic beverage and tobacco industries [bolding added]. (...) EPI has has been widely quoted in news stories regarding minimum wage issues, and although a few of those stories have correctly described it as a "think tank financed by business," most stories fail to provide any identification that would enable readers to identify the vested interests behind its pronouncements. Instead, it is usually described exactly the way it describes itself, as a "non-profit research organization dedicated to studying public policy issues surrounding employment growth" that "focuses on issues that affect entry-level employment." In reality, EPI's mission is to keep the minimum wage low so Berman's clients can continue to pay their workers as little as possible [more bolding added]. EPI also owns the internet domain names to MinimumWage.com and LivingWage.com, a website that attempts to portray the idea of a living wage for workers as some kind of insidious conspiracy."
Source:

[ *SourceWatch is a collaborative project of the Center for Media and Democracy to produce a directory of the people, organizations and issues shaping the public agenda. A primary purpose of SourceWatch is documenting the PR and propaganda activities of public relations firms and public relations professionals engaged in managing and manipulating public perception, opinion and policy. SourceWatch also includes profiles on think tanks, industry-funded organizations and industry-friendly experts that work to influence public opinion and public policy on behalf of corporations, governments and special interests. Over time, SourceWatch has broadened to include others involved in public debates including media outlets, journalists and government agencies." ]

CAVEAT:

The "About..." page of any website should *always* include clear statements concerning who is 'behind' the site, whether they're called sponsors, funders partners, supporters or whatever, and what the site hopes to accomplish. In the case of the EPI, there's no mention on their About Us page of the vested interests of the industries that stand most to gain from the information that EPI disseminates. To say that "EPI sponsors nonpartisan research..." is a blatant falsehood.

The Bottom Line:

Beware of websites that misrepresent themselves.
* Ask questions.
* Use SourceWatch.

See also:
Full Frontal Scrutiny
... a joint venture between Consumer Reports WebWatch and the Center for Media and Democracy, two non-profit organizations whose mission includes consumer education using investigative reporting. This Web site seeks to expose front groups, which are organizations that state a particular agenda, while hiding or obscuring their identity, membership or sponsorship, or all three.

</End reality check .>

If you want to read some *credible* U.S. research
on the American minimum wage, see this site:

Minimum Wage Issue Guide
(See esp. Minimum wage — Facts at a glance - incl. "no evidence of job loss from previous minimum wage increases.")

Source:
Economic Policies Institute
The Economic Policy Institute is a nonprofit, nonpartisan think tank that seeks to broaden the public debate about strategies to achieve a prosperous and fair economy.

[ "The Employment Policies institute deliberately attempted to create confusion in the eyes of journalists and the general public by adopting a name which closely resembles the Economic Policy Institute, a much older, progressive think tank with ties to organized labor." - SourceWatch ]

------------------------------------------------------------------

Wage Growth Among Minimum Wage Workers (PDF file - 442K, 25 pages)
June 2004
This study shows "that wage growth among minimum wage employees is actually quite robust. Using over two decades of Current Population Survey (CPS) data, these authors dispel the notion that minimum wage employees are dependent on government policies to increase their wages. The authors also examine the factors that lead to wage growth and find that higher education and job training along with a strong labor market are significant contributing factors."

Helping low-wage Americans : Wage-based tax credits.
A new solution to an age-old problem
(PDF file - 570K, 30 pages)
May 2004
Washington
Summary (below) by CERC (Bulletin N°52)
"(...) The near-universal conclusion of decades of economic research is that minimum wage increases diminish total employment and destroy opportunities for entry-level employees. Moreover, most of the benefits associated with minimum wage hikes accrue to non-poor families. The EITC, in contrast, increases poor Americans’ income and work-effort, without destroying job opportunities.(...)"

Living Wage and Earned Income Tax Credit: A Comparative Analysis (PDF file, 960K, 38 pages)
January 2003

Minimum Wage

Living Wage and Earned Income Tax Credit: A Comparative Analysis (PDF file - 961K, 38 pages)
Dr. Mark Turner, Georgetown University
Dr. Burt S. Barnow, Johns Hopkins University
December 2002
" The results of this study should vault the concept of a local EITC into debates in every municipal entity now considering a living wage. A local EITC is as yet a new phenomenon."

More on the Minimum Wage from the Employment Policies Institute

BUT HOLD ON THERE A SECOND...

Here's an excerpt from what Disinfopedia* has to say about the Employment Policies Institute (follow the Disinfopedia link for more):
[ *Disinfopedia "is a collaborative project to produce a directory of public relations firms, think tanks, industry-funded organizations and industry-friendly experts that work to influence public opinion and public policy on behalf of corporations, governments and special interests. Disinfopedia is sponsored by the Center for Media and Democracy." ]

------------------------------------------------------
"The Employment Policies Institute is one of several front groups created by Berman & Co., a Washington, DC public affairs firm owned by Rick Berman, who lobbies for the restaurant, hotel, alcoholic beverage and tobacco industries [bolding added]. EPI, registered as a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization, has been widely quoted in news stories regarding minimum wage issues, and although a few of those stories have correctly described it as a "think tank financed by business," most stories fail to provide any identification that would enable readers to identify the vested interests behind its pronouncements. Instead, it is usually described exactly the way it describes itself, as a "non-profit research organization dedicated to studying public policy issues surrounding employment growth" that "focuses on issues that affect entry-level employment." In reality, EPI's mission is to keep the minimum wage low so Berman's clients can continue to pay their workers as little as possible [more bolding added]. EPI also owns the internet domain names to MinimumWage.com and LivingWage.com, a website that attempts to portray the idea of a living wage for workers as some kind of insidious conspiracy. "Living wage activists want nothing less than a national living wage," it warns (as though there is something wrong with paying employees enough that they can afford to eat and pay rent)."
------------------------------------------------------

CAVEAT:
Beware of websites that misrepresent themselves.
About the Employment Policies Institute

The "About..." page of any website should *always* include clear statements concerning who is 'behind' the site, whether they're called sponsors, funders partners, supporters or whatever, and what the site hopes to accomplish. In this case, based on the 'complementary' info provided by Disinfopedia, I'd say that the purpose of the site is related to the bolded info in the above paragraph more than to any dedication to "studying public policy issues surrounding employment growth".
[ Hey, at least the Fraser Institute (one of Canada's best-known conservative think tanks) is a bit more direct in its mission statement on the About the Institute page: "The Fraser Institute is dedicated to enhancing our quality of life by researching the role of competitive markets, lower taxes, and less regulation" --- although I do recall a few years ago when the Institute's motto was "Free market Solutions for Public Policy Problems".
...and I still have a hard time grasping how the Fraser institute can have charitable organization status from the Canada Revenue Agency.
]

Economic Success Clearinghouse - U.S.
(formerly the Welfare Information Network)
Economic Success Clearinghouse connects you to resources about effective policies, programs and financing strategies that help low-income and working poor families.

Economic Success Clearinghouse resources include:

Welfare
- Cash assistance for low-income families with dependent children

Workforce development
- Services to help individuals connect to the job market, develop work-related skills, sustain employment, and advance in the labor market

Work supports
- Services, such as child care and food, housing, and transportation assistance, to help low-income families secure and retain employment

Income supplements
- Benefits, such as child support and tax credits, that boost the earnings of low-income workers

Asset development
- Supports designed to help low-income families build personal and financial resources, and achieve economic security

Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC)

EPIC Alerts Public to Homeless Tracking System:
Proposed guidelines to create a homeless tracking database called "Homeless Management Information Systems" present serious risks to civil liberties.

Homeless Management Information Systems (HMIS) Data and Technical Standards Notice (PDF file - 225K, 26 pages)
- July 2003 guidelines

EPIC Homeless Tracking Fact Sheet - (PDF file - 53K, 2 pages)
August 2003

Source :
Poverty and Privacy

Feeding America - formerly America’s Second Harvest
This new name best conveys our mission—providing food to Americans living with hunger—and will be supported through expansive public outreach campaigns that will raise awareness of domestic hunger and our work.

Food Research and Action Center (FRAC)
"The Food Research and Action Center (FRAC) is a leading national organization working to improve public policies to eradicate hunger and undernutrition in the United States. Founded in 1970 as a public interest law firm, FRAC is a nonprofit and nonpartisan research and public policy center that serves as the hub of an anti-hunger network of thousands of individuals and agencies across the country."

Selected reports:

One in Eight Americans Receives Food Stamps
January 13, 2010
Some 37.9 million people -- one in eight Americans -- received food stamps to help buy food at latest count, the government said on Tuesday as enrollment set a record for the ninth month in a row.
Food stamps are the primary federal anti-hunger program. It helps poor people buy groceries. The economic stimulus package boosted benefits by $80 a month for a family of four. Participation has surged since the financial-market turmoil more than a year ago and has set a record each month since December 2008. The Agriculture Department said enrollment reached 37.9 million in October, the latest month for which figures are available, up 746,000 from the previous month.The average monthly benefit was $133.60 per person in October.
Source:
CNBC.com

Related links:

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)
(historically and commonly known as the Food Stamp Program)
*** A Short History of SNAP ***
Source:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service

---

Highlights of the Child Nutrition and
Women, Infants, and Children Reauthorization Act of 2004

July 8, 2004
"On Wednesday, June 30, 2004, President Bush signed the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004 into law (Public Law 108-265). The Act expands the availability of nutritious meals and snacks to more children in school, in outside school hours programs, and in child care; and improves the quality of food in schools."

Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act Section-by-Section from the Congressional Research Service (PDF file - 373K, 53 pages)
July 16, 2004

Federal Food Programs in the U.S
- incl. links to info about : Food Stamp Program - National School Lunch Program - School Breakfast Program - Summer Food Service Program for Children - Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants & Children - Child and Adult Care Food Program - The Emergency Food Assistance Program - Community Food and Nutrition Program - Resources to assist afterschool and summer programs in using the child nutrition programs
- also incl. State Profiles (Choose a state to view a profile of the Federal Food Programs in the state)and a National Profile.

Source:
Current News & Analyses

NOTE: for more links to food and hunger resources, go to the Food Banks and Hunger Links page of this site:
http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/foodbkmrk.htm


Forbes.com
- "Home Page for the World's Business Leaders"

Special Report
The 400 Richest Americans
September 21, 2006
A nine-figure fortune won’t get you much mention these days, at least not here. This year, for the first time, everyone in The Forbes 400 has at least $1 billion.

The Top Ten:

1. William H. Gates III
2. Warren E. Buffett
3. Sheldon Adelson
4. Lawrence J. Ellison
5. Paul G. Allen
6. Jim C Walton
7. Christy Walton
8. S. Robson Walton
9. Michael Dell
10. Alice L. Walton
[NOTE that four of the ten top billionaires in the U.S. are from the family that owns Wal-Mart, the American juggernaut that routinely gives its new staff applications for the local welfare and food stamp programs because Wal-Mart employees aren't paid enough to make ends meet.]
- see the special Wal-Mart section of the Canadian Social Research Links Banks and Business Links page.

Back to Forbes:
"The collective net worth of the nation’s wealthiest climbed $120 billion, to $1.25 trillion."

To put this figure in perspective:

In 2002, $1.25 trillion represented about 12% of the U.S. gross domestic product. (http://www.iipa.com/pressreleases/2004_Oct7_Siwek.pdf)

With a population of about 83 million, Germany’s total government revenue in 2003 was $1.25 trillion (http://www.newstartnigeria.org/germany.asp)

In total, about $1.25 trillion of annual public spending on security and support (Medical care - Cash aid - Food benefits - Housing benefits - Education aid - Services - Jobs and training - Energy assistance )
(http://www.nawrs.org/Madison/Final%20Projects/Plenary/Plenary%201/Haveman.pdf)

Cost of Iraq War to top $1.25 trillion dollars, says academic
Rhett A. Butler, mongabay.com
September 20, 2005

Hmmmm......

Foundation for Child Development "Connecting Research with Policy to Promote Social Change since 1900"
The Foundation for Child Development (FCD) is a national, private philanthropy dedicated to the principle that all families should have the social and material resources to raise their children to be healthy, educated and productive members of their communities.
- incl. links to:
Press Release * Fact Sheet * Policy Brief * Fast Facts

2005 Index of Child Well-Being shows mixed picture for America's children:
huge declines in crime, violence and risky behavior amid increasing poverty and worsening health
New Index Report Finds Virtually No Improvement In Reading
And Math Test Scores Since 1975; Obesity Epidemic Continues To Worsen
Press Release
March 30, 2005
"Washington, D.C. – Dramatic declines in rates of violence and risky behaviors such as teen births, smoking, and alcohol and illegal drug use during the past 10 years have contributed substantially to modest and slow progress in the overall well-being of America’s children, according to the 2005 Index of Child Well-Being (CWI), released today by the Foundation for Child Development (FCD)."

Complete report:

2005 Report
Index of Child Well-Being (CWI), 1975- 2003 with Projections for 2004
(PDF file - 79K, 17 pages)
"The 2005 CWI report presents a mixed picture of child well-being. Substantial and dramatic improvements in safety and risky behavior among young people, especially since 1993, contrast with declines in health and economic well-being and a 30-year flat line in education.

Source:
Google.ca News Search Results : "2005 Index of Child Well-Being"


Gangs of America: The Rise of Corporate Power and the Disabling of Democracy
April 2003
"Corporations are the dominant force in modern life, surpassing even church and state. The largest are richer than entire nations, and courts have given these entities more rights than people. To many Americans, corporate power seems out of control. According to a Business Week/Harris poll released in September 2000, 82 percent of those surveyed agreed that “business has too much power over too many aspects of our lives.”
Complete Report (PDF file - 987K, 307 pages)
Table of Contents (HTML) - incl. links to each of the first seven chapters of the book (in PDF format only)
Purchase a paper copy of this report
Links to (80+) related sites

Gladwell.com


Pause for reflection:

Million-Dollar Murray:
Why problems like homelessness may be easier to solve than to manage
February 13, 2006
"(...) Murray Barr used more health-care dollars than almost anyone in the state of Nevada. It would probably have been cheaper to give him a full-time nurse and his own apartment."
The cost of chronic homelessness in America, and Philip Mangano's solution.
Source:
Gladwell.com

Related link:

“Zero Dollar Linda“ : A Meditation on Malcolm Gladwell’s “Million Dollar Murray,“
the Linda Chamberlain Rule, and the Auditor General of Ontario
(PDF - 225K, 28 pages)
By John Stapleton
November 2010
(...) I believe we need to create a space in the public conversation to talk about building social assistance policies based on trust in the majority, not suspicion of a minority of outliers. We need intelligent rules, administered with positive discretion, by public servants who are educated and supported in this approach.
Source:
Metcalf Foundation
The Metcalf Foundation helps Canadians imagine and build a just, healthy, and creative society by supporting dynamic leaders who are strengthening their communities, nurturing innovative approaches to persistent problems, and
encouraging dialogue and learning to inform action.

Open Policy - John Stapleton's website
TIP: Check out John's Publications - Media Commentaries - Presentations

 

Global Policy Forum (U.S.)
"Global Policy Forum monitors policy making at the United Nations, promotes accountability of global decisions, educates and mobilizes for global citizen participation, and advocates on vital issues of international peace and justice."

Inequality. Now You See It, Now You Don’t (PDF file - 365K, 2 pages)
September 2003
"This article from the International Monetary Fund's monthly journal Finance & Development defines and analyzes cross-country inequality, within-country inequality, and global inequality, asking 'how much should we worry about inequality?'"
Related Link: International Monetary Fund

Related Links:

A Rich Nation, a Poor Continent (NY Times article)
July 9, 2003
"The 400 richest US citizens have a combined income of $69 billion, which is more than the total income of the 166 million people living in (...) Nigeria, Senegal, Uganda and Botswana."

More Information on Inequality of Wealth and Income Distribution (Global Policy Forum --- 80+ links)

Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation
The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation is an independent philanthropy focusing on the major health care issues facing the nation. The Foundation is an independent voice and source of facts and analysis for policymakers, the media, the health care community, and the general public.

The Medicaid Resource Book
This reference book describes four pivotal aspects of how the Medicaid program operates -- who it covers, what it covers, how it is financed, and how it is administered. It was written to assist the public and policymakers in understanding the structure and operation of the Medicaid program.
Table of Contents : * Medicaid Eligibility * Medicaid Benefits * Medicaid Financing * Medicaid Administration * Medicaid Glossary * Appendix 1: Medicaid Legislative History, 1965-2000 * Appendix 2: Index to Medicaid Statute * Appendix 3: Index to Medicaid Regulations * Appendix 4: Selected Resources from KCMU * Appendix 5: Selected Internet Medicaid Resources
Source:
Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and The Uninsured

Snapshots: Health Care Costs
This is "a series of online publications ... that use charts, data and analysis to provide insight into the political and policy debates about the cost of health care in the United States." Some of the topics include out-of-pocket spending for health care, insurance premium cost-sharing and coverage take-up, health care spending in the U.S. compared with other countries, and effect of changes in medical technology on health care costs.
- incl. links to eight snapshots dated from May 2006 to March 2007.
Sample snapshots:
* Effect of Tying Eligibility for Health Insurance Subsidies to the Federal Poverty Level, February 2007
* Health Care Spending in the United States and OECD Countries, January 2007
* Distribution of Out-of-Pocket Spending for Health Care Services, May 2006
Source:
Kaiser Family Foundation
Reviewed in:
New this Week
[ Librarians' Internet Index ]

State Health Facts
Select a state to see a large collection of health insurance statistics
- incl. Demographics and the Economy (poverty, income, cash assistance) - Health Status - Health Coverage & Uninsured - Medicaid and SCHIP - Medicare - Health Costs and Budgets - Managed Care & Health Insurance - Providers & Service Use - Women's Health - Minority Health - HIV/AIDS - state comparisons - resources - and more...


Heritage Foundation
Founded in 1973, The Heritage Foundation is a research and educational institute - a think tank - whose mission is to formulate and promote conservative public policies based on the principles of free enterprise, limited government, individual freedom, traditional American values, and a strong national defense.
- incl. links to resources - news analysis - key issues events - special sections for lawmakers, journalists, researchers, coalitions, scholars, supporters - and more...
Townhall.com- Conservative News and Information

Understanding Poverty in America (PDF file - 592K, 19 pages)
by Robert E. Rector and Kirk A. Johnson, Ph.D.
January 5, 2004
"The living conditions of persons defined as poor by the government bear little resemblance to notions of “poverty” held by the general public. (...) The typical American defined as “poor” by the government has a car, air conditioning, a refrigerator, a stove, a clothes washer and dryer, and a microwave. He has two color televisions, cable or satellite TV reception, a VCR or DVD player, and a stereo. He is able to obtain medical care. His home is in good repair and is not overcrowded. By his own report, his family is not hungry and he had sufficient
households would be judged to have high living standards in comparison to most other people in the world."
Source:
The Heritage Foundation

Related Links:

Poverty in America
January 08, 2004
- a direct rebuttal of the Rector article from the Progressive Protestant

Food Stamp Participation Increases in October 2003 to More Than 23.3 Million Persons;
Is More Than 6.4 Million Persons Higher Than in July 2000

January 6, 2004
- 23.8% avg. increase in demand for all U.S. states from October 1998 to October 2003
Source:
Food Research and Action Center

"The Food Research and Action Center (FRAC) is a leading national organization working to improve public policies to eradicate hunger and undernutrition in the United States."

2002 American Community Survey Shows Increase in Housing Burden (PDF file- 149K, 2 pages)
September 2003
Source:
National Low Income Housing Coalition

Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace, Stanford University
"A world-renowned library and archives, and a unique center of scholarship and public policy research,
committed to generating ideas that define a free society."

Welfare for the Well-Off: How Business Subsidies Fleece Taxpayers
(Essays in Public Policy)
Stephen Moore
"Federal subsidies to US businesses now cost American taxpayers nearly $100 billion a year. If all corporate welfare programs were eliminated, Congress would have enough money to entirely eliminate the capital gains tax and the death tax. Alternatively, Congress could cut the personal and corporate income tax by 10 percent across the board. Either of these alternatives would do far more to enhance the competitiveness of US industry than the current industrial policy approach of trying to help American companies one at a time. "

Huffington Post

Health Experiences From Around The World
-- How Do Universal Health Care Systems Compare?

July 21, 2009
By Margo Irvin and Morgan Korn
Landmark health care legislation that would provide health insurance for all Americans is under intense scrutiny -- in particular, the "public option," which creates a government health insurance program that would compete with private insurers. Critics lambast the public option as "socialized medicine," warning that bureaucracy and government-mandated rationing would lead to interminable waits and dangerously substandard care. Americans are without health insurance, an anomaly when compared to their European and Asian counterparts. President Barack Obama had wanted a comprehensive bill on a new domestic health care system on his desk for signing by October, but acknowledging the fractious environment, extended his deadline to the end of the year. What the White House and Democrats are proposing does not resemble the health care systems in other countries -- seven of which are depicted in the slideshow that accompanies this article.

"(...) 45 million Americans are currently uninsured, including 9 million children, and estimates put the number of early deaths due to lack of health care at 18,000 a year. Despite the fact that Americans spend over twice as much per capita on health care as most other industrialized nations, the US falls behind those nations when it comes to preventable mortality. Yet, in an attempt to sway public opinion away from universal coverage, opponents point to worst-case scenarios in countries with government-run health care."

[TIP : if you click the above link, you'll see "Read More" immediately under the title of the article; you can scan Huffington Post articles by theme (Canadian Health Care, Health Care, Health Care Bill, Health Care Debate, Obama Health Care, Slidepoll, Socialized Medicine, Universal Health Care, World News)
Source:
Huffington Post

Recent release from
Human Rights Watch:

California: From Foster Children to Homeless Adults
State Fails to Prepare Foster Youth for Adulthood
News Release
May 12, 2010
(LosAngeles) - California is creating homeless adults by failing to ensure that youth in foster care are given the support to live independently as adults and by ending state support abruptly, Human Rights Watch said in a new report. Human Rights Watch said that the state should provide financial support, connections with adults, shelter, and other safety nets for young people as they make the transition towards independence.

The 70-page report, My So-Called Emancipation: From Foster Care to Homelessness for California Youth (PDF - 1.3MB), documents the struggles of foster care youth who become homeless after turning 18, or "aging out" of the state's care, without sufficient preparation or support for adulthood. California's foster care system serves 65,000 children and youth, far more than any other single state. Of the 4,000 who age out of the system each year, research suggests, 20 per cent or more become homeless.

Source:
Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch is one of the world’s leading independent organizations dedicated to defending and protecting human rights. By focusing international attention where human rights are violated, we give voice to the oppressed and hold oppressors accountable for their crimes

INFOMINE - Scholarly Internet Resources Collections
University of California
"...a comprehensive showcase, virtual library and reference tool containing highly useful Internet/Web resources including databases, electronic journals, electronic books, bulletin boards, listservs, online library card catalogs, articles and directories of researchers, among many other types of information."

Institute for Policy Studies
The Institute for Policy Studies strengthens social movements with independent research, visionary thinking, and links to the grassroots, scholars and elected officials.

Executive Excess 2007: The Staggering Social Cost of U.S. Business Leadership (PDF file - 988K, 32 pages)
14th Annual CEO Compensation Survey
August 2007
This report provides data and analysis about CEO compensation and the CEO-worker pay gap. Also include comparisons of compensation for U.S. business leaders with other U.S. leaders and European business leaders, and proposals for change. Opens directly into a PDF document. From the Institute for Policy Studies and United for a Fair Economy.

Found in:
Librarians' Internet Index

Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[University of Wisconsin-Madison]
The Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP) is a national, university-based center for research into the causes and consequences of poverty and social inequality in the United States. It is nonprofit and nonpartisan. The Institute was established in 1966 at the University of Wisconsin-Madison by the U.S. Office of Economic Opportunity, the organization given responsibility for reducing poverty in America.

What's New at IRP?

Links to U.S. Poverty-Related Resources (IRP)


Poverty Dispatch - U.S.
- links to news items from the American press about poverty, welfare reform, child welfare, education, health, hunger, Medicare and Medicaid, etc.
NOTE: this is a link to the current issue --- its content changes twice a week.

Past Poverty Dispatches
- links to two dispatches a week, going back to June 1 (2006) when the Dispatch acquired its own web page and archive.

Source:
Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP)
[ University of Wisconsin-Madison ]

Selected IRP reports:

President Obama and antipoverty policy:
What does the stimulus bill do to fight poverty, educate citizens and improve public health?
(PDF - 239K, 3 pages)
By T. Smeeding
March 2009

---

Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP Discussion Paper Abstracts - 2008
Links to 13 papers presented at the Changing Poverty Conference (May 29–30, 2008, University of Wisconsin–Madison).
"(...) a small working conference to discuss a new set of commissioned papers that consider trends and determinants of poverty and inequality, the evolution of poverty-related policy, and the consequences of poverty for families and children."
[ NOTE : All papers have since been updated to September 2008.]

Selected papers:
(click the link above to see the whole list)

What Does It Mean to Be Poor in a Rich Society? (PDF - 192K, 37 pages)
September 2008
By Robert Haveman
Department of Economics and Public Affairs
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Excerpt from the abstract:
In this paper, the author attempts to broaden the discussion of poverty and poverty measurement. He first discusses the broad question of “what is poverty?” and describes various poverty concepts that have been proposed. He then describes the official U.S. poverty measure, highlights its main characteristics, and notes some of the criticisms directed toward it. Finally, he examines broader conceptions of poverty and deprivation. The paper ends with a modest proposal for the development of a broader measure of poverty and social exclusion for the United States.

Poverty Politics and Policy (PDF - 99K, 28 pages)
September 2008
By Mary Jo Bane
Harvard University
John F. Kennedy School of Government
Excerpt from the abstract:
Much has happened in politics and policy around poverty and welfare after and to some extent because of Bill Clinton’s 1992 campaign agenda. [Remember that catchy slogan"Ending welfare as we know it!"?- Gilles] In this paper, the author addresses three questions: What changed in policy, practice and the lives of the poor? What changed, if anything, in public opinion and the political context around poverty and welfare? What are the prospects and the best political strategies for improvement in the lives of the poor going forward from 2008?

Trends in Income Support (PDF - 201K, 53 pages)
September 2008
By John Karl Scholz, Robert Moffitt, and Benjamin Cowan
Excerpt from the abstract:
Antipoverty programs are designed to mitigate the most pernicious aspects of market-based economic outcomes—unemployment, disability, low earnings, and other material hardship. These programs compose society’s “safety net” and each has different eligibility standards and benefit formulas. (...) The authors have three primary goals in this paper. First, they provide updated information on expenditures and recipients for a range of antipoverty programs, describing the evolution of the safety net over the past thirty-five years. Second, they use data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) to calculate the antipoverty effectiveness of federal programs for families and individuals in different circumstances. Third, they explore changes in the characteristics of recipients of means-tested transfers, tax credits and social insurance.
[TIP: I highly recommend this paper as a primer on American social programs - it covers
a wide range of initiatives, and it underscores the significant differences with the Canadian income security and universal health care systems.]

Welfare Reform: The U.S. Experience (PDF - 294K, 50 pages)
February 2008
By Robert Moffitt
Department of Economics
Johns Hopkins University
Excerpt from the abstract:
The reform of the cash-based welfare program for single mothers in the U.S. which occurred in the 1990s was the most important since its inception in 1935. The reforms imposed credible and enforceable work requirements into the program for the first time, as well as establishing time limits on lifetime receipt. Research on the effects of the reform have shown it to have reduced the program caseload and governmental expenditures on the program. In addition, the reform has had generally positive average effects on employment, earnings, and income, and generally negative effects on poverty rates, although the gains are not evenly distributed across groups. A fraction of the affected group appears to have been made worse off by the reform.

Poverty Levels and Trends in Comparative Perspective (PDF - 140K, 27 pages)
September 2008
By Daniel R. Meyer and Geoffrey L. Wallace
Excerpt from the abstract:
In 2006, 42 years after President Johnson proclaimed war on poverty, the rate of poverty according to the official measure was 12.3 percent, about the same as it was in the late-1960s. A poverty measure that incorporates additional income sources shows somewhat lower poverty, 11.4 percent, but if a relative measure (that incorporates changes in the standard of living over time) is used, poverty in 2006 would be 16.0 percent. Regardless of the exact rate, it is clear that the struggle against poverty has been protracted and difficult, and, despite a variety of social policy changes, very little progress has been made. This paper reviews the way in which poverty is officially measured in the U.S., examines which groups are most affected and how poverty has changed over time, and concludes with a comparison of U.S. poverty rates with those of other countries. The authors end with the suggestion that “perhaps it is time for a renewed war on poverty, this time fought with new commitments and different policy weapons.

Welfare Reform: The U.S. Experience (PDF file - 296K, 50 pages)
Revision of a paper prepared for the Economic Council of Sweden conference, “From Welfare to
Work,” Stockholm, May 7, 2007.
Discussion Paper no.1334-08
By Robert Moffitt
February 2008
Abstract
The reform of the cash-based welfare program for single mothers in the U.S. which occurred in the 1990s was the most important since its inception in 1935. The reforms imposed credible and enforceable work requirements into the program for the first time, as well as establishing time limits on lifetime receipt. Research on the effects of the reform have shown it to have reduced the program caseload and governmental expenditures on the program. In addition, the reform has had generally positive average effects on employment, earnings, and income, and generally negative effects on poverty rates, although the gains are not evenly distributed across groups. A fraction of the affected group appears to have been made worse off by the reform.

Institute for Social Research (ISR) - University of Michigan
The nation's longest-standing laboratory for interdisciplinary research in the social sciences.
Enormous site! From this page, check out the links to ISR's four centers:  Survey Research Center - Research Center for Group Dynamics - Center for Political Studies - Population Studies Center

* See the Index of ISR Projects for a complete list of projects from all four centers - includes links to income dynamics, health dynamics, aging, public opinion research, demographics, and more...

What's New - Government Resources on the Web
- links to almost 600 resources added to the University of Michigan's Documents Center since January 2002
Source : University of Michigan Documents Center

The Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), located within the Institute for Social Research,  is a membership-based, not-for-profit organization serving member colleges and universities in the United States and abroad. ICPSR provides:
- Access to the world's largest archive of computerized social science data.
- Training facilities for the study of quantitative social analysis techniques.
- Resources for social scientists using advanced computer technologies.

Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID)
Institute for Social Research

The PSID is an ongoing longitudinal survey (since 1968) of 8,700 core households designed to illuminate the economic behavior of individuals in relation to their families as a whole. The data are collected annually, and the data files contain the full span of information collected over the course of the study. PSID data can be used for cross-sectional, longitudinal, and intergenerational analysis and for studying both individuals and families.

Child Development Supplement
In 1997, the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) supplemented its core data collection with data on parents and  their 0- to 12-year-old children, the Child Development Supplement. The objective of this study is to provide researchers with a comprehensive, nationally representative, and longitudinal data base of [over 3,500] children and their families with which to study the dynamic process of early human capital formation.

Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR) - U.S.
"The Institute for Women's Policy Research is a public policy research organization dedicated to informing and stimulating the debate on public policy issues of critical importance to women and their families. IWPR focuses on issues of poverty and welfare, employment and earnings, work and family issues, the economic and social aspects of health care and domestic violence, and women's civic and political participation."
HINT : Click on "PDF Reports" in the left margin of the home page for links to dozens of reports about women's economic and social issues.
Resources - 150+ links to general and subject-specific sites for women
Status of Women in the States 2000 - "... part of an ongoing research project conducted by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) to establish baseline measures of the status of women in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. (...) The data used in each report come from a variety of sources, primarily government agencies, although other organizations also provided data where relevant."

Survival at the Bottom: The Income Packages of Low-Income Families with Children (PDF file - 3.7MB, 98 pages) - U.S.
July 2003
Key Findings:
- Low-income families show a strong commitment to the labor market.
- Many low-income workers do not have health insurance.
- Child care costs are high for working, low-income families.
- Low-income families do not have more children than the average American family.
- Contributions from family members and private charities cannot replace the need for government assistance.
- Low-income families depend on multiple income sources.
- Employment precedes marriage for African American single-mothers.
- Income is linked to human capital levels.
"Our research counters many misconceptions about low-income families. This study shows that low-income families are more likely to be two-parent families than single-parent families; display a strong commitment to the labor force; and have average fertility rates. In our sample, the vast majority of low-income families work; they are poor because they are low skilled, earn low wages, and receive few benefits through employment.

Free IWPR Reports (all in PDF format)

Interagency Council on Homelessness - U.S.
"Given the complex nature of addressing such a broad problem as that of homelessness, it is not so surprising that there exists a federal initiative in the United States to collaborate on "out of the box" approaches to alleviating this situation. In 1987, with the passage of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act, Congress established the Interagency Council on Homelessness in order to provide organized leadership in the area of providing assistance to homeless families and individuals. From the homepage, visitors can read about the Council's latest activities, then continue on to learn about funding opportunities and information from states and local municipalities on their own homelessness-based initiatives. Specifically, visitors can learn about the various regional coordinators employed by the Council, and read some rather ambitious 10-year plans to end chronic homelessness adopted by cities such as Columbus, Ohio, Atlanta, San Francisco, and Chicago"
Site Review:
The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2003

International Progressive Networks
Over 300 links to progressive networks around the world - Select a country or region of the world to see links to relevant sites, or visit the Alternative media watch and Mainstream media
watch pages

Internet Nonprofit Center - Information for and about nonprofit organizations

Internet Scout Project
(from the University of Madison, Wisconsin)
The Internet Scout Project points to the best resources on the Internet. Librarians and educators do the filtering for you, reading hundreds of announcements each week looking for the online resources most valuable to the education community. View the Scout Reports online or subscribe to mailing lists and receive a semi-monthly e-mail report with reviewed sites and links to new studies and more.


Joint Center for Housing Studies
The Joint Center for Housing Studies is Harvard University's center for information and research on housing in the United States. The Joint Center analyzes the dynamic relationships between housing markets and economic, demographic, and social trends, providing leaders in government, business, and the non-profit sector with the knowledge needed to develop effective policies and strategies.

'Unprecedented' rise in number of precariously housed Americans:
2009 State of Nation's Housing report

June 22, 2009
By Michael Shapcott
Lower-income Americans are especially hard-hit by current recession and there has been an "unprecedented" increase in the number of people who are precariously housed. Those are among the grim findings in the 2009 State of the Nation's Housing report that was released today in Washington DC by Harvard University's Joint Center for Housing Studies, the National Low Income Housing Coalition and others. Some key observations: "Low income homeowners and renters are hit especially hard in the current climate... in 2007, the year for which the most recent data exists, 51% of low income renters and 43% of low income owners paid more than half their incomes for housing... altogether, 17.9 million households spent more than half of their incomes on housing, a 30% increase that is 'unprecedented'.”
Found in:
Wellesley Institute Blog
Wellesley Institute

Complete report:

The State of the Nation's Housing 2009
- includes links to the full report in one PDF file and a table of contents with links to individual chapters in PDF format

Executive summary (PDF - 332K, 5 pages)

Housing Duress Continues Despite Signs of a Bottom in Housing Sales and Starts:
Harvard Releases the 2009 State of the Nation’s Housing Report
June 22, 2009
Press Release
(New York) The worst housing downturn in generations continues to grind on, finds a study released today by the Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University. Despite some stabilization in homebuilding and home sales in the spring, real home prices continued to fall and foreclosures mount in most areas in the first quarter of the 2009.

Related link:

National Low Income Housing Coalition (U.S.)
The National Low Income Housing Coalition is dedicated solely to achieving socially just public policy that assures people with the lowest incomes in the United States have affordable and decent homes.

- Go to the Homelessness and Housing Links page: http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/homeless.htm

Joint Center for Poverty Research (JCPR)
The Northwestern University / University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research supports academic research that examines what it means to be poor and live in America. Core funding provided by the US Department of Health and Human Services.
This is a large site with a lot of information and hundreds of links to reports and other research sites. From the home page, you can click on links to information on poverty, JCPR publications, conferences and events, a newsroom with press releases, articles, and interviews on poverty and policy related issues. And don't forget their Links page...

JCPR Publications - scroll or search by author, by date, by subject and more...

Here are a few samples of what you'll find on this site:

The Effects of Higher Minimum Wages on Welfare Recipiency: Another Look (PDF file - 158K, 24 pages) - U.S.
by Mark Turner and Alena Bicakova
February 2003
[Adobe PDF file dated March 20/03]

Poverty Research News - Marriage and Family
May-June 2002
"
The Bush Administration has proposed improving children’s well-being as the overarching purpose of welfare reform, and its marriage initiative is one of its chief strategies for doing so. This issue of Poverty Research News examines the latest research on marriage and family formation in low-income families."
Poverty Research News - Back Issues - "The quarterly newsletter of the Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research"
- almost two dozen links to newsletter issues starting going back to January 1997

Contracting Welfare Reform: Uncertainties of Capacity-Building Within Disjointed Federalism (PDF file - 254K, 56 pages)
Working Paper of the Project on the Public Economy of Work
March 2002
"Under the banner of devolution, welfare reform legislation enacted in 1996 gave states broad latitude to reorganize welfare delivery in order to make work its focal point. The law established what states must do (require work), but largely left to them the question of how to do it. Since TANF's implementation began in 1997, there has been a substantial shift in welfare-to-work responsibilities from public welfare agencies to private intermediaries (emphasis added).Yet, nearly five years later, we know remarkably little about how these changes have occurred and whether they are leading to the creation of a new system of provision organized to support work."
Essential reading on "contracting-out as a capacity-building strategy for providing welfare-to-work services". In other words, what happens when welfare-to-work programs are privatized? This study is based on a four-year examination of welfare-to-work contracts in
Chicago.
Source : Joint Center for Poverty Research (JCPR)

Welfare Reform Reauthorization
Poverty Research News
Nov.-Dec. 2001 Newsletter
This issue of Poverty Research News looks to the reauthorization of the 1996 welfare reform law, the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA). After nearly five years of reform, the debate between conservatives and liberals in Congress over reauthorization (beginning in early 2002) will be hotly contested and closely watched. Its outcome is likely to determine the direction of welfare reform for the remainder of this decade. Ron Haskins and Rebecca Blank open this issue of the newsletter by outlining key topics likely to arise in the debate. Their discussion is based on their forthcoming book, The New World of Welfare. Five policy experts then respond to the issues raised by Haskins and Blank. Beyond the details of specific policies, a broader question arises of whether welfare reform programs should now aim to reduce poverty.

Food Insecurity and Public Assistance
Working Paper
George J. Borjas
May 2001
This paper examines the extent to which welfare programs reduce the probability that vulnerable household are food insecure, where food insecurity occurs when the household experiences food deprivation because of financial resource constraints.
(The above link takes you to the Working Paper abstract)
Complete Paper (PDF file - 150K, 54 pages)

The Incentives of Government Programs and the Well-Being of Families
June 2001
The papers compiled in this volume were first presented at a December 2000 conference, "The Incentive Effects of Tax and Transfer Policies," hosted by the
Joint Center for Poverty Research with support from the Annie E. Casey Foundation.
Table of Contents - overview and links to individual chapters and shorter policy briefs on each issue (all in PDF format)
Executive Summary (PDF file - 21K, 6 pages)
Complete Book (PDF file - 693K, 221 pages)
Topics covered in the individual chapters : The Effects of Welfare and Tax Reform: The Material Well-Being of Single Mothers in 1980s and 1990s - Welfare Reforms, Family Resources, and Child Maltreatment - The Earned Income Tax Credit and Labor Market - Participation of Families on Welfare - Financial Work Incentives for Low-Wage Workers: Encouraging Work, Reducing Poverty, and Benefiting Families - How Welfare and Work Policies Affect Children: A Synthesis of Research - Improving Public Employment and Training Programs - Using Financial Incentives to Encourage Welfare Recipients to Become Economically Self-Sufficient - The Effect of Tax and Transfer Programs on the Family Structure of the Low Income Population - The Effect of Child Support Enforcement on Women's Income - Child Care Subsidies for Low-Income Families

Poverty Research News - The quarterly newsletter of the Joint Center for Poverty Research
The index (above link) offers links to the current issue of the newsletter as well as older issues back to January 1997.
Topics of back issues include : 20 Years of Change in Social Policy - Incentive Effects of Tax and Transfer Policies - Food and Nutrition Programs - Moving to Opportunity - What Policymakers Want to Know - Rural Dimensions of Welfare Reform - Effects of Welfare Reform on Children - Juvenile Crime - Fathers and Welfare Reform - Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methods to Evaluate Welfare Reform
The July-August 2001 issue of the newsletter includes articles on the changing well-being of families over the last decade, how welfare reform is playing out in welfare offices, and the effectiveness of going back to school for displaced workers.

Policy Briefs : JCPR Policy Briefs are designed to highlight key policy implications and to broaden the dissemination of poverty-related research among policy makers, social service agencies, advocates, and policy influencers.  JCPR Research Summaries are executive summaries of current policy-related research.
- 30+ briefs covering topical issues like the Earned Income Tax Credit, welfare reform, early childhood intervention, child care subsidies, child maltreatment and many others.
- Most on-line briefs and summaries contain a link to the full text of the relevant source working paper.
Here's a recent example of a policy brief:
The EITC and Labor Market Participation of Families on Welfare

Research Briefing :  Early Childhood Intervention Programs: What are the Costs and Benefits?
The Subcommittee on Human Resources of the US House Committee on Ways and Means and the Joint Center for Poverty Research co-sponsored a research briefing in Washington on early childhood intervention programs on May 10. Specific research will examine the short-term and long-term developmental impacts of early childhood programs and possible policy implications of these findings.
Incl. link to :
Early Childhood Intervention Programs: What Do We Know? (PDF file, 236K, 53pp)
Janet Currie
April 2000

Women's Poverty Relative To Men's In Affluent Nations: Single Motherhood And The State
By Karen Christopher, Paula England, Katherin Ross, Tim Smeeding, and Sara McLanahan.

Based on a paper presented at the conference on Child Wellbeing in Rich and Transition Countries, Luxembourg
September 30-October 2, 1999

The Luxembourg Income Study (LIS) is used to analyze eight Western industrialized nations - including Canada.


Miscellaneous Links (not because they're of lesser importance; I just haven't had time to explore them - but you should...)

Center for Law and Social Policy
Child Abuse Prevention Network

Hudson Institute

International Policy

Corporate Watch

FedWorld Home Page

American Civil Liberties Union

The Future of Children

The HungerWeb

Related Canadian Social Research Links pages:

American Non-Government Social Research Links (M-Z)
American Government Social Research Links

Poverty Measures

Children and Families - International

Social Research Statistics


 PAGE D'ACCUEIL - SITES DE RECHERCHE SOCIALE AU CANADA

SEARCH
FREE WEEKLY NEWSLETTER


To search the complete
Canadian Social Research Links website ,
use the text box below:


To search ONLY the page you are now reading,
use Ctrl + F to open a search window.


SUBSCRIBE TO THE
CANADIAN SOCIAL RESEARCH NEWSLETTER

Sign up to receive this free weekly newsletter by e-mail or read it online
(including archives back to January 2005).
Each issue includes all links added to this site during the previous week.
(2800+ subscribers in January 2017)

Site created and maintained by:
Gilles Séguin(This link takes you to my personal page) E-MAIL: gilseg@rogers.com